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THURSDAY, JULY 18, 2013

MEN’S VOLLEYBALL

8-YEAR VOLUNTEER PROMOTED

3 David Owsley Museum of Art interns share their internship progress SEE PAGE 4

Team adds 2nd paid coach, names alumnus to take over new spot

THE DAILY NEWS

SEE PAGE 6

BSUDAILY.COM

BSU fills new Indy economic position Building Better Community’s Primacy of Place program grows |

EMMA KATE FITTES NEWS EDITOR news@bsudailynews.com

Ball State’s Building Better Communities recently created and filled a new position, director of economic development policy, in Indianapolis and is looking to add another in Fort Wayne. Primacy of Place Initiative is one THE POSITION  of five different Building Better sections of the Communities BBC and focuses director of economic on using univerdevelopment policy at Ball State’s sity resources Indianapolis Center for the “improvement of life expeTHE RESPONSIBILITES  riences for resiDavid Terrell will help dents, businesses encourage economic and visitors.” development and serve In his new posias a portal through tion, David Terwhich individuals rell, the former and local businesses adviser for the can access university Indiana lieutenant resources. governor, will be helping encourTHE GOAL age economic deThe position helps the velopment at Ball university meet the State’s Indianaponew goal in the 20122017 strategic plan lis Center. advancing Indiana. He will serve as a portal through which individuals and local businesses can access university resources. Those support resources could include everything from research to training. “For the first time now we are actually putting an individual, a university employee, in a region with some responsibility to a region,” said John Fallon, associate vice president of economic development and community engagement. The university has been considering the positions for a few months. It aligns with the new goal added in Ball State’s 2012-2017 strategic plan, advancing Indiana.

TREATS IN THE HEAT JORDAN HUFFER I SHOOT PEOPLE FOR FUN

Booths serve up classic food essentials at the Delaware County Fair The Delaware County Fairgrounds are filled with many smells, most of them coming from wonderful food. Fair food is one of the best parts of the county fair, and the vendors this year didn’t disappoint. I sampled five different foods from independent vendors.

SIRLOIN TIP DINNER   Wagner Food Service

This stand is something you can’t miss. The first thing you notice is the smell of the food cooking. They cook it in large cast iron skillets at the front of the booth for everyone to see. They have sandwiches and a veggie plate, as well as sides. The star of the show is the sirloin tip dinner. A regular costs$9 and a large costs $11. Mushrooms on top are an extra $1. Drinks are $2 and $4. The meat, mushrooms and onions are extremely tender and flavorful. This are laid over a bed of red potatoes, which are soft and buttery. The staff is more than willing to give you a sample of the meat so you can taste it for yourself before committing to a plate. The only bad thing is it is a little messy. But it’s a generous portion that will fill anyone up. This was my favorite food of the day. It was the perfect mix of fair food and a simple, good meal. I may have dreamt about it. RATING: HHHHH

PO-BOYS 

The Big Easy New Orleans Cuisine New Orleans Cuisine is a one-of-a-kind booth that has authentic New Orleans style food. One of the owners is a New Orleans native, and draws on that experience for inspiration for their cajun-style food. They are more than happy to give you information on the food, which some people may not be familiar with. From this booth I sampled the Shrimp Po-Boy, which is $7. Several handbattered shrimp are served in a very soft roll with cajun mayo, lettuce and pickles. They also have a Red Beans, Rice and Sausage Bowl for $6. The Po-Boy was incredible with the soft bread and the crunchy shrimp balancing each other perfectly. I was still thinking about it the next day. The texture was wonderful and the spiciness of the cajun mayo and shrimp breading was balanced by the lettuce and pickles. I normally hate pickles on sandwiches, but I did not even notice them on this one. The best thing about the food here is the sweet tea. It’s real, southern, sweet tea that is well worth the $2 you will spend on it. I tend to be a bit of a snob when it comes to tea, but the taste of this was clean and sweet. You don’t get the nasty aftertaste like you would with some sweet teas. RATING: HHHHH

DN PHOTOS JORDAN HUFFER

SEE TREATS, PAGE 4

See TERRELL, page 3

Daniels denies censoring university Emails from Purdue president try to ban textbook from K-12 | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS INDIANAPOLIS — Purdue University President Mitch Daniels fended off calls for his ouster Wednesday and denied trying to quash academic freedom while serving as Indiana’s governor, a day after an Associated Press report cited emails in which he opposed use of a book by historian and antiwar activist Howard Zinn. MITCH DANIELS Conservative Purdue free speech University advocates rose President to his defense, saying it was appropriate for Daniels to express concern about what was taught in public institutions. Emails published Tuesday by the AP show Daniels tried to ensure Zinn’s book was not used in Indiana’s K-12 and

MUNCIE, INDIANA

college classrooms and that he wanted to “disqualify the propaganda” he said was being taught to teachers in training at Indiana’s colleges. Daniels on Wednesday told reporters at Purdue that the story was “unfair and erroneous.” He had previously told the AP he was only referring to Zinn’s book appearing in K-12 classrooms. Neither he nor a spokesman replied to questions from the AP Wednesday about what he found to be in error. Daniels said at his news conference that he would never censor academic views. If Zinn had tenure at Purdue, he said, “I would defend him and his rights not to be dismissed for the nature of his work.” Daniels’ 2010 emails, obtained by the AP through a public records request, showed the governor requested that Zinn’s 1980 book examining American history with a focus on violence against Native Americans and on class inequality be banned from classrooms. The Republican also asked for a “cleanup” of college courses and talked about cutting funding for a program run by a local university

SO LONG, FAREWELL, AUF WIEDERSEHEN, ADIEU; THE DAILY NEWS WILL BE BACK IN AUGUST.

JORDAN HUFFER IS A SOPHOMORE PHOTOJOURNALISM MAJOR AND WRITES ‘I SHOOT PEOPLE FOR FUN’ FOR THE DAILY NEWS. HER VIEWS DO NOT NECESSARILY AGREE WITH THOSE OF THE NEWSPAPER. WRITE TO JORDAN AT JAHUFFER@BSU.EDU.

professor who was one of his sharpest critics. “This terrible anti-American academic has finally passed away,” Daniels wrote, referring to Zinn, in an exchange of emails between top state education officials on Feb. 9, 2010. “The obits and commentaries mentioned his book, ‘A People’s History of the United States,’ is the ‘textbook of choice in high schools and colleges around the country.’ It is a truly execrable, antifactual piece of disinformation that misstates American history on every page. “ His education adviser responded that the book was being used at Indiana University in a course for teachers. David Shane, a top fundraiser and state school board member, also recommended a strategy for reviewing the content of university courses. The publication of the emails sparked reaction in higher education circles nationwide, with some educators expressing alarm about whether a university president with such intentions would try to censor teachings. “It is ultimately bad for democracy. No head of state

CONTACT US

News desk: 285-8245 Sports desk: 285-8245 Features desk: 285-8245

THE EMAILS The AP obtained emails between top state education officials and Mitch Daniels in 2010 through a public records request. They showed he requested Howard Zinn’s American history book, which focused on violence against Native Americans and on class inequality, be banned from K-12 classrooms. FEB. 9, 2010  “This terrible anti-American academic has finally passed away,” Daniels wrote, referring to Zinn. “The obits and commentaries mentioned his book, ‘A People’s History of the United States,’ is the ‘textbook of choice in high schools and colleges around the country.’ It is a truly execrable, antifactual piece of disinformation that misstates American history on every page.” should engage in any form of censorship,” said Gerardo Gonzalez, dean of the Indiana University College of Education.

See DANIELS, page 2

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Go online to see photography from campus, community events. Visit bsudaily.com and click on multimedia.

MUNCIE ACTIVISTS TO HOLD VIGIL IN HONOR OF MARTIN Former student coordinates event to create outlet EMMA KATE FITTES NEWS EDITOR | news@bsudailynews.com

Muncie activists are planning on holding a candlelight vigil in honor of Trayvon Martin on Sunday at 8 p.m. outside of the Delaware County Courthouse. Kai Bennett, a former Ball State student who is coordinating the event, said he hopes to create an outlet TRAYVON MARTIN for commuVictim of Fla. nity memshooting in bers to disFebruary 2012 cuss the case and pay their respects for Martin. “There’s just been a lot of talk about the [George] TWEET US

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Zimmerman case,” he said. “I know that people have a lot to say about the issues that are going on right now surrounding that case and I just thought that it would be a good time to remember Trayvon Martin and the loss that happened that day... I kind of thought it was important to bring the focus back to Trayvon.” The event will start with predetermined speakers, then have a moment of silence and open up for “soapbox,” where people have a limited amount of time to share their opinions. One of the speakers will be Marwin Strong, chairman of the Muncie Human Rights Commission. Strong said he has been to about 17 of these sort of events and has a lot of experience with cases of people dying from drugs and violence. His speech will focus on racial profiling as well as the Zimmerman case.

FORECAST

TODAY High: 90, Low: 74 Partly cloudy

See VIGIL, page 2

VOL. 92, ISSUE 136 TOMORROW High: 91, Low: 73 Mostly sunny


PAGE 2 | THURSDAY, JULY 18, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM

NEWS SERVICE DIRECTORY

The Ball State Daily News (USPS-144360), the Ball State student newspaper, is published Monday through Thursday during the academic year and Monday and Thursday during summer sessions; zero days on breaks and holidays. The Daily News is supported in part by an allocation from the General Fund of the university and is available free to students at various points on campus. POSTAL BOX The Daily News offices are in BC 159, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306-0481. Periodicals postage paid in Muncie, Ind. TO ADVERTISE Classified department 765-285-8247 Display department 765-285-8256 or 765-285-8246. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday. TO SUBSCRIBE Call 765-285-8250 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Subscription rates: $75 for one year; $45 for one semester; $25 for summer subscription only. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Daily News, BC 159, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306. BACK ISSUES Stop by BC 159 between noon and 10 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and afternoons Friday. All back issues are free and limited to two issues per person.

EDITORIAL BOARD EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Steven Williams NEWS EDITOR Emma Kate Fittes SPORTS EDITOR Dakota Crawford PHOTO EDITOR Jordan Huffer DESIGN EDITOR Michael Boehnlein COPY CHIEF Daniel Brount

VIGIL: Event 22 children die in India organizer after eating school lunch says service Food tainted with

MULTIMEDIA BSUDAILY.COM

insecticide; cause of incident unclear | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

UFO: Unidentified Fair Object

Check out the gallery of photos of rides and food from the annual Delaware County Fair.

ONLINE EXCLUSIVE BSUDAILY.COM

New species of flesheating fly found in Indiana for 1st time

The insect, never before seen north of New Mexico, can help forensic scientists find death times of corpses.

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1. Same-sex couples seeking divorce clash with Ind. law 2. Google Glass finds its way to campus 3. State approves Ball State plans for new planetarium, greenhouse 4. NBA: Pacers sign Chris Copeland 5. Daniels taps former colleagues in Purdue hiring

PATNA, India — The children started falling violently ill soon after they ate the free school lunch of rice, lentils, soybeans and potatoes. The food, part of a program that gives poor Indian students at least one hot meal a day, was tainted with insecticide, and soon 22 of the students were dead and dozens were hospitalized, officials said Wednesday. It was not immediately clear how chemicals ended up in the food at the school in the eastern state of Bihar. One official said the food

may not have been properly washed before it was cooked. The children, between the ages of 5 and 12, got sick soon after eating lunch Tuesday in Gandamal village in Masrakh block, 50 miles north of the state capital of Patna. School authorities immediately stopped serving the meal as the children started vomiting. Authorities suspended an official in charge of the free meal scheme in the school and registered a case of criminal negligence against the school headmistress, who fled as soon as the children fell ill. Sahi said a preliminary investigation suggested the food contained an organophosphate used as an insecticide on rice and wheat crops. It’s believed the grain

was not washed before it was served at the school, he said. However, local villagers said the problem appeared to be with a side dish of soybeans and potatoes, not grain. Children who had not eaten that dish were fine, although they had eaten the rice and lentils, several villagers told the AP.

have much impact on Daniels beyond initial discomfort because the emails were written long before he took over at Purdue. He was named the university’s president in January after being unanimously selected by the board of trustees, most of whose members he appointed while governor. Robert O’Neil, former president of the University of Virginia and a leading expert on academic free speech issues, said the response depends on whether Daniel’s expressions were limited to his time as governor, or whether they continued after taking over at Purdue. “I suspect there are some Pur-

due faculty who would give him a pass and others who would find it censurable,” O’Neil said. Peter Wood, president of the National Association of Scholars, a group associated with conservative academic causes, said it was appropriate for Daniels to express concern about was taught in public institutions and to object to the use of Zinn’s book. “Faculty members make their own best judgments about what to teach and how to teach it,” Wood said. “But that’s not an absolute principle. They have to recognize that that academic freedom they enjoy comes with responsibilities.”

WHERE

to promote discussion

WHO

| CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

THE FACTS WHAT

Cafeteria food found to be tainted with insecticide hospitalizes and kills dozens Patna, India 22 students have died, and 25 other students and the school cook are in the hospital

“I’m really hopeful for people to understand that racism is still alive here in the United States of America... it’s in every culture,” he said. “We got to have those tools to sit down... and talk about these situations. We can look at each other as great people and human beings instead of as racism.” Strong said Martin’s death hit close to home since he has a 15-year-old son. “The case was really, really, really hurtful how the outcome came,” he said. “Some say litigative circumstance, but it was still wrong... It hurts my heart that they let this guy off.” Bennett said he hopes the event will stay respectful and positive. So far, he said he has had a good response, but he is not worried about attendance. “If there were five people I would still think it was as good as if there were 50,” he said. “It’s not really about the number of people that turn out.” In the end, his goal is to bring world issues to the surface in Muncie. “We’re all the same equal members of the same democracy, so I think, especially with the local media’s focus on local issues so much, it’s really easy to miss out on some of these bigger issues,” he said. “I think it’s just really important that people are talking about what is going on in the country.”

CAUSE

How the chemicals ended up in the food is not yet known

DANIELS: Controversy adds to concerns of president’s academic credentials

| CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

Purdue alumni who opposed Daniels’ selection last year renewed their call for his removal. They had earlier questioned his academic credentials and suitability for the position. “I’m hopeful that this new information, which shows more people the side of Daniels we have always known existed, will energize people to work to have him removed,” said Aaron Hoover, a spokesman for Society for an Open and Accountable Purdue and a 2008 graduate. But some questioned whether the email revelation would

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Level: Diabolical Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

SOLUTION FOR MONDAY.

SOLUTION FOR MONDAY. ACROSS 1 ISRAEL’S BARAK 5 HALF AN S-CURVE 8 CAROL BEGINNING 14 HONEYMOONER’S ISLAND DESTINATION 16 JUICE FOR ZEUS 17 *”PRESS YOUR LUCK” CONTESTANT’S CRY 18 BRONX-TO-CONEY ISLAND SUBWAY 19 *WHAT SPUTTERING MIGHT INDICATE 21 DR.’S SPECIALTY 22 NOT JUST CENTURIES 23 BIG NAME IN SMOOTH JAZZ 27 __ NUI: EASTER ISLAND 28 NETHERLANDS CARRIER 31 MELVILLE NOVEL 32 CARD FOR TOMORROW? 33 BIG APPLE SCH. 34 *AID FOR THE SHORT? 38 CHASE FIELD TEAM, ON SCOREBOARDS 39 BETELGEUSE’S CONSTELLATION 40 PLENTY

41 “THE SPANISH TRAGEDY” PLAYWRIGHT THOMAS 42 NIPPON NOODLE 43 IMMUNITY AGENTS 45 VERMEER’S “GIRL WITH __ HAT” 46 SALE ABBR. 47 *GLEE CLUB ON “GLEE” 53 SAN __, ARGENTINA 54 IGNORE WARNINGS, SAY ... AND A HINT TO THE LAST WORDS OF THE ANSWERS TO STARRED CLUES 57 “FATHER OF AMERICAN UNIVERSALISM” HOSEA __ 58 CLOSE WAY TO FIGHT 59 MUM 60 DASH LENGTHS 61 “CRITIQUE OF PURE REASON” PHILOSOPHER DOWN 1 DIMINISH 2 __ POLLOI 3 DRIVE 4 DENOUNCE 5 URBAN PLANNER’S CONCERN

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45 MYSTIFY 46 “THIS MEANS WAR!” 47 HIS __: BIG SHOT 48 MORALES OF “CAPRICA” 49 IT DEALS WITH WHAT’S LEFT 50 ACTRESS BLANCHETT 51 KINDLE COMPETITOR 52 MEX. MISS 55 K+, E.G. 56 ASIAN HOLIDAY

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THURSDAY, JULY 18, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM | PAGE 3

NEWS

Coding camp teaches app building basics for phones Program aims to fill growing demand for HTML coding

|

SAFARALI SAYDSHOEV STAFF REPORTER sisaydshoev@bsu.edu

Summer “coding camps” for young computer users are expanding to meet the surging interest in apps for smartphones. In Muncie this month, 13 students took part in the “Adventures in Mobile Technology” camp. “Are you the next mobile app millionaire?” the camp’s flier says. “Create your own apps for mobile devices [iPhone, iPad, Android, etc.]! Use the latest SDK [software development kit] to create games, movies, apps, videos and more.” The camp is sponsored by the Indiana Academy for Sci-

ence, Mathematics, and Humanities — a school in Muncie designed for gifted students. “We taught 13 junior high students the basics of developing mobile phone apps and websites — like line-byline HTML coding,” said Susie Cunningham, an instructor at the academy. Other coding camps are set up at schools across the country. At Emory University in Atlanta, the iD Tech Camp teaches programming skills amid a growing concern that schools are failing to produce enough code-literate graduates to meet the demands of industry. The iD Tech program has dozens of locations across the country with 28,000 students this year — up from 200 in 1999, The Associated Press reported. Students hope the training can lead to jobs in web design, film

animation and app creation, among other areas. Nationwide the growth of cellphone users and application downloads have increased dramatically. A 2012 Pew Research Center study found that 88 percent of American adults use cellphones and about 43 percent of these users download applications to their cellphones. A 2012 Ball State study found 69 percent of college students use smartphones. That study estimated an increase to 90 percent use by 2014. The academy has been hosting elementary, middle and high school camps for almost 10 years. Campers use Macintosh and Windows computers, including desktop models with touch screens that mimic the mobile experience of launching programs and content by direct contact.

Mastering the arcane demands of programming takes years of practice — far more than can be covered in a summer camp. But the training “exposes these kids to the environment,” Cunningham said. “The main goal would be they get to take their projects with them and continue developing them at home,” she said. Delna Balsara was a camper from Granger near South Bend. She said the work was challenging, but a lot of fun. “Most of the things that we learned in here was new to us and it was fun learn them,” she said. A class of just 13 means students get individual attention — something appreciated by Allen Parker of Alexandria. “I liked it because the size of this camp was smaller than the ones that I went before,” he said. “You get to know people more personally.”

| THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PHOTO COURTESY OF MSN.MONEY.COM

BOSTON — A Rolling Stone cover story featuring a glamorous photo of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is generating controversy, with several retailers including CVS and Walgreens announcing Wednesday that they will not carry the issue. The cover of the magazine’s Aug. 1 edition is a photo in which Tsarnaev looks more like one of the rock stars that usually grace it than a suspect in the April 15 bombings at the marathon finish line that killed three and wounded more than 260. A preview on the magazine’s website says the story by contributing editor Janet Reitman

traces how “a bright kid with a charming future became a monster.” Rolling Stone editors said in a statement that the story falls within the traditions of journalism and the magazine’s commitment to serious and thoughtful coverage. “The fact that Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is young, and in the same age group as many of our readers, makes it all the more important for us to examine the complexities of this issue and gain a more complete understanding of how a tragedy like this happens,” the statement said. The cover was ill-conceived at best and reaffirms a message that destruction gains fame for killers, Boston Mayor Tom Menino wrote in a letter to Rolling Stone publisher Jann Wenner. “Among those we lost, those who survived, and those who help carry them forward, there

BRITAIN, FRANCE IN CONTRAST OVER SAME-SEX MARRIAGE ACCEPTANCE | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS LONDON — The French like to make fun of the British, joking about their repressed ways in matters of the heart. But when it came time to debate same-sex marriage, it was France that betrayed a deep conservative streak in sometimes violent protests — while the British showed themselves to be modern and tolerant. With little fanfare or controversy, Britain announced Wednesday that Queen Elizabeth II — hardly a social radical — had signed into law a bill legalizing same-sex marriages in England and Wales. France has also legalized gay marriages, but only after a series of gigantic protests attracting families from the traditional heartland that revealed a deeply split society. Official word that the queen had approved the bill drew cheers in the usually sedate House of Commons. “This is a historic moment that will resonate in many people’s lives,” Equalities Minister Maria Miller said in a statement. “I am proud that we have made it happen and I look forward to the first samesex wedding by next summer.” There were British political figures and religious leaders vehemently opposed to gay marriage but the opposition never reached a fever pitch, in part because the same-sex marriage bill had broad public support and the backing of the leaders of the three major political parties. In fact, it was Prime Minister David

THE POPE’S PERSPECTIVE WHO

Pope Francis and Archbishop Justin Welby WHAT

Met for the first time to work together to promote family values “based on marriage.” Welby has said legislation in Britain allowing same-sex marriage would undermine family life. WHEN

Friday. The British legislation passed Wednesday. Cameron, leader of the tradition-minded Conservatives, who proposed the legislation in the first place. The public seemed to take it for granted that gay marriage should be a part of British life. It was perhaps a sign of how Britain has evolved in past decades into a much more cosmopolitan nation than its starchy, traditionalist image would suggest. “The opposition seemed restricted to a very small number of people very vigorous in their views,” said Steven Fielding, a political scientist at the University of Nottingham. “It was restricted to the back benchers of the Conservative Party. It wasn’t shared across the political spectrum. It was an issue whose time had come. To oppose it seemed slightly strange.” The law was also written in a way that allowed the Church of England — which is opposed — to sidestep the controversy since it is explicitly barred from conducting same-sex marriages. The picture was completely different in France. Few people had expected legalizing gay

| CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 Beyond using immersive learning for educating students, the initiative looks to better serve the state by helping advance communities and businesses. “The university relies on the state for a significant amount of its operational support, so that support is only as good as the state’s ability to continue to pay for it,” Fallon said. “We think that it makes sense to do everything we can to support the very systems and structures that support the university.” Terrell was by far the most qualified candidate, Fallon said, in both experience and education. For the past eight years Terrell has been working in economic development at a state level with a program aimed at improving the quality of life in Indiana through economic development. “I’m at a point in my career where it makes sense for me to go this direction,” Terrell

said in a statement. “This is my last frontier: I’ve worked in government, I’ve worked in the private sector, but I haven’t worked in academia. It’s an exciting opportunity.” Fallon is currently searching for candidates to fill the same position in Fort Wayne, another highly populated DAVID TERRELL area of Indinew director ana. He hopes of economic to have the development hiring propolicy in Indy cess completed by August. Both position’s salary will come out of the university’s general budget. “We have the opportunity to do something truly remarkable here, and I am pleased that BBC is the unit on campus that is given this responsibility,” Fallon said. “We are determined to do something special with these roles.”

Boston mayor says Rolling Stone bombing suspect cover ‘ill-conceived’ Magazine defends story as thoughtful, serious journalism

New legislation in Britain, Wales sees restricted opposition

TERRELL: Former lieutenant governor adviser is hired

marriage to face much of a hurdle. French polls had shown for more than a decade that the concept enjoyed majority public support, and Paris has had a gay mayor for years. And to outsiders, of course, France is seen as the land of “anything goes” when it comes to sex — from the Marquis de Sade to author Colette to disgraced French politician Dominique Strauss-Kahn, notorious for his libertine sex parties. Politically, too, it was meant to be a blip. Legalizing gay marriage was near the bottom of French President Francois Hollande’s 36-point agenda for his presidency. It was mentioned in passing during his presidential campaign but was never an issue that galvanized opposition, and was entirely eclipsed by concerns about the economy.

Then, something clicked in the conservative heartland — which showed just how much of a force it is in French life. When the law was drafted and the idea of gays marrying turned from concept to imminent reality, traditionalists spoke up, and loudly. Protests grew bigger, and spread wider. Opponents of the bill stirred up fears about gay parents raising France’s new generations. A fringe of far-right skinheads drew camera crews and condemnation as they wrestled with riot police at Paris protests. But most of those at the barricades were families, children with grandparents, members of France’s minority of practicing Catholics bussed in en masse from towns and villages to march on the capital.

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are artists and musicians and dancers and writers. They have dreams and plans,” he wrote. “They struggle and strive. The survivors of the Boston attacks deserve Rolling Stone cover stories, although I no longer feel that Rolling Stone deserves them.” Three retailers based within 50 miles of the site of the bombings, including Rhode Island-based CVS and convenience stores Tedeschi Food Shops and Cumberland Farms in Massachusetts, said they will not carry the magazine. Walgreens, headquartered in Illinois, joined them in opting out of selling the issue. “Tedeschi Food Shops supports the need to share the news with everyone, but cannot support actions that serve to glorify the evil actions of anyone,” the chain said on its Facebook page. “Music and terrorism don’t mix!”

THE TWO SIDES: SUPPORTERS:

Rolling Stone editors issued a statement in response to criticism saying • Tsarnaev is within the age group of their readers •The story falls within the magazine’s commitment to thoughtful coverage and the traditions of journalism CRITICS:

Some of the criticism for the cover includes •The mayor of Boston calling it ill-conceived and reaffirming of the belief that destruction brings fame • Several retailers have decided not to carry the magazine; one of them, Tedeschi Food Stamps, said it glorifies evil actions •One of the runners from the Boston Marathon said it seems to trick readers into initially thinking Tsarnaev is a music star


PAGE 4 | THURSDAY, JULY 18, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM

FEATURES FEATURES@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/DN_FEATURES

MEETING MUNCIE

15 international students spend 5 weeks on campus experiencing American culture ROSS MAY STAFF REPORTER | rcmay@bsu.edu

With an empty campus and a deconstructed Village, Muncie is not on the list of summer vacation hot spots for most Ball State students. The story is much different, however, for 15 international students who have travelled from Malaysia and Indonesia to stay on campus for five weeks. For the third consecutive year, the Study of the U.S. Institute on New Media and Journalism at Ball State gave a group of international undergraduates the opportunity to immerse themselves in the culture, politics and social life of an American college student. Zacky Anderson, an English literature major from Jakarta, Indonesia, sees this as an opportunity to bring new experiences back home. “We are seen as future leaders that will hopefully bring movements, improvements

DN PHOTO ROSS MAY

Zacky Anderson, an English literature major from Jakarta, Indonesia, performs a dance native from his country. The dance was part of the Study of the U.S. Institute on New Media and Journalism program.

TREATS: Vendors bring new, original $5 recipes to fair | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

GATOR

CRACKERBILLIES

This stand features mostly hand-breaded, fried foods. Their specialty is the gator, which comes with fries for $11 or on a stick for $8. Everything is cooled to order in a spicy breading. They also have fried pickles, fish, shrimp, hot dogs and cheese sticks. I had a sample of the gator. Both the meat and the breading were very flavorful. The only downside of the gator was that it was a bit chewy. It’s hard to describe exactly what it tastes like. The moistness of chicken is very much there, but it really holds no other resemblance to it. It’s something that you’ll have to try for yourself. Rating: HHHII

BACON DONUTS

DEV’S DEEP-FRIED MADNESS

The name of the stand says it all. They offer a wide variety of fried food, even some things that you would never think could be fried. They have two different kinds of pickles, Oreos, Snickers, Milky Ways and Twinkies; all of which are deep-fried in a soft funnel cake dough. The owner recommends the hot pepper cheese cubes. The majority of these fried foods are $4. The most intriguing item on the menu is the bacon doughnut. It includes two regular doughnuts with two doughnut holes covered in cinnamon sugar, icing and bacon crumbles. It’s a decent-sized meal

and a better understanding of the world back to our communities,” Anderson said. While at Ball State, the students attended a series of lectures, workshops, field trips and cultural activities intended to develop their management, team building, organizational communication and conflict resolution skills. The visiting students kicked off their final week at Ball State with a cultural presentation Monday in the Arts and Journalism building. The presentations included meals that represented each region’s cuisine, including Maylasian Nasi Lemak, a traditional rice steamed or boiled in coconut milk, ginger and lemon grass. They also discussed recent political uprisings and finished with native dances. Students performed a remix of the Poco-Poco and Yamko Rambe Yamko Indonesian dances,

which they compared to an American line dance. On Friday the students will leave Ball State and travel to Washington, D.C., and New York City. “It’s important that we will have the opportunity to visit places like Washington, D.C., and New York,” Nouvindri Adji said. “These are cities that we have never known outside of seeing them on the television. It’s very exciting to see the differences in culture within the United States.” The trip proved to Anderson that Americans are very different than how popular television shows depict them. “Something I really uphold and appreciate about the American people is their confidence and optimism,” he said. “They have the attitude that you should never say no, never say that you can’t, instead they say that you will.”

« We are

seen as future leaders that will hopefully bring movements, improvements and a better understanding of the world back to our communities. » ZACKY ANDERSON, an English literature major from Jakarta, Indonesia

DN|BRIEF

| FAIR-STYLE FUN

LOCAL COMEDY SHOW WILL USE NEW VENUE, NAME

for a small price, only $3. The doughnuts were very fluffy and moist. The cinnamon sugar, icing and bacon crumbles all come together to create a one-of-a-kind flavor. The bacon was a little overcooked for my tastes and they fell off the pastry easily. However, with a price point that is $3 it’s well worth it. Rating: HHHII

PINEAPPLE LEMONADE SHAKE-UP GOODWIN FAMILY PRODUCTS

Any fair that you go to will be full of stands selling Lemonade Shake-ups. It is something that I always make a point to get, but it can be hard to narrow down your choice. Some of them will be way too bitter and will kill the joy of the drink. I chose a Pineapple Lemonade Shake-up that I found to be the perfect solution to my issues with shake-ups. The pineapple takes the sour kick out of the lemonade and makes it a very smooth drink that can be enjoyed with a meal or on its own. The shake-up is around the same price as at other booths, $5 for a large and $4 for refills. They also offer some pork rinds and wheat wheels, at $5 for a large bag. Rating: HHHHI

DN PHOTOS JORDAN HUFFER

TOP: Children ride down a slide at the Delaware Country Fair. There are rides appropriate for all ages at the fair, which runs though this week. BOTTOM: Loaded funnel cakes are on display at the Delaware County Fair. There were several specialty food items this year at the fair.

While this is just a sampling of food, there is still much more to eat at the fair and it’s worth a stop. Admission is $5 for a car load of people, or $2 for a walk up.

The Comedy Moshpit will soon restart with a new venue and a new name. The newly-dubbed Laughter House Five will have its first show on Sunday at 9 p.m. at the Valhalla Room in downtown Muncie. The shows will be $5 and only for people 21 and older. Manager Kyle DeWees said the new name, a reference to Kurt Vonnegut’s novel “SlaughterhouseFive,” is part of a fresh start. “[My friend and I] were pitching each other terrible names for the show as a joke,” DeWees said. “He suggested that one and I actually loved it and wanted to run with it.” DeWees said the new venue contacted him to house the comedy show at the bar. “They knew that I was looking for a new place,” he said. “I got a random text message from the guy who puts together the events over there about a week and a half after we ended the Comedy Moshpit over at Be Here Now.” The first show will headline DJ Dangler and feature Noel Quizalla, David Britton and Cortney White. Regular shows have not been confirmed yet, but DeWees said there should be shows one or two Sundays per month and plans are in motion for an open mic night on Wednesdays. DeWees will also be filming his first podcast “The Sunday Dinner” on Sunday before the show. The podcast will have comics and other individuals come to his house for dinner and simply have a conversation about anything. – SAM HOYT

Students showcase summer museum internship projects Public presentation previews exhibits to open during August S  AM HOYT CHIEF REPORTER | sthoyt@bsu.edu The three summer interns at the David Owsley Museum of Art celebrated their hard work at a public presentation on Wednesday. About 20 people showed up to listen to history graduate student Jennifer Tellman discuss her time planning tours focused on adopting and adapting cultures, senior photography major Rochelle Martin talk about developing writing in the museum and senior art history major Ivana Armstrong explain the exhibition she is planning about the classical components of 1890s French posters. Armstrong said the first step

in planning her exhibition was increasing her knowledge of the French culture at the time. “It was definitely different than I had been envisioning when I first came into it, but all of the research was exactly up my alley,” she said. “That and learning to write in a clear and concise, very brief way made it not only a fun, but a great learning experience.” More than a dozen posters are at Armstrong’s disposal to use in the exhibition, which opens on Aug. 23. Her initial plan was to play off the sexualization of women, but she adapted her plans to fit the posters she had. The interns checked in with museum officials once a week to discuss the progress on their respective projects. Armstrong met with Carl Schafer, associate director of the art museum, to talk about her ideas and what direction her exhibition was taking. One of the biggest problems

Armstrong said she faced was the lack of information on some of the posters. “We have one Russian poster that we just recently figured out who the artist was, but we had no artist and no title,” she said. “We had some pieces that we didn’t have information about, some where the information was rather scarce, so filling in the gaps there was fun, but definitely challenging.” Her favorite piece was a promotional poster for the play “Lorenzacchio” by Alphonse Mucha, which featured Sarah Bernhardt, a woman who played the lead male role. “Not only is the image monumental and beautiful in every way, it’s interesting to learn about Bernhardt, who was kind of a pre-first-wave feminist,” Armstrong said. “She had interesting ties with not only Mucha, but also [Henri] Toulouse-Lautrec, one of the other artists. It’s

interesting to see the connections that are between all of the artists and the people that they depict in the posters.” Armstrong said even someone with no background in classical culture or French posters will be able to take something from her exhibition. “A big concern of mine has been to make sure that this was accessible to all people, whatever knowledge base you come with,” she said. “Come with an open mind and a willingness to simply look and experience these posters for what they are.” Armstrong said getting to know the other interns was the best part of her summer at the museum. “They are fabulous people working with these individuals that know so much and have been in this museum that is really a gem in mid-Indiana and has all of this information that is usually overlooked by students and

THE PROJECTS Three summer interns at the David Owsley Museum of Art presented their work to a crowd of about 20 on Wednesday. JENNIFER TELLMAN

A history graduate student Planned tours focusing on adopting and adapting cultures ROCHELLE MARTIN

A senior photography major Developed writing in the museum IVANA ARMSTRONG

A senior art history major Put together an exhibition focusing on classical components of 1890s French posters the community,” she said. “It’s a wonderful resource and they’re in it up to their elbows and understand every aspect of it.” Tania Said, the director of education at the museum and the adviser that the other two interns checked in with, said the variety of majors among the

interns was a benefit. “With the photography major and the history major this summer, it was nice to illustrate to the public through the intern showcase that we would be welcoming to anybody,” she said. “I never want to deter people away because you never know what kinds of things are going to be cooking behind the scenes.” Said said the interns have a good degree of control over their projects. “I lay out a few options and I say, ‘This is what I think would work really well based on your knowledge and experience and what the museum needs,’” she said. “Usually people say, ‘It sounds wonderful, I couldn’t have imagined that.’” Internships at the museum used to be very informal, but have developed into a more set program in recent years, allowing staff to prepare projects they think would best suit the interns.


THURSDAY, JULY 18, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM | PAGE 5

FORUM OPINION@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/BSUDAILYNEWS

DNSWITCHBOARD WITH THE SUMMER COMING TO A CLOSE,

FORUM POLICY

WHAT ARE YOUR PLANS FOR THE REST OF YOUR BREAK? STEVEN WILLIAMS, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

JORDAN HUFFER, PHOTO EDITOR

attending a Cubs game in late July. The rest of my summer will consist of preparing for my last semester at Ball State by moving my stuff from one apartment to another.

have two big stories that I have been neglecting and I need to change that. I’m going on a few day trips, which is also going be fun. I know for a fact that I will be living exclusively off locally grown tomatoes.

ÂŤ I plan on visiting my father and

DAKOTA CRAWFORD, SPORTS EDITOR

 I’m going to be writing a lot. I

Âť

Âť

ÂŤ I am most excited about a

trip I have planned to New York City. After that, I’ll just be taking everything slow, and preparing for the annual migration to Funcie. You stay classy, Ball State.

Âť

EMMA KATE FITTES, NEWS EDITOR

MICHAEL BOEHNLEIN, DESIGN EDITOR

DANIEL BROUNT, COPY CHIEF

week to hang out with my family and my dog. Then it’s back to Muncie to move in and start this whole school process over again. Basically I don’t really know what to do when the DN isn’t printing.

busy than I am during the semester so for the last month I will not be setting any alarms and instead I will be catching up on some much needed sleep. When I’m not sleeping I’ll be rollin’ with the homies.

as possible with my friends and family in Illinois before returning to Muncie. Other than that, I’ll keep sleeping as much as possible before I get none during the Fall Semester.

ÂŤ I am going back to Colorado for a

ÂŤ This summer I have been more

Âť

Âť

 I’ll be spending as much time 

| THE DAILY NEWS COMIC Josh Shaffer is an art major and draws “Strange Gods� for the Daily News. His views do not necessarily agree with those of the newspaper. Write to Josh at jashaffer @bsu.edu.

The Daily News forum page aims to stimulate discussion in the Ball State community. The Daily News welcomes reader viewpoints and offers three vehicles of expression for reader opinions: letters to the editor, guest columns and feedback on our website. Letters to the editor must be signed and appear as space permits each day. The limit for letter length is approximately 350 words. All letters must be typed. The editor reserves the right to edit and condense submissions. The name of the author is usually published but may be withheld for compelling reasons, such as physical harm to the author. The editor decides this on an individual basis and must consult the writer before withholding the name. Those interested in submitting a letter can do so by emailing opinion@bsudailynews.com or editor@bsudailynews.com The Daily News encourages its readers to voice their views on legislative issues. The following legislators represent the Ball State community: REP. SUE ERRINGTON Indiana District 34 200 W. Washington St. Indianapolis, IN 46204 1-800-382-9842 SEN. TIM LANANE Indiana Dist. 25 200 W. Washington Street Indianapolis, IN 46204 1-800-382-9467 U.S. SEN. DAN COATS 493 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, DC, 20510 (202) 224-5623 U.S. SEN. JOSEPH DONNELLY B33 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, DC 20510 (202) 224-4814 U.S. REP. LUKE MESSER U.S. 6th District 508 Cannon House Office Building Washington, DC 20515 (202) 225-3021

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Cancer (June 22-July 22) Today is an 8 -- Clean up messes and increase efficiency to clear the way for a higher income. Patience increases the odds of success. It’s all coming together at work. Make something beautiful for your family.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Today is a 7 -Provide facts for a scientific type and impress them with your knowledge. Ask someone who understands to help. Hold off travel or risks. Get down to business, and it settles into a positive flow. Enjoy. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Today is an 8 -- Innovation increases profits. Stick close to home, and enjoy domestic comforts.You have what you need. Creative work pays well. Don’t discuss work-in-progress now, but share what you’re learning.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Today is a 9 -Reconnect with your support system. Postpone a social outing. Don’t push yourself too hard. Provide information, and it all comes together for a lovely moment. Get the facts.You’re exceptionally intelligent. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)Today is a 9 -- A bonus gets discovered at home. Focus on making money, and don’t spend it, yet. Everything flows at work with grace. Consider options carefully. Imagine perfection. Bring out hidden luxuries. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)Today is a 7 -- You’re an inspiration to others, despite momentary confusion.You’re self-confident and powerful. Travel or launch later. Dig into a pile of work, and time just flies. Friends provide the missing ingredient.

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This year’s perfect for exploring creativity, pursuing innovative ideas and practical crafts. Line up routines and activities with your passions and talents for focused impact. Your career thrives through discipline and attention to your network. Home pulls magnetically all year, while family and friends remain your core focus. Stir with love.

 

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Today is an 8 -- Accept intangible payments or gifts. Don’t back a friend’s scheme just yet. Contemplate your next move. Business details fall into place. Postpone chores. Wax philosophical. Mull it all over.

Aries (March 21-April 19) Today is an 8 -- Love isn’t about being reasonable. Add play and revisit a challenge. Discipline is key, as are friends who actively support the cause. Share your appreciation. New business doors open.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Today is an 8 -- Plan your itinerary, and budget the trip.Your team comes to the rescue, and business prospers with discipline. Your network and groups provide breakthrough connections. Continue to make steady progress. Everything seems possible. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Today is a 9 -- Draw upon hidden resources.You’ve learned a lot. Work takes priority for the next few days. Accept another challenge. Finish the paperwork and increase your benefits. Business connections spark an exciting fire.

Taurus (April 20-May 20) Today is a 9 -- A female sets the tone and pace, and that’s a good thing. Romance enters the picture, especially today and tomorrow. Invest in home and family, mindful of your budget. Better living comes through discipline.

www.bsudaily.com

Gemini (May 21-June 21) Today is a 9 -- It’s getting interesting.Your dreams seem achievable, and they are, with unfaltering action. Stay focused on goals and avoid any type of gambling (especially with the rent money). Business thrives with steady attention.


PAGE 6 | THURSDAY, JULY 18, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM

SPORTS SPORTS@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/DN_SPORTS

VOLLEYBALL COACH

GOES FULL-TIME Coach volunteered for 8 seasons, now earns paid position CRAWFORD SPORTS EDITOR | DAKOTA @DakotaCrawford_

After spending eight seasons as a volunteer assistant coach with the Ball State men’s volleyball team, Jim Palilonis has been promoted to a full-time, paid position. Other than a personal phone, and some new office space, Palilonis said little will change for him. “Previously it’s been a volunteer position, but it’s been treated as a full-time assistant that just doesn’t get paid,” Palilonis said. “It was never, ‘Well, I’ll be there if I can.’ Sure, there were times that a kid was sick or something that kept me from coming in, but I’ve essentially been an unpaid full-time assistant.” His two children, now 8-year-old identical twins, are a big part of the reason that Palilonis was with the program in the first place. He served as an assistant with Ball State in 2002 — a season in which Ball State advanced to the NCAA Tournament’s Final Four. He then left the program to pursue a local teaching job. From 2004-05, Palilonis was an alternative school teacher at the Greater Randolph County Interlocal Cooperative. That would change when his wife, Jennifer, faced complications in her pregnancy. “The last day I taught was literally the day we had an

emergency c-section,” Palilonis said. “I left the alternative school, went to the hospital and I haven’t been back in a classroom since.” The Palilonis twins, Gage and Quinn, were born two months premature. They spent the next eight weeks in an incubator. Palilonis left his job behind to take care of the newborn twins and ensure they would grow up healthy. “Initially, we just weren’t going to send them off to day care or anything like that,” he said. “Financially it wasn’t worth sending them off to someone else, when I’d rather just stay home with them and raise them myself just to make sure they were doing all right.” He focused on raising his twins until they reached about 1 year old. That’s when he got a call from Ball State coach Joel Walton. “As soon as we heard that Jim was going to be a stay-at-home dad — we were practicing in the mornings — I thought maybe we could get him back in the gym with us early in the day before his wife left for her job,” Walton said. That is exactly how things worked out for Palilonis. “Honestly it gave me a chance to socialize back in the real world,” he said laughingly. “When you’re at home raising newborn kids you don’t get out much. So it became kind of an opportunity to not only help the team and help Joel, but to step back out into reality and to start working with normal people.”

COACHING CAREER 2002 - Joined Ball State men’s volleyball team as volunteer coach

2004-05 - Served as Winchester High School girl’s volleyball head coach 2007 - Rejoined Ball State men’s volleyball team as volunteer coach 2010-2012 - Served as volunteer assistant for Ball State women’s volleyball 2013 - Named full-time assistant by coach Joel Walton Palilonis meshed well with the Cardinals. So did his children, for that matter. He said for the first two or three years he was the team, his twins were at his side. It’s no surprise that his family grew around volleyball. His wife, who works in Ball State’s journalism department, also has roots in the sport. Palilonis said Jennifer played in high school and played club ball, so her support was easy to come by as he continued to volunteer at Ball State. Of course, gaining a paid position hasn’t hurt his case either. “It makes it easier to keep doing because I’m drawing salary,” Palilonis said. “Honestly though, [Jennifer has] always been cool with it. She’s always been great. That’s part of the reason it’s worked.” While the future of the team may be uncertain, one thing in Palilonis’ future is not. He won’t be doing it for free any longer.

DN PHOTO EMMA FLYNN

Assistant coaches Jim Palilonis and Kevin Furnish watch a men’s volleyball match during the 2013 season. Palilonis has been hired as a full-time, paid assistant coach.

Combined 07-18-13  

The print edition of The Ball State Daily News on Thursday, July 18, 2013.

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