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DN MONDAY, MAY 20, 2013

MOVIES WITH MICHAEL See what a nonTrekie thinks about the new ‘Star Trek’ sequel in theaters

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MEN’S GOLF

Cards advance to NCAA finals

THE DAILY NEWS

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NEXT WEEK MATTERS

Ball State advances to MAC tournament for first time since 2010 PHOTO PROVIDED BY DAVID SHEFL

The “Field Observation of Severe Local Storms” class witnesses a lightning strike as weather develops in Texas. The group traveled through various areas in the Great Plains to follow tornadoes and other storm activity.

Professor, students see storms up close Class witnesses Texas tornado during trip through Great Plains SAM HOYT CHIEF REPORTER | sthoyt@bsu.edu

DN PHOTO JORDAN HUFFER

Members of the baseball team walk across the field to congratulate the Northern Illinois team on its victory. Ball State lost the game 4-6 in 10 innings and lost its MAC West title bid. CRAWFORD SPORTS EDITOR | DAKOTA @DN_SPORTS

A

MAC TOURNAMENT PAIRINGS

fter facing defeat on Saturday, the Ball State baseball team found reprieve in one message. As parents and supporters greeted the team at the dugout, they repeatedly reminded them that for the first time in a long time, next week matters. Coach Rich Maloney said he was proud of the way his team competed on Saturday. Ball State fought back from a 3-0 deficit against Northern Illinois to push the game into extra innings. Junior right-hander T.J. Weir relieved senior Chris Marangon in the first inning. Marangon had given up one run after facing five batters. Weir stepped on the mound with the bases loaded and worked the Cardinals out of a jam. He stranded three Northern Illinois runners on base as he started a great day of pitching. He would go on to pitch through the ninth inning as he allowed just seven hits and two runs. Weir was pulled only because Maloney felt he had exceeded his pitching limit on the day. Weir held the Huskies scoreless through the game’s final five innings of regulation, but they took advantage of his absence in the 10th.

WEDNESDAY, 9 A.M.

No. 4 Ball State – No. 5 Miami WEDNESDAY 12:30 P.M.

No. 3 Northern Illinois –No. 6 Bowling Green WEDNESDAY 4 P.M.

No. 2 Buffalo – No. 7 Toledo WEDNESDAY, 7:30 P.M.

No. 1 Kent State – No. 8 Central Michigan

Northern Illinois scored three runs to jump ahead 6-3. Even after watching the Huskies have such a successful offensive frame, the Cardinals fought back in the bottom of the inning and scored one more run. Senior Blake Beemer’s hit to center field nearly gave the Cardinals an additional run, but it fell short and Northern Illinois was able to make the catch, ending the game.

SEASON RESULTS FRIDAY, APRIL 19

Miami 1 – Ball State 0 SATURDAY, APRIL 20

Ball State 5 – Miami 2 SUNDAY, APRIL 21

Miami 6 – Ball State 5

See BASEBALL, page 6

A Ball State professor INSIDE THE STORM and his eight students WHAT were eager to see tor- Tornadoes caused destruction nadoes last week in and several deaths Texas, but hearing of WHERE the tragedies that re- Granbury, Texas sulted made it a “bit- WHEN 8 p.m. Wednesday tersweet” experience. David Call, a me- WHAT HAPPENED teorology professor Tornadoes across northern Texas included one that who leads Ball State’s resulted in six deaths in storm chasing class Granbury. Authorities said with geography pro- residents will soon be able to fessor Reuben Allen, get belongings and start to said seeing trans- rebuild the devastated areas. SOURCE: THE ASSOCIATED PRESS formers explode and the size of the tornado were the first hints of the destruction it was causing. “You can’t gauge a tornado’s destruction by its size, but obviously when you see a very wide tornado, it’s going to affect a bigger number of people and make it more likely that people will be killed or injured,” he said. “This was the most destructive tornado that I’ve ever seen.” The trip is part of the “Field Observation of Severe Local Storms” class, and spans across the plains of the United States, including Texas, Nebraska and Kansas. It costs around $3,000 for the class and trip, but Call said the trip gets students out of “windowless rooms” to really experience storms.

See STORM, page 3

Police bullet kills FOOD BANK OFFERS AID FOR SENIORS Ball State student college student runs program to DO YOU QUALIFY? AGE

Officer aimed for masked robber, hits 21-year-old, he says | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS NEW YORK — The police officer who accidentally killed a Long Island college student along with an armed intruder faced perhaps the most harrowing decision of a law enforcement career: split-second moment when the risk is so high that you must act to save a life. “The big question is, how do you know, when someone’s pointing a gun at you, whether you should keep talking to them, or shoot?” said Michele Galietta, a professor of psychology at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice who helps train police officers. “That’s what

provide food boxes

THE FACTS

WHO

21-year-old Andrea Rebello WHAT

A police officer accidentally shot Rebello while aiming for a masked robber holding her in a headlock. WHEN

Friday

WHERE

At Rebello’s off-campus house in Long Island, N.Y. makes the job of an officer amazingly difficult.” She spoke Sunday as Hofstra University students honored 21-year-old Andrea Rebello by wearing white ribbons at their graduation ceremony. Rebello was killed two days earlier after a masked man walked through the unlocked door of her off-campus home.

See SHOOTING, page 2

The Second Harvest Food Bank of East Central Indiana plans to provide Delaware County senior citizens relief with food packages, allowing their fixed incomes to go further. Beginning next month, the program will provide 150 residents of the county 60 years of age and older, who also meet income guidelines, with a 40-pound box of free food each month. The program is opening in Delaware County for the first time, and it is only approved for one year, but expanding the program is not an unrealistic option. Carissa Harrington, a senior social work major at Ball State, has been working on the program for over a year and has made it a personal

MONTHLY INCOME

Household size of 1: $1,245 Household size of 2: $1,681 Household size of 2: $2,116 Household size of 4: $2,552 ADDITIONAL HOUSEHOLD MEMBERS

add $436 per person to income guideline FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL THE SECOND HARVEST OFFICE AT 765-287-8698

goal of hers to see the program become full time before she graduates next spring. “I would love to see Delaware come on as a full-time county, because there is such a huge need for it. It’s unbelievable. So that would be a great going away present,” she said. The need for this kind of aid has been made evident already, Harrington said. The program has seen applications come in at a rate as high as 75 per day. Applications are open two

THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS

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Carissa Harrington, a senior social work major, works with a woman interested in signing her grandmother up for the new food program sponsored by the food bank. Harrington is one of several people who were helping sign people up for the program that aims to get food into the hands of people who may not be able to afford it.

more days, next Tuesday and Thursday. The program is not new to the state of Indiana. Neighboring counties, Wabash and Randolph, each serve 400 senior citizens already. Program director Nicole Miles said recipients of this program will no longer be forced to make a decision TWEET US

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between food and other necessities. “A lot of seniors just don’t have the income that it takes to purchase medications that they may need,” Miles said. “And at the end of the day, they just don’t have money to purchase food.”

FORECAST

TODAY High: 87, Low: 68 Partly cloudy

See PROGRAM, page 2

VOL. 92, ISSUE 121 TOMORROW High: 84, Low: 68 PM t-storms


PAGE 2 | MONDAY, MAY 20, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM

NEWS

WEATHER THIS WEEK

TODAY Partly Cloudy, High: 87, Low: 68 TUESDAY T-Storms, High: 85, Low: 68 WEDNESDAY Scattered T-Storms, High: 78, Low: 64 THURSDAY Isolated T-Storms, High: 73, Low: 56 FRIDAY Mostly Sunny, High: 67, Low: 50 SERVICE DIRECTORY

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PROGRAM : Food service extends to Delaware County | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 Miles said they will accept as many applications as they can, and ideally will use a wait-list system that would allow for applicants who do not make the first 150 spots to receive food if a spot opens up. Kara Cambell, a 71-yearold applicant, said she hasn’t heard of another program that provides this service. She said she is applying because her family’s medical bills are high and the food will improve what her family eats. “I think it’s [the program is] very good and a lot of people will be able to eat now,” she said. Working with community members like Cambell is one reason Harrington said she loves her job. Harrington started with Second Harvest a little over a year ago answering phones and doing miscellaneous paperwork. In order to make her experience more immersive, her role expanded to becoming a Commodity Supplemental Food

PHOTO EDITOR Jordan Huffer

NEWS EDITOR Emma Kate Fittes

DESIGN EDITOR Michael Boehnlein

SPORTS EDITOR Dakota Crawford

COPY CHIEF Daniel Brount

Program assistant. She said seeing the program move to her home county meant a lot to her, and she is

excited for the future. “It’s my baby,” Harrington said of the program. “I have built so many great relationships

with the people on it, and I was jumping up and down when I found out we brought on Delaware County.”

Her life ended in the seconds that forced the veteran police officer to make a fatal decision, but the questions surrounding the student’s death are just beginning, along with an internal investigation by the Nassau County Police Department. The bare facts are simple. Rebello and the intruder, Dalton Smith, died early Friday when the officer fired eight shots, hitting him seven times, with one bullet striking Rebello once in the head, said county homicide squad Lt. John Azzata. With a gun pointed at her, Smith “kept saying, ‘I’m go-

ing to kill her,’ and then he pointed the gun at the police officer,” said Azzata. The officer acted quickly, saying later that he believed his and Rebello’s life were in danger, according to authorities. No doubt, he was acting to try to save lives — his own and that of the young woman, Galietta said. But the fallout was tragic. “What we’re asking the cop to anticipate is, ‘What is going on in the suspect’s mind at the moment?’” she said. “We’re always trying to deescalate, to contain a situation, but the issue of safety

comes in first, and that’s the evaluation the officer has to make.” In collaboration with the New York City Police Department, Galietta is part of a John Jay program that prepares young officers to react to life-threatening situations. Actors are used to replicate scenarios reflecting reality. Police tactical manuals are meant to assist officers in making the best decision possible, but in the end, “they’re not 100 percent foolproof,” Galietta said. “In a situation like that, you can follow procedure, and it doesn’t mean it comes out perfectly.”

SHOOTING: Classmates honor student killed by officer | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

A police officer aiming at the would-be robber opened fire, hitting the Hofstra junior as well as the ex-convict holding her in a headlock. On Saturday evening, flags on the Hempstead campus were at half-staff and students held a silent outdoor vigil in front of a photo of the young woman. Surrounded by candles and flowers, they sang “Ave Maria.” Rebello’s funeral is scheduled for Wednesday in Sleepy Hollow, in Westchester County, north of New York City.

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Nicole Miles speaks with a client of the Second Harvest Food Bank. Miles is the director of the program that will give food to 150 qualifying senior citizens.

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Still updating 24/7. Sudoku Crossword

By Michael Mepham

Level: Easy Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

SOLUTION FOR THURSDAY.

SOLUTION FOR THURSDAY. ACROSS 1 FINDERS’ SHOUTS 5 MATERNITY WARD EVENT 10 FORMAL TITLE 13 DESTROY 14 LEGEND AUTOMAKER 15 1988 CY YOUNG WINNER HERSHISER 17 1978 HIT FOR THE COMMODORES 20 MICROBE 21 MINNESOTA WILD’S ORG. 22 STATUS __ 23 SAFETY FEATURE AT A DANGEROUS INTERSECTION 28 BOXER PLAYED BY WILL SMITH 29 __ THE FINISH 30 GIVE ONE’S WORD 31 BUSINESS BIGWIG 33 OLYMPICS SLED 35 MIDEAST SULTANATE 39 ENGLISH : JOHN :: WELSH : __ 40 HIGH MALE VOICE 41 PRO __: IN PROPORTION 42 LIKE THE NIGHT

43 SEEK PREY 44 AGRICULTURE GODDESS ON THE NEW JERSEY STATE SEAL 45 BIGGER THAN MED. 47 MULTINATIONAL COIN 49 SCINTILLA 50 FALSE START PUNISHMENT, IN FOOTBALL 55 HUSH-HUSH MARITIME ORG. 56 AAA SUGGESTION 57 JUST HANGING OUT 58 AS EXPECTED, OR, GOLFWISE, A HINT TO NUMBERS FOUND IN 17-, 23- AND 50-ACROSS 64 WORK ON THE DECK 65 STEAMED 66 THE STUFF OF LEGENDS 67 25-DOWN STUDENT 68 SHOWS UP 69 GETS THE PICTURE DOWN 1 MUSEUM DISPLAY 2 “HOW’S THAT AGAIN?” 3 INSTRUMENT “PLAYED” FOR

A HAIRBRUSH MICROPHONE USER 4 SCORNFUL LOOK 5 ROLE FOR KEATON AND KILMER 6 “HERE,” ON METRO MAPS 7 MOJITO LIQUOR 8 FORMER SENATOR LOTT 9 DISCUSS IN DETAIL 10 NOTE AFTER FA 11 KIRKUK NATIVE 12 EXCAVATED ANEW 16 FRANCE’S THIRD MOST POPULOUS CITÉ 18 “DESERT FOX” ROMMEL 19 DOG FOOD BRAND 23 MEANT TO HAPPEN 24 TONY WHOSE #6 WAS RETIRED BY THE TWINS 25 NEW HAVEN SCH. 26 DUMBFOUNDED 27 GAVE ONE’S WORD 32 OFT-SPRAINED JOINT 34 HOPPED OUT OF BED 36 BREAD WITH SWIRLS STOLEN BY JERRY IN A CLASSIC “SEINFELD” EPISODE

37 WHAT THE DOG DID WITH THE HOMEWORK? 38 FOUL, AS WEATHER 40 SHOWY 44 TIME-SHARE UNIT 46 GREEK STREET FOOD 48 TREATS AGAIN, AS A SPRAIN 50 DANDY FELLOWS 51 BLOWN AWAY 52 LIKE YOUTUBE VIDEOS GONE WILD 53 NOSTALGIA-INDUCING 54 HOMECOMING GROUP 59 “FIDELITY, BRAVERY, INTEGRITY” ORG. 60 NONKOSHER MEAT 61 PRINTEMPS FOLLOWER 62 HOLY MLLE. 63 PUZZLED COMMENTS

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MONDAY, MAY 20, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM | PAGE 3

NEWS

Self defense program to spread to new universities Professors expand trainings to other colleges, Muncie

|

EMMA KATE FITTES AND SAM HOYT news@bsudailynews.com

The elements of earth, wind, fire and water have proven too strong to contain at Ball State as the Elemental Self Defense program, created by students, will be expanding to other universities next year, including Antioch College in Ohio and Florida State. “The more people we can help and affect, the better off we’ll all be,” said Mellisa Holtzman, associate professor of sociology and co-founder of Elemental. Holtzman said Elemental is a distinctive sexual assault protection program. The program follows a video of different scenarios, stopping and breaking down potential responses based on elements that define personality types: earth, wind, fire and water. Anyone is welcome to the program, Holtzman said. She said one distinct part of the program is that they focus on defense from acquaintances, instead of just stranger rape. “We bring in a lot of props that we feel are important to learn to protect yourself from a sexual assault,” Holtzman said. “Because we’re dealing with acquaintances, many of these situations take place on beds or on couches or in dorm rooms. We bring beds and couches to the seminar and we teach people how to protect themselves on those surfaces.” So far, Holtzman and Chad Menning, associate professor of sociology and co-founder of Elemental, have brought the program to Antioch College. “[The program] went over very well at Antioch,” Holtzman said. “They want to have us back to teach it again and again. The individuals who had us out want to become a certified instructor and offer it on a regular basis on their campus.”

| THE ASSOCIATED PRESS SPRINGFIELD, Ill. — Illinois lawmakers agreed to legalize the use of medical marijuana on Friday under a plan that’s being billed as the strictest in the nation among states that have authorized the drug’s medicinal use, though it is unclear whether the Democratic governor plans to sign it. The plan authorizes a pilot program for physicians to prescribe marijuana only to patients with whom they have an existing relationship. Background checks are required, and patients must have at least one of more than three dozen terminal illnesses or other debilitating medical conditions specifically listed in the bill. Gov. Pat Quinn has declined to say whether he supports the legislation, saying only that he was “open-minded”

SEAT BELT ENFORCEMENT BEGINS

Indiana’s annual Click It or Ticket initiative began Friday as the Memorial Day holiday approaches. More than 250 Indiana law enforcement agencies support the enforcement initiative, and it features paid, statewide advertising and other public outreach efforts designed to promote seat belt use. “As we kick-off the busy summer driving season, it’s important that everyone buckles up every trip, every time — both day and night. No excuses,” Sgt. Jason J. Webber said. “Our officers are prepared to ticket anyone who is not wearing their seat belt.” This year’s enforcement effort will end on June 2. Last year, Indiana law enforcement agencies issued 18,104 citations to motorists failing to wear a seat belt. “Clearly there is more work to be done,” Webber said. “Although Indiana’s current seat belt usage rate is 93.6 percent – there remains a significant number of drivers who are at an increased risk for death or injury because they still fail to buckle up on a regular basis.” – STEVEN WILLIAMS

STUDENTS HELP TRAIN POLICE FOR SUICIDE ATTEMPT RESPONSES

DN FILE PHOTO BOBBY ELLIS

Students participate in the Elemental self defense program last fall at Ball State. The program, which started at Ball State, will be spreading to other universities.

Jesse Taskovic, a sophomore Japanese major, attended an Elemental training session last fall and said spreading the training is a good idea. “It’s infectious, it’s going to really relay the message of safety,” Taskovic said. “Not just in terms in sexuality but in terms of so many other things… because the program is open to such diverse crowds.” Taskovic said since his training he has used the tactics he was taught. Over Winter Break Taskovic said he was on a date and went back to the person’s apartment when the guy said he forgot his wallet. When he began making advances on Taskovic, Taskovic took a wind approach and did not give him permission to touch him. When that didn’t work, Taskovic switched to fire response and pushed him off.

« The more people we can help and affect, the better off we’ll be, » MELLISA HOLTZMAN, cofounder of Elemental

“[The program] helped me avoid what potentially could have become molestation,” Taskovic said. Taskovic said he will return to Elemental training in the fall to reinforce what he has already learned. “It’s changed me, it’s protected me, it’s ensured I can have a happier life and I really would wish that on anyone, so I really encourage anyone who could… to consider it,” Taskovic said. “It really does give you tools to maintain a healthy lifestyle.” Holtzman said she and Menning are also working to expand Elemental in Muncie and will be

holding training in two different locations off campus in the fall. “[Menning and I] don’t want Elemental to be restricted to Ball State students, although it was originally designed by Ball State students,” Holtzman said. Holtzman said part of the process of marketing Elemental off campus is using Vizi Courseware. The software functions as the platform for them to share information about the program with other people, she said. “Bottom line, people generally never feel that they’re at risk until they’re suddenly in a situation that they don’t know how to get out of,” Holtzman said. “It’s better to get this kind of training early and never need to use it, than to never get this training and suddenly find yourself in a situation where you wish you had the training.”

Ill. approves medicinal marijuana Background checks, qualified illnesses required under law

DN|BRIEFS

on the issue. Lt. Gov. Sheila Simon, a former prosecutor, has said she is in favor of the plan after meeting with patients, including military veterans. The proposed legislation creates a framework for a four-year pilot program that includes requiring patients and caregivers to undergo background checks. It sets a 2.5 ounce limit per patient per purchase and calls for 60 dispensaries regulated by the state where patients could buy the drug. “We are embarking here on a way to achieve relief, compassionate relief, consistent with the law [with] a system which avoids abuse,” said the bill’s sponsor, Democratic Sen. Bill Haine of Alton. “It’s the tightest, most controlled legislative initiative in the United State related to medical cannabis.” Supporters said it is a compassionate measure that could save patients from the agony caused by illnesses such as cancer, multiple sclerosis and HIV. They argue that marijuana can relieve continual pain without triggering the harmful effects

QUAD TALK

HOW WOULD LEGALIZATION AFFECT YOU?

« It wouldn’t impact me directly because

I don’t smoke nor do I need to smoke for a medicinal reason. I think there will be more people that will try to come up with excuses for which to get it.

»

LILIANA PALACIO, a senior social work major

« Probably not at all. I think that it would save taxpayers a lot of money in terms of locking up non-violent criminals and prosecuting marijuana offenders .

»

JOHN HUSTON, a senior political science and economics major

of other prescription drugs, including painkillers such as Oxycontin and Vicodin. But opponents contend the program could encourage the recreational use of marijuana, especially among teenagers. A report issued last month by the Pew Research Center poll showed that 77 percent of Americans say mari-

juana has legitimate medical uses. Eighteen states and the District of Columbia allow the use of marijuana for medical purposes. But critics in the Illinois Senate, which approved the plan Friday in a 35-21 vote, worried about whether the regulations would be enough to prevent abuse of the drug.

After responding to a suicide attempt with the University Police Department about a month ago, Ball State’s Alive Campaign, a student suicide prevention and awareness group, partnered with Meridian Health Services to train local officers. “We weren’t really happy with the way they responded,” said Carmen Diaz, executive director of Alive. “The process was quick and he was treated more like a criminal.” Diaz said she took offense to the way UPD of- DO YOU COPY? ficers spoke to the individual, standing over him See Daniel Brount’s column and harshly questioning him. on suicide “I didn’t feel proud to witness it as the leader of awareness and what you can do. a suicide prevention group,” she said. The individual declined to speak to the Daily + PAGE 5 News. Diaz said she began looking for a way to be sure local police are trained in crisis response the same way she was trained, to treat those who need help with compassion instead of with the negative stigmas associated with suicide. “The police get a lot of training, so they are commendable for that, NATIONAL TRENDS and what they do is amazing,” •Suicide was the 10th Diaz said. “But there is a strong leading cause of death stigma between the help-seeking for all ages. activity [after a suicide attempt] •There was an average because they are afraid of being of 105 suicides each treated like a criminal.” day in the United Diaz and Meridian Health SerStates. vices, a health services group that •There is one suicide focuses on treating the whole for ever 25 suicide person, not just physical wounds, attempts. began a 40 hour week-long train•7.8 percent of students said they ing with Delaware County police had attempted suicide and UPD on May 3. one or more times The Daily News was unable to during the past year. contact UPD. SOURCE: cdc.gov “It’s really cool to see that happen,” Diaz said. “Trainings are costly and we are lucky to get them for free here at Ball State. Anyone can advocate for this; some people are afraid because there is such a big role to play. But just let them know they are never alone, and let them know there is help.” – CHRISTOPHER STEPHENS

AP|BRIEF

MOTHER’S DAY PARADE SHOOTERS BOOKED WITH ATTEMPTED MURDER NEW ORLEANS — Residents of one of America’s most violent cities cheered seven arrests in a Mother’s Day neighborhood parade shooting that left 19 people wounded and three in critical condition. Two New Orleans brothers were booked with 20 counts each of attempted second-degree murder in Sunday’s shooting spree. Five others were accused of helping suspects avoid capture. Mayor Mitch Landrieu, who strongly promotes the city’s tourism industry, including the annual Mardi Gras celebration, said the arrests are the latest evidence of the city’s determination to stop the gunplay that mars its image. “The culture of death and violence on the streets of New Orleans is unnatural, it’s unacceptable and the people of New Orleans have had enough,” Landrieu said. Akein Scott, 19, was captured Wednesday night. His brother, Shawn Scott, 24, was arrested Thursday morning. The latest arrested Friday was 19-year-old Monique Pepe. Police said she allowed Shawn Scott to hide at her house. She and four others are charged with being accessories after the fact to attempted second-degree murder and obstruction of justice, police said. Police said the shootings were believed to be gang related. The Dalai Lama, visiting New Orleans for the first time Friday, expressed condolences to victims. “Nonviolence is the only way of solving problems,” he told reporters.

STORMS: Unexpected storms shake up otherwise uneventful meteorological trip | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 “This trip is somewhat like when people go to camp or other isolated environments,” he said. “When we get students out of their normal environments, they have nothing to focus on but the weather and forecasting and this class.” David Stefl, a graduate student in atmospheric sciences who is currently on the trip, said the experience has been a blast and he has learned a lot so far. “There’s only so much you can learn in a classroom, and really getting out in the field and forecasting these things every day and going to search for them really puts into practice what we’ve learned in the classroom,” he said. “I figured if I’m going to be dealing with this stuff for the

rest of my life every day, it might be good if I had a handle on exactly what it looks like, exactly how they act in the field.” Call said the trips tend to begin with him leading the group, but as students get a stronger hold on the information, he recedes into the background. “Some of the days that have been the most memorable have been the days when I’ve been wrong and the students have been right, when I’ve thought we should do one thing and they’ve thought we should do another, and they’ve gotten it right,” he said. Call said there is another major difference between normal classes and this one. “In this class, there are no clear answers,” Call said. “Here, we get up in the morning and

think we know where the storms are going to be, but they often surprise us and form in different areas we didn’t expect. There are times when I’m not sure what to do myself.” Call has led the class since 2008. He saw his first tornado in western Kansas on the first trip. “It sounded like a great opportunity to apply my meteorological training,” he said. “A lot of our students have been really enthusiastic about it.” One such student is Stefl, who said the most exciting part of the trip was when they saw their first tornado. “We were driving down the road and really not paying attention to what the storm was looking like. We were looking at radar trying to get to a certain spot to get a good viewing angle

on it,” he said. “All of the sudden, right to our left on the car, a tornado just pops up.” He said fear wasn’t his initial reaction, an adrenaline rush was. “I remember talking to some of my classmates that I had so much adrenaline that I was going to have trouble sleeping that night,” Stefl said. He said the tornado was roughly five miles from the group, so it didn’t pose much of a threat. Call said the tornadoes are often the least of their worries. “There are a lot of other things that we encounter that are a lot more hazardous than tornadoes,” he said. “The fact that we drive thousands of miles is one. I’ve logged 50,000 miles now on these chase trips. When you log that many miles, you’re going to encounter wild animals, sleepy

truckers and drivers that pull in front of you without warning. I’m not so worried about a tornado hitting us as I’m worried about us being swamped by water or bashed by hail.” Call said there have been some trips with very little activity. “We’re really at the mercy of the weather pattern,” he said. “Last year the weather pattern was terrible. We had that drought which pushed all the storms to the fringes of the plains and made it difficult for them to form any type of tornadic activity. “This week was pretty interesting. We started out the week pretty down, but the pattern has done a 180 and become very active. It’s been a week of highs and lows.” Call said the trip is a great

chance to see some of the extremes of weather. “The storms themselves are really pretty out here. I mean, they’re destructive, but they’re also amazing and beautiful,” he said. “You don’t generally don’t see storms this photogenic out in the Midwest, they just don’t grow as large as they do in the Great Plains.” But Call said they don’t forget about what tornadoes are capable of. “It’s great to see tornadoes, but we only want to see them in areas where there aren’t people,” he said. “A lot of us have gone into this field because we want to help protect people by issuing warnings and other weather information to let them know what to do, and this is a reminder of how important that job is.”


MONDAY, MAY 20, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM | PAGE 4

FEATURES

SATURDAY Join the Cornfed Derby Dames at their roller derby “Go Fast, Turn Left” against the Bonnie Booms from South Bend at 7 p.m. at the Gibson Skating Arena.

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Star Trek opens at only $70 million

Opening night profits were lower than studio expected despite beaming ratings THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Zachary Quinto and Chris Pine star in “Star Trek Into Darkness.” The movie opened worldwide this past weekend, grossing about $70 million.

LOS ANGELES — “Star Trek: Into Darkness” has warped its way to a $70.6 million domestic launch from Friday to Sunday, though it’s not setting any lightspeed records with a debut that’s lower than the studio’s expectations. The latest voyage of the starship Enterprise fell short of its predecessor, 2009’s “Star Trek,” which opened with $75.2 million. Since premiering Wednesday in hugescreen IMAX theaters and expanding Thursday to general cinemas, “Into Darkness” has pulled in $84.1 million, well below distributor Paramount’s initial forecast of $100 million. The film added $40 million overseas, pushing its total to $80.5 million since it began rolling out internationally a week earlier. The “Star Trek” sequel bumped “Iron Man 3” down to second place after two weekends on top. Robert Downey Jr.’s superhero saga took in $35.2 million domestically to lift its receipts to $337.1 million. Overseas, “Iron Man 3” added $40.2 million, raising its international total to $736.2 million and its worldwide tally to nearly $1.1 billion. While “Iron Man 3” and “Into Darkness” did well overseas, they were outmatched by the debut of Baz Luhrmann’s “The Great Gatsby,” which followed its domestic debut a week earlier with a wide rollout internationally. “Gatsby” pulled in $42.1 million overseas, coming

in a bit ahead of both “Iron Man 3” and “Into Darkness.” Domestically, “Gatsby” held up well at No. 3 with $23.4 million, lifting its total to $90.2 million. In today’s Hollywood of bigger, better sequels, follow-up films often outdo the box office of their predecessors, as each “Iron Man” sequel has done. While “Into Darkness” earned good reviews and is getting strong word-of-mouth from fans, the film did not quite measure up to the opening weekend of director J.J. Abrams’ “Star Trek” reboot from four years ago, at least domestically. “’Star Trek’ remains a fan-boy movie. It doesn’t seem to have the same kind of cross-over appeal as say an ‘Iron Man’ or some of these others,” said Paul Dergarabedian, an analyst for box-office tracker Hollywood.com. “It’s a very specific brand, but I think the general public would love this movie, because it’s such an action movie. But to get a hundredmillion-plus opening weekend, unless you’re ‘Twilight,’ you really have to cross over to all audiences.” Paramount points out that overseas business is up in many markets, though, so that worldwide, the sequel is off to a better start. “Because of the nature of the franchise, because of how many movies have been made and the various forms of the TV shows, I’m not sure that ‘Star Trek’ goes

MCT PHOTO

BY THE NUMBERS

Amount movies made in the U.S. during their opening weekend:

$70.6 million “Star Trek Into Darkness”

$75.2 million 2009’s “Star Trek”

$175.3 million “Iron Man 3”

$51.1 million “The Great Gatsby”

by the rules of normal sequels. I think each movie stands on its own, because it’s a unique franchise,” said Don Harris, Paramount’s head of distribution. “My goal was always that we grow the franchise. We’re clearly seeing by today’s numbers that the movie is being embraced on a worldwide basis in a way we’ve never seen before.” Harris said that domestically, “Into Darkness” finished its first weekend 6 percent ahead of revenues for 2009’s “Star Trek,” which got a head-start with $4 million in Thursday night previews to give it a $79.2 million haul through the first Sunday.

SEQUEL SATISFIES TREKKIE STANDARD I never watched the TV series, the only knowledge I had of the old “Star Trek” is from pop culture and television references. And despite my lack of knowledge, when “Star Trek” came out in 2009, I couldn’t have been more excited. I had always enjoyed the idea of “Star Trek”; I just never had the time to get heavily into it. With the reboot being a prequel to the happenings of the television show, I figured it’d be a good introduction. I was right. Director J.J. Abrams, who wasn’t a big fan of the original “Star Trek” franchise himself, used these films as a way to reinvent the characters and roles laid out in the original series. He set out to make a film for movie-goers and not just “Star Trek” fans. Abrams has said after making the first film, he’s learned to appreciate the old “Star Trek” series and has even watched and enjoyed them. This is apparent when watching “Star Trek Into Darkness.” While the film was just the kind of sequel I had been hoping for, I wasn’t too happy with the number of shout-outs to the original “Star Trek.” I only recognized a few of them, and when I did I knew that the film was meant for the Trekkies among us and not just us movie-goers. The film features the familiar faces of Chris Pine as James T. Kirk, Captain of the Starship Enterprise, and Zachary Quinto as his no-nonsense, always logical, Vulcan humanoid partner Spock. The film also introduces a new face - one we won’t soon forget - rising British actor Benedict Cumberbatch as the sinister John Harrison. Pine and Quinto prove once more that their chemistry together makes them perfect for their roles. Right off the bat, we see how they’re still learning how to work together. When Spock jumps down into an active volcano in order to stop it from erupting and killing an entire indigenous race of people, he puts himself in a life-threatening position and, relying on logic, he chooses to stay in the volcano despite the risk of death. Kirk, staying true to form, chooses to bend the rules in order to save Spock’s life by beaming Spock out of the volcano. The secondary characters, Nyota Uhura (Zoë Saldana), Montgomery “Scotty” Scott (Simon Pegg) and Leonard “Bones” McCoy (Karl Urban), add a more subtle layer of humor than in the first film. Uhura’s on-going lovers quarrel with Commander Spock, Scotty’s spastic personality and quirky humor, and Bones’ corny metaphors add comic relief to an otherwise serious plot. The movie seems to be as much about their character development as it is about Kirk and Spock. The special effects throughout the movie make it a feast for the eyes. Coupled with the outstanding score, composed by Michael Giacchino, you’ll be left with chills all around. Costume design seemed very simplistic, taking a lot from what we know of the Starfleet uniforms and redesigning them in a modern fashion similar to the first movie. But the most amazing aspect of the movie would have to be the set design. With several different settings throughout the film, the designers succeeded at making you feel like you were a part of their world, and I was blown away at the amount of detail in each location. In the end, the movie was well-directed and well-written. While it was definitely influenced by the old “Star Trek” stories, it had just enough to make it new and exciting. Overall, I’d give the film a 4.5/5. While it is a stunning addition to the rebooted “Star Trek” franchise, the movie relies too heavily on old “Star Trek” dialogue and therefore lacks the originality I hoped to see. All movies, even reboots, should be able to stand alone without explicit knowledge of what the movie is based on, and “Star Trek Into Darkness” falls short of doing so.

MICHAEL BOEHNLEIN MOVIES WITH MICHAEL

MICHAEL BOEHNLEIN IS A SENIOR PRE ART MAJOR AND WRITES ‘MOVIES WITH MICHAEL’ FOR THE DAILY NEWS. HIS VIEWS DO NOT NECESSARILY AGREE WITH THOSE OF THE NEWSPAPER. WRITE TO MICHAEL AT MABOEHNLEIN @BSU.EDU.

MOVIES TO WATCH FOR THIS SUMMER SINGLE TICKET WINS IN FLORIDA Preparing for a summer of movie fun can be a difficult task. Most of the biggest movies of the year release during the summer, with many falling flat in reception. But this summer features some interesting titles that could do well in the box office as well as in reviews.

STEVEN “After Earth” (May 31)

WILLIAMS INDECISIVE

STEVEN WILLIAMS IS A SENIOR JOURNALISM AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS NEWS MAJOR AND WRITES ‘INDECISIVE’ FOR THE DAILY NEWS. HIS VIEWS DO NOT NECESSARILY AGREE WITH THOSE OF THE NEWSPAPER. WRITE TO STEVEN AT SBWILLIAMS @BSU.EDU.

DIRECTOR: M. NIGHT SHYAMALAN

Starring: Will Smith, Jaden Smith, Isabelle Fuhrman, Sophie Okonedo Could this be the resurrection of M. Night Shymalan’s directing career we’ve been expecting, or another reason to look back in his catalog for his best work? Shymalan has struggled to find the same spark as his older projects like “Signs” and “The Sixth Sense.” MCT PHOTO Casting Will Smith and son Jaden Smith in a film that features almost exclusively those two will likely end in box office success. The two play father and son in a futuristic science fiction film where the two crash land on Earth 1,000 years after it has been abandoned. Will Smith hasn’t latched onto many commercial flops in his career, but much of the film’s critical success depends on Shymalan’s direction. “This Is the End” (June 12)

DIRECTOR: EVAN GOLDBERG, SETH ROGEN

Starring: James Franco, Paul Rudd, Seth Rogen “This Is the End” with its ensemble cast, including James Franco, Paul Rudd, Seth Rogen and Jonah Hill among others, is probably the most interesting comedy to release since the first “Hangover.” The cast play themselves in a fictional party set at Franco’s house. Eventually, the group of comedians is faced with the apocalypse. The result looks insanely entertaining. In a situation where anything can happen, expect plenty of laughs with a group like this working together. The fact that every one

plays themselves should add an interesting dynamic that hasn’t been seen before. It’s also Seth Rogen’s first attempt at directing as he takes the reins with “Superbad” director Evan Goldberg.

“Man of Steel” (June 14) DIRECTOR: ZACK SNYDER

Starring: Henry Cavill, Amy Adams, Russell Crowe, Michael Shannon I preface what I’m about to say with this: I don’t watch many comic book movies. That’s not because they aren’t interesting, but the biggest reason is how poor comic book movies have been for the most part. Recently, with “The Avengers” and Christopher Nolan’s MCT PHOTO “Batman” trilogy, these movies have been some of the best of the year. Based on what I’ve seen so far from Zack Snyder and cast, “Man of Steel” looks to be a worthy reboot. With both Russell Crowe and Michael Shannon featured, the acting should be top notch along with Snyder’s excellent visual style.

“Pacific Rim” (July 12) DIRECTOR: GUILLERMO DEL TORO

Starring: Charlie Hunnam, Idris Elba, Charlie Day If there’s any movie that could go either way this summer, it’s “Pacific Rim.” The apocalyptic plot is becoming overused in Hollywood, but “Pacific Rim” goes further by adding gigantic monsters to threaten the world. Conventional methods can’t stop the destruction so the rest of the human race turns to its last option — gigantic humancontrolled robots. That’s why it would come as no surprise the director was Michael Bay, but he isn’t. And it’s why there’s still some hope for “Pacific Rim,” because Guillermo Del Toro is running the show. The trailer features plenty of action, so the question is will there be enough character and plot development?

One person won estimated $590.5 mil, not yet claimed | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS ZEPHYRHILLS, Fla. — Some lucky person walked into a Publix supermarket in suburban Florida over the past few days and bought a ticket now worth an estimated $590.5 million — the highest Powerball jackpot in history. But it wasn’t Matthew Bogel. On Sunday, he loaded groceries into his car after shopping at the Publix. He shook his head when asked about the jackpot. “It’s crazy, isn’t it?” he said. “That’s so much money.” It’s an amount too high for many to imagine. Compare it to the budget for the city of Zephyrhills: This year’s figure is just more than $49 million. The winning Powerball jackpot is 12 times that. Whoever has the ticket hadn’t come forward as of Sunday afternoon. “This would be the sixth Florida Powerball winner and right now, it’s the sole winner of the largest ever Powerball jackpot,” Florida Lottery executive Cindy O’Connell told The Associated

WINNING NUMBERS 10, 13, 14, 22 & 52

POWERBALL NUMBER 11

Press. “We’re delighted right now that we have the sole winner.” Publix spokeswoman Maria Brous said there are a lot of rumors about who won, but the store doesn’t know. “We’re excited for the winner or winners,” she said. Florida Lottery spokesman David Bishop said Sunday afternoon that it was doubtful the winner would come forward that day. The ticket-holder can’t claim the prize until today when the agency opens, he said. “It never happens this quickly,” Bishop said. “If they know they won, they’re going to contact their attorney or an accountant first so they can get their affairs in order.” O’Connell said Florida has had more Powerball winners than any other state but did not give any indication whether anyone had stepped forward with the winning ticket in Saturday’s drawing. But plenty of people in Zephyrhills — population 13,337 — are wondering whether it’s someone they know.


MONDAY, MAY 20, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM | PAGE 5

FORUM

SEEING SUICIDE COMES FIRST DANIEL BROUNT DO YOU COPY? DANIEL BROUNT IS A SOPHOMORE CREATIVE WRITING MAJOR AND WRITES ‘DO YOU COPY?’ FOR THE DAILY NEWS. HIS VIEWS DO NOT NECESSARILY AGREE WITH THOSE OF THE NEWSPAPER. WRITE TO DANIEL AT DJBROUNT @BSU.EDU.

FORUM POLICY

Though we sometimes see deaths opportunities to educate themselves. from suicide in the news, we rarely hear It is likely that almost every student about suicide attempts. With the death on campus has experienced or knows of a celebrity, suicide reaches the news, someone who has experienced suicidal but thousands of suicide attempts re- thoughts. “Suicide Facts at a Glance� also main concealed. points out that the presAlong with many other ence of suicidal thoughts SIGNS OF reasons, the impact and is highest among 15 to sensitivity of suicide 24-year-olds. DEPRESSION makes the media hesitant Respect is an essential IF THEY ARE... to cover it. Despite this, we part of aiding our peers. careless, moody, withdrawing, misusing need to recognize its prevIt has become common alcohol and drugs. alence in our society. behavior to joke about IF THEY FEEL... Among 15 to 24-yearsuicide in a frivolous way, alone, like they have no olds, suicide causes 20 with phrases such as “I’m purpose, like a burden, percent of annual deaths, going to kill myself� being like there is no escape according to “Suicide used ignorantly. InsensiIF THEY ACT... Facts at a Glance� on cdc. tivity only makes it more desperate, numb, gov. Also in this age group, difficult to understand the hopeless, ashamed there are 100 attempts for impact of suicide. It makes SOURCE: SafeTalk resource book every suicide death. it more difficult for those If we only react when experiencing suicidal people actually die from suicide, then no thoughts to open up and get help. lives will be saved. We have to acknowlWe have to show our friends and edge attempts. Stopping suicide is about family that we are there for them, and prevention and awareness, but how can we have to take steps so that we know we prevent what we are not aware of? how to help. Thoughts of suicide reach numerous Awareness is the first step. Prevenpeople on campus and in Muncie. A tion comes after that. Deaths by suicide heightened awareness of this epidemic are a mistake, a tragedy that should not is the only way to halt it. happen. But the problem will never be From the counseling center to crisis solved by starting at the end, trying to prevention lines to the Alive Campaign, move backwards by only notifying peoa club devoted to raising awareness for ple of deaths. We must know that these suicide, there are an extensive amount of attempts are occurring, that people are resources available at Ball State. Yet this suffering from these thoughts. work can only succeed if students lisOpen your heart to those around you ten. These organizations are attempting who may be suffering, and take a step to bring information and trainings, such to educate yourself. The more we pay as SafeTALK and Question, Persuade, attention to this epidemic, the more and Refer. Students must take these lives we can save.

The Daily News forum page aims to stimulate discussion in the Ball State community. The Daily News welcomes reader viewpoints and offers three vehicles of expression for reader opinions: letters to the editor,

guest columns and feedback on our website. Letters to the editor must be signed and appear as space permits each day. The limit for letter length is approximately 350 words. All letters must be typed.

The editor reserves the right to edit and condense submissions. The name of the author is usually published but may be withheld for compelling reasons, such as physical harm to the author. The editor decides

Don’t forget your friend’s birthday! 6HQGDFODVVL¿HGELUWKGD\ZLVKLQ WKH'DLO\1HZV

DNSWITCHBOARD WHAT WOULD YOU DO WITH THE MONEY IF

YOU WON THE $590.5 MILLION POWERBALL? STEVEN WILLIAMS, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

EMMA KATE FITTES, NEWS EDITOR

is to pay off all debts. But it’s pretty necessary when you think about it and it’s something I would do immediately. I would also use some of the money to pay for an extra year of college for no reason at all except to stall my actual life from starting.

bill because I probably would have a heart attack if I won. Then I would buy an island in the Bahamas and live like a queen while owning a bunch of newspapers, just for fun.

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Today’s birthday (5-20-13) ___ (c) 2007, Tribune Media Services Inc. Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Information Services.

To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.

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and make sure that that money is gaining me money. I would definitely finish up my major in art and pursue a dual major in journalism graphics. I’d have the money to do so, it’d just be a matter of time I’m willing to spend getting my education. After college, I’d get a nice job at a fun paper as a designer and just live off of my money, working the job to pass my time.

ÂŤ I would buy the ‘Avatar’

franchise from Nick and make it more amazing than it already is. I’d also buy all the camera equipment I could ever want or need. Top of the line all the way.

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DANIEL BROUNT, COPY EDITOR

 I’d put some of the money

DAKOTA CRAWFORD, SPORTS EDITOR

toward helping my family out and save or invest the rest. Then I’d finish my education, and after college I would live off the money while attempting to get a book published.

ÂŤ I would invest in a travel agency and hire Eddie Money to sing to all of my customers.Âť

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this on an individual basis and must consult the writer before withholding the name. Those interested in submitting a letter can do so by emailing opinion@bsudailynews.com or editor@bsudailynews.com

The Daily News encourages its readers to voice their views on legislative issues. The following legislators represent the Ball State community:

SEN. TIM LANANE Indiana Dist. 25 200 W. Washington Street Indianapolis, IN 46204 1-800-382-9467

REP. SUE ERRINGTON Indiana District 34 200 W. Washington St. Indianapolis, IN 46204 1-800-382-9842

U.S. SEN. DAN COATS 493 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, DC, 20510 (202) 224-5623

U.S. REP. LUKE MESSER U.S. 6th District 508 Cannon House Office Building Washington, DC 20515 (202) 225-3021

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Artistic and creative endeavors thrive this year. Complete old projects and renew friendships. Take charge of finances, and consider longterm impacts of actions. Adapt for what is needed. Recognition comes later. Practice, and get clear on your purpose, talents and strengths. Time alone and with loved ones refreshes.

U.S. SEN. JOSEPH DONNELLY B33 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, DC 20510 (202) 224-4814

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ÂŤ First, I would start a mutual fund

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ÂŤ I would pay off my medical

ÂŤ The typical answer for this

Taurus (April 20-May 20) Today is an 8 -- Wait a while longer for progress, and work on details. For the next month with the Sun in Gemini, there is more money coming in. Choose your creative strategy carefully for beautiful results. Gemini (May 21-June 21) Today is a 7 -- Provide information to someone who can take action. Consider long-term impacts of financial actions. Nurture your own well-being. Today and tomorrow could be quite romantic. For the next month, you have a lucky advantage. Cancer (June 22-July 22) Today is an 8 -- Two of you get lucky. Advance your agenda.You’re very attractive now. The decisions you make now last, including a new friend. Consider modifying and developing a bright idea together. Venture forth.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)Today is a 9 -- Work interferes with your studies. Catch up on reading, but keep it focused on priorities. Don’t get distracted by social media. For four weeks, team projects go well.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)Today is an 8 -- Check your internal gauges. Let associates know your views and what you want. Chart the money. For the next month, new doors open to adventure. Consider all options. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)Today is a 7 -Share your exuberance, as everyone is part of a successful outcome. Personal matters demand attention. Replace something that’s broken at home. Travel looks good for the next month. Keep a journal.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Today is an 8 -- Provide information, and discover changes. Finish up old projects. Review your budget this month. Don’t borrow or lend, either. Light exercise is good. Bend, stretch and move. Earn a surprise bonus. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Today is an 8 -- Anticipate tough questions. You won’t have to keep up this pace for long. Keep pushing boundaries. It’s getting social. Build and grow your partnerships this month to strengthen your endeavors. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Today is a 9 -- Keep your objective in mind. Don’t spend more than you have. Imagination takes over.You’re being observed. It’s a busy month; put your heart in your work.

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Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Today is an 8 -- Let them drag you into the fun, but keep your treasure buried.You get creative over the next month. Postpone travel for now. Finish up old business. Begin the proposal for what’s next. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Today is an 8 -- You want to be at home, soaking in love. Revamp closets and storage. Count dollars and pay bills. This next month is good for household projects; postpone romance until they’re complete. Aries (March 21-April 19) Today is an 8 -- Make a break. Move quickly. Use your secret weapon. Negotiate to refine the plan. Lightning fast talk goes over people’s heads. Listen to advice, but don’t follow it. Follow through on what you said.


PAGE 6 | MONDAY, MAY 20, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM

SPORTS SPORTS@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/DN_SPORTS

/////////// THE

HAPS

WEDNESDAY Ball State baseball travels to Avon, Ohio, for the Mid-American Conference Tournament.

EVENTS THIS WEEK

Ball State advances to Nationals Cardinals win playoff over San Diego, move on from Regionals

above par. Both Ball State and San Diego State were collectively 1-over on the day. Off the tee, Ball State coach Mike Fleck said San Diego State was in better position to mark circles, but as the team had preEVAN BARNUM-STEGGERDA dicted, the playoff came down to CHIEF REPORTER touch around the green. @Slice_of_Evan “It’s something the guys Uncertainty hung like a talked about on the tee before cloud over the Ball State the playoff hole,” Fleck said in men’s golf team. With its sea- a news release. “They said it son on the line, the Cardinals was really going to come down went 3-over on a cold, blus- to the shots around the green, tery day in Pulland it definitely man, Wash. did. San Diego Sitting at 8-under, State looked like ROUNDthree strokes out of they were in much BY-ROUND the fifth and final better position, SCORES spot that would adbut our last three Alex Stinson vance to Nationals, guys got it done. 74, 69, 69 (212) all Ball State could It was awesome do was watch. to watch.” Tyler Merkel San Diego State Pars from junior 70, 70, 75 (215) controlled its own Tyler Merkel, sefate, but on a day nior Tony Lazzara McCormick Clouser 68, 72, 76 (216) that saw Pullman and sophomore Regional winner McCormick ClousJoe Gasser and unanimous er, left the Cardi72, 73, 72 (217) No. 1 California nals in position post its highest to win with one Tony Lazzara score of the event, golfer remaining. 71, 75, 75 (221) par golf was not a Senior Alex “gimme.” Stinson, who was When the last Aztecs finished 3-under on the day and 4-unup, they were knotted in a tie der for the tournament, found with Ball State for fifth. himself in the bunker, but his To resolve the tie, the 10 approach shot landed within golfers met at the 18th tee a foot of the hole. box, with the four lowest “I honestly thought I made it scores for each team set to when I hit it,” Stinson said in determine who was going to a news release. “But that’s not Atlanta, and whose season what it’s about. was ending. When Stinson’s up-andThe 551-yard par-5 had down birdie putt dropped, been a friendly hole through Ball State erupted in cheers the first 36 holes, but Sat- that just hours ago had been urday’s inclement weather somber, waiting silence. bumped the course average Merkel finished in a tie for

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PHOTO PROVIDED BY BSU ATHLETICS

Senior Alex Stinson tees off during the NCAA Pullman Regional in Washington State. Stinson golfed 4-under par, which helped the Cardinals earn a place in the National Tournament.

30th individually. He finished 1-under, and was Ball State’s second top scorer behind Stinson, who finished 19th. Lazzara carded out at 5-over, Clouser finished even and senior Joe Gasser at 1-over. Gasser’s birdie on 18 to end regulation allowed Ball State to be

in position to force a playoff. The team total of 864 is the lowest for a Ball State team in a 54-hole NCAA event. Ball State will be making its 13th NCAA Nationals appearance, and joins California, TCU, Saint Mary’s (Calif.) and Southern California from the

Miami set to host Indiana in gritty series rematch Pacers, Heat start bracing for 2nd physical matchup | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS MIAMI — A year ago when Miami and Indiana faced off in the postseason, there were blooddrawing hits, flagrant fouls, technical fouls, choke signs being directed toward LeBron James and more than a few sharp-tongued comments. Here they possibly go again, at least on the comment front. The Eastern Conference finals between the Heat and Pacers won’t begin until Wednesday night, but there’s already signs that the animosity present throughout last season’s Miami-Indiana second-round series will likely return this time around. The first flare-up appeared to arrive Saturday night, when Pacers coach Frank Vogel called the reigning champion Heat “just the next team that’s in our way.” Predictably, the Heat didn’t seem to take that as flattery. “We’re a great team,” said James, the Heat forward who won the NBA’s MVP award for the fourth time this season. “We’re very confident. We’ll be ready for them. If we’re just another team, you don’t prepare,

MCT PHOTO

The Golden State Warriors’ David Lee takes a shot against the San Antonio Spurs’ Tim Duncan in the first quarter of Game 6 in the Western Conference semifinals at Oracle Arena in Oakland, Calif. on Friday.

you really don’t prepare for just another team. We’re not just another team. You have to prepare for us.” Pushing, shoving, a few extra words, that’s all typical extracurricular activity in playoff basketball. With Heat-Pacers last season, there seemed to be more. Dwayne Wade and Udonis Haslem were bloodied at times. Haslem targeted Indiana’s Tyler Hansbrough in what was perceived as retaliation for a foul against Wade. And Lance Stephenson — who made the “choke” sign after James missed a free throw in a

Game 3 loss — getting leveled by now-former Miami reserve Dexter Pittman in a particularly memorable end to a blowout Heat win in Game 5. “We don’t need bulletin-board material,” James said. Pacers 2, Heat 1 surely will keep Miami from believing a third straight finals trip is an inevitability, since not only was that the lead Indiana held in last season’s playoff series, it also represents the win totals from this year’s three matchups between the clubs. “If we’re the same team that we were last year, that won’t

be good enough,” Heat coach Erik Spoelstra said. “Period. Fact. That’s why we’ve spent so much time this year trying to develop habits to improve. We don’t feel we’re the same team that played the Indiana Pacers last year.” Of course, the Pacers feel the same way. Indiana took Sunday off, after the grind of a six-game secondround series against the New York Knicks ended, and is expected to start its Heat-centric workouts on Monday in Indianapolis before flying to Miami on Tuesday. “This is not about getting back at Miami,” Vogel said. “If you’re in the final four, you’re competing for a championship. You’re competing for a championship. And they’re just the next team that’s in our way.” His last line was duly noticed by the Heat, who bristled at his claim last season that Miami has the biggest collection of calldrawing floppers in the NBA, one that got Vogel fined by the league. “We know this is a good team,” Wade said. “This team right here, they’re in the Eastern Conference finals for a reason. I expected to see them here. And I think it’s only right that we see them in the Eastern Conference finals, after the series we had last year.

Pullman Regional. “It’s absolutely amazing,” Fleck said. “Our motto the last few years has been to stay relevant, and we did that this week. Coming down those last few holes [in regulation], I kind of thought we had lost the opportunity, but

we didn’t. It’s amazing what these guys have done and what they continue to do. And we’re still relevant.” Stinson echoed his coach’s sentiments. “One goal down, let’s see what we can do at Nationals,” Stinson said.

Spurs top Grizzlies in series opener, set for 2nd game

not anything specific,” coach Lionel Hollins said. “It’s just that we were running too fast, we missed some layups, we were taking bad shots and our defense was really awful. And the Spurs played well.” The NBA’s stingiest defense wasn’t up to its usual standards, allowing the Spurs to hit 53 percent of their shots and a franchise postseason-record 14 3-pointers while All-Star power forward Zach Randolph struggled. Randolph had just two points. The Spurs asserted themselves early, scoring on their first seven possessions and also getting a couple head-to-head stops from their veterans while claiming a 23-8 lead. Parker swiped the ball from Conley on Memphis’ second possession, running out for a layup, and Hollins burned a timeout in the first 2 minutes. “Every time we made a mistake defensively, they made us pay every time,” Marc Gasol said, who had three baskets in a push that helped Memphis get within 51-37 at halftime. “It was overhelp or no help or whatever it was, they made you pay.”

SAN ANTONIO WINS GAME 1 AT HOME | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS SAN ANTONIO — The San Antonio Spurs opened the Western Conference finals resembling the past champions who’ve been there so many times before. Tony Parker had 20 points and nine assists, Kawhi Leonard scored 18 points and the Spurs struck first by beating Memphis 105-83 on Sunday. San Antonio raced out to a 17-point lead in the first quarter, then came up with a response when Memphis rallied to get within six in the second half. Both teams pulled their starters with over 5 minutes left and the Spurs leading by 21. The Spurs avoided a repeat of their Game 1 loss when the teams met two years ago in the first round. The Grizzlies went on to knock San Antonio out of the playoffs as the top seed that time. “We just didn’t play well. It’s

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BASEBALL: Cardinals look beyond loss to MAC Tourney | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

It was the final game of a three-game series and decided the winner of the Mid-American Conference West regular season title. The Huskies took the title, and the team celebrated its win on the Ball State pitching mound. Despite suffering the heartbreaking loss in its regular season finale, the Cardinals held their heads high as they walked away from the diamond. “The West division would have been an unbelievable story, but it would still be an unbelievable story if we win the tournament,” Maloney said.

The Cardinals were able to grind out wins in the second half of the season to push a record that was as low as 17-19 at one point, to the 28-23 mark with which they ended the season. The late season really put them in position to compete for the MAC West title on Saturday. More importantly, it gave the Cardinals a spot in this year’s MAC Tournament – set to begin on Wednesday. “The program has been down these last few years, and now we’ve brought it back to where we are in a tournament. That was our first goal,” Maloney said. Ball State was 14-36 in 2012, 15-35 in 2011 and 29-29 in

2010 – the most recent year the team made it to the MAC Tournament. This is Maloney’s first year with the Cardinals since he was hired at Michigan in 2002. He said his team has grown around the play of Ball State’s hardworking seniors. Beemer, like the rest of Ball State’s seniors, played the final home game of his career on Saturday. He remained confident that the loss would do nothing to stunt that growth. “We’ve played pretty good baseball these last three weekends, and we’ve got good momentum,” Beemer said. “We’ll carry that momentum

into the tournament and anything can happen.” The loss moved Ball State to No. 4 in the tournament field, while Northern Illinois moved up to the No. 3 spot. The Cardinals will square off with No. 5 Miami of Ohio in the opening game. Senior outfielder Wes Winkle said the opponent is of less concern for his team than just playing to its full potential. “We’re glad to be in the tournament, whether we were going to be the 2, or the 3, or the 4 seed… it doesn’t really matter,” he said. “Anybody can beat anybody when it comes tournament time, so we’ll be ready.”

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DN 05-20-13