Page 1

DN MONDAY, JUNE 3, 2013

Customized hula hoops

FULLCOURT PRESS

BSU student creates new designs

Indiana basketball fans need to support the Pacers. Now, and next year, too.

SEE PAGE 4

THE DAILY NEWS

SEE PAGE 6

BSUDAILY.COM

Tornado kills 3 storm chasers Oklahoma storm claims 13 lives in city, suburbs Friday night

DN PHOTO SAFARALI SAYDSHOEV

Roger Conatser stands outside Island Muncie, the smoothie stand located behind his home. Conatser, a former photographer, got the idea to open the business catering to people who use the nearby Cardinal Greenway.

| THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Three veteran storm chasers died doing what they loved: roaming the Great Plains in search of dangerous storms like the one in Oklahoma that ended their final pursuit. Tim Samaras, his son Paul and colleague Carl Young, who through the years had shared dramatic videos with television viewers and weather researchers, died Friday night when an EF3 tornado with winds up to 165 mph turned on them near El Reno, Okla. They were among 13 people who died in the storm in Oklahoma City and its suburbs. Their deaths in pursuit of the storm are believed to be the first among scientific researchers while chasing tornadoes, the Storm Prediction Center in Norman, Okla., said. “They put themselves in harm’s way so that they can educate the public about the destructive power of these storms,” said Chris West, the undersheriff in Canadian County, where the men died.

PARADISE

IN MUNCIE

Tropical seasonal concessions business reopens for 6th summer with specials, smoothies, ice cream

A

See CHASERS, page 3

tasty landmark, “The Island Muncie” on the Cardinal Greenway has reopened for the summer. It’s just a short bike ride from campus. The island is a tropical concession seasonal business where people can get smoothies, ice cream, Jamaican Jerk chicken, and drinks. The island is open 5 p.m. to dark from mid-May until the beginning of October. This is the sixth year for owner Roger Conatser, who runs the Island on the edge of the Greenway. “It’s really like a little island once you come off the Greenway. There is not traffic, or many buildings around, just flowers and the noise of the island waterfall,” he said. Conatser’s 6-year-old daughter first gave him the idea of making smoothies for bike riders on the Greenway.

MCT PHOTO

SMOOTHIES ON CAMPUS WHERE

L.A. Pittenger Student Center WHEN

Late Nite, during the school year COST

Free with BSU ID

See SMOOTHIES, page 4

Stephanie Houk carries tree limbs while cleaning up on May 26 in Moore, Okla. Houk was one of many volunteers who helped clean up after storms that affected communities in Oklahoma.

DN ILLUSTRATIONS LAUREN CHAPMAN

ONLINE CLASSES Online threats to be seen as felony FOR VETS HONORED New legislation to begin

Courses rank 8th, 12th out of 1,200 schools for 1st time EMMA KATE FITTES NEWS EDITOR | news@bsudailynews.com

For the first time, Ball State has been placed on the list of Best Online Programs for Veterans by the U.S. News & World Report, receiving four rankings for its programs. Online undergraduate, graduate business and graduate education programs ranked eighth; online graduate nursing programs ranked 12th. “From what [students] tell us, it’s the quality of our service,” said Beck Hannaford, veterans benefits and financial assistant coordinator. “I call people and email peo-

BY THE NUMBERS

8th

rank for online undergraduate, graduate business and graduate education programs

12th

rank for online graduate nursing programs

413 number of veteran

students at Ball State.

1,200 number of schools in the Service

Members Opportunity College Consortium, including Ball State.

ple back... I can’t underplay our teachers; apparently they do a good job.”

See VETERAN, page 2

July 1, define social media harassment as criminal | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS CROWN POINT, Ind. — Nearly three months after a student posted on Facebook the alleged threats a Lake Station teacher wrote on a classroom chalkboard, prosecutors mull criminal charges against the man. The posting set off a maelstrom of media attention, leading the veteran Edison High School business educator to retire. The message to a sixth-period class read, in part: “A. You are idiots!!! B. The guns are loaded!!! C. Care to try me???” Veteran teacher Jeff Kincaid is reported to have been angered at the time by students’ conduct toward a substitute teacher during his absence. Kincaid was placed on administrative leave March 1. Police took their findings

THE NEW LAW

The new legislation makes posting threats on social media a crime of intimidation. It will take effect on July 1. • If the threat is against an employee of a school, hospital or church, it is a D felony. •Threats against a prosector, deputy prosecutor, judge or bailiff are a C felony. •A threat interfering with a public building, such as bomb threat, is also a C felony.

to the office of Lake County Prosecuting Attorney Bernard Carter for review later that month. Police are reported to have been considering a charge of intimidation, which can be filed as a felony if the offense takes place on school property. Telephone calls from The Times to Lake Station police officials were not returned.

Kincaid’s attorney, Andrew Yoder, of Merrillville, declined to comment, as did Carter’s office. However, law enforcement professionals not directly connected to the pending case discussed how social media is changing their world. “It brings out issues we never had to deal with in the past,” Porter County Prosecutor Brian Gensel told The Times in Munster referring to social media such as Facebook, Twitter and other Internet platforms. Gensel said his office has had to deal with whether posts on social media sites constitute threats. He said threats can lead to charges of harassment or intimidation. Gensel said the determination can be “tricky,” depending on the threat’s specificity or directness. “You can’t harass a hospital, but you can harass an employee,” Gensel noted as an example.

See LAW, page 2

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NEWS

VETERAN: University considered to be ‘military friendly’

WEATHER THIS WEEK

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The Ball State Daily News (USPS144-360), the Ball State University student newspaper, is published Monday through Thursday during the academic year and Monday and Thursday during summer sessions; zero days on breaks and holidays. The Daily News is supported in part by an allocation from the General Fund of the university and is available free to students at various points on campus. POSTAL BOX The Daily News offices are in AJ 278, Ball State University, Muncie, Ind., 473060481. Periodicals postage paid in Muncie, Ind. TO ADVERTISE Classified department 765-285-8247 Display department 765-285-8256 or 765-285-8246. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday – Friday. TO SUBSCRIBE Call 765-285-8250 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Subscription rates: $75 for one year; $45 for one semester; $25 for summer subscription only. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Daily News, AJ 278, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306. BACK ISSUES Stop by AJ 278 between noon and 10 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and afternoons Friday. All back issues are free and limited to two issues per person.

| CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

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Police were forced to break down a door and kill a South Bend man who killed his daughter and wounded his wife. bsudaily.com

Rogue exotic animals wander in unrelated Florida towns A wandering llama was tasered in Tallahassee and a lost kangaroo was forced down by tranquilizer darts in Tampa. bsudaily.com

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including 100 students who are children of veterans. Hannaford said about three out of every four veteran students take online classes. After serving as a weapons instructor for five years in the Navy, graduate CICS student Hondo Pamez came back to Ball State. “My time in the Navy prepared me for a lot of things, but you need a degree

The university was recognized out of 1,200 schools in the Service Members Opportunity College Consortium, the oldest veterans academic group in the country. It has also been recognized as a military-friendly college for five years by magazine G.I. Jobs. During that time, the number of veteran students at Ball State has quadrupled to 413,

now,” Pamez said. He said he is hoping to become a network engineer and has enjoyed taking online classes at Ball State for the last three years. “I enjoy the freedom of them,” Pamez said. “I want to take them because it freed up more time during the day.” He said he spends his extra time with his wife and three kids.

Hannaford said the classes offer convenience for veterans because they have a more flexible schedule and don’t have to transfer schools if they move. Also, he said it is common for them to be uncomfortable on campus because it is a new environment. “I get very few problems,” he said. “Veterans are technology savvy. They are computer animals.”

LAW: High school postings bring attention to threats

| CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

The new law, which will take effect July 1, creates the crime of intimidation for using Internet social media sites to post threats. It makes the crime a D felony if the threat is lodged against an employee of a school, hospital or church. The crime rises to a C felony if the target is a prosecutor, deputy prosecutor, judge or bailiff, or if the threat is designed to interfere with the occupancy of a public building, that is, a bomb threat. Crider, a retired Indiana conservation officer in Hancock County, serves as security manager at Hancock Regional Hospital. “We had an individual who posted a threat to come there and shoot up the place,” Crider said. “As you might imagine, it caused quite uproar.” Crider said he took his concerns to his local prosecutor, who determined that, under current statute, he had no case, as the threats were against the hospital as opposed to an individual or specific doctor or other employee. Crider said he asked whether this was, in fact, a gap in

Harassment is a lesser charge, confined to a B-level misdemeanor, he said. However, intimidation can rise from an A-level misdemeanor to a D-level felony. The higher the letter, the more serious the offense. And then there’s free speech, Gensel said. Law enforcement has to be sensitive to people being able to air their grievances in a free society. The question, Gensel said, becomes at what point would a reasonable person interpret a comment as a threat? David Powell, executive director of the Indiana Prosecuting Attorneys Council, said the Indiana Legislature recently expanded the intimidation statute to incorporate social media into the framework. Powell said what triggered the effort was the experience of state Sen. Michael Crider, R-Greenfield. “The intimidation statute was expanded under his bill to give law enforcement the tools to deal with these issues,” Powell said.

GET CONNECTED

WHAT HAPPENED? EDISON HIGH SCHOOL TEACHER

• Jeff Kincaid, a high school business teacher, threatened his students after they mistreated a substitue teacher. • Chalk board: “A. You are idiots!!! B. The guns are loaded!!! C. Care to try me???” • Police may be considering the charge of intimidation for the teacher SOCIAL MEDIA IMPLICATIONS

• A written threat on a chalkboard or a comment thread might need intrepretation • The Indiana Legislature expanded a statute on intimidation to include social media

the law, which led to his bill. “I’m pretty pleased with the final outcome of the bill,” Crider said. In Kincaid’s case, he did not post the alleged threats to social media — a student did. Yet those close to the case say the attention created notoriety throughout the community. Previously, it likely would

have been handled administratively — and more quietly — by the school system, they said. Joel Schumm, clinical professor of law at Indiana University’s Robert H. McKinney School of Law in Indianapolis, said the influence of social media can’t be discounted. The county prosecutor is an elected official, and police officers work for elected officials, he said. “Modern technology and social media make it much easier for the public to quickly and strongly apply pressure,” Schumm said. “Facebook and Twitter have largely rendered obsolete the old avenues of expressing dissatisfaction through handwritten letters, picketing or letter to the editor.” The impact can be either beneficial or harmful, he said. “Public pressure sometimes works to the benefit of someone charged with a crime,” Schumm said. “In other cases, police and prosecutors may be pressured by a strong public reaction to pursue a matter that would normally be resolved short of criminal charges.

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Still updating 24/7. Sudoku Crossword

By Michael Mepham

Level: Easy Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

SOLUTION FOR THURSDAY.

SOLUTION FOR THURSDAY. ACROSS 1 RAN A TOWEL OVER 6 FREE STUFF AT A PARTY, IN SLANG 10 THROWS IN 14 HAVE BECAUSE OF 15 SUPERGIRL’S KRYPTON NAME 16 MUNICH MRS. 17 “GREAT TASTE … LESS FILLING” BEERS 18 SRS.’ NEST EGGS 19 KEISTER 20 SIBLINGS, SONS, DAUGHTERS, ETC. 23 35MM CAMERA TYPE 24 ANXIOUS MED. CONDITION FOR TV’S MONK 25 ACTOR MCKELLEN 26 ONETIME TELECOM GIANT 29 “ALONG RELATED LINES ...” 33 COSMETICIAN LAUDER 34 LIKE SORTED CLEAN SOCKS, HOPEFULLY 35 MORE THAN HALF 38 PUSH-UP MUSCLE, BRIEFLY 40 GREEK SANDWICH

41 DESK COMPARTMENT 44 SIMPLE QUESTION TYPE 47 MAIN THOROUGHFARE 50 THEY’RE TWO SIZES ABOVE M’S 51 OUT __ LIMB 52 “THE RAVEN” MONOGRAM 53 AQI MONITOR 56 HAVE THE SONG MEMORIZED 60 GOOSE EGG 62 “ARE YOU __ NOT?”: “JOINING US?” 63 “KIM” ACTOR FLYNN 64 GUNG-HO 65 OLD ITALIAN COIN 66 HALF A WASHINGTON CITY 67 __ DE FOIE GRAS 68 NEGOTIATOR’S GOAL 69 EYELID WOES DOWN 1 GULPS (DOWN) GREEDILY 2 “COUNT ON ME” 3 “GREAT” RUSSIAN CZAR 4 SUMMERS IN PARIS 5 TOSS BACK JIGGERS OF

LIQUOR 6 SUPERFICIAL, AS BEAUTY 7 FEND (OFF) 8 SAUDI __ 9 STREETLIGHT OF OLD 10 JACKSON 5 HAIRDO 11 GRUNT WORK 12 FLOOD CONTROL STRUCTURE 13 EAT DINNER 21 GERMAN’S EIGHT 22 MOST-DRAFTABLE STATUS 27 WEDDING CAKE SECTION 28 PREFIX WITH PLASM 30 FOOD PACKAGING FIG. 31 “LATER, GATOR” 32 ENERGY 35 17TH-CENTURY YEAR WHEN HENRY HUDSON ENTERED HIS BAY 36 BASEBALL’S HERSHISER 37 LITERARY LANGUAGE OF INDIA 39 __ CORTEX: OUTERMOST BRAIN TISSUE 42 SUFFIX WITH SOCK OR SWITCH

43 WENT ON A RAMPAGE 45 “FREEZE, FIDO!” 46 SIBLING’S SONS 48 ACTRESS KAZAN 49 ONCE EVERY 12 MONTHS 54 WORKER, BRIEFLY 55 BOOK OF MAPS 57 LYMPH __ 58 __ BORA: AFGHAN REGION 59 PART OF Q.E.D. 60 REHEAT QUICKLY 61 PERÓN OF ARGENTINA

bsudaily.com


MONDAY, JUNE 3, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM | PAGE 3

NEWS

‘It was chaos. People were going southbound in the northbound lanes. Everybody was

RUNNING FOR THEIR LIVES.’ Oklahoma tornado claims 10 lives, city still recovering

New technology creates any object by layering material

| THE ASSOCIATED PRESS EL RENO, Okla. — As the East Coast braced for the possibility of severe storms Sunday, the all-too-familiar task of cleaning up went on in Oklahoma after the weekend’s violent weather claimed 10 lives there. Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin toured damage in El Reno, about 30 miles from Oklahoma City, on Sunday. She said in an interview that the death toll could rise as emergency workers continue searching flooded areas for missing residents. The state Medical Examiner’s Office spokeswoman Amy Elliott said the death toll had risen to 10 from Friday’s EF3 tornado, which charged down a clogged Interstate 40 in the western suburbs. Among the dead were two children — an infant sucked out of the car with its mother and a 4-yearold boy who along with his family had sought shelter in a drainage ditch. Severe weather was forecast to move into the Northeast on Sunday, mainly from the Washington, D.C., area to northern Maine. Hail and high winds were the chief threat, though a tornado could not be ruled out, forecasters said. In the southern part of the United States, thunderstorms, high winds and hail were expected as part of a slow-moving cold front. Heavy rains could spawn

MCT PHOTO

Ashley Slinkard embraces Becky Brady as they look at Brady’s daughter’s destroyed home in St. Charles, Mo., on Saturday. The home was destroyed during a category EF3 storm, with winds reaching up to 150 mph.

flash flooding in some areas, the National Weather Service said. Oklahoma wasn’t the only state hit by violent weather Friday night. In Missouri, areas west of St. Louis received significant damage from an EF3 tornado Friday night that packed estimated winds of 150 mph. In St. Charles County, at least 71 homes were heavily damaged and 100 had slight to moderate damage, county spokeswoman Colene McEntee said. Northeast of St. Louis, the town of Roxana, Ill., also saw

damage from an EF3 tornado. National Weather Service meteorologist Jayson Gosselin said it wasn’t clear whether the damage in Missouri and Illinois came from the same EF3 twister or separate ones. A total of five tornadoes struck the Oklahoma City metro area on Friday, the National Weather Service said. Fallin said Sunday that 115 people were injured. It formed out on the prairie west of Oklahoma City, giving residents plenty of advance notice. When told to seek shelter, many ventured out and snarled traffic across the

metro area — perhaps remembering the devastation in Moore. An EF5 tornado on May 20 killed 24 people. Oklahoma Highway Patrol Trooper Betsy Randolph said roadways quickly became congested with the convergence of rush-hour traffic and fleeing residents. “They had no place to go, and that’s always a bad thing. They were essentially targets just waiting for a tornado to touch down,” Randolph said. “I’m not sure why people do that sort of stuff, but it is very dangerous.”

CHASERS: Storm chasers die ‘doing what they love’ | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

Tim Samaras, 54, and Paul Samaras, 24, both of Bennett, Colo., were trapped in their car along with Young, 45, of South Lake Tahoe, which straddles the California and Nevada border. Many times before, Tim Samaras had told anyone who would listen that tornadoes were unpredictable. “I don’t know if I would say I worried about it because one of the biggest things he stressed was safety,” said Tim’s brother, Jim Samaras, who confirmed the deaths to The Associated Press. “He knew what to look for. He knew where not to be and in this case, the tornado took a clear turn toward them.” Tim Samaras and his Twistex tornado chase team had been featured on the Discovery Channel and given grants by the National Geographic Society. They also were regular presenters at conferences dedicated to advances in meteorology. The Oklahoma storm that killed the three chasers developed before their eyes Friday. Tim Samaras tweeted a photo of clouds rising through

3-D printing generates controversy

a volatile atmosphere and “Samaras was a respected noted: “Storms now initiating tornado researcher and friend south of Watonga along triple ... who brought to the field a point. Dangerunique portfolio ous day ahead STORM CHASERS of expertise in for OK — stay WHO engineering, sciweather savvy!” Three veteran storm ence, writing and It was his final chasers: Tim Samaras, videography,” the tweet. his son Paul Samaras and center said. “He looked at colleague Carl Young The storm artornadoes not WHAT rived during Frifor the spotlight They were killed when a day night’s rush of TV but for tornado with 165 mph hour, when roads the scientific winds turned on them were clogged aspect,” Jim Sa- WHERE with commuters maras said. “At Near El Reno, Okla. and others trying the end of the to flee the storm. day, he wanted WHEN Video taken by a to save lives and Friday night number of storm “They put themselves he gave the ulchasers showed in harm’s way so that timate sacrifice they can educate debris pelting vefor that.” hicles. the public about the The tornado in destructive power Winds swept the classic movie of these storms,” one vehicle with “The Wizard of said Chris West, a crew from The Oz” fascinated a the undersheriff in Weather Chanthen-6-year-old Canadian County, nel off the road, Tim Samaras, where the men died. tossed it 200 yards his brother said. and flipped it into “He didn’t give a crap about a field. The crew members Toto, he didn’t give a crap escaped without any serious about the munchkins,” Jim Sa- injuries. maras said. “This is a very sad day for the The Storm Prediction Cen- meteorological community ter said in a statement Sun- and the families of our friends day that it was saddened by lost. Tim Samaras was a pioTim Samaras’ death. neer and great man,” Weather

Channel meteorologist Jim Cantore tweeted Sunday. The Discovery Channel, which featured Tim Samaras on “Storm Chasers” until last year, planned to dedicate a show Sunday evening to the three men, noting they died “doing what they love, chasing storms.” The National Geographic Society called Tim Samaras a “courageous and brilliant scientist” and posted on its website an interview conducted with him last month. “Being close to a tornado is one of those incredible, fleeting moments that sometimes you have to take a couple of seconds to take in,” he said in the interview, which went on to describe his engineering background and the need for tornado research. “We still don’t know why some thunderstorms create tornadoes while others don’t,” he added. “We’re trying to collect as many observations as possible, both from outside and from the inside. If we better understood some of the final mechanisms for tornado genesis, our forecasting will be greatly improved.”

about anything they like: iPad stands, guitars, jewelry, even guns. But experts warn this cool innovation could soon turn controversial — because of safety concerns but also the potential for the technol| THE ASSOCIATED PRESS ogy to alter economies that SAN MATEO, Calif. — Invis- rely on manufacturing. “We believe that 3-D printing align, a San Jose company, uses 3-D printing to make is fundamentally changing the each mouthful of customized, manufacturing ecosystem in its entirety — how transparent braces. and where products Mackenzies Choco- PRODUCTS are made and by lates, a confectioner WHAT whom,” said Peter in Santa Cruz, uses a Weijmarshausen, 3-D printer to pump Shapeways is an CEO of New Yorkout chocolate molds. online business focused on based Shapeways, And earlier this year, marketing products an online company Cornell University made by 3-D that makes and sells researchers used a printers. Some of 3-D printed prod3-D printer, along the products are... ucts designed by inwith injections of a  ings, necklaces dividuals. Products special collagen gel, • R and other include a delicate, to create a humanjewelry twig-like egg cup shaped ear.  ook ends (cost: $8.10) and a Once a science-fic- • B lamp that looks like tion fantasy, three- • Action figures a nuclear mushdimensional print- • Lamps room cloud (cost: ers are popping up • Car axles • iPhone cases $1,388.66). everywhere from the •A  top from the “We’re on the desks of home hobmovie “Inception” verge of the next byists to Air Force industrial revoludrone research centers. The machines, generally tion, no doubt about it,” added the size of a microwave oven Dartmouth College business and costing $400 to more professor Richard D’Aveni. “In than $500,000, extrude layer 25 years, entire industries are upon layer of plastics or oth- going to disappear. Countries er materials, including metal, relying on mass manufacturto create 3-D objects with ing are going to find themselves with no revenues and moving parts. Users are able to make just no jobs.”

Owners dispute exotic animal law Attorney calls new state requirements ‘a sham,’ imposition | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS COLUMBUS, Ohio — Some owners of exotic animals say a new Ohio law is onerous and infringes on their constitutional rights, and they’ve asked a federal appeals court to strike it down. The private owners argue in a brief filed Friday that the law violates the First and Fifth Amendments, by limiting their freedom of association and effectively taking their property by requiring them to implant microchips in their animals at their own expense before being registered with the state. They argue the law includes impossible hurdles that leave owners who want to operate forprofit businesses only one option: joining a zoological group that private owners are “loathe to associate with,” a lawyer for the owners wrote in the brief. Attorney Robert Owens called Ohio permitting requirements “a sham” — imposing compliance costs so exorbitantly high

WHY THEY’RE FIGHTING IT: Some exotic animal owners believe the law imposes on their First and Fifth Amendments. They believe the law...

• Limits their freedom of association • Takes their property by making them microchip the animals • Forces for-profit owners to join undesirable zoological groups •Imposes unnecessarily high compliance costs they exceed the value of the animals involved and threatening to financially wipe out those who seek permits. The appeal comes after a federal judge in Columbus sided with the state last year in upholding the law. Ohio strengthened its regulation of exotic animal ownership after a Zanesville man released dozens of his animals in 2011 from his eastern Ohio farm before committing suicide. Authorities killed most of the animals, including black bears, Bengal tigers and African lions, fearing for the public’s safety.

TURKEY’S PRIME MINISTER REFUTES ‘DICTATOR’ ACCUSATION

10,000 protesters gather Sunday to ask for resignation | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ISTANBUL – Turkey’s prime minister on Sunday rejected claims that he is a “dictator,” dismissing protesters as an extremist fringe, even as thousands returned to the landmark Istanbul square that has become the site of the fiercest anti-government outburst in years. Over the past three days, protesters around the country have unleashed pent-up resentment against Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who after 10 years in office many Turks see as an uncompromising figure with undue influence in every part of life. A huge, exuberant protest in Taksim Square subsided overnight, but an estimated 10,000 people again streamed into the area on Sunday, many

waving flags, chanting “victory, victory, victory” and calling on Erdogan’s government to resign. About 7,000 people took part in protests in Ankara, the capital, that turned violent on Sunday, with demonstrators throwing fire bombs and police firing tear gas. Scores of protesters were detained. Some protesters have compared Erdogan to a sultan and denounced him as a dictator. Scrambling to show he was unbowed and appealing to a large base of conservative Turks who support him, Erdogan delivered two speeches on Sunday and appeared in a television interview. With Turkish media otherwise giving scant reports about the protests, many turned to social media outlets for information on the unrest. “There is now a menace which is called Twitter,” Erdogan said. “The best examples of lies can be found there. To me, social media is the worst menace to society.”

QUICK FACTS WHAT

Violent protests taking place in Ankara and Istanbul against President Recep Tayyip Erdogan WHO

Around 7,000 people in Ankara and 10,000 in Istanbul WHERE

In the major cities of Turkey WHEN

The ongoing protests began Friday WHY

Protesters view Erdogan as a dictator who is overly invasive in their lives Under Erdogan’s leadership, Turkey has boosted economic growth and raised its international profile. But he has been a divisive figure at home, with his government recently passing legislation curbing the sale of alcohol and taking a strong stand against the Syrian regime that some believe has put security at risk. The demonstrations were

ignited on Friday by a violent police crackdown on a peaceful sit-in to prevent the uprooting of trees at Taksim Square in Istanbul and have since spread around the country. The Turkish Doctors Association said the three days of demonstrations have left 1,000 people injured in Istanbul and 700 in Ankara. Sunday’s violence occurred in Ankara when the protesters tried to march toward Erdogan’s office from the city’s main square. A group of youths formed a barricade and hurled fire bombs or threw back gas canisters at police. An Associated Press reporter saw at least eight injured people being carried away, and police appeared to directly target journalists with tear gas. The state-run Anadolu Agency said 200 demonstrators were detained. In Istanbul’s Taksim Square on Sunday, dozens of people climbed on the roof of a cultural center that Erdogan said will be demolished and turned into

MCT PHOTO

A graffiti artist admires his work on a main pedestrian street in Istanbul, Turkey, on Saturday. Police and protestors clashed during the day in the city.

an opera hall. A banner reading “Don’t yield” was hung from the building. “If they call someone who has served the people a ‘dictator,’ I

have nothing to say,” Erdogan said in an address to a group representing migrants from the Balkans. “My only concern has been to serve my country.”


PAGE 4 | MONDAY, JUNE 3, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM

FEATURES FEATURES@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/DN_FEATURES

High-end

Hoops

Ball State graphics student creates artwork in hula hoops with designs

A

DANIEL HUTCHINSON STAFF REPORTER

WHAT

Be-Bop-A-Lula, specialty hula hoops. WHO

Ashley Miller, a master’s degree graphics student WHERE

Ashley Miller, a master’s degree graphics student, poses with one of the hula hoops that she has designed and decorated. Miller has sold more than 40 hoops to buyers across the country.

LOGO PROVIDED BY ASHLEY MILLER

Find her hula hoops on Etsy.com

When Miller began to learn to hula hoop with a friend, she found hula hoops with patterns that seemed to move as the dancer spun. These designer hoops could only be purchased at a high price to be shipped from Canada or the West Coast. Miller grabbed some tape and took to her own hoops, creating any design she wanted. “At first I looked around to see how people were decorating theirs, but before long I started thinking up my own ideas,” Miller said. “I got more colors. I started changing the tapes

| CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL

I used and the types of splits just to see how many colors I could use and what kind of designs I could do. It became a free form thing for me as soon as I figured out what worked and what didn’t.” Miller took her creations to Be Here Now to sell to concert-goers, later moving the sales online to Etsy, an online arts market. She began taking requests for particular colors and patterns. Her sales grew, and she has now sold more than 40 hula hoops to customers online through Be-Bop-A-Lula Hula Hoops.

“They have been ordered from several different places. I’ve sent one all they way to British Columbia in Canada,” Miller said of her online sales. “I think that’s the farthest I’ve sent one, but I get orders from Washington and Arizona. That’s pretty cool to me.” Miller works for hours on each hoop, which she sees as a completely different art than her graphic design work. “It’s a different medium. Most of the time I’m working on a computer screen making graphics. It’s really nice creating physical art,” Miller said. “I feel each piece is kind of a work

DN PHOTOS KRYSTAL BYERS

LEFT: Mary Kothman plays in Sursa Hall on May 23. The performance was part of the School of Music’s 67th Annual Chamber Music Festival. Featured in the performances were selections from composers J.S. Bach, Johannes Brahms, Marcel Boucard and Robert Schumann. ABOVE: Kothman, David Blakley, Valerie Hurwitz, Daniel Colston and Nigorabonu Miliyeva play for the 67th Annual Chamber Music Festival. Both students and faculty played in the concert.

SMOOTHIES: Smoothie stand opens for 4th summer

« As a photographer I

| CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 “My daughter and I were making smoothies one day and she saw bikers passing from our kitchen window on the greenway and said, ‘Dad we need to make smoothies for those people,’” Conatser said. “It was a hit on my head to just start building a place like this.” He said he then contacted the Greenway and asked for permission to build a concession side. Once he received permission, he built it in his backyard. Conatser is a former U.S. Air Force photographer who has traveled to many countries. “As a photographer I used to travel a lot to Jamaica and had always wanted to have a place where people would find their peace and relax,” he said. Kevin Downard, a computer technician at IU Health Ball Memorial Hospital, knew Conatser even before he started the island. “I get the best smoothies in the world here in the island,”

dmhutchinson@bsu.edu

s Ashley Miller gears up to graduate in July with a master’s degree in graphics, she still finds the time to design and sell intricate hula hoops for dancers nationwide. Miller blends her love for design with the movement of the spinning hoop to create original art for her customers at Be-Bop-A-Lula Hula Hoops in Muncie.

BE-BOP-A-LULA

PHOTO PROVIDED BY ASHLEY MILLER

|

used to travel a lot to Jamaica and had always wanted to have a place where people would find their peace and relax. » ROGER CONATSER, owner

DN PHOTO SAFARALI SAYDSHOEV

A waterfall feature stands as part of The Island Muncie located on the Cardinal Greenway. The smoothie stand recently reopened for the summer and is only a bike ride away from campus.

Downard said. “The island is amazing, it’s like stepping outside of Muncie.” Downard really likes every special that they offer, especially the Acai Pomegranate Blueberry smoothie. First time customer Rhea Leisure said she enjoyed her first smoothie. “It’s amazing and I will bring

my daughter with me next time,” she said. Conatser said he enjoys serving his customers. “Island always makes people come together and relax. And this is the reason why we still keep this place to bring joy to people,” Conatser said. The Island Muncie caters bikers and walkers who use the

Greenway daily. Conatser’s island sees up to 50 people per day while it’s open, but is not limited only to smoothies. People can also have birthday parties, baby showers and weddings there. Some customers find information about the Island and come from as far as Ohio. “We do not advertise, and rely on word of mouth,” Conatser said. “But sometimes I even see people coming from Ohio and other cities around just by hearing about this place.” Conatser said The Island Muncie is his little paradise where he sees others relaxing and having a good time.

of art, because I have a vision for it, I have an idea of a look or feel that I want for it. There’s some attachment there, and sometimes not so much. Sometimes, they turn out not quite how I want them to. It looks cool, but it’s not what I expected. I feel like that happens sometimes with art too.” Miller plans to continue with selling her hoops on Be-Bop-A-Lula Hula Hoops after graduating at the end of the summer. The hoops have changed from a creative outlet to business, but she has yet to let go of the fun she has creating and playing with hula hoops.

CHARACTER PLOT MIRRORS ACTORS M. Night Shyamalan hasn’t had the best track record when it comes to directing movies. The last movie he directed was “The Last Airbender” in 2010 and, while the movie already had a built-in audience and crazy high budget, under Shyamalan’s direction, the movie flopped. For these reasons, I can see why it’d be important that the new Shyamalan directed film “After Earth” be successful. I don’t think it’s going to give Shyamalan the comeback he has desperately been searching for. The movie starts out on a planet far from Earth, Nova Prime, where humankind is forced to relocate after cataclysmic events leave the planet uninhabitable. Once they leave the planet they encounter creatures called Ursa that are bred to kill humans. They track humans by the pheromone released when they’re afraid, making Ursa nearly impossible to fend off. A small group has honed a skill called “ghosting” which allows them to let go of all fear and sneak up on the Ursa undetected. General Cypher Raige (Will Smith) is a legendary ghoster whose son, Kitai Raige (Jaden Smith) wants nothing more than his father’s approval. To give Kitai an opportunity to prove his worth, Cypher brings him along on one of his missions. After receiving heavy damage to their ship when they fly through a storm of debris, they’re forced to land on the quarantined planet of Earth. Cypher and Kitai are all that remain of the crew and the only chance they have of being rescued lies within a distress beacon in the tail section of the spaceship. To get there, Kitai needs to traverse the harsh neglected wilderness while Cypher directs his every move. Ultimately, the movie is about a young boy conquering his fears and a father learning how to accept his son and see him as an equal. While Gary Whitta and M. Night Shyamalan wrote the script, the story was originally written by Will Smith. This movie seems to be an obvious attempt for Will Smith to jumpstart Jaden Smith’s lackluster movie career. Will Smith managed to get his career started on his own, and is now helping Jaden Smith establish himself in Hollywood, which is mirrored in the plot of the movie as Cypher works to help Kitai prove his worth. I feel as if the entire film is a metaphor for what Will and Jaden’s home life is like. It’s hard not to watch this movie and think that the way. Personally, I liked the film. Yes, the story was somewhat predictable, and while it was hard to see Will wasted on the part he had, I felt it was original enough to be enjoyable. I wasn’t expecting a lot. However, I was pleasantly surprised with the movie overall, and despite its 12 percent rating on RottenTomatoes.com, I would give this movie a 3/5.

Rating: HHHII

MICHAEL BOEHNLEIN MOVIES WITH MICHAEL MICHAEL BOEHNLEIN IS A SENIOR PRE ART MAJOR AND WRITES ‘MOVIES WITH MICHAEL’ FOR THE DAILY NEWS. HIS VIEWS DO NOT NECESSARILY AGREE WITH THOSE OF THE NEWSPAPER. WRITE TO MICHAEL AT MABOEHNLEIN @BSU.EDU.


MONDAY, JUNE 3, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM | PAGE 5

FORUM OPINION@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/BSUDAILYNEWS

DNSWITCHBOARD WHAT WOULD YOU DO WITH A 3-D PRINTER?

FORUM POLICY

STEVEN WILLIAMS, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

JORDAN HUFFER, PHOTO EDITOR

DAKOTA CRAWFORD, SPORTS EDITOR

with a 3-D printer. The possibilities are endless. I think I would manufacture my own baseball equipment. I’d create a bunch of baseballs and baseball bats to practice with. Live out my old dreams.

replicas of my favorite characters and then use them to act out scenes from my fan fictions. I would also corner the market on said figures and sell them to others who are tired of their characters never having any merchandise.

printer. From there I would start selling my 3-D printers for profit. I don’t know that the market value would hold up for very long, but it’s worth a shot. Unless just printing money is an option, then I’d go with that.

 I can’t really imagine what I would do

ÂŤI would print out accurate and exact

Âť

Âť

ÂŤ I would first print off a second 3-D Âť

EMMA KATE FITTES, NEWS EDITOR

MICHAEL BOEHNLEIN, DESIGN EDITOR

DANIEL BROUNT, COPY EDITOR

go back in time and make sure the 3-D printer was never invented because they scare me. There doesn’t seem to be any way to limit what can be printed, and I don’t feel safe in a place where people can print weapons from the Internet.

LEGOs I’d go crazy. I’d also make a lot of small replicas of famous buildings. Simply put, I’d make a bunch of toys. I’m not sure yet what ‘practical’ uses I’d have for a 3-D printer but I’m sure if I ever got one, I’d quickly think of ways to use it.

objects for myself. The market will probably be flooded with custom objects when 3-D printers become common, so I can’t imagine it’d be very easy to succeed selling them.

ÂŤ I would print off a time machine to

ÂŤ First off, I would make so many

Âť

Âť

 I’d probably just make custom 

The Daily News forum page aims to stimulate discussion in the Ball State community. The Daily News welcomes reader viewpoints and offers three vehicles of expression for reader opinions: letters to the editor, guest columns and feedback on our website. Letters to the editor must be signed and appear as space permits each day. The limit for letter length is approximately 350 words. All letters must be typed. The editor reserves the right to edit and condense submissions. The name of the author is usually published but may be withheld for compelling reasons, such as physical harm to the author. The editor decides this on an individual basis and must consult the writer before withholding the name. Those interested in submitting a letter can do so by emailing opinion@bsudailynews.com or editor@bsudailynews.com The Daily News encourages its readers to voice their views on legislative issues. The following legislators represent the Ball State community:

| THE DAILY NEWS COMICS

REP. SUE ERRINGTON Indiana District 34 200 W. Washington St. Indianapolis, IN 46204 1-800-382-9842 SEN. TIM LANANE Indiana Dist. 25 200 W. Washington Street Indianapolis, IN 46204 1-800-382-9467 U.S. SEN. DAN COATS 493 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, DC, 20510 (202) 224-5623 U.S. SEN. JOSEPH DONNELLY B33 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, DC 20510 (202) 224-4814 U.S. REP. LUKE MESSER U.S. 6th District 508 Cannon House Office Building Washington, DC 20515 (202) 225-3021

Josh Shaffer is an art major and draws “Strange Gods� for the Daily News. His views do not necessarily agree with those of the newspaper. Write to Josh at jashaffer@bsu.edu.

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Consider your purpose, talents and strengths before June 25, and then follow them to the bank after. Save for the years ahead. Learn about your partner as you share the load. Define what’s most important, and go for that. Attract helpers and allies. Recognition comes later. Get restored by love.

Gemini (May 21-June 21) Today is a 7 -- Unexpected benefits come your way. Keep objective about it. Stand your ground.Your partner has connections. Your expenses would be too high to make a profit. Focus on creating a steady income stream. Talk about money later. Cancer (June 22-July 22) Today is a 7 -- A test or challenge presents itself. Friends provide support. Make comfort a priority. Stay patient and calm, and don’t let anyone push you around. Hold on to your small change. It adds up. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)Today is a 7 -- Pay back a favor. It’s not a good time to gamble. Set long-range goals. Caution is advised. Stick to the rules. Get plenty of rest, and celebrate later. Quiet time recharges.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Today is a 7 -- This partnership stays exciting. A female sets the pace. Financial planning gets more fun, especially as prospects improve. Others collaborate on a creative project. The fine lines add depth.

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Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Today is a 7 -- Increase your family’s comfort with domestic treats. Do the homework to complete a project. A female translates the legalese. The odds are in your favor now, although it may not play out as imagined. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Today is a 6 -- Make an amazing discovery (though traveling is still not a good idea). Shrewd business people see financial favor. Write up your brilliant ideas. Bring work home if needed. Clean out closets. Explain your view to someone who misunderstood. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Today is a 7 -Get a surprise for your home.Your accomplishments draw admiration. Bask in the glory, and don’t push yourself too hard. Postpone a financial discussion. Seek out the best deal. Think things over. Gather information.

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Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Today is a 9 -- Don’t spend time or money on travel now. Lay a new foundation. Reveal your hidden skills. Build consensus. Cash flow improves; keep costs down anyway. Find answers and solutions. Bring home the bacon today and tomorrow. Aries (March 21-April 19) Today is an 8 -- Discover another great moneymaking idea, or an epiphany. Anticipate some resistance to changes. Heart and mind are in sync today and tomorrow. Don’t participate in gossip. Get down to business. Apply your vision. Taurus (April 20-May 20) Today is a 6 -- Feel free to change your mind.Your imagination will be very active for the next two days, so take notes. Poll for suggestions and experienced advice. Choose the color. Hold on to what you have. Connect with an old friend.


SPORTS SPORTS@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/DN_SPORTS

PAGE 6 | MONDAY, JUNE 3, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM

/////////// THE

HAPS

EVENTS THIS WEEK

TODAY The Indiana Pacers travel to Miami, Fla., for Game 7 of the Eastern Conference Finals at 8:30 p.m.

INDIANA PACERS

Indiana, Miami set for Game 7

« Our approach right now

Pacers prepare for Heat in chance to advance to Finals against Spurs

is not if we lose we’re out — our approach is if we win, we get to the finals. And that’s what we’re going for. We’re going to give our best shot and try to win the Eastern Conference championship. »

| THE ASSOCIATED PRESS MIAMI — As the final horn in a Game 6 loss to the Indiana Pacers was sounding, LeBron James walked toward several of his Miami Heat teammates to shake some hands and share a couple of quick words. His message was clear: Get ready for Game 7. Here comes the ultimate game. To the winner, a trip to the NBA Finals. To the loser, an offseason loaded with regret. It’s that simple now for the champion Heat and the confident Pacers, who meet in Game 7 of the Eastern Conference finals tonight in Miami — a perk the Heat earned by finishing with the league’s best record this season. “Each and every year there are 30 teams that would love to be a part of this, to have one game to advance to the NBA Finals,” James said. “And there’s two teams that’s in this position. And it’s something that you can’t substitute, this feeling. You can’t substitute the atmosphere that we’re going to be in on Monday night for both teams. We should all cherish this moment.” When it’s over tonight, only one club will be cherishing the outcome. “It is a closeout game and an elimination game,” Pacers coach Frank Vogel said. “Our approach right now is not if we lose we’re out — our approach is if we win, we get to the finals. And that’s what we’re going for. We’re going to give our best shot and try to win the Eastern Conference championship.” Tonight’s winner will open the NBA Finals on Thursday against San Antonio. History suggests that the odds are long for the Pacers. Since the NBA went to its current playoff format in 1984, home teams are 16-2 in Game 7’s played in the conference finals or NBA Finals. Then again, the Pacers were colos-

FRANK VOGEL, Pacers head coach

MCT PHOTO

The Heat’s Dwyane Wade loses the ball to the Pacers’ Lance Stephenson in Game 6 of the Eastern Conference Finals in Indianapolis on Saturday. Indiana won 91-77, leading to Game 7 tonight in Miami, Fla.

sal underdogs heading into this series, and if it wasn’t for a last-second collapse at the end of Game 1, they probably would already be East champs. “It’s going to be tough in their arena,” Pacers guard Lance Stephenson said. “We’ve just got to bring it. If we play aggressive like we do at home, we can get the ‘W.’” Indiana headed to Miami with enough luggage for an eight-day trip. If the Pacers win Game 7, they’re headed to San Antonio, with no time to make a return swing through Indianapolis along the way. “We believe we can win the series. We always have,” Vogel said. “We haven’t been perfect this series, but we’re going to need to be near perfect

to win a Game 7 there.” Dwyane Wade’s sore right knee — which has been an issue for about three months now — is not getting better anytime soon, and he’s stopped even wanting to discuss how it’s affecting his game. Chris Bosh said he needed to get back in the gym Sunday and regain some lost rhythm. Wade is averaging 12 points on 32 percent shooting in his last three games, Bosh just 6.3 points on 24 percent shooting in that same span. “Just got to come out and play to win,” Wade said. “It’s one game for both teams.” Said James, when asked about the other two parts of Miami’s Big Three: “I mean, we can state the obvious.

They’re both struggling.” They’re hardly the only Heat players who picked the wrong time of year to go into a slide. Ray Allen is shooting 13 for 46 in this series, Shane Battier is at 2 for 16, and they’re a combined 9 for 39 from 3-point range against the Pacers. Mike Miller gave the Heat a big second-half boost as they tried to rally from a big deficit in Game 6, and Heat coach Erik Spoelstra suggested that Miller could get some time in the series finale. “Everything is on the table,” Spoelstra said. One roster tweak the Heat will make today: Chris Andersen’s one-game suspension for pushing Indiana’s

Tyler Hansbrough is now complete, and the Heat backup big man — who is 15 for 15 from the field in the series — will be available for Game 7. So even on the cusp of elimination Sunday, Spoelstra was decidedly upbeat. “You feel alive when you’re tested, when there’s adversity, when you have to reveal your character,” Spoelstra said. “Then when you do with that collectively, that is a special moment and a special feeling. There’s nothing like it in pro sports ... arguably two of the top words in pro sports is ‘Game 7.’” The Heat had to win a Game 7 in the East finals at home last season, so they understand the pressure that will be there on tonight. But in his postgame remarks Saturday, James was smiling, laughing on occasion, showing no signs of strain even though a season of the highest expectations is on the brink of ending earlier than anyone would find acceptable. How he handles everything tonight will probably determine if the Heat live to play another day in these playoffs. “I probably will not be able to relax until the game starts,” James said. “You know, it’s an opportunity for us. And like I said, that’s what we had the best record in the league for. If we didn’t take care of business on the road at some point in the playoffs, we could always fall back on this. We hate to be in this position, but it’s an opportunity and we look forward to it on Monday.”

PACERS EARNED SUPPORT, NOW ENJOYING BANDWAGON The Pacers look to knock off the defending champion Miami Heat in tonight’s series-deciding Game 7. Few had the foresight to predict a seven-game series coming into the conference finals considering the Pacers’ recent playoff history. Fans at Banker’s Life Fieldhouse, though, they are an exception. They’ve remained confident in the Pacers’ ability to beat the Heat. Loud, supportive crowds have shown up throughout the series — something that has been far too uncommon in recent seasons. From 2005 to 2010 the Pacers’ attendance ranked no higher than 27th in the NBA. This was a statement from basketballknowledgeable Hoosiers that

they would not lend support to a team that didn’t deserve it. Great, it worked. For several years, talk of the Pacers leaving Indiana and constant reminders of mediocrity on the court kept fans and the organization in a grudge match. Despite impressive playoff series in each of the Pacers’ last two seasons, fans won’t open their arms to a team that is as easy to embrace as any. It’s time for that to change. Fans aren’t fooling anyone but themselves at this point. The roster is full of young, hardworking and humble players that have proven they can compete with the best of the best. Paul George, a future superstar, is as sincere off the court as he is talented on it. Roy Hibbert has established himself as

a dominant center, but still expresses a need to improve. The fiery head coach Frank Vogel ties everything together. He encapsulates the spirit of his young, quietly confident team. In 2012, the Pacers were 17th in attendance, despite having the Eastern Conference’s thirdbest record. What’s the excuse now? Offcourt issues are a thing of the past, and the team’s ability has been made evident. The Heat suffered just three losses over its last 39 games of the regular season ... the same number Indiana has handed them in this series. There is no question that fans have played a critical part in the team’s victories over Miami. LeBron James has been visibly frustrated in two of the Pacers’

three home games as he fouled out of Game 4, and received a momentum-shifting technical Game 6 after aggressively sprinting the length of the court in response to being called for an offensive foul. Sellout crowds have bellowed chants of “beat the Heat,” “he’s a flopper” and “built not bought.” Indiana’s fans are at least two things: smart and loud. They know when to chant, what to chant and who to chant at. They have shown up when it counted most. After Indiana won Game 6, fans filled the main concourse, eager to spot Shaquille O’Neal and Charles Barkley on TNT’s livebroadcast stage. That excitement continued through the evening as fans floated cheerfully along the streets of

ATP WORLD TOUR

FEDERER FIGHTS BACK FOR 900TH WIN No. 2 wins, still in pursuit of record 18th Grand Slam | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Chasing a shot, Roger Federer caught his right shoe in the French Open’s red clay, twisting that foot awkwardly and tumbling to the ground. Soon enough, he was in a real rut, in danger of his earliest exit from a Grand Slam tournament in nine years. Federer regrouped and restored order eventually, coming back from a two-sets-toone deficit to beat 15th-seeded Gilles Simon of France 6-1, 4-6, 2-6, 6-2, 6-3 on Sunday in the fourth round to reach his 36th consecutive major quarterfinal. “I didn’t hurt myself or anything,” Federer said afterward. “But maybe I did lose that touch of confidence.” During a rare stretch of mid-

match mediocrity from the owner of a record 17 Grand Slam championships — the 2009 French Open trophy is part of his collection — Federer lost 10 of 13 games, including the one in which he fell. But Simon, a former member of the top 10, could not keep Federer down. Still, Federer acknowledged the need to “tidy up my ROGER FEDERER play” before Men’s singles he faces an- tennis player other Frenchman, No. 6-seeded Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, in the quarterfinals. Tsonga, the 2008 Australian Open runner-up, had little trouble getting past Viktor Troicki of Serbia 6-3, 6-3, 6-3. Tsonga is 3-9 for his career against Federer, but he did come back from a twoset hole to win their 2011

Wimbledon quarterfinal. Federer’s major quarterfinal run, a record in the 45-year Open era, began at Wimbledon in 2004, shortly after he lost in the third round of the French Open to three-time titlist Gustavo Kuerten. “I’m very proud of it. When I retire, maybe it’s something I’ll look back on and realize that it wasn’t easy to do,” Federer said, “because it required many sacrifices and winning matches like this one.” Running after a ball in his backhand corner while ahead 3-2 in the second set, Federer landed hard on his right knee as he fell when his right sneaker’s toe stuck in the clay. When Federer rose, dirt was caked along his right leg. “I wasn’t bothered by the fall in any way,” Federer said. “Maybe it gave him a mental boost.” The first sign of a comeback came when Federer grabbed a 4-2 lead in the fourth set by breaking with a big forehand

that forced an error by an onthe-run Simon. Federer let out a guttural yell and shook his racket. The fans roared. They were even louder moments later when Federer held for 5-2 with a volley winner. And the crescendo kept building, especially when Simon put a backhand into the net, giving the fourth set to Federer. “He managed to raise his game when he wasn’t playing well,” said Simon, who never has reached the French Open quarterfinals. The fifth set was mostly one-sided, similar to the first, about three hours earlier. The next-to-last point of that opening set was a thing of a beauty, as Federer stretched beyond the doubles alley to sling a forehand that wrapped around the net post and landed in a corner. Little could he — or Simon — have known there was trouble ahead.

downtown Indianapolis. Euphoric drivers honked their horns, while pedestrians could be seen high-fiving, and heard echoing chants of “beat the Heat.” Small Pacers’ crowds would regularly file out of the building often giving no indication that its home-team had just won (something they did often, going 30-11 at home) through the regular season. Whether the Pacers are eliminated in Game 7, or they defeat Miami and go on to become world champions, fans need to support this team. Regular-season or playoffs, they’re special and worth supporting. With that being said, I have a feeling that tonight’s game won’t be the last fans see of Indiana this postseason.

DAKOTA CRAWFORD FULL-COURT PRESS

DAKOTA CRAWFORD IS A JUNIOR JOURNALISM AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS NEWS MAJOR AND WRITES ‘FULL-COURT PRESS’ FOR THE DAILY NEWS. HIS VIEWS DO NOT NECESSARILY AGREE WITH THOSE OF THE NEWSPAPER. WRITE TO DAKOTA AT DMCRAWFORD @BSU.EDU.

Combined 06 03 13  

The print edition of The Ball State Daily News on Monday, June 3, 2013.

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