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DN TUESDAY, JAN. 29, 2013

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Bars talk limits of capacity MFD discusses safety issues following Brazil nightclub fire |

EMMA KATE FITTES CHIEF REPORTER emfittes@bsu.edu

Bars and clubs in the Village are taking a second look at their safety precautions after a nightclub fire killed more than 230 people in southern Brazil. According to CNN, police arrested three people in connection with the fire, which authorities believe to have started at about 2:30 a.m. Sunday when a band’s pyrotechnic show ignited insulation material. About 2,000 people were estimated to be inside the club, although the maximum capacity was 1,000 people. David Miller, chief inspector of the Muncie Fire Department, said Indiana follows the international fire code to prevent situations like this. “When you have a situation like you did there, and hundreds of people are wanting to get out, you need every exit that you can get,” Miller said. “A lot of times people say ‘That’s not going to happen to me’ or ‘This one exit isn’t going to make that much of a difference.’ Well, it really does.” Justin Wrightsman, the general day manager at the Locker Room, said their main safety precaution is having two clearly labeled exits, one at the front where patrons enter and another in the back hallway near the exit.

See CAPACITY, page 4

WILL YOU PASS THE TEST?

Writing Proficiency Exam draws criticisms of accuracy in determining student skill.

MAC games lead to wins, Woody wins award

NEW KID ON THE BLOCK SEE PAGE 3

Clawson’s unlikely journey leads him from club team to Division I Ball State squad

DN FILE PHOTO EMMA FLYNN

DN PHOTO COREY OHLENKAMP

Sophomore Jon Clawson works on his hits during a morning practice on Friday. Clawson made his debut over the weekend against Barton College with a total of six kills.

S

EVAN BARNUM-STEGGERDA CHIEF REPORTER | @Slice_of_Evan

ophomore middle attacker Jon Clawson once thought he wouldn’t play volleyball after his senior season at Center Grove High School, but two years later he found himself in the last place he thought he would be. Clawson played in all three sets in Ball State’s 3-0 over Barton on Saturday, recording six kills and one service ace to help his team stay unbeaten to maintain the program’s best start since the 2006 season. His statistics for the match weren’t All-American caliber numbers, but they were another step in his journey to play volleyball at the Division I level, and ultimately become a starter for Ball State. THE BEGINNING

Patrons of Dill Street Bar and Grill cheer during last year’s weekly crab races. Safety concerns have risen about local bars following a deadly fire early Sunday morning at a nightclub in Brazil.

SEE PAGE 6

Sitting in his homeroom his junior year of high school, Clawson was asked by a classmate, Isaac Cartwright, to play for the school’s volleyball team in the spring. Immediately, Clawson was reluctant to play. Although one of his teachers and the volleyball coach at Center Grove, Katie Rice, had tried to get Clawson to use his 6’6” frame on the volleyball court his freshman and sophomore years, Clawson had always brushed off the requests, because he didn’t even know guys played volleyball. While attempting trick basketball shots in the backyard their junior year, Clawson’s best friend Andrew Smeathers suggested he try out for Center Grove’s basketball team their senior year. While Smeathers went on to play again for the Trojan basketball team the next winter, and now plays at Butler, Clawson never made it to tryouts. Then Cartwright brought up that Clawson could play volleyball in the spring to maintain his fitness level and if he didn’t like it he could always quit. “[Cartwright] kind of talked me into it,

INDIVIDUAL STATS JON CLAWSON, SOPHOMORE MIDDLE ATTACKER • Height: 6’6” • Sets Played: 3 • Kills: 6 • Attack Percent: .625 • Assists: 1 • Blocks: 2 and I haven’t really looked back since,” Clawson said. Clawson spent a majority of his first season of organized volleyball on the junior varsity team, but his natural athleticism and adaptation to the game made it impossible to keep him off the varsity roster by the time the state tournament began. The Trojans ended up finishing fifth in the state that year. Coupling his athleticism with a rapidly expanding knowledge of the game, Clawson’s senior campaign saw him make the Indiana All-Star team as a middle hitter and led his team to third place in the state tournament.

See VOLLEYBALL, page 6

Boy Scouts reconsider policy denying gays Religious, civic groups would be able to decide how to handle issue | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS NEW YORK — The Boy Scouts of America is considering a dramatic retreat from its controversial policy of excluding gays as leaders and youth members. Under the change now being discussed, the different religious and civic groups that sponsor Scout units would be able to decide for themselves how to address the issue — either maintaining an exclusion of gays or opening up their membership. Monday’s announcement of the possible change comes after years of protests over the policy — including petition campaigns that have prompted some corporations to suspend donations to the Boy Scouts. Under the proposed change, said BSA spokesman Deron Smith, “the Boy Scouts would not, under any circumstances, dictate a position to units, members or parents.” The Boy Scouts, which celebrated its

100th anniversary in 2010, has long excluded both gays and atheists. Smith said a change in the policy toward atheists was not being considered, and that the BSA continued to view “Duty to God” as one of its basic principles. Protests over the no-gays policy gained momentum in 2000, when the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the BSA’s right to exclude gays. Scout units lost sponsorships by public schools and other entities that adhered to nondiscrimination policies, and several local Scout councils made public their displeasure with the policy. More recently, amid petition campaigns, shipping giant UPS Inc. and drug-manufacturer Merck announced that they were halting donations from their charitable foundations to the Boy Scouts as long as the no-gays policy was in force. Also, local Scout officials drew widespread criticism in recent months for ousting Jennifer Tyrrell, a lesbian mom, as a den leader of her son’s Cub Scout pack in Ohio and for refusing to approve an Eagle Scout application by Ryan Andresen, a California teen who came out as gay last fall.

See BOY SCOUTS, page 5

IND. FLU DEATHS RISE FROM 21 TO 43 TOTAL OVER PAST TWO WEEKS INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — The Indiana State Department of Health says the number of flu deaths in Indiana has risen to 43. The new total is up from 40 last Wednesday when the agency released its most recent flu report. Agency spokesman Ken Severson confirmed the new total. At least 33 of the people who have died from the flu were over age 65, and at least 38 had underlying medical conditions such as heart disease, diabetes, asthma and renal disease. As of Jan. 14, the number of flu-related deaths was at 21. Two of the deaths at the time had occurred from individuals under the age of 18.

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Mike McNicholas of Arlington Heights, Ill., Jamboree Troop 1406, checks Facebook and sends an email home to his parents and sister in July 2012. The Boy Scouts of America are reconsidering their policy on excluding gay members.

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SOLUTION FOR MONDAY.

ACROSS 1 BIT OF HIGH JINKS 6 EASTERN EUROPEAN 10 SOUNDS OF DISAPPROVAL 14 TEAM LEADER 15 HANG (AROUND) IN A HAMMOCK, SAY 16 DOS CUBED 17 SECOND-LARGEST INDIAN CITY 18 PLAY PARTS 19 SAY GRACE, SAY 20 *4-0 WORLD SERIES WIN, E.G. 22 SALAD FISH 23 MAKE ILLEGAL 24 SPY FOR MOSES 26 BIT OF SCHOOLYARD DISAGREEMENT 29 GARDNER OF HOLLYWOOD 32 UNDER THE COVERS 35 “THE SHIELD” FORCE, BRIEFLY 36 DIABOLICAL SORTS 39 “NORMA __” 40 POOLING VEHICLE 41 *BROOM ALTERNATIVE

42 WWW BOOKMARK 43 ORG. WITH MANY SPECIALISTS 44 ONLINE NEWSGROUP SYSTEM 45 NORA WAS HIS MISTRESS 46 JUSTIN TIMBERLAKE’S FORMER BAND 48 FIR FELLER 49 BOK __: CABBAGE 50 NUDGES 53 CORROSIVE STUFF 55 CASHLESS DEAL 57 DESIGNED FOR TWO FUNCTIONS, AND A HINT TO THE ANSWERS TO STARRED CLUES 63 BUFFALO’S LAKE 64 NOT NUTS 65 RUN TO THE WINDOW 66 GAVE FOR A WHILE 67 MALEVOLENT 68 GREAT ENTHUSIASM 69 COLONY CRITTERS 70 RIGA RESIDENT 71 SCATTER ABOUT

DOWN 1 ADAPTER LETTERS 2 CAROLERS’ OFFERING 3 SHAKESPEARE’S “THE WINTER’S __” 4 SLEEPY HOLLOW SCHOOLTEACHER CRANE 5 PLATES FOR COMPANY 6 SIDE WITH A SANDWICH 7 BRIDAL GOWN TRIM 8 ANCIENT MEXICAN 9 ITALIAN SCOOTER 10 DAVID LETTERMAN LIST 11 *SCOURING AID 12 GENGHIS __ 13 TOFU SOURCE 21 BUREAUCRATIC BUNGLES 25 SPEECH THERAPIST’S CONCERN 26 HIGHWAY TO FAIRBANKS 27 SIRS’ COUNTERPARTS 28 *GRAFFITI MAKER’S MEDIUM 30 CLAMPING DEVICE 31 METLIFE COMPETITOR 33 TURN A DEAF __ 34 AIRPORT ANNOYANCE 37 CARLSBAD CAVERNS

LOCALE: ABBR. 38 “I’M LISTENING!” 41 “WATCH YOUR HEAD!” 45 PREVAILED AGAINST, SLANGILY 47 COMMON RENTAL RESTRICTION 51 FOUR-WHEELED FLOP 52 DRY ITALIAN WINE 54 SAFECRACKERS 55 WARD OF “CSI: NY” 56 SMALL SONGBIRD 58 ARMY DIVISION 59 SHOT AT THE BAR 60 COLD WAR COUNTRY: ABBR. 61 MAL DE __: HENRI’S HEADACHE 62 “THAT HURTS!”

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TUESDAY, JANUARY 29, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM | PAGE 3

FEATURES

WEDNESDAY Miss the warm weather for working out? Check out how to transition indoors and stay in shape.

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THURSDAY The bars are more than just for drinking. Check out some of the best bar food in Muncie.

FRIDAY Toledo-based band Silent Lions travels to Muncie to promote their newest CD at a local house party.

PASS OR FAIL? Students, professors critique accuracy, efficiency of required Writing Proficiency Exam WATERMEIER STAFF REPORTER | SAM scwatermeier@bsu.edu

E

van Dossey, a 2012 graduate, was generally successful with writing assignments until he took the Writing Proficiency Exam. Dossey found out he failed his second Writing Proficiency Exam after he graduated. His diploma was withheld until he could complete and pay $500 to enroll in the four-week Writing Proficiency course. Unlike full-time students, the alumni had to pay per course hour. The Writing Proficiency Exam, which became a graduation requirement in 1984, involves a two to three-page essay with a two-hour time limit. The exam asks students to choose an article and study it in preparation for a prompt they will not see until the day of the exam. As is the case with every student who takes the exam, Dossey’s performance hinged upon the response of two essay readers. “The exam is graded in a way that tries to reduce writing ability to a measurable science,” Dossey said. “But there is inherent subjectivity in any analysis of writing. For every two readers who thought my essay was a failure, one may have thought it was effective.” Paul Ranieri, an associate professor of English, also questions the exam’s validity. While he believes the comprehensive method of grading gives reliable results, he does not think that the test best reflects a student’s general writing ability. “Writing is a lifelong, ever-evolving process,” Ranieri said. “How students write now probably isn’t going to be how they write one, five, 10, 20 years from now.”

However, Ranieri does not completely deny that the exam is important. “A positive offshoot of a test like this is that it sends the message that writing is important,” Ranieri said. “But I think there are many better ways to send that message.” While talking about measuring students’ writing ability, Ranieri pulled out a stack of folders from his shelf — portfolios brimming with writing samples spanning a few students’ careers at Ball State. Ranieri is the director of the Honors Writing Program, which evaluates students’ portfolios in addition to their performance on an impromptu essay like the one on the Writing Proficiency Exam. Like the Honors Writing Program, Ranieri said the proficiency essay needs a fuller body of work to accompany it to best represent students’ writing ability. “People treat writing like a tetanus shot: one shot and you’re good for a long time,” Ranieri said. “One could argue that the Writing Proficiency Exam encourages that kind of ‘let’s get this over with’ attitude.” In his view, effective writing comes from

certain contexts and conditions that the proficiency program does not provide. “All of us have battlefield writing skills,” Ranieri said. “I’ve written important notes, emails and memos in half an hour. But in every case like that, I would benefit from more time. This exam asks students to write with a set of battlefield skills that is not adaptable to every situation.” “Battlefield” is an apt term to describe the kind of environment for which the Writing Proficiency Program intends to prepare students. “We could give students more time to develop and write the response on the exam, but lots of places in life will require them to think more quickly,” said Marilyn Buck, associate provost. Buck said the exam is less a measure of general writing ability than a test of critical thinking. Not much has changed since the exam was put into place and no foreseeable changes are in the future. Yet professors like Ranieri say that the individual impact the exam has on students such as Dossey should be questioned, while other professors such as Buck stand by the exam’s stated objective to “provide an appropriate assessment of undergraduate student writing.” “Nothing is further from the truth: not for upper-level classes, undergraduate or graduate, not for writing in real life, not for writing in a profession,” Ranieri said. Writing proficiency program director Anna Priebe told the Daily News she would not comment on the criticism aimed at the Writing Proficiency Exam.

WRITE THE RIGHT WAY PREREQUISITES FOR THE EXAM:

• ENG 104 or its equivalent • At least 60 but no more than 90 credits toward graduation HOW TO PREPARE:

• Choose an article to analyze and register for its section. • Outline the article, identifying the thesis and the points it uses to support, develop and explain it. • Summarize the main ideas in each paragraph. • Research the topic as well as the context of the article and its author. • Reflect on how the article confirms or challenges your beliefs. NECESSARY MATERIALS FOR THE EXAM:

• Your student ID or driver’s license • A printed, marked-up copy of your article • A pen or pencil • A dictionary or thesaurus • Check your email because a week before the exam, you will receive an email telling you which computer lab to go to and when sign-in begins. FEEDBACK

:

To request feedback on your performance, email writingcomp@bsu.edu and include your name, student ID number and the section number of the exam you took. You will receive a reply including your exam as an attached Word document as well as contact information of the administrators who will be able to meet with you. Once you have made an appointment with one, send him an electronic copy of your exam. For more info, visit www.bsu.edu.

Cornerstone spring arts classes begin Students receive discounted prices for various courses |

SPRING INTO ART WHAT

Arts classes

Cornerstone Center for the Arts 520 E. Main St.

SUNGMIN LIM CHIEF REPORTER slim3@bsu.edu

ACTOR TAYE DIGGS CHASES, CATCHES SUSPECTED THIEF LOS ANGELES (AP) — Los Angeles police said actor Taye Diggs chased down and captured a burglary suspect he found rummaging through his garage. It happened after the “Private Practice” star and his wife returned to their Studio City home from the Screen Actors Guild Awards, where Diggs was a presenter. LAPD spokesman Richard French said shortly before 11:30 p.m. Sunday, Diggs saw a man in his garage, apparently looking for items to steal. French said the man ran off, but Diggs followed him down the street and held him for police. Neither man was hurt. Twenty-year-old Hassan Juma was arrested and remained jailed Monday on $50,000 bail.

Madison St.

AP|BRIEF

Cornerstone Center for the Arts, 520 E. Main St. COST

Main St. Walnut St.

Victoria Meldrum was heartbroken when she couldn’t continue dancing after middle and high school. College-level dance classes at Ball State seemed to be for dance majors and minors, which as a journalism graphics major she wasn’t. But then she discovered she could still dance with classes offered at Cornerstone Center for the Arts in downtown Muncie. “I took my first class, contemporary and jazz, last fall and loved it,” said Meldrum, an alumna of Ball State. “I was able to meet other people in the community who shared my love. There were a few girls who had years of experience and others who never had a dance class before. It was a really fun environment for learning.” Located in a former Masonic Temple, Cornerstone offers classes in a variety of areas, such as dance, fitness, martial arts,

WHERE

Jackson St.

approx. $55-$81 Go to cornerstonearts.org for more information CLASSES OFFERED IN

DN GRAPHIC

music, theatre and visual arts. The classes, which began Monday, are open for all ages. Open spots are still available. Sarah Anderson, director of education at Cornerstone, said these classes are a great way to explore a new area or try a new hobby. “We cover a broad range of topics and art forms, so there is a something for everyone,” she said. This semester Meldrum and her friend Marta Vitolins are taking Indian and Bollywood dancing classes together. In the class students learn traditional

Dance Fitness Martial arts Theatre Visual arts *One-time workshops are also available and Bollywood dance forms by using hands, feet and eye coordination. “I’m just excited that there’s an interesting class like Bollywood to take,” said Vitolins, a senior classical cultures major. “I want to have a way to stay active.” Meldrum said taking the Indian and Bollywood class is a lot less scary when someone has her back, like her friend Vitolins. “Dance is also the only way I can trick myself into exercising,” Meldrum said. “I have the incentive to work hard so that I can perform at the level I used

PHOTO COURTESY OF CORNERSTONE CENTER FOR THE ARTS

A student at Cornerstone Center for the Arts paints during one of the 2012 classes. Cornerstone offers classes in a variety of arts including dance, theatre and painting.

to in high school.” The Bollywood class is $81, but most of Cornerstone’s other classes range from $55 to $75 for a one-hour, 12-week class. In addition, Cornerstone offers a financial aid program, which full-time Ball State students can take advantage of.

They can get up to $75 off of one class during a fall or spring semester. In order to receive the discount, the student must fill out the form by the Friday of the first week of classes. Citing Cornerstone’s motto “Explore. Create. Escape,” Anderson said students should take

classes because they can explore new art areas, create memories and escape the everyday. “[Classes] are a great way to relax, learn something new, get fit or have fun with friends,” she said. “I think students enjoy being able to take a class ‘just for fun.’”

Taylor Swift talks sexier look, new tour ‘Red’ album portrays more mature sound; tour comes to Indy | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS NEW YORK — Taylor Swift has been turning heads with her new, sexy wardrobe, but the 23-year-old said it’s just a reflection of getting older. Swift has people buzzing about her recent red carpet choices, which have included plunging necklines and shorter skirts. “As far as wardrobe, we have been operating from a different place,” Swift said. While her choices may be demure compared with the Kim Kardashians of the world, for Swift, a former teen sweetheart, it’s raised eyebrows, and she acknowledges that it’s been a bit of a shock for some people who are accustomed to seeing her wear long dresses. She recalled how her decision to wear shorts

at last year’s MTV Video Music Awards caused a stir. “It was like, ‘Gasp, Taylor wears shorts.’ And I thought it was hilarious,” she said, adding: “I’m not going to be like taking my clothes off or that sort of thing.” Swift’s new look is a reflection of her overall maturation, with her latest album, “Red,” selling more than 3 million copies since it was released last fall and producing two smash singles, “I Knew You Were Trouble” and “We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together,” which is nominated for record of the year at next month’s Grammy Awards. “I’m so happy about [my] three nominations — it’s so unreal,” Swift said in a phone interview Monday from Paris. Swift said she’s especially happy with the success of songs like “I Knew You Were Trouble,” a dance-infused song that takes her further from her country realm than ever before. “The fans have been so good to

me this year,” she said. “I wanted to make a genre-defying record, I wanted to make an album that was hard to pin down and hard to box in.” Swift said fans should expect more surprises during her upcoming tour, which kicks off March 13 in Omaha, Neb. On April 26, the tour will take her to Banker’s Life Fieldhouse in Indianapolis with Ed Sheeran. She’s partnering with Diet Coke for the tour, and she’s signed on to be a pitchwoman for the beverage. While a recent op-ed piece in The New York Times questioned whether pop stars should be endorsing soft drinks with society’s push toward a healthier lifestyle, Swift, who noted she’s become more health-conscious, said the beverage is part of her life. “I think my lifestyle plays a part into what I choose to endorse,” Swift said. “Diet Coke is something that is a part of my life... Also a part of my life is exercise.”

MCT PHOTO

Taylor Swift arrives at the 70th Annual Golden Globe Awards show on Jan. 13 at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills, Calif. The media has been commenting on her more mature wardrobe.


PAGE 4 | TUESDAY, JANUARY 29, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM

NEWS

Speaker promotes active role Lake pushes faculty to be part of lives, education of students RACHEL PODNAR CHIEF REPORTER | rmpodnar@bsu.edu

Colleges taking an active part in the lives and education of their students was a key topic a speaker in the area of higher education law discussed in a lecture Monday afternoon. Peter Lake spoke to the audience of around 100 about how much higher education has changed from a university directional point of view since his book was first published 15 years ago. The Center for Higher Education Law and Policy at Stetson University College of Law director said currently,

universities are spending a large amount of time complying with regulation, leading to Lake’s term “compliance university.” “So much of our college safety energy is directed toward compliance with legal mandates, which seem to be coming out more quickly than Rihanna albums,” Lake said. “The compliance is almost impossible for administrators to come up with.” Lake provided background on higher education law, detailing it barely existed until the 1960s, and universities had almost complete power over their student’s lives and could impose restrictions and deny rights. It was not until the 60s, he said, that students were granted freedom from discrimination, civil liberties and privacy rights.

Then he described the “Bystander” era, up until the 2000s, where universities turned a blind eye toward negative influences surrounding college with the idea that students were fully formed adults who must deal with the consequences for their actions alone. “The campus police were responsible for protecting buildings and stuff, they weren’t there to do physical security for students,” he said. “It was a revolutionary idea that students might be entitled to even basic safety in their living conditions.” Lake spoke of universities growing as facilitators, helping students make good decisions and enterprise risk management on campus. Facilitating is an approach for universities to approach risks in college like

« So much of our college safety energy is

directed toward compliance with legal mandates, which seem to be coming out more quickly than Rihanna albums. » PETER LAKE, Stetson University College of Law’s director of The Center for Higher Education Law and Policy alcohol, mental health and suicide in a holistic way. “Modern college students [do not] need to be babysat, nor do we need to be bystanders,” Lake said. “We can facilitate good decisions just as easily as we can facilitate bad ones. A facilitator, instead of trying to find the most blameworthy person to hang by the neck, [asks everyone], what can we all do collectively to make this better.” He shared a message of hope

for universities and the future of higher education. “Don’t believe the boogeyman,” Lake said. “Because the boogeyman wants to tell you that we’re running out of money, that there are no jobs and higher education is in decline. A facilitator flicks it off. Sure there are challenges, but every challenge is a hidden opportunity.” Merrill C. “Jack” Beyerl, who the lecture series is named after, served as vice president

for student affairs and dean of students from 1964 to 1988. Each year, a distinguished speaker in the field of higher education addresses administrators and those involved in student affairs. Graduate student in student affairs administration Michelle Kailey had the opportunity, along with other graduate students, to meet with Lake at a dinner on Tuesday night. She described him as “wicked smart,” and said that his insight was valuable, especially with education policy issues. “We’ve been talking a lot in our classes about this being a rough time for education,” Kailey said. “He was very optimistic and saying this is the time to be in the profession because there are changes but [we are going to be] uniquely situated to deal with it and grow the profession.”

CAPACITY: Late spring inspection gives Village ‘clean bill of health’ | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

MCT PHOTO

Relatives of the victims from the Kiss nightclub fire identify the bodies Sunday in Santa Maria, Brazil. According to the latest reports, an estimated 231 people died and 48 were injured in the fire.

No fire alarm, only 1 exit in Brazil nightclub fire Survivor says those who couldn’t see fire had no chance | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS SANTA MARIA, Brazil — The nightclub Kiss was hot, steamy from the press of beer-fueled bodies dancing close. The Brazilian country band on stage was whipping the young crowd into a frenzy, launching into another fast-paced, accordion-driven tune and lighting flares that spewed silver sparks into the air. It was another Saturday night in Santa Maria, a university town of about 260,000 on Brazil’s southernmost tip. Then, in the pre-dawn hours of Sunday, it turned into a scene of indescribable horror as sparks lit a fire in the soundproofing material above the stage, churning out black, toxic smoke as flames raced through the former

beer warehouse, killing an estimated 231 people. “I was right there, so even though I was far from the door, at least I realized something was wrong,” said Rodrigo Rizzi, a first-year nursing student who was next to the stage when the fire broke out and watched the tragedy unfold, horror-stricken and helpless. “Others, who couldn’t see the stage, never had a chance. They never saw it coming.” There was no fire alarm, no sprinklers, no fire escape. In violation of state safety codes, fire extinguishers were not spaced every 1,500 square feet, and there was only one exit. As the city buried its young Monday, questions were raised about whether Brazil is up to the task of ensuring the safety in venues for the World Cup next year, and the Olympics in 2016. Four people were arrested for questioning, including two band members and the nightclub’s co-owner. Rizzi hadn’t even planned

on going out that night. He was talked into it by friends and knew dozens at the club. He said the first sign of a problem was insulation dripping above the stage. The flames at that point were barely noticeable, just tiny tongues lapping at the flammable material. The band’s singer, Marcelo dos Santos, noticed it and tried to put out the smoldering embers by squirting water from a bottle. The show kept going. Then, as the ceiling continued to ooze hot molten foam, dos Santos grabbed the drummer’s water bottle and aimed it at the fire. That didn’t work either, Rizzi said. A security guard handed the band leader a fire extinguisher. He aimed, but nothing came out; the extinguisher didn’t work. At that point, Rizzi said, the singer motioned to the band to get out. Rizzi calmly made his way to the door — the club’s only exit — still thinking it was a small fire that would quickly

CONTRIBUTING SAFETY HAZARDS •A  bout 1,000 people over capacity in club • No fire alarms • No sprinklers • No fire escapes • F ire extinguishers not placed every 1,500 square feet • Only one exit be controlled. The cavernous building was divided into several sections, including a pub and a VIP lounge — and hundreds of the college students and teenagers crammed in couldn’t see the stage. They continued to drink and dance, unaware of the danger spreading above them. “I was halfway across the floor, I could see the door, but the air turned black with this thick smoke,” he said. “I couldn’t breathe. People started to panic and run toward the door. They were falling, screaming, pulling at each other.”

Student group seeks faculty adviser to become recognized as official club Members want to home-brew beer, visit microbreweries

|

ADAM BAUMGARTNER GRAPHICS EDITOR graphics@bsudailynews.com

A group of students is attempting to brew up a new club at Ball State. The focus is beer. Graduate student Chase Lenon and three of his friends set out last semester to start a club dedicated to homebrewing beer.

The club would teach members the processes and different options available when creating different beers. It would also help members understand and navigate through the multitude of different beers available. The main goal is education, Lenon said. “It’s mostly for fermentation knowledge,” Lenon said. “Just get in a room, talk about the science behind it, maybe even grow some hops.” Lenon said enjoying the beers is a part of the mission, but it will not be an environment in which anyone feels

forced to drink. Among the social events the group would like to plan are visits to area breweries, including the Heorot in downtown Muncie, which will be making its first microbrew available for purchase in early February. As of right now, the group cannot become an official club because it does not have a faculty adviser. “Everyone we asked is like, ‘Oh, I can’t be affiliated with that, because it’s alcohol related,’” Lenon said. He hopes that a member of the faculty will recognize the

goal is not to promote inappropriate drinking, but to educate on brewing processes. Lenon said people should be interested in the club “if they like chemisty, [and] if they like really good-tasting beer.” Students under 21-yearsold would be able to join, but the club would not allow them to taste the beers. There would be no cost to join. Brewing kits usually cost $35 to $50, making approximately five gallons of beer. For more details, contact Lenon at chase.lenon@gmail.com.

Locker Room employees also attend a meeting about once a month in which they go over safety procedures, Wrightsman said. The patio capacity is 50 to 75 people, seating capacity is 100 people and the overall capacity is “more like in the 300’s. It’s in a book somewhere,” Wrightsman said. Wrightsman said the only time they really need to enforce capacity is when they get busy during Homecoming and St. Patrick’s Day. He said the general manager will tell the bouncer if he feels the establishment is too full, and then they will restrict access. “This year at Homecoming we had probably 75 to 100 people on the patio,” Wrightsman said. “It’s just so hard to count heads because people are in the bathrooms, we can’t really send the guys in the bathroom to count the girls, and people move around so much.” Neal Soley, a manager at Be Here Now, said in an email that the concert venue uses a Department of Human Resources-approved fire plan that is practiced monthly. Representatives from Folly Moon, Dill Street Bar and Grill, Cleo’s Bourbon Bar and D Luxe Bar and Lounge could not be reached by the Daily News on Monday. Miller said it is not uncommon for owners to underestimate the importance of capacity. “A lot of times when we go in to set an occupancy load, we have people say ‘Well, I don’t get this many people in here, [so] it shouldn’t be this much,’” Miller said. “It’s not based on how many people you might have, it’s based on how many people you could have at one given time.” Senior business administration major Max Murdoch said he goes to the bars in the Village about two to three times a week, but has

never been asked not to enter a bar because they were over capacity. Murdoch also said he isn’t sure if any bars have a second entrance, but that would be a good preventative measure. In general, Muncie’s inspectors look for an address visible from street, fire extinguishers, hood systems in restaurants, sprinkler systems and extension cords. All the paperwork for these items being serviced and tested have to be on the premises, Miller said. If a problem is identified, the inspector issues a request for the business owner to fix it within 30 days. If they refuse, eventually the case will be filed at the city court. Miller said that the Village was inspected late last spring and was given a “clean bill of health” and that the businesses have “always come through and rectified the problem.” But since the Village changes often and businesses are moving in and out, Miller said he can’t guarantee that an inspector wouldn’t walk in and find a problem. “The city has expanded a little bit, and every time we turn around we have a new restaurant popping up it seems, but we still have the same amount of people, so we’ve gotten behind to the point where we are looking more at 14 to 16 months that we get to everyone one time around,” Miller said. According to the Indiana Department of Homeland Security, inspections every 12 months are ideal. “[A fire like in Brazil] could really happen anywhere,” Miller said. “I think that’s one of the positives to having a professional fire bureau. A lot of places need to cut down somewhere, but you have to be reactive instead of being proactive. Hopefully it doesn’t get lost in the shuffle that we need prevention.”

DN|BRIEF

BODY TESTS AT LOWER PRICE THIS WEEK

The Human Performance Laboratory will offer body fat testing at a discounted rate until Friday. Tests use the BOD POD to estimate the body fat percentage. Students can learn about their estimated body fat percentage to help them with weight loss and maintaining a healthier lifestyle. Alex Powell, a sophomore political science major, said it is useful. “It is very eye-opening for students to learn more about their body and to make healthier food options,” Powell said. Students can also be tested with the GE Lunar Prodigy Dual Energy Xray Absorptiometer that tests for percentage of body fat and bone density, Lange Skinfold Calipers for the body fat percentage measurements, SECA stadiometer test for height measurements and the Health-O-Meter Medical Balance Scale that tests the body mass index measurements, according to the clinical Exercise Physiology Program testing lab website. Andrea Huckleby, a senior psychology major, said the testing is important to have on campus. “It offers a healthier outlet for people to see what they need to work on to become healthier,” Huckleby said. The regular price for the testing is $25 dollars. This week, students can get a test for $15 dollars. If they come with a friend, the second test is $10 dollars, or $12.50 a person. If students bring two friends, the third test is $5 dollars and will cost $10 dollars per person. -BENECIA BROWN


TUESDAY, JANUARY 29, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM | PAGE 5

STATE/NATION

Bill would certify therapists who use music Counselors would be awarded certification similar to techniques that helped Giffords | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS INDIANAPOLIS — A bill that would certify Indiana therapists who specialize in using music to treat people with autism, Alzheimer’s and other conditions is advancing in the General Assembly. The music therapy bill cleared the Indiana House’s Employ-

ment, Labor and Pensions Committee last week with unanimous support. If it clears the full House, the Senate would need to approve it. The bill, which was sponsored by state Rep. Suzanne Crouch, R-Evansville, would create a new state board to certify music therapists in Indiana. “It’s a small, very specialized

group of individuals,� she said. The Evansville Courier & Press reported Monday that about 160 music therapists in Indiana provide the kind of treatment that helped rehabilitate former Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords after she was wounded in a 2010 mass shooting in Tucson, Ariz. Among those they treat are people with Alzheimer’s, and children with autism and other developmental disabilities. “It is an evidence-based practice, and it’s something that has

great outcomes for the clients we serve,� said Casey DePriest, owner of the Evansville-based Integrative Music Therapy. DePriest, who chairs a task force pushing for Crouch’s measure, said a state certification would help patients get their health insurance providers to cover a treatment that’s already funded for some through Indiana’s Medicaid waiver and other state programs. Certification would also allow prosecutors to use the state’s consumer fraud laws to pros-

ecute people who bill themselves as music therapists but have no training in health care. States that have adopted similar certifications have seen an increase in insurers willing to cover music therapy, DePriest said. Four universities in Indiana — the University of Evansville, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne and Saint Mary-ofthe-Woods College — have music therapy programs.

able to take part.� Many of the protest campaigns, including one seeking Tyrrell’s reinstatement, had been waged with help from the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation. “The Boy Scouts of America have heard from scouts, corporations and millions of Americans that discriminating

against gay scouts and scout leaders is wrong,� said Herndon Graddick, GLAAD’s president. “Scouting is a valuable institution, and this change will only strengthen its core principles of fairness and respect.� The Scouts had reaffirmed the no-gays policy as recently as last year, and appeared to have strong backing from con-

servative religious denominations — notably the Mormons, Roman Catholics and Southern Baptists — which sponsor large numbers of Scout units. Under the proposed change, they could continue excluding gays. Smith said they could announce the change as early as next week, after BSA’s national board concludes a regularly

scheduled meeting on Feb. 6. Were the change adopted, Smith said, “there would no longer be any national policy regarding sexual orientation, and the chartered organizations that oversee and deliver Scouting would accept membership and select leaders consistent with each organization’s mission, principles or religious beliefs.�

BOY SCOUTS: Protesters believe end of ban could restore dignity | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 “An end to this ban will restore dignity to countless families across the country, my own included, who simply wanted to take part in all scouting has to offer,� Tyrrell said. “My family loved participating in scouting, and I look forward to the day when we might once again be

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INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Indianapolis is putting more police in downtown Indianapolis after weekend gunfire outside the Circle Centre Mall. WISH-TV reported the changes being made by Public Safety Director Troy Riggs also include a zero-tolerance policy for lawbreakers who previously might have gotten off with warnings. The changes begin this coming weekend. Investigators said most of the problems have begun with arguments among teenagers. Officers would disperse crowds only to see the groups meet up in new locations where they sometimes turned violent. Officers arrested a 16-year-old boy Saturday night after off-duty Marion County sheriff’s deputies saw him fire three shots near the Indiana Convention Center, one block from the mall.

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PAGE 6 | TUESDAY, JANUARY 29, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM

SPORTS SPORTS@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/DN_SPORTS

/////////// THE

HAPS

EVENTS THIS WEEK

WEDNESDAY The Ball State men’s basketball team hosts Toledo in a conference game at 7 p.m.

THURSDAY The Ball State women’s basketball team takes its 5-1 conference record to Western Michigan at 7 p.m.

FRIDAY Men’s volleyball puts its undefeated record on the line as it plays Quincy at home at 7:30 p.m.

Cards’ play has improved in conference Woody wins award for standout play in last two games

|

MATT McKINNEY ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR @Matt_D_McKinney

Coming out of Winter Break, the Ball State women’s basketball team was 3-10, and had just suffered its seventh loss in eight games. Since that mark, the team has gone 5-1, all against conference foes. Before the break, the team was scoring 58.5 points per game and consistently looked too small to compete against nonconference opponents. However, throughout the MidAmerican Conference schedule slate of games, Ball State has averaged 61 points per game. The 5-1 start is the best opening to conference Ball State has had since the 200809 season, where the team finished its MAC play 14-2. That team went on to famously beat Tennessee in the first round of the NCAA Tournament. According to coach Brady Sallee, the difference in play didn’t just start when the ball tipped off in Ball State’s first MAC game. “Honestly, I think it was before conference play,” Sallee said. “I think it was against Wyoming. I thought we played to the gameplan, I thought we played hard, we competed with a really good team. We just didn’t make some plays down the stretch.” Ball State lost to Wyoming 64-61 in mid-December. Forward Katie Murphy led the team with 16 points. Guard Brittany Carter scored 11 points, off her 3-of-7 shooting from downrange. Sallee points to practice habits

being improved as a reason behind the team’s improved play. “They simply went out to become a better practice team,” Sallee said. “Now you can just focus on playing like you practice every day. You didn’t have to be supernatural. You didn’t have to do anything better on gameday than you did every day during the week.” One player that is reaping the benefits of the team’s winning is point guard Brandy Woody. “It’s awesome,” Woody said of the quick MAC start. “Starting the season was a little rough, but then once we entered conference play and got the first wins. We’re kind of on a roll right now. I’m excited to see what comes next.” Despite the 5-1 start to conference play, Sallee still sees room to grow for Ball State. “I hope we’re not hitting our stride yet,” he said. “I think we have a lot of basketball left. I see a lot of room for improvement.” Ball State has a difficult stretch of games ahead. After road games against Western Michigan and Eastern Michigan, the team will return home to play Central Michigan and Toledo. Central Michigan and Toledo are No. 1 and No. 2 in the MAC West, respectively. Central Michigan is 6-0 in the conference, with Toledo just one step behind at 5-1 in the MAC. In fact, Toledo’s only conference loss came in a seven-point loss to Central Michigan. Wins against Central Michigan and Toledo would go a long way toward Ball State establishing its place in the MAC West. “January basketball is about positioning yourself. February basketball is about winning leagues,” Sallee said. “We’ve positioned ourselves and now we have to come out in February

DN FILE PHOTO JONATHAN MIKSANEK

Junior guard Brandy Woody pushes toward the paint for a layup attempt against Ohio University Jan. 26 in Worthen Arena. Woody scored 23 points for the Cardinals in their victory over the Bobcats.

and we have to amp it up. ... If we can get ourselves to the end of February in the right shape and thinking the right way, then I like this team going into March.”

earned it ... For what we’re trying to do with the program, I think it’s great recognition not only for her, but for us. You’re talking about a kid who earned it. She earned every nickel of that award. For her to be the first one in my time here is special.” Sallee said he knew that she had won it before practice today, but it wasn’t talked about or discussed among the team. He didn’t even know if Woody knew

at the time. Woody earned the award for her play in Ball State’s last pair of games, at Buffalo and at home against Ohio. She set new career highs against Buffalo by scoring 29 points, grabbing 11 rebounds and playing 40 minutes. Woody was also the main scoring threat against Ohio on Saturday. She put up 23 points and dished out six assists in the

blowout 77-46 win. “The exciting thing is not necessarily all the points and all those things, it’s just how hard she’s playing,” Sallee said. “I find it hard to believe there’s anybody playing as hard as that kid is on a night-in night-out basis. There’s a lot of good players in the league, but I don’t any of them mean to their teams what she means to ours. That’s when you know you have something special.”

Junior currently leads MAC in rebounding, tied for 11th in scoring in MAC with Berry CONOR HOCKETT CHIEF REPORTER favorites like Ohio’s D.J. Coo | @ConorHockett per for the MAC Player of the

helped his case. After recording 34 points and 14 rebounds, while shooting a combined 11-of-17 (65 percent) from the field, the Perth, Australia native picked up his second MAC West Division Player of the Week award of the season. Majok also won the award back on Dec. 10. His success is remarkable considering it’s the first time Majok has played through the physicality of the MAC, Taylor said. The 6-foot-9-inch big man has shown ability to go through or over defenders trying to muscle him in the paint. Majok’s physical advantages over most other interior players in the MAC have led to him leading the conference in rebounding at 10.1 boards per game. He also is tied with junior guard Jesse Berry for 11th in scoring at 12.6 ppg.

MAJOK MAJOK STATS

WOODY’S AWARD

Due to her play in the previous two games, Woody has earned the MAC-West Player of the Week. “I was tickled to death,“ Sallee said. “There’s no doubt that she

MAJOK IN CONTENTION FOR MAC PLAYER OF YEAR AWARD

DN FILE PHOTO BOBBY ELLIS

Junior forward Majok Majok attempts to push past an Indiana defender during the second half of the game Nov. 25, 2012 in Bloomington. Majok was awarded the MAC West player of the week this week.

There’s not much Majok Majok hasn’t done this season. The junior forward introduced himself to the Division I scene with four double-figure scoring games to start the season. His success against Akron’s Zeke Marshall, widely considered the best interior defender in the Mid-American Conference, for 26 points and 13 rebounds proved the junior college transfer couldn’t be guarded one-on-one. For Ball State coach Billy Taylor, Majok has played well enough to warrant some consideration among preseason

Year award. “If he can continue to play at the level he’s been playing — scoring the ball in the paint, rebounding with a lot of aggressiveness — he certainly has got to be in the talks for player of the year,” Taylor said in last week’s press conference. “A lot of that is determinant on how we play and I’m hopeful that we’re going to play better. But I certainly think the ways he has been able to dominate in the paint at times has been very impressive.” Taylor said before Ball State played Buffalo and Miami last week, and Majok’s most recent performances only

VOLLEYBALL: Clawson’s club team play moves him to D1 | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

FROM CLUB TO VARSITY

After his last high school match, Clawson was approached by Ball State’s men’s volleyball coach Joel Walton, who expressed informal interest in him. “We knew about Jon because he had come to some of our summer camps and is a very good athlete,” Walton said. Walton didn’t offer any type of scholarship to Clawson, but invited him to the team’s open gym sessions in the preseason. Still new in the volleyball world, Clawson didn’t give much thought on Walton’s offer and didn’t think he was going to play volleyball, other than for leisure, again. “It wasn’t an official offer or anything, and I kind of brushed it off,” Clawson said. Clawson’s freshman year at Ball State, Phil Daprile, a 2009 Center Grove graduate, asked him to give volleyball another shot. Clawson decided to try out, made the A-team and was back to playing volleyball. “He was a little rusty and a little raw,” Daprile said. “But he is a great blocker and is unbelievably athletic.” As the only freshman on the

A-team, Clawson helped the club team make it to Kansas City, Mo., to capture the National Collegiate Volleyball Federation’s DI-AA Silver National Championship for the first time in Ball State’s history. His play in Kansas City didn’t go ignored in Muncie as he got the attention of Ball State’s varsity program. The team had dismissed a middle hitter and had not found a viable replacement in the recruiting process. Needing to fill the spot, word spread quickly about what Clawson had done in his first season at the club level. Before he knew it, Clawson “had Jamion Hartley showing up at my front door.” “Some of our guys had heard that he played very well with the club team, and that they had finished well at a national tournament,” Walton said. “And that he was the only freshman competing with the juniors and seniors.” Hartley showed up to convince Clawson to play for the varsity team. Clawson said he was interested, which Hartley relayed to Walton. It took a few months, but eventually Walton extended an official offer. Within two days, Clawson was on the court prac-

ticing with the varsity team. “I called him near the end of July, and said, ‘Jon, we really want you to play for the varsity this year,’” Walton said. “He’s quick, he’s hard working and he was really a good find for us.”

NOT A TEAM, BUT FAMILY

After Hartley showed up to convince Clawson, he took time to talk over the offer with his family, especially his brother. “My brother was a big influence when I started playing volleyball because I wanted to get to the level he was at,” Clawson said with a smile. “You always want to match up with your siblings.” Clawson remembers his whole extended family getting together to watch his brother’s games and said it was something he wanted to emulate and get the chance to experience. “Everybody in my family always seemed to have fun coming up and watching him,” Clawson said. “So you know it’s a cool thing to be able to do … making your family happy.” The Clawsons had already made it to Muncie on a few occasions, such as the alumni match Jan. 5 and the St. Francis match Jan. 12. Joey was in attendance for the St. Francis match

and saw his brother put on the Cardinal uniform for the first time. Six years ago on Nov. 20, 2007, the roles were reversed, and Jon watched Joey’s first basketball game. Walton has repeatedly said that Ball State men’s volleyball is more like a family than a team. And the players have seemed to open up and embrace Clawson as a brother on the team. “I’m close with everybody on the team,” Clawson said. “We’re together five, six, now sometimes seven days of the week. You would think people would get sick of each other, and sometimes we bicker like a family, but in the end we are all in it together.” Being in that family atmosphere lumps Clawson right back into the sibling rivalries he is so accustomed to already. Clawson played fellow middle attacker Kevin Owens’ team during his junior year of high school. Clawson and Owens met at the net several times, but one play in particular sticks out to the pair.

For the full story, go to bsudaily.com

18

starts

31.2

minutes per game

12.6

points per game

.531

shooting percentage

10.1

rebounds per game

11

blocks If Majok’s consistency continues — three double-doubles in six league games — it’s only a matter of time before more accolades come his way.

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01-29-13  

The print edition of the Ball State Daily News on Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2013.

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