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THE DAILY NEWS

TUESDAY, APRIL 16, 2013

VOL. 92, ISSUE 112

2 EXPLOSIONS, 3 DEAD, 100+ INJURED, 2 OTHER DEVICES FOUND

BOSTON NEEDS EMPATHY DN editorial says students should reflect, help in times of tragedy

INDY RETHINKS SECURITY

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

SEE PAGE 4

SEE PAGE 4

Director of Public Safety says tactics to be reviewed before Mini-Marathon

SEE PAGE 5

Editor-in-Chief Andrew Mishler explains coverage of Boston bombing

A female runner reacts to the aftermath of the explosions at the Boston Marathon on Monday. Reports state that two other explosive devices were found and disarmed.

PHOTO PROVIDED BY KENSHIN OKUBO, THE DAILY FREE PRESS

BOSTON MASSACRE Authorities say no suspects in case

SEE PAGE 4

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did this or why. And people shouldn’t jump to conclusions before we have all the facts. But make no mistake – we will get to the bottom of this. And we will find out who did this; we’ll find out why they did this. Any responsible individuals, any responsible groups will feel the full weight of justice.

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the gruesome scene inside a medical tent that had been set up to care for fatigued runners, but “they saw a lot.” “They just kept filling up with more and more casualties,” Lisa Davey said. “Most everybody was conscious. They were very dazed.” As the FBI took charge of the investigation, authorities shed no light on a motive or who may have carried out the bombings, and police said they had no suspects in custody. Officials in Washington said there was no immediate claim of responsibility.

Dart

BOSTON — Two bombs exploded in the crowded streets near the finish line of the Boston Marathon on Monday, killing at least three people and injuring more than 140 in a bloody scene of shattered glass and severed limbs that raised alarms that terrorists might have struck again in the U.S. A White House official

The fiery twin blasts took place about 10 seconds and about 100 yards apart, knocking spectators and at least one runner off their feet, shattering windows and sending dense plumes of smoke rising over the street and through the fluttering national flags lining the route. Blood stained the pavement, and huge shards were missing from window panes as high as three stories. “They just started bringing people in with no limbs,” said runner Tim Davey of Richmond, Va. He said he and his wife, Lisa, tried to shield their children’s eyes from

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| THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

speaking on condition of anonymity because the investigation was still unfolding said the attack was being treated as an act of terrorism. President Barack Obama vowed that those responsible will “feel the full weight of justice.” As many as two unexploded bombs were also found near the end of the 26.2-mile course as part of what appeared to be a well-coordinated attack, but they were safely disarmed, according to a senior U.S. intelligence official, who also spoke on condition of anonymity because of the continuing investigation.

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See MARATHON, page 4

ALUMNUS FINISHES RACE PRIOR TO BOMB EXPLOSIONS BSU community finds family, friends in Boston at time

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CAITLIN VANOVERBERGHE iDESK MEDIA COORDINATOR cmvanoverber@bsu.edu

After explosions shook the finish line of the Boston Marathon, the Ball State community scrambled to find family and friends who were in the area. Ball State alumnus Michael Suer had finished the race and was safely back in his hotel room when the bomb went off. “Then I start getting these texts from my brother-in-law, and all these people saying ‘Hey, are you OK? Are you OK?’” Suer said. “We turned on the news and were like ‘wow.’”

Suer was one of three reg- race. One was at the 26-mile istered Boston Marathon marker about 15 minutes beparticipants from Muncie. fore the explosion. Melissa McGrath, assistant “I got a lot of Facebook mesprofessor of speech-language sages from people saying pathology, participated in they are OK which was really the race. Mcnice,” she said. “I Grath’s husband able to call BY THE NUMBERS was informed Ball my house and talk State to tell her to my parents. It students that she made me feel a was unharmed Muncie residents lot better to get in registered for marathon after the attack. touch with them.” Shawn Hickey, a Freshman marBall State junior Indiana residents keting major Brymusical theatre registered for marathon an Kubel’s high major, is from school classmate Boston and said it was watching the had been hard to total participants race from about a get in touch with registered for marathon block away from her family and the explosion site. friends since cellphone tow- Kubel said it took him about an ers were reportedly down for hour and a half to get ahold of some time after the attack took his friend. place. Many of her friends from See REACTIONS, page 4 high school were watching the

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1. UPDATE: Boston Marathon bombing kills 3, injures more than 140 2. Dill to move to previous CBX location 3. Students attempt to break world record for longest hug 4. Bieber criticized for Anne Frank comment 5. Threat leads to absences in N. Ind. schools

COVERAGE SHOWS TERROR The Boston Marathon explosions and their aftermath were captured in chilling images that ran as relentless tape loops of terror online and on TV networks Monday.

ATTACK TO LEAD TO CHANGES Counterterrorism teams will now heavily reconsider tactics to avoid attacks, such as the Boston Marathon terrorist incident, across the world.

CORRECTION In Monday’s edition, the Daily News printed that the men’s volleyball team’s winning streak was the longest winning streak since 1966. It is the longest winning streak since 1982. The Daily News regrets this error.

DN OOPS!

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EDITORIAL BOARD EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Andrew Mishler

PHOTO EDITOR Bobby Ellis

MANAGING EDITOR Steven Williams

ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR Corey Ohlenkamp

NEWS EDITOR Devan Filchak ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR Evie Lichtenwalter DAY EDITOR Sara Nahrwold SPORTS EDITOR Mat Mikesell ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR Matt McKinney FEATURES EDITOR Lindsey Gelwicks ASSISTANT FEATURES EDITOR Anna Ortiz 72HRS EDITOR Michelle Johnson

CONTACT US

55 KILLED BY CAR BOMBS Insurgents in Iraq deployed a series of car bombs as part of highly coordinated attacks that cut across a wide swath of the country Monday, killing at least 55.

Find a mistake in the Daily News? Email us at oops@bsudailynews.com or tweet with #DNoops.

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Visit us online for all the breaking news! Crossword

Sudoku

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

By Michael Mepham

Level: Mild

SOLUTION FOR MONDAY.

ACROSS 1 SOCCER OFFICIALS 5 “YOU __ DEAD!”: “I’M TELLING MOM!” 10 LOCATION 14 BERRY IN HEALTHY SMOOTHIES 15 “NO WAY!” 16 JAZZ CLASSIC “TAKE __ TRAIN” 17 LOST COLOR IN ONE’S CHEEKS 19 GREASY SPOON GRUB 20 HIT HARD 21 LIKE BLUE HAIR 22 “FAUST” DRAMATIST 24 FRED’S DANCING SISTER 26 BARTENDER’S TWIST 28 BEER TO DRINK ON CINCO DE MAYO 30 FOUR QUARTERS 31 TAX AGCY. 32 ARCHAIC “ONCE” 33 TALK SHOW PIONEER JACK 36 RESIDENTIAL BLDG. UNITS 38 STACK OF UNSOLICITED MANUSCRIPTS

41 BUSH SECRETARY OF LABOR ELAINE 43 MADELINE OF “BLAZING SADDLES” 44 EMAILS THE WRONG PERSON, SAY 48 U.S./CANADA’S __ CANALS 49 SUNRISE DIRECTION, IN KÖLN 51 BUYER’S “BEWARE” 53 TRIBAL CARVING 57 GO 58 CITY ON THE RIO GRANDE 59 FEED THE KITTY 61 “COOL” MONETARY AMT. 62 EVEN-HANDED 63 IT MAY BE FILLED WITH A GARDEN HOSE 66 HELSINKI RESIDENT 67 ACTRESS BURSTYN 68 HIP-SWIVELING DANCE 69 VEXES 70 EXTREMELY POOR 71 RUIN BOND’S MARTINI DOWN 1 DAILY GRIND

2 BESIDES CHILE, THE ONLY SOUTH AMERICAN COUNTRY THAT DOESN’T BORDER BRAZIL 3 __ MARKET 4 BREAK A COMMANDMENT 5 “TOY STORY” BOY 6 FEND OFF 7 DANCE AROUND 8 SOMME SALT 9 WHERE NIKE HEADQUARTERS IS 10 CONSIDERABLE, AS DISCOUNTS 11 TERSE CRITICAL APPRAISAL 12 TIES TO A POST, AS A HORSE 13 ART GALLERY PROPS 18 DELIGHTFUL SPOT 23 “PAPER MOON” OSCAR WINNER TATUM 25 MANY, INFORMALLY 27 CHANGE FROM VAMPIRE TO BAT, SAY 29 KWIK-E-MART OWNER ON “THE SIMPSONS” 34 EXTEND AN INVITATION FOR

35 “I KNEW IT!” 37 THORN IN ONE’S SIDE 39 APPEARS STRIKINGLY ON THE HORIZON 40 CO. LETTERHEAD ABBR. 41 WELCOME SUMMER FORECAST 42 NOTICEABLE LIPSTICK COLOR 45 COME DOWN HARD ON 46 FILLED PASTA 47 TOP-NOTCH 48 GOLDEN SLAM WINNER GRAF 50 SAID 52 AWAY FROM THE WIND 54 TAKES HOME 55 PUNCH BOWL SPOON 56 OVER AND DONE 60 HARD TO SEE 64 FRENCH LANDMASS 65 ACIDITY NOS.

SOLUTION FOR MONDAY.

bsudaily.com


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TUESDAY, APRIL 16, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM | PAGE 3

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HAPS

EVENTS THIS WEEK

TODAY Off a weekend conference series, Ball State baseball will play a home game against Indiana Tech at 3 p.m.

SATURDAY Ball State men’s tennis wraps up its regular season with an away match at 11 a.m. against Buffalo.

Ball State football’s spring practice wraps up with the annual Spring Game at 3 p.m.

Gardner moves to D-line

PACERS’ GAME AT BOSTON CANCELLED

To the average football fan, a position change from wide receiver to defensive end could be a radical swap. That move is exactly what Ball State’s Trey Gardner is adjusting to this spring. “It was just a chance to get on the field,” Gardner said. “It was a tough decision but I was ready to go ahead with it so I could play.” In his two seasons as wide receiver for Ball State, Gardner made four appearances, but only one game in 2012. In the offseason, he talked with defensive line coach Chad Wilt and came up with the idea to make the position change to defensive end. But the move from a skill position to the line isn’t as unusual after looking at the skill sets needed for both positions. Both wide receivers and defensive ends must be able to burst off the line of scrimmage quickly. They also have similarities in their techniques to getting past an opposing player with their hands, hips and feet. Since Ball State’s defensive scheme calls for a pass rush defensive end, the players at that position are slimmer

Junior Jennifer Gilbert receives a high-five as she rounds third base after her home run during the game against Butler on April 9. Gilbert was named MAC player of the week.

Wideout played in just 1 game in 2 seasons on offense MAT MIKESELL SPORTS EDITOR | @MatMikesell

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Trey Gardner walks off the field at Indiana after Ball State’s victory over the Hoosiers on Sept. 15, 2012. Gardner is switching from offense to defense during the 2013 season.

than stereotypical linemen. “The rush defensive end is kind of a hybrid position for us,” Wilt said. “He’s going to drop, he’s going to do some coverage stuff. We don’t have to let him get in over tackles a lot.” Wilt compared Gardner to current starting defensive end Jonathan Newsome. On the depth chart, Newsome is listed at 6-feet-3-inches and 236 pounds. Gardner is

under two hours.

Q: After a long run, what’s the first thing you go to for food?

The Daily News is introducing you to lesser-known players and coaches on the Ball State football team this spring. Check back until the Spring Game on April 20 for interviews with different players and coaches. Today’s edition features defensive line coach Chad Wilt. Wilt is from Carlisle, Pa., and graduated from Taylor University in 2000. He is in his third season as a coach for Ball State.

A: If it’s a really good run, I’m going to try to stay healthy. I love fruits, fresh fruits and some yogurt. If my inner fat kid wants to come out, which he certainly comes out too often, give me a good steak dinner down at St. Elmos. I love St. Elmos. I love seafood. Salmons, shrimps crabs. It’s hard for me to choose one. I do love food.

A: I love to run. I’ve been training for the past couple years and done the Indy halfmarathon. I love to mountain bike too. If it’s outdoors and active, I’m probably going to be all for it.

Q: In your coaching career, who has been the most difficult player to gameplan against?

Q: What’s one thing about you that a lot of people don’t know?

Q: What was your best time?

A: Last year, I ran the Indy half-marathon in a little over one hour and 50 minutes, so

NEW YORK (AP) — The Boston Celtics’ home game against the Indiana Pacers scheduled for Tuesday night has been canceled because of the Boston Marathon bombings. The NBA said Monday that the game will not be rescheduled. The Celtics and Pacers already have clinched playoff berths and are locked into certain seedings in the Eastern Conference. Two bombs exploded in the packed streets near the finish line of the Boston Marathon on Monday.

DN FILE PHOTO JONATHAN MIKSANEK

DN FILE PHOTO BOBBY ELLIS

listed at 6-feet-4-inches and 216 pounds. But the biggest difference Wilt said for a wide receiver moving to the line is being able to be physical on every play as opposed to playing out in open space. Gardner has been studying Newsome during the spring practices to better adjust going from a two-point stance to getting a hand on the ground every play.

But one skill Gardner said could help him at defensive end is knowing the quarterback’s tendencies. “Just knowing when he’s going to pull his arm back, so I can put my arms up to knock the ball down,” Gardner said. Gardner will spend the rest of the spring practice and the preseason adjusting to his new role, hoping to see more playing time than he has in the last two seasons.

GETTING TO KNOW: COACH CHAD WILT

MATT McKINNEY ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR @Matt_D_McKinney

AP|BRIEF

Q: Have you had the shrimp cocktail from St. Elmos?

A: Absolutely. It’ll clear your sinuses right up. I love the shrimp cocktail. I was down there a couple weeks ago and I had that.

A: Devin Hester. When I was a grad assistant at Virginia, we played Miami when Devin Hester was there and he was special. He could do it all. Run it, catch it, return it. He was certainly a guy who you had to always know where he was. In 2009, I coached

against CJ Spiller from Clemson. Phenomenal player. Phenomenal. Kind of the same guy. Speed, power, make you miss in CHAD WILT the open field in the return. Another guy who just did it all. We [Ball State] didn’t have to see Sammy Watkins this year when we played Clemson. Another one would be Ryan Broyles from Oklahoma. We played Oklahoma two years ago. He’d be the third guy. These guys are special players.

Q: What’s your favorite thing about coaching?

A: Relationships with the players. Spending time with them, at numerous levels, seeing them get it. Whether it’s the schemes, whether it’s the techniques or for them to see what life is about, what the future could be for them. Seeing them grow up and mature.

Nick Miles is going to be going into his third year with us. The maturation process that Nick has gone through in his three years with us, that’s the most rewarding part.

Q: What’s the thing that makes you the maddest as a coach?

A: When players don’t play hard. A guy that’s going through the motions. And that could be in individual skill development, it could be in a scrimmage situation or it could be in a game. When you just say “Man. He’s not playing hard.“ Everybody is going to make a mental mistake. Everybody’s going to screw up an assignment. That doesn’t mean it’s acceptable, but that’s going to happen. The thing that you do control is your effort.

Q: What do you like to do when you’re not coaching?

A: I love to read. I like spy novels, espionage, stuff like that. I like some personal development things too, leadership, spiritual improvement books. A variety of books.

CARDS SWEEP MAC AWARDS FOR 5TH TIME THIS SEASON Junior Gilbert ties season record for home runs with 19 DAKOTA CRAWFORD STAFF REPORTER | @DakotaCrawford_ Ball State softball is on a roll. A pair of Mid-American Conference West honors went hand-in-hand with the team’s perfect 5-0 record over the last week. Junior left fielder Jennifer Gilbert was named the MAC West Player of the Week. In the team’s last five games, Gilbert accumulated 16 RBIs, eight runs scored and six home runs. Now with 19 home runs, Gilbert has tied the single-season conference record set by Kelli Metzger of Akron in 1999. Metzger previously held the record for career RBIs as well, with 167. Gilbert not only tied, but easily moved past that mark last week with her new total of 173 career RBIs. Coach Craig Nicholson knows that great individual play is important, but also knows that it comes as a result of great team play. “Having a constant in the middle of your order is great for an offense,” Nicholson said of Gilbert. “The people around her are doing a pretty good job. If you’re going to drive in that many runs, you’re going to have to have people with good at-bats and people on base.” Junior Taylor Rager, for example, has started just one less

game than Gilbert this season. Along with a .418 batting average, Rager has accumulated 51 hits and 30 RBIs. Senior outfielder Amanda Carpenter has added 31 RBIs and 25 runs of her own. It has not been all about offense though. The MAC West recognizes one player and one pitcher on a weekly basis. Last week, a Ball State player earned each honor. It was the Cardinals’ fifth sweep of the awards this season. Freshman pitcher Nicole Steinbach shares the MAC Pitcher of the Week honors with Central Michigan’s Kara Dornbos. Steinbach opened the week with a win over Akron. The freshman held her conference opponent to just two hits and three walks over seven innings, all while throwing five strikeouts. Steinbach has a 2.29 ERA this season. With 16 starts and 15 complete games on the season, she has given up 113 hits while striking out 90 hitters. Ball State has been offensively dominant in recent years. In seven years with Nicholson as coach, the program has set countless records and earned multiple accolades as a result of their high-powered offenses. The solid play from both sides of the ball will only ensure that more individual players have the opportunity to earn recognition from outside the program. Ball State will return to action at 6 p.m. on Wednesday at Ohio State.

Close games are Ball State’s Achilles’ heel in 2013 Cardinals have been making small mistakes in important moments despite holding lead DAVID POLASKI STAFF REPORTER Ball State encountered anoth| @DavidPolaski er one of those on Sunday in its

DN PHOTO JORDAN HUFFER

Kyle Raleigh pitches against Central Michigan on April 12. Ball State will take on Indiana Tech today at 3 p.m.

Ball State baseball led Bowling Green 1-0 in the top of the fourth last Tuesday at Ball Diamond. The visitors hit a deep fly ball out to center field, where Ball State outfielder Wes Winkle settled under it, ready to send his team back into the dugout. He misjudged the ball; it came down and hit Winkle in the head. The ball rolled to the wall and both runners scored, giving Bowling Green the lead. The play was a microcosm of the season for Ball State so far. Little mistakes leading to bigger problems is an issue Ball State coach Rich Maloney has seen all season. “Whenever a little thing seems to happen with us, that little thing ends up being a bigger thing,” Maloney said. “That’s one of the things in building the program that we have to get out of our system.”

6-3 loss to Central Michigan. Leading 3-2 in the top of the ninth, Ball State was looking to put away the final three batters and win its second straight Mid-American Conference series. With a shot to get the save, lefty Miles Moeller hit the first batter of the inning. The hit batter was the little mistake that snowballed into a big inning for Central Michigan. Three singles, a double and a walk later, the Chippewas had six runs and Maloney was left scratching his head, wondering what went wrong. “The guys have to understand when something happens that they don’t want, they have to play through it,” Maloney said. “Now there have been times when we did play through it, just not enough this season.” Ball State played through it just an inning earlier. Central Michigan put its fastest player

on base and moved him to third through a steal and sacrifice fly, ready to tie the game. With a 3-2 count and two outs, Moeller fired a pitch up and in. The batter swung and missed, ending the inning and igniting the Ball State faithful. Unfortunately for Ball State, it couldn’t score in the bottom of the eighth, meaning there was no margin for error in the top of the ninth. “Our margins are so small that we have to grind it out, we’re not a team of stars,” Maloney said. “And when they’re that small, the little things show up more.” Good teams find a way to win games they deserve to lose. For Ball State, it has been a season where it has been losing games it deserves to win, a signature of a rebuilding team. To the Cardinals’ credit, the team has already won more games this year than all of last season. Despite all the inopportune errors, missed chances to get a timely hit, or a dropped fly ball in center that could have ended the inning, Maloney said this team

RECENT CLOSE LOSSES APRIL 14

BSU leads 3-2 in the top of the ninth, BSU loses 6-3. APRIL 9

Game tied at 4 in the seventh, BSU loses 7-5. APRIL 5

BSU leads 11-9 in the bottom of the eighth, loses 12-11. APRIL 3

BSU leads 8-1 in the fourth, loses 10-9. MARCH 29

BSU leads 2-0 in the bottom of the seventh, loses 6-2. has shown a lot of progress. The next step, Maloney said, is becoming mentally sound enough to make those game-altering plays that are the difference between a win and a loss. “We have to get a little bit better in some of those little facets and not let a little bump in the road turn into a big bump,” Maloney said. “Sometimes we do that and we’re pretty good. Sometimes we don’t, that’s why we’re a team that’s hovering around .500 right now.”


PAGE 4 | TUESDAY, APRIL 16, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM

BOSTON MASSACRE NEWS@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/BSUDAILYNEWS

HISTORY OF U.S. BOMBINGS

Here are some of the worst bombings in the U.S. dating to the 1800s, including some famous attempts that failed. April 15, 2013 Two bombs explode in the packed streets near the finish line of the Boston Marathon, killing three people and injuring at least 144. Jan. 17, 2011 A backpack bomb is placed along a Martin Luther King Day parade route in Spokane, Wash., meant to kill and injure participants in a civil rights march, but is found and disabled before it can explode. White supremacist Kevin Harpham is convicted and sentenced to 32 years in federal prison. May 1, 2010 Pakistani immigrant Faisal Shahzad leaves an explosives-laden sport utility vehicle in New York’s Times Square, hoping to detonate it on a busy night. Street vendors spot smoke coming from the vehicle and the bomb is disabled. Shahzad is arrested as he tries to leave the country and is sentenced to life in prison. Dec. 25, 2009 The so-called “underwear bomber,” Nigerian Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab, is subdued by passengers and crew after trying to blow up an airliner heading from Paris to Detroit using explosives hidden in his undergarments. He’s sentenced to life in prison.

Obama addresses attack President doesn’t call incident a terrorist act until later announcement | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON — A stony-faced President Barack Obama declared that those responsible for the explosions at the Boston Marathon “will feel the full weight of justice,” but he urged a nervous nation not to jump to conclusions. Top lawmakers declared the deadly incident an act of terrorism, and a White House official said it was being treated that way. Obama, speaking from the White House late Monday, pointedly avoided using the words “terror” or “terrorism,” saying officials “still

do not know who did this or why.” However, a White House official later said the incident at the famous race was being treated as terrorism. “We will find out who did this. We’ll find out why they did this,” Obama said in his brief statement. “Any responsible individuals, any responsible groups, will feel the full weight of justice.” Authorities said at least three people were killed and more than 144 injured during two explosions near the finish of the marathon. A senior U.S. intelligence official said two other explosive devices were found near the end of the 26.2-mile course. The president said the government would increase security around the United States “as necessary,” but he did not say whether his administration thought the

incident was part of a larger plot. Following a briefing with intelligence officials, Maryland Rep. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger, top Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, said most urban areas in the country would be under high alert. “We want to make sure this is not a pattern,” Ruppersberger said, adding that people could expect to see greater security at public areas such as train stations, ports and baseball games. On Capitol Hill, Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., told reporters that she had been in contact with U.S. intelligence agencies and it was her understanding “that it’s a terrorist incident.” Feinstein, who chairs the Senate Intelligence Committee, said the officials reported no advance warning that “there was an

Boston bombs may not have used cell phones.

POWER SOURCE

SHRAPNEL RAPNEL

DN GRAPHIC

July 27, 1996 A bomb explodes at Centennial Olympic Park in Atlanta during the Summer Games, killing two people and injuring more than 100. Eric Robert Rudolph is arrested in 2003. He pleads guilty and is sentenced to life in prison. MCT PHOTO

Emergency personnel assist the victims at the scene of a bomb blast during the Boston Marathon on Monday. Three people died and at least 144 were injured.

WE REPORT ON REACTIONS: Participant delays flight home NATIONAL NEWS FOR A REASON | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

There’s a standard that each newspaper, professional or collegiate, has to meet in order to run a full page of coverage on a certain story. At the Ball State Daily News, the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, met this standard. The 2012 presidential election met this standard. And in today’s issue, the bombings at the Boston Marathon meet this standard. As journalists, we’re as guilty as anyone in sometimes reading through stories about war, crime and death and not taking the severity of the situation into account. It isn’t just names and numbers that appear in the newspaper. It is real people. The 8-year-old boy who died in the bombings was someone’s son. The other two people who died had family members and friends who, as soon as they heard about the bombings, prayed that they weren’t involved. No matter who these people were, they made impacts on people’s lives. And now, they’re gone. The Ball State Daily News decided to run coverage of the Boston bombings on the entire front page for a reason. We want to respect the tragedy in Boston by giving it ­— and you, the readers — the coverage it deserves. The same principle applies to our decision to use “Boston Massacre” as the main headline. This is a massacre, and calling it anything less is a disservice to the victims. April 15, 2013, will take its place in history as a dark day in American history. From now on, when people think of “Boston Massacre,” they’ll think of this day, not the incident of 1770. That is the gravity of this incident. With the multiple U.S. mass shootings of 2012 in mind, it’s important to remember that no matter how hard we try to prevent incidents like this, a tragedy can manage to cause suffering in a split second. As we wrote in our editorial on page 5, what matters most isn’t how we as a country prepare, it’s how we respond. The first step toward responding is to be informed. For most, that likely started by watching the news Monday and reading coverage online, and it continues today by reading this edition of the Daily News. The paper today not only reflects the significance of the bombings in Boston, but what we believe to be important for our readers to know. We don’t want you to just be informed. We want you to remember why it’s important to be informed.

CHARGE

Intentionally entionally added to ct harm. The inflict bombs in Boston impacted people on their lower extremities and largely consisted ball bearings.

Jan. 20, 1998 A bombing at an abortion clinic in Birmingham, Ala., kills one guard and injures a nurse. Eric Robert Rudolph is suspected in the case.

ANDREW MISHLER IS THE EDITOR OF THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS. WRITE TO ANDREW AT EDITOR@ BSUDAILYNEWS.COM

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Jan. 22, 1998 Theodore Kaczynski pleads guilty in Sacramento, Calif., to being the Unabomber in return for a sentence of life in prison without parole. He’s locked up in the federal Supermax prison in Colorado for killing three people and injuring 23 during a nationwide bombing spree between 1978 and 1995.

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

THE BASICS OF AN IED

A look at the typical components of an improvised explosive device SWITCH Engages fusing switch. INITIATOR

Sept. 11, 2001 Four commercial jets are hijacked by 19 al-Qaida militants and used as suicide bombs, bringing down the two towers of New York City’s World Trade Center and crashing into the Pentagon. Nearly 3,000 people are killed in New York, Washington and Pennsylvania.

SOURCE: The Associated Press

attack on the way.” California Republican Rep. Ed Royce, chairman of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, said it was a “terrorist attack” and “yet another stark reminder that we must remain vigilant in the face of continuing terrorist threats.” The White House said Obama refrained from publicly calling the attacks terrorism because it was early in the investigation and the perpetrators were unknown. But the official said any time there is an event with multiple explosions going off at the same time and aimed at hurting people, the administration considers that terrorism. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because the investigation was still under way and the official was not authorized to be quoted by name.

“I was really shaken up when I saw the tweets about it,” he said. “I didn’t know [the word] ‘explosion,’ that’s not very descriptive. I didn’t know what was up. So then I saw Twitter start blowing up about that and then I realized my friend told me he was in Boston watching his mom [running].” Suer and Hickey both commented on how important the marathon is to the Boston community. Schools are closed that day and there is usually a large number of attendees. “Today’s a big celebration, happy day for everybody and then this happens,” Suer said. “Everyone is out celebrating and it’s just packed with

people and everyone is out just having a good time. You really feel bad for the families that are affected.” That fun and friendly atmosphere has certainly changed. “We went out for dinner just now and walked back. It’s a two block walk and we saw seven police cars, some [officers] standing on the corners driving up and down the roads with their lights on,” he said. “While we were sitting outside, we saw at least one police officer walk by with a German shepherd sniffing around, trying to look for things. The cops are just out everywhere. Pretty much the whole city is on lock down.” According to the Associated Press, the Federal Aviation Ad-

ministrations established a no-fly zone over the area shortly following the explosion, and canceled flights out of Boston’s Logan International Airport. “We’re glad that we weren’t flying out today,” Suer said. “I really wouldn’t want to go to the airport right now and have to fly out. Who knows, it’s awfully scary.” “It’s a weird feeling,” Kubel said. “A feeling you shouldn’t have to go through when you find out that someone that is really close to you is involved in such a tragic situation like that, and it could have been a lot worse so thankfully it wasn’t, at least for him and his family.” Sara Nahrwold and Devan Filchak contributed to this story.

year, despite the Boston events. “You know, there are people trying to hurt others,” Lopez said. “They are going to do whatever they have to bypass security.” Lopez ran at last year’s 500 Mini-Marathon and said there was little to no security, something he thinks will change. “There really wasn’t much security at all,” Lopez said. “I honestly just walked right through and got in my corral.” Lopez said he can see how it would be hard to completely secure something like the Boston Marathon just based on the size of the track and that spectators can just walk up to the track. Riggs said he wants to ensure there is adequate security at all large scale events in Indianapolis. “With any large event we spend an inordinate amount of time planning for safety and making sure our citizens are safe,” Riggs said. Dianna Neff, a senior secondary English education major, said she plans to run a marathon in June and isn’t going to let something like this get under her skin. “If you let these things scare you, you aren’t going to be able to do anything,” she said. “You will be afraid to leave the house.”

She said she follows several professional runners on Twitter who ran at Monday’s Boston marathon and rushed to the computer to guarantee their safety after she heard about the bombing. Neff said running is something she isn’t going to stop, doing regardless of any terrorist attacks. “I plan on doing this forever, I mean until my knees give out at least,” Neff said. Lopez echoed the sentiment. “It doesn’t worry me at all, you can’t worry about stuff you do every day,” Neff said. Lopez said he had a friend who ran in the race and finished before the bombs; but when he heard the news, his thoughts first went to all of the people who could have been affected or hurt. Riggs said it is far too early for his office to be able to make any official statements regarding changes to security at any Indianapolis events, but he is trying to look to Boston for guidance. “We always learn from one another,” Riggs said. “Just continue to watch the news, and see the information that is coming out. We will be releasing any information here in Indianapolis on [the public safety] website.”

BOSTON TRAGEDY FORCES LOCAL MARATHONS TO REEVALUATE Ball State marathon participants still not worried about security

|

CHRISTOPHER STEPHENS CHIEF REPORTER castephens@bsu.edu

Tragedy at the Boston Marathon less than a month before Indianapolis’ Mini-Marathon has caused a reason to reevaluate security. The Indianapolis 500 Mini-Marathon is scheduled to take place May 4, with an expected turnout of 35,000 participants. “Right now there are no threats to the city of Indianapolis,” said Indianapolis Public Safety Director Troy Riggs. “What we will do is monitor the situation in Boston; we will learn if there is anything we can do to strengthen our security measures.” Riggs said his office is trying to put together information so they can have a clearer picture of what happened in Boston on Monday and look to move forward with any information they receive. Sam Lopez, a wellness management graduate student, said he plans to run in the marathon this

The explosive force of the bomb. Experts speculate the Boston bombs used blackpowder.

SOURCE: Terrorism and WMDs by John Pichtel

MARATHON: Public asked to stay indoors after attacks | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 Police said three people were killed. An 8-year-old boy was among the dead, according to a person who talked to a friend of the family and spoke on condition of anonymity. Hospitals reported at least 144 people injured, at least 15 of them critically. The victims’ injuries included broken bones, shrapnel wounds and ruptured eardrums. At Massachusetts General Hospital, Alisdair Conn, chief of emergency services, said: “This is something I’ve never seen in my 25 years here ... this amount of carnage in the civilian population. This is what we expect from war.” Some 23,000 runners took part in the race, one of the world’s oldest and most prestigious marathons. One of Boston’s biggest annual events, the race winds up near Copley Square, not far from the landmark Prudential Center and the Boston Public Library. It is hosted on Patriots Day, which commemorates the first battles of the American Revolution. Boston Police Commissioner Edward Davis asked people to stay indoors or go back to their hotel rooms and avoid crowds as squads checked parcels and bags left along the route. Investigators didn’t know whether the bombs were hidden in mailboxes or trash cans.

QUAD TALK

IN RESPONSE TO THE BOSTON MARATHON BOMBINGS

« I’m hoping

that it wasn’t a purposeful thing, that it wasn’t someone doing it to harm people. I hope humanity is not that bad.

»

CALEB DAY, a sophomore public communications major

« It’s definitely

getting the press that it deserves, it should be really interesting to see where it goes.

»

KANE SAN MIGUEL, a sophomore public relations major


TUESDAY, APRIL 16, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM | PAGE 5

FORUM

OUR VIEW

ATTACK SHOULD BE REMINDER TO BE EMPATHETIC

AT ISSUE: 

Boston Marathon bombing reminds Americans of vulnerability

We all remember where we were on that fateful day. Some of us were taking the ISTEP test, some were at the doctor’s office and others were home sick. But no matter how little we understood about what was going on, we all know where we were on Sept. 11, 2001. It split our lives into two categories: Pre- and post9/11. But our sense of vulnerability has gone back down since the aftermath. We’ve watched footage of the Middle East, we’ve adapted to annoying airport security procedures and with the exception of shootings, we’ve remained relatively silent about attacks on the home front. No matter where you live, though, the terrorist attack at the Boston Marathon on Monday is a reminder that we’re still fragile. As of 11 p.m. Monday, three people died and at least 144 people were being treated for injuries from the blasts. Although the death toll isn’t as staggering as 9/11 or other recent tragic events, that doesn’t mean it’s less

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significant. In the wake of the Aurora and Sandy Hook shootings, reporting on unimaginable and graphic tragedy has become routine for news media. People turning to social media to spread the word, express condolences and tell people to pray for victims has also become routine. But there’s another side of the coin, the side that says we’ve become jaded and have lost empathy. Mere hours after the bombing, people used images from the attack to make memes, including a picture of a victim being pushed in a wheelchair, his leg blown off with bones hanging down and the words “Go to the marathon they said... It’ll be fun they said...� Other memes with phrases such as “As if I needed another reason not to go running,� “Come join us... we’re having a blast� and “Must have been from I ran� started floating around the Internet by Monday evening. But it’s no laughing matter. Tragic events like the marathon bombing, Sandy Hook and Aurora shouldn’t

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just be a talking point or a part of Internet fun. We’ve become a culture of crisis and don’t seem to have as much of a sense of loss across the board as we once did. In order to truly be influential, we all need to do more. We need to use those heartbreaking images of mangled bodies to remember that lives were changed and destroyed. Just like Americans came together after 9/11, it’s time to rise from the ashes of these bombs and show those who bring hate into the world the power of the human spirit. The American Red Cross said it had enough blood to help Boston Marathon victims, but it may need more soon, and the Salvation Army is in contact with Boston authorities to figure out what types of donations victims need. Not only should people of our generation remember where we were on April 15, 2013, we should remember what we did to help.

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Personal growth colors this year, as you shed limitations and develop healthier, happier practices. Self and public image both get a boost, as communication buzz opens new doors and amplifies your message. After June, the pull to renew and beautify your home calls. Fill the space with love and laughter.

Aries (March 21-April 19) Today is an 8 -- Stay close to home, and celebrate your friends and family. Others may come to you with problems. Simply listening can be a great help. Don’t tell everything you know.

Cancer (June 22-July 22)Today is a 9 -- Believing in yourself is part of the game. Go and accomplish the impossible. It’s worth trying.Your intuition lines up with your actions.You’re especially charming, too. Keep practicing.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Today is a 9 -- Establish your message clearly, and maintain team communications.You’re entering a two-day responsibility phase. Use it to forge ahead. Work interferes with travel. Use your partner’s ideas. It’s okay to disrupt the routine.

Taurus (April 20-May 20) Today is a 9 -- What you learn now can help you immensely. Study intensely.Your partner has some constructive criticism; listen like each word is worth gold. Ponder the possibilities that arise.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)Today is an 8 -- Complete projects now. Listen to advice from an authority figure. Don’t be afraid to ask questions. Learn new tricks. Postpone a shopping trip. Finish up old business today and tomorrow. Provide prizes. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)Today is an 8 -- Gather input from others.You’re learning quickly. Don’t shop for a few days, or get sucked into distracting discussions. Stay focused. Consider all options.Your status is rising. Love grows.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Today is an 8 -- Write down long-range goals. Strategize to increase your reserves. Don’t talk about money, or offer to pick up the bill. Do that after you nail your savings goal.

Gemini (May 21-June 21) Today is an 8 -- Natural beauty catches your eye. Provide detailed information, and listen for what others can provide. Keep careful notes. Finish what’s already on your lists. Take time out to get lost in a sunset.

 

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Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Today is an 8 -- Manage finances. A lack of funds threatens your plans. Be frugal, and keep quiet about money for now. Better cash flow lies ahead. Accept a gift. Intuition prompts an action.

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 ATTENTION International Students FREE Dinner at Christian Campus House April 17th @ 6 p.m.!

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Today is an 8 -- Today and tomorrow are especially good for compromise, which is useful when controversy arises. Keep accounts separate. Don’t waste your words or money.You’re building security. They’re saying nice things about you. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Today is a 9 -- There’s too much work coming in. Gather support from partners, and make your workplace more comfortable. Select what you want carefully. Spend some now to save more over time. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Today is a 9 -- Your nerves will become less frazzled soon. Ignore a nasty tone. A goal gets achieved. Accept a loved one’s support and a compliment.You’re changing how you see yourself. Talk like you mean it.


PAGE 6 | TUESDAY, APRIL 16, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM

FEATURES FEATURES@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/DN_FEATURES

WEDNESDAY Hold the trip to the liquor store and forget the bar stool. 72 HRS gives the low-down on homebrewing.

Lawsuits and empty store fronts surround the Village. Check out the few businesses that have passed the test of time.

THURSDAY As 4/20 approaches, take a look into the life of a pot dealer dealing on campus between classes.

STUDENTS BEHIND TWITTER ACCOUNTS REVEAL SECRETS Ball State’s big names in social media explain how they began, why they do it JERMEY ERVIN CHIEF REPORTER | jrervin@bsu.edu

DN PHOTO COREY OHLENKAMP

Monica Ramirez, a freshman musical theatre major, plays Colby in “Smudge.” Colby taunts her child with a carrot as she deals with the fact that she is repulsed by her own baby.

MUTANT BABY

A couple’s life changes when they spot a strange creature on the sonogram

|

DANIEL BROUNT SENIOR COPY EDITOR djbrount@bsu.edu

Nicholas and Colby were expecting their first child, but ended up with something very different — a smudge. The baby, described as “sloppy and purplish grey,” gains the title of smudge due to her deformities and abnormal appearance. Premiering tonight in the Cave Theatre, “Smudge” explores the dynamics of parenthood. Director Kyle Stoffers wants the audience to appreciate healthy children because not many people understand how common autism and birth defects are. “My main goal was to produce something that was honest and different from most of the other shows that we produce in the Cave, in that it would entertain as well as make the audience think about their own expectations as far as parenthood,” he said. The baby, known as both Smudge and Cassandra, is deformed, and the parents have to overcome their original hopes and take care of her. Monica Ramirez, a freshman musical theatre major, plays Colby. As the mother of the child, she has to interact with the baby, who is represented by a carriage onstage. “Working with an inanimate object, that’s been really hard, responding to beeps and flashes of light being called by a stage manager,” she said. “That is a challenge and an obstacle.” Brent Eickhoff, assistant director and a sophomore directing and theatre education major, worked on manu-

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“Smudge” WHERE

Cave Theatre, AC 007 WHEN

7:30 p.m. Today-Saturday 2:30 p.m. Saturday - Sunday COST

$6, available at the door or University Theatre Box Office facturing the carriage holding the baby. He used a variety of objects, such as color-changing light bulbs and fiber-optic cables, to create it. For inspiration, he looked to see how it was made in past productions of the play. “Figuring out how to build the thing is the hardest part,” he said. “It’s not that complicated; it’s simple enough to figure out once you start reading it.” In addition to the technology bringing the baby to life, the actors work to bring it to life through their characters. To help visualize what they are working with, each drew a depiction of the smudge. “It’s been really hard when you have situations that need to build and you don’t really have anything to respond to,” said Jordan Rowe, a freshman theatre studies major playing Nicholas. “You have to imagine it in your head.” As an all-freshmen cast, the actors also had to work to connect with their much-older characters. Jeff Pierpoint, a freshman musical theatre major, said he is very different from his character Pete, Nicholas’ older brother. “Because we’ve spent so

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much time in this production, we all have become very cohesive,” he said. “The amount of time we’ve spent working together has allowed us to delve into the story. We’ve all made relationships with the story that we’re trying to tell.” Despite the actors being different from their characters in both age and personality, Stoffers felt they were the right actors for the production. “It’s definitely great to work with a cast of all freshmen because I had the option of upperclassmen people, but I felt like these people together

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would be the best to tell the story,” Stoffers said. “I got to cast the people that I wanted and it just happened that they were freshmen.” Just as Stoffers picked a young cast, he called himself a young director. “One of the biggest challenges would be just being a young director and just not really knowing how to form the production as a whole, just putting together a show of this magnitude that has such a complicated message but that is told in a simple way,” he said.

The Freemasons of Indiana Congratulate

You

Andrew Miller & Kasey Mock

can

Whose achievements have earned them a scholarship awarded by

avoid

WE ARE ALWAYS IN NEED OF:

PHOTOGRAPHERS n REPORTERS n DESIGNERS COPY EDITORS n VIDEOGRAPHERS n CARTOONISTS

DN PHOTO COREY OHLENKAMP

Monica Ramirez and Jordan Rowe kiss after looking at their baby’s sonogram at the start of the play. The play has an all-freshman cast.

www.iglsb.org

The Grand Lodge F. & A.M. of Indiana Scholarship Fund

Mr. & Ms. Ball State Bodybuilding Competition Wednesday, April 17th, @ 7pm in Emens All tickets $5.00! Tickets available at the door the night of the event.

Note: The names of all account administrators featured in this story are pseudonyms. The Daily News respects these individuals’ desire for anonymity. Last year it was Ball State memes. This year it’s Ball State Secret Admirers. Ball State students clearly have a passion for these Internet-based cultural blips. Ball State students also have a pronounced and persistent appreciation for the peer-run social media accounts that relate to campus culture. Drinking Redefined (@JoAnnWhora) has accumulated 5,122 followers. When Serenity Poe began Party Updates (@BSUpartyupdate), she had something besides drinking on her mind. Poe wanted to help students with limited social connections. “It just kind of stemmed from representing the plain Joe’s and Jane’s of college that didn’t have access to parties but have every right to access to those parties,” Poe said. Freshman speech pathology major Katie Simmons has used Party Updates when coordinating her weekend activities. “Usually parties publicized on Twitter are a lot bigger,” Simmons said. Simmons said these parties often boasted an unusually mixed bag of people. “What I’m doing is working,” Poe said. “As much as we hate to admit it, alcohol is a big part of our lives in college. It gives us something to group around, something to celebrate. It’s a freedom thing.” Ball State Makeouts (@BSUMakeOuts) didn’t broadcast the lead up to the party, but the aftermath. The account recently deactivated and its administrator, Alex Bragg, could not be reached after the account ended. While the site maintained somewhat of a notorious reputation among party people with a propensity for PDA, Bragg’s choice may have put many minds at ease. All it took for Frog Baby to have an unofficial voice on the web was four freshmen who wanted in on the social media action. Administrators said they try to keep their content Ball State related so they can tap into the existing community. This leads to a better follower reaction. “Everything is free game, no racial slurs, no political views,” representative of the Frog Baby account Taylor Hartley said. BSU Chug that Beer (@ Chugg_a_Lugg) grew from Connor Varney’s personal account. “I got popular by sitting on my roof tweeting funny things about alcohol and living the

THE ACCOUNTS PARTY UPDATES (@BSUPARTYUPDATE)

On the feed: Locations and information about submitted parties. Party-themed observations and quips from the adminstrator. Origin: Wanted to help people find a place to party Followers: 2,636 BALL STATE MAKEOUTS (@BSUMAKEOUTS)

On the feed: Retweets of submitted photos featuring people caught making out Origin: Administrator took a trip to Purdue University, saw its version of the feed and decided to bring it to Ball State Followers: The feed has been disconnected BSU CHUGG THAT BEER (@CHUGG_A_LUGG)

On the feed: party information, photos, quips from the administrator Origin: Administrator’s personal account grew popular Followers: 1,054 CAMPUS COWBOY (@BALLSTATECOWBOY)

On the feed: The adminstrator’s countrythemed tweets Origin: Administrator’s personal account grew popular Followers: Discontinued, more than 4,500 at peak college dream,” Varney said. “I didn’t really care about getting a lot of followers.” The feed’s success prompted Varney to invite his audience to parties he would host. Varney is a marketing major and said he uses “basic selling techniques” when posting on the feed. One account that will not be passed down for posterity is Campus Cowboy (@BallStateCowboy). The account grew from its administrator Luke Bowen’s personal account into a Ball State sensation. The account topped out at more than 4,500 followers at its peak. What originally presented fun grew tiring over time. “I’m getting married,” Campus Cowboy said. “I’ll have a real life instead of sitting on the computer and wasting away time in class.” There isn’t a clear-cut reason why these things are so popular, but if you ask Serenity Poe, it’s about unity. “It’s definitely pride, coming from a school that often gets put down for being ‘not as good’ as IU or Purdue,” Poe said. “I have a lot of pride in the people I go to school with. I think I’m surrounded by great people.”

For more, go to bsudaily.com

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DN 04-16-13