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Highlighting, re-reading not as effective, according to psychology researchers PODNAR CHIEF REPORTER | RACHEL rmpodnar@bsu.edu

H

igh school teachers have instructed students how to pass standardized tests throughout the years, but study methods they often use aren’t as effective as they may think, according to a new study.

A 2012 study published in Psychological Science in the Public Interest, “Improving Students’ Learning With Effective Learning Techniques,” reviewed studies on 10 techniques based on cognitive and educational psychology research, and found that some study skills such as highlighting or re-reading are not as effective as they are widely-used. The researchers found common study techniques like summarizing, highlighting and rereading were rated as having low utility, less

than self-explanation and in-depth questioning. Practice testing and distributing practice sessions over time are the most effective techniques, according to the study. Kent State associate professor of psychology Katherine Rawson said the team had a good idea as to what the findings would be because of prior research, but the results may surprise students and educators. “We already knew which strategies were the winners and which ones weren’t,” she said. “The

surprise is on the user-end of the strategies. Students regularly report using highlighting and re-reading when the literature suggests they are not particularly effective strategies.” Kent State professor and director of experimental training John Dunlosky, who worked on the team of researchers with Rawson, said methods like highlighting can be useful, but they cannot stand alone. “Highlighting is just the beginning,” he said via email. “Students can begin by highlighting the most important information, but then they should review that information from time to time until they have learned it well. And, when students reread, they often do so passively, so they need to use other strategies [such as self testing] as they are reviewing their notes to learn them best.”

WHAT WORKS WHAT

Here are the most effective and least effective study habits according to a psychological report. LOW • Summarization

• Highlighting • The keyword mnemonic • Imagery use for text learning • Re-reading MODERATE • Elaborative interrogation

• Self-explanation • Alternating problem type HIGH • Practice testing

• Distributed practice

See STUDY, page 3

DN PHOTO ILLUSTRATION EMILY THEIS AND COREY OHLENKAMP

Ind. plan could require armed officials at schools

DN| BRIEF

New proposal would allow employees to carry firearms during regular school hours | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DN FILE PHOTO BOBBY ELLIS

Bill Scholl said he is nearly finished with the second interviews for a replacement for Billy Taylor. Scholl is confident a new coach will be in place soon after Saturday’s games.

SCHOLL OPTIMISTIC COACH VACANCY WILL BE FILLED BY END OF FINAL FOUR Ball State athletic director Bill Scholl has been reluctant to release names or say how big the candidate pool is for the vacant men’s basketball coaching position, but it’s clear the search is starting to take on a new tone. Scholl is on the road again this week and said he’s nearing the phase of second interviews with potential replacements for Billy Taylor. “Clearly there are some candidates that separated themselves, and we want to have another conversation with them,” Scholl said. Since Taylor was fired on March 14, Scholl has named the Final Four as a tentative ending point for the search. Scholl said he’s optimistic a coach will be in place soon after the games are completed Saturday. “I didn’t really specify an end or beginning of [the search], but I pretty much feel like we’re on track to hit that target,” Scholl said. Scholl will be in Atlanta for this weekend’s games, but said it’s commonplace for the industry to gather there. He didn’t specify whether he’s going to interview any staff on the competing teams or whether there’s a favorite for the job at this point. “There was a lot of interest in the job and we really went out of our way to turn over a lot of stones,” Scholl said. “I don’t want to quantify it but a lot of talented people expressed interest and we talked to an awful lot of them.”

INDIANAPOLIS — Indiana’s public and charter schools would be required to have an employee carry a loaded gun during school in order to respond quickly to attacks under a proposal an Indiana House committee approved Tuesday. Supporters said the proposal could help prevent tragedies such as the December elementary school shooting in Newtown, Conn., in which 20 students and six teachers died. Opponents said they’re concerned that the proposal was rushed and that it’s unnecessary and could force schools to hire people who are willing to carry guns.

Schools would be required to always have someone carrying a gun on duty during school hours. People filling the role could be police officers or other non-educators but also could be teachers or principals. Regardless, the protection officers would have to meet training standards set by a new statewide school safety board, said the provision’s sponsor, Rep. Jim Lucas, R-Seymour. “I’ve been approached by several teachers that would love the ability to have their natural right to self-defense recognized and would gladly do this without being paid,” Lucas said. The House Education Committee voted 9-3 to approve the bill, advancing it to the Ways and Means Committee for financial review. It would still need approval from the full House and Senate, which are both dominated by Republicans. A National Rifle Association-sponsored study released Tuesday recom-

GUN PROPOSAL WHAT 

The House Education Committee voted 9-3 to approve a bill that would require at least one person at an Indiana public or charter school to carry a gun. SO WHAT?

The proposal comes months after the elementary school shooting in Newton, Conn., which killed 20 children and six adults. Opponents say they’re concerned that the proposal was rushed and could force school to hire people who are willing to carry gun’s. mended schools across the nation each train and arm at least one staff member. South Dakota’s governor last month signed into law a measure allowing the state’s school districts to arm teachers and other personnel with guns, but no

SECONDARY GETS LIFT FROM NEW COACH Morrison’s first spring practice at Ball State shows his personality will help defense

See GUNS, page 3

CALL THE FASHION POLICE... or not! Find out what rules were meant to be broken SEE PAGE 6

SEE PAGE 4

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ACROSS 1 PRESSURED, WITH “ON” 7 NASA CITRUS DRINK 11 DIGITAL DOC FORMAT 14 CRY FROM AN OVERSLEEPER 15 SMOKEHOUSE ORDER 16 MEYERS OF “KATE & ALLIE” 17 *CAREER SOLDIER 19 QUAINT CURSE 20 YELLOWISH GREEN 21 “GOTCHA!” 22 SMALL CRAFT CONCERN 23 END OF A NEW YEAR’S SONG 24 *1995 MOVIE FLOP DUBBED “FISHTAR” BY SOME CRITICS 26 WORD BEFORE CHI OR AFTER MAI 28 LONG TALE 29 *MUCH-SOUGHT-AFTER CELEBRITY 35 BAKER’S 13 38 CAMPFIRE RESIDUE 39 BEIJING-BORN, SAY 41 MADHOUSE 42 GREEN STUFF

44 *SUN EMANATION RESPONSIBLE FOR THE NORTHERN LIGHTS 46 UNVEILER’S CRY 48 BRITISH VERB ENDER 49 *PETAL PUSHER? 54 WALRUS FEATURE 58 DIETER’S GAIN? 59 SINGER ERYKAH 60 POLITICAL CHANNEL 61 WORD OF REPULSION 62 BRANGELINA, E.G.—OR, IN A WAY, EACH OF THE ANSWERS TO STARRED CLUES 64 “__ BIG TO FAIL”: 2009 ACCOUNT OF THE FINANCIAL CRISIS 65 GETS TO 66 MOURN 67 CLAIRVOYANT’S GIFT 68 SOFT “YO!” 69 BEGINNING BITS DOWN 1 OSCAR NIGHT RIDES 2 “OUR TOWN” GIRL

3 TOO POOPED TO POP 4 UNWORLDLINESS 5 SERMON ENDING? 6 DEAL-BUSTING ORG. 7 BEHIND-CLOSED-DOORS EVENT 8 ‘TIL TUESDAY LEAD VOCALIST MANN 9 CAVS AND MAVS 10 “THE PYRAMID” CHANNEL 11 29-ACROSS CHASERS 12 DRYLY AMUSING 13 NOT LIKELY TO MOVE 18 RIVER VALLEY FORMATION 22 DISCO ADJECTIVE 24 FINGERS-CROSSED THOUGHT 25 ANGLER’S GEAR 27 PLACE TO PLAY “SPACE INVADERS” 29 “SKYFALL” DIRECTOR MENDES 30 GI’S HANGOUT 31 IMAGE-EDITING SOFTWARE 32 “__ A PITY” 33 YEAR ABROAD? 34 FAM. REUNION ATTENDEE

36 YEARS AND YEARS 37 BOB OF HOPE, MAYBE 40 TAKE A TRIP BY SHIP 43 CONGRESSIONAL OUTPUT 45 TRIATHLON ATTIRE 47 VINE YARDS? 49 CHAMPAGNE GLASS 50 JAVA’S COFFEE CUP ET AL. 51 STARES STUPIDLY 52 LATIN CLARIFIER 53 1921 ROBOT PLAY 55 SHOE TOP 56 SIMULTANEOUS WEAPONS DISCHARGE 57 OFT-PATCHED CLOTHING PARTS 60 TRITE STUFF 62 HUMDINGER 63 SOFTWARE-DRIVEN FILM EFFECTS, FOR SHORT

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WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM | PAGE 3

NEWS

VETERANS HOPE TO MAKE DIFFERENCE WITH EDUCATION Doctoral student, former soldier works to teach community ASHLEY REED STAFF REPORTER | aereed@bsu.edu Transitioning to college from the military can be a challenging endeavor, and students, faculty and staff gathered Tuesday to learn more about student veterans and their experiences with that transition. April Krowel, an Army veteran and a first-year doctoral student in Ball State’s Department of Counseling Psychology, presented “Understanding and Welcoming Student Veterans” at the L.A. Pittenger Student Center. She joined the Army right after 9/11 and was deployed to Iraq in 2003. Her presentation was an add-on to her masters thesis, which explored college adaptation differences between traditional college students and student veterans. “Transitioning to college was different and challenging because you have this sense of isolation from people who are supposed to be your peers,” Krowel said. “But you have so much more life experience that it’s kind of challenging to relate to them.” After returning from war, one in five combat veterans has a mental or physical disability, but 80 percent of those people claim they don’t, Krowel said. Invisible wounds, such as anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder, can be difficult for family members, friends and professors to understand. With health issues and long absences from school, many veterans test into remedial courses making graduating a more challenging task. “Leaving the military isn’t just leaving a job, it’s leaving a way of life,” she said. Through her research, Krowel

feels that the faculty and staff at Ball State can help student veterans by projecting an understanding attitude, being informed, being accessible and taking a cut-to-the-chase approach to degree attainment. “[Student veterans] want to be here,” Krowel said. “They want to have a sense of belonging.” Being sensitive toward veterans is one thing some faculty and staff seem to have a problem with, Krowel said. “The most challenging thing I see with student veterans is that they don’t give school enough time,” said Beck Hannaford, Veterans Benefits and Financial Assistant coordinator. Krowel said the university could help student veterans finish school by waiving application fees, giving priority registration, creating workshops for faculty and staff and granting credit for military experiences. “Our wish list would be that we would have a Veteran’s Resource Center similar to Indiana University and Purdue University,” Hannaford said. “My other wish is that Indiana would pass a law granting in-state residency to every veteran within 12 months after they come off active duty. There’s a huge difference between in-state fees and out-ofstate fees.” Hannaford said he has known Krowel since she came to Ball State and was impressed with her presentation and the effort she has given at the university. “She’s been able to focus and been on track to earning her doctoral degree,” he said. “I wish we could just bottle up her work ethic; that [would] be a great thing to have. We’ve been honored to have her at Ball State.” Krowel’s husband, Justin Krowel, is a Purple Heart and Bronze Star recipient and a student veteran at Ball State. He will present “Leadership Lessons from Two Theaters” at Bracken Library on April 19.

| FALSE ALARM

DN PHOTO ANDREW MISHLER

Students outside of University Theatre begin to file back into the building after a fire alarm went off Wednesday evening. Some students were in the middle of rehearsal.

Sustainability project hopes to revamp homes Muncie, Ball State group looks to fix, improve properties

|

ARIC CHOKEY STAFF REPORTER aachokey@bsu.edu

Students will get the chance to see what types of projects are being worked on in Muncie through the Ball State EcoREHAB immersive learning program and sustainability methods of the project. EcoREHAB works with Muncie Community Development and the local EcoREHAB of Muncie Inc. to bring sustainability to existing properties in the area.

Projects include rehabilitation of properties according to standards that promote sustainable and green construction, and providing resources to current homeowners to promote sustainable practices and management, according to the EcoREHAB page on Ball State’s website. The initiative, which was started in 2009, is spear-headed by Jonathan Spodek, associate professor in the Department of Architecture. Spodek also co-founded EcoREHAB of Muncie Inc. According to a letter of affirmation from Spodek in August 2012, the organization has already rehabilitated two houses and is working on a third. The

students in the program take part in every step of the process from budgeting to construction. The initiative has received grants from the Muncie Economic Development Block Program and the Ball Brothers Foundation for the two houses. According to the website, a goal of the organization is to be able to sell these homes at an affordable price to low- and moderate-income residents and families. The project has received the Mary Frances Abel Award from the Muncie Historic Preservation and Rehabilitation Commission for its renovation of a historic house. The award was created in 1988 and was

named after a local historian. The award is based solely on exterior improvements, according to the award’s application. Past presentations by EcoREHAB have included tips and training on how to rehab and manage a house and optimizing space to be eco-friendly and energy efficient. It also introduced ideas on how to recycle materials for use in the rehabilitation process. That training is another goal of the program, which aims to provide assistance for private home owners and other organizations in the realm of sustainable design. The presentation will be held today at 10:15 a.m. in Architecture Building room 100.

Ind. glass maker pushes refund bill GUNS: Lawmakers disagree

Policy could allow residents to receive money for bottles | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS MUNCIE — Indiana companies that use discarded materials such as glass in their products are urging lawmakers to pass a bill requiring refundable deposits on beverages sold in recyclable bottles and cans. Verallio North America vice president Stephen Segebarth told a joint meeting of the Indiana House and Senate environmental affairs committees on Monday that a bill that calls for a 5 or 10 cent refundable deposit on recyclable containers would boost job creation by providing discarded glass or metal for companies them into new products. He said Verallio, which makes

glass bottles and jars, is con- grow it,” he told legislators. stantly searching for cullet — The Star Press reported that the industry’s term for used an estimated 3 billion beverand broken glass that can be age containers are disposed of melted down and reused. in Indiana’s landfills every year, “We are just burying the raw hungry and ro- BY THE NUMBERS resources Veralbustly pursuing lio and the othall cullet we can ers would like get,” Segebarth beverage containers are to reuse. said. Gov. Mike disposed of in Indiana R e p r e s e n t a - landfills each year Pence has not tives of Indiana yet taken a poFarm Bureau sition on conand Richmond- refundable deposit on tainer-deposit based Perpetual recyclable containers legislation, said Recycling SoluDan Schmidt, tions also testiPence’s envified in favor of beverage containers make ronmental polithe bill. David up 7 percent of waste cy director. Bender, Per- littered in parks, beaches Indiana Farm petual Recycling and roadsides Bureau lobbyist Solutions owner, Wayne Dillman told lawmakers said the group his three-month old plant that supports a bottle bill because recycles plastics into flakes for its members are tired of colmanufacturing reuse can’t find lecting bushels of discarded enough plastic for its needs. containers from roadside “There’s not enough in Indi- ditches to “keep them out of ana to feed our plant, let alone our machinery.”

But grocery stores, supermarkets and convenience stores are among the bill’s opponents. The American Beverage Association, formerly the National Soft Drink Association, also opposes the legislation. The group represents nonalcoholic beverage producers, distributors, franchise companies and support industries. Kevin Dietly of the ABA told lawmakers that beverage containers make up only 7 percent of the waste stream littering parks, beaches and roadsides. He said bottle refund legislation is a costly way to recover such a small percentage of the waste stream. He said it’s much easier to recycle beverage containers through curbside and other large-scale recycling programs. Since 1986 only one state has enacted such legislation. Delaware has repealed its bottle law and other states are considering the same, he said.

school were literally taught to the test because of accountability,” he said. “[Students have not been] learning the information, they’re just learning it to puke it back. We can’t blame [students] because adults who should have known better have set this system up and [students] have learned that’s good education when it’s not.” Rohrer cited many resources on campus like the learning and writing centers that many students don’t take advantage of, and the most effective studying involves creating different pathways of learning using a combination of different methods. Alisha Layman, a study strategies tutor for the Learning Center, works with students to help them with time management and how to read their textbooks. Layman echoed Rohrer’s sentiment that few students know how to effectively study. “The biggest problem is mostly freshmen come to us [who] have never had to study before in high school and they don’t know how,” she said. “They don’t

if there was a class to teach you to do it over a span of time so you could actually learn the material instead of cramming and doing the test and forgetting what you learned,” Flores said. Throughout her career, Rawson said she has spent a large amount of time focusing on effective study techniques. She doesn’t think all of the research on the subject has translated to actual practice in the classroom, though. Although she does not think their research findings will immediately change what is practiced, it is work in the right direction. “No, [people are not using effective study techniques]. There is not a good bridge between empirical based research and practice as to what students do and what teachers do,” Rawson said. “[Our report] is something teachers and students can access. It’s probably one stone in the foundation of a bridge, but there is a lot more bridge that is going to have to be built on top of it.”

3 billion

5-10 cents 7 percent

STUDY: Students never taught proper studying habits | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

Junior telecommunications sales and promotions major Kelsey Granitz has tried to determine what study techniques work best for her. In the fourth grade, she was taught to write information down seven times so she could remember it, which she said the technique has been effective for her, but she wishes she had more information on how to study. “It is hard to study and if you don’t know what you’re doing, you’re not going to have any results,” Granitz said. “You need to have techniques that can be effective. I’d say I was taught a little bit but it needs to be elaborated on, especially in high school as tests are bigger parts of your grades.” Ball State assistant professor of psychological science James Rohrer said freshmen come to college with little knowledge of how to study. He attributes the deficiency to 12 years of being taught under the teach-to-thetest mentality. “Almost all [students] in public

think they need to take notes in class, they don’t think they need to study for class until the first test comes along and they bomb the test.” Sophomore computer technology major Daniel Flores picked up a study technique during high school — silly word associations. He changes names or terms to something funny so he can remember it more effectively. Flores said this method helps him get through tests “I remember in high school I picked up on some things but I had to teach myself how to study,” he said. “No teacher covers that. You get to college and you didn’t really learn study techniques in high school and you’re generally left in the dark.” In high school, Flores said he used the cram method but found that it didn’t work with the amount of material on college tests. Like Granitz, he said teaching students how to study would be helpful college preparation. “I think it would be awesome

on proposed weapons law | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

no states require armed employees in schools, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. Indiana law currently prohibits anyone other than police officers and authorized school employees from possessing firearms on school property. Lucas said he knows of no Indiana districts that now allow teachers to have guns at school. Lucas added the proposal to a Senate-approved bill that aimed to start a state grant program to help school districts hire police officers who’ve undergone extra training on how to deal with students and school facilities and buy safety equipment. Rep. Vernon Smith, D-Gary, said he had concerns about requiring guns in schools and questions about how many trained employees would be needed if in case the designated person was away. “I don’t think that the step is needed,” Smith said. “This was hurriedly done, and it has not been thoroughly thrashed to the degree I think it ought to be.” Senate President Pro Tem David Long, R-Fort Wayne, said he supported the proposal as a way to improve school security without being “prohibitively expensive” by requiring police officers at all schools. “The idea is to have some way to defend the children in case someone were to break through the security,” Long said. “We think that’s important that there be some armed resistance.” Representatives of school, teachers and police organizations testified before the House committee on Tues-

day. But most offered little comment on Lucas’ proposal, which was described for the first time during the meeting. However, Todd Bess, executive director of the Indiana Association of School Principals, said schools have worked for years to establish safe environments and that he believed that can be done without having firearms in every building. Frank Bush, executive director of the Indiana School Boards Association, said he worried that schools would need to hire additional employees where current staffers wouldn’t want the additional responsibility. “I don’t see anything wrong with the notion of having someone in the school that can provide that kind of protection,” Bush said. While the state has about 1,850 public schools and 70 charter schools, the proposal would allow multiple schools on a single campus to share a protection officer. The provision would require schools to have those employees designated by the start of 2014. Lucas said schools could have multiple employees be trained and allowed to carry guns, a possibility that worried Rep. Sue Errington, D-Muncie. “Personally, I’d rather see it limited rather than have a lot of guns around children,” Errington said. Rep. Woody Burton, R-Whiteland, said he believed the proposal is “a great idea” although high training standards will be needed to assure the public. “We want to make sure there’s somebody trained that can stop them before they kill 25 people,” Burton said.

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HAPS

EVENTS THIS WEEK

FRIDAY Women’s tennis continues play in conference with a home match against Toledo at 1 p.m.

FRIDAY Men’s volleyball travels to Illinois to take on last-place Quincy in the MIVA standings.

SATURDAY Softball begins a two-game weekend series against Western Michigan starting at 2 p.m.

FOOTBALL

Coach brings new energy to secondary Morrison’s personality allows defenders to push harder during spring practices MAT MIKESELL SPORTS EDITOR | @MatMikesell

DN PHOTO JONATHAN MIKSANEK

Cody Campbell goes up to bat during a home game March 23. Ball State will rotate pitchers against Northern Kentucky so they will all be available against Western Michigan this weekend.

Ball State to rotate pitching against NKU Facing lowly Norse, Maloney says team has to stay focused DAVID POLASKI STAFF REPORTER | @DavidPolaski Heading into the game against Northern Kentucky, Ball State coach Rich Maloney expects to see quite a few arms going throughout the course of the game. With a weekend upcoming against Western Michigan, Maloney wants to make sure all of his pitchers will be available for the conference series, and not burn somebody out against non-conference Northern Kentucky. The Norse come into the game struggling, holding a 3-24 record. Maloney said the record isn’t important considering the circumstances. “You can throw out the record when it’s a midweek game,” Ma-

loney said. “We’re going to pitch about five or six guys, so who knows what will happen.” He said Clay Manering will get the start, but won’t be expected to throw more than two or three innings in order to keep him fresh for the weekend. With so many different pitchers participating, it adds a lot more room for error to occur, nullifying the team’s records. Instead, Maloney said he wants his team to focus on throwing strikes. It’s something teams have done well against Northern Kentucky. The team has just three players batting over .250, and are averaging just 3.2 runs per game. Northern Kentucky’s Brad Clement is the only player on the team batting over .300. His .323 average leads the team, and he leads in every single offensive category. Despite the struggling opponent, Cody Campbell doesn’t want to look ahead to

SOFTBALL

BSU goes north to meet in-state opponent IPFW Teams haven’t met since 2010, both offensively minded FISHBURN STAFF REPORTER | MELEAH mcfishburn@bsu.edu Ball State will travel to Fort Wayne, Ind., today to face IPFW for the first time since falling to the team 5-4 in 2010. Cardinals offensive leader junior Jennifer Gilbert has yet to face the Mastodons in her collegiate career and has one goal in order to be successful: “See the ball, hit the ball,” she said. Gilbert is not worried about her stats at the plate, but is focused on putting the ball in play against a defense she has never played against. “Taking advantage of mistakes when they are thrown at you,” she said. Coach Craig Nicholson does not anticipate a lot of scoring early on between the two strong offensive teams. In preparation for seeing the team for the first time since 2010, Nicholson plans on making pregame adjustments to the

Cardinals defense by battling early and taking advantage of their offense. “The second and third time through, our offense is better,” he said. “The good thing is they are going to be in the same boat with our pitching,” Freshman Nicole Steinbach has been winner of the Mid-American Conference West Division pitcher-of-the-week for three consecutive weeks. Steinbach recorded no walks Saturday against Toledo, and one walk against Bowling Green on Friday. “It starts with her throwing strikes,” Nicholson said. “When she uses all of her pitches, she is going to be very effective.” Nicholson continues to strengthen his team’s defense to match its offense by using repetition and potential game situations in practice. “It is definitely an area that we need to clean up a little bit,” he said. “We tend to put so much into what we are doing offensively that we relax a little bit when we are playing defense.” The team will play its first home game of the season Friday in a double header.

the weekend. “Every opponent is approached the same way for us,” Campbell said. “Don’t get too high and don’t get too low, know that the playing field is even, and try to ride it out for a win.” Sometimes teams will play down to their level of competition and find it difficult to get excited about playing a belowaverage opponent. Maloney doesn’t think that will be the case, mainly because of the game plan he employs. It doesn’t revolve around defeating the opponent, but making sure his players challenge themselves. When a player tries to improve on his previous performance, it doesn’t matter who the opponent is because he’ll always be challenging himself. “We just want to go out there and throw strikes, get a timely hit and make routine plays,” Maloney said, reciting the plan he uses for every game. “When we do that, we don’t have to try and get up for a struggling team be-

TEAM COMPARISON

Ball Northern Kentucky State 3-24 12-12 Record 6.23 3.99 Team ERA .209 .257 Batting Avg 187 118 Runs Scored 209 115 Runs Against cause it’s more like we’re playing against ourselves.” For Ball State, making the routine play has been anything but that lately. Errors have led to several unearned runs over the past two series’ and could have cost the team a few wins. “We’ve got to start fielding better. We were doing great for a long time, [but] now we’ve fallen into a rut,” Maloney said. “Solid fielding has to be a staple for our team to have success.” First pitch against Northern Kentucky is at 3 p.m. at Ball Diamond.

After moving to three different schools in four years, Shannon Morrison was ready for an easy transition to a new school. When he was hired as Ball State’s defensive backs coach in February, he got exactly what he wanted. He was an assistant coach for Butch Jones’ staff at Cincinnati in 2012. When Jones left to take the job at Tennessee, Morrison found himself as the newest coach at Ball State, coaching alongside Pete Lembo after being an assistant with him at Lehigh. Coming from Cincinnati, the move to Muncie was a harmless transition for him and his wife. “This was the easiest move; before spring ball, I was home every weekend,” Morrison said. “The other jobs it was eight to 10 hour drives, so I wasn’t home every weekend.” Morrison comes in to coach a Ball State secondary that struggled last season. During the offseason, Lembo announced a reconstruction of the coaching duties in the defense, which included the cornerbacks and safeties being under the instruction of one coach — Morrison. With Morrison having control of the entire secondary, it allows Ball State to have a more fluid secondary that is on the same page and will have better chemistry by the season opener in August. He also brings a new energy to the defense, which has shown from being one of the most animated coaches during spring practice. “I want them to know I’m upset and pissed at them,” Morrison said. “But at the same time I still love them. It’s not all serious. It can’t be all serious because if I yell at them or go at them, [the players] will start to think I’m attacking them and I don’t want

SHANNON MORRISON •G  raduated from Marshall in ‘95 • 1 7th year as football coach •S  pent 2012 as assistant at Cincinnati •C  oached with Pete Lembo at Lehigh in 2004 that to happen.” But his energy hasn’t gone unnoticed by his players. The secondary seems to respond to his animations and energy in a positive way. “It gives me juice to go out and play every play,” cornerback Eric Patterson said. “I know he’s watching and if you don’t go hard, he sends you up the bleachers.” Alpines, or commonly known as stadium steps, is what Patterson refers to as punishment for not giving full effort. At the first spring practice of the year, some members of the secondary had to run up the snow-covered steps. “It sucks,” Patterson said while laughing. Morrison said the secondary struggled with communication and not being in the same page in 2012, which has been a No. 1 priority for him. He also wants to get his players in a mindset of being able to respond better when there is a let down during a game. While he admits he can be hard on his players, he said the way he does it lets them know he cares about them as players and as people. More importantly, he wants to have fun coaching, which is why he became a coach in the first place. “I’m still a kid at heart, my wife tells me that all the time,” he said. “That’s the reason why I got into coaching. I didn’t want to grow up. I still want to be around the game.”

RUTGERS

SCHOOL CONSIDERING RICE’S JOB

Video shows coach abusing, using slurs at players in practice | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS NEWARK, N.J. — Rutgers said it would reconsider its decision to retain basketball coach Mike Rice after a videotape aired showing him shoving, grabbing and throwing balls at players in practice and using gay slurs. The videotape, broadcast Tuesday on ESPN, prompted scores of outraged social media comments as well as sharp criticism from Gov. Chris Christie and NBA star LeBron James. Athletic director Tim Pernetti was given a copy of the video in late November by a former employee. He suspended Rice for three games a month later, fined him $50,000 and ordered him to attend anger management classes. In an interview with WFAN Radio in New York on Tuesday, Pernetti said university president Robert Barchi also viewed the tape last fall and agreed with the punishment. But ESPN’s broadcast prompted an outcry, led by the governor himself. “Governor Christie saw the

video today for the first time and he is obviously deeply disturbed by the conduct displayed and strongly condemns this behavior,” spokesman Michael Drewniak said. “It’s not the type of leadership we should be showing our young people and clearly there are questions about this behavior that need to be answered by the leaders at Rutgers University.” The Miami Heat’s James weighed in with a tweet: “If my son played for Rutgers or a coach like that he would have some real explaining to do and I’m still gone whoop on him afterwards! C’mon.” Rice, who was hired by Pernetti three years ago, is 44-51 at Rutgers, including 16-38 in the Big East, after going 7331 in three seasons at Robert Morris. The Scarlet Knights went 15-16 this season and 5-13 in the Big East. “You have to be always cautious about public reaction, because the reaction the public is having is the same I had when I saw it [the film],” Pernetti told the radio station. “I am factoring everything into what we do going forward. The most important thing I am factoring in is trying to make sure that we don’t do harm to Rutgers University, because we are small slice of the pie here at this great place.

I don’t want to put any negatively on the university when we have a lot of real good things going on.” Pernetti said he understands why many are asking why Rice wasn’t fired after the initial investigation. “I spent more time with that option on whether we should fire Mike or not than any other option,” he said. “At the same the results of the investigation where we ended up, the determination was made to suspend him. My biggest concern as the AD is that I am always trying to protect the interests and reputation of the university and that’s what makes this one so difficult. There is a lot of hindsight, 20-20, .... that there will be no other option than to terminate Mike. I made that decision. I am accountable for it. I have to live with it.” Rice was Pernetti’s first major hire after getting the AD’s job. “In the end I am not going to look back and say shoulda, woulda. All I can do is figure out going forward the decisions I can make to fix the problem for Rutgers,” Pernetti said. Pernetti said his decision to only suspend Rice was made in part because the coach was remorseful and admitted he made mistakes. Pernetti said Rice also worked hard to improve himself with the counsel-

ing, the practice monitor while working on his own behavior. Rice had a reputation as being “a fiery guy with an edge” before coming to Rutgers and Pernetti said the two talked about it for five hours before he was hired. “He convinced me he understood his reputation, but he also understood where the line was,” Pernetti said. “I made clear to him if he crossed the line he would be held accountable. In this case he did, and we held him accountable for it.” That might not be enough in the wake of the video made by Eric Murdock, the former NBA player who was hired by Rice to be director of player development. The two had a falling out over Murdock’s appearances at a camp, and Pernetti said Murdock’s contract was not renewed. Murdock, who said he was fired, then compiled the video, splicing together the practice lowlights of Rice’s first three years as coach. Pernetti said about 60 percent of the incidents happened in Rice’s first season. He also was upset with Rice using a certain gay slur at a university where student Tyler Clemente committed suicide after a roommate used a webcam to see him kissing a man.


WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM | PAGE 5

NEWS

ARIZ. COURT ASKS TO BAR SECTION OF IMMIGRATION LAW

Prosecutors file charges in Brazil nightclub fire Lawyer says owners, 2 band members charged with murder | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS SAO PAULO — Eight people have been charged in connection with the deadly nightclub fire in southern Brazil that killed 241 people earlier this year, prosecutors said Tuesday. The Jan. 27 fire roared through the crowded, windowless Kiss nightclub in the city of Santa Maria, filling the air with flames and thick, toxic smoke. Police have said the band performing at the club lit a flare that ignited flammable soundproofing foam on the ceiling, releasing a deadly combination of cyanide, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide. Prosecutor David Medina told a Tuesday news conference that the nightclub’s two own-

ers and two band members were charged with murder. “The owners of the nightclub and the members of the band were fully aware of the danger the public faced and could have foreseen the result, but they took no action or were indifferent to the risks,� Medina said. “Fireworks were used in a place that was completely inappropriate for any kind of flame. There was wood, curtain and unfortunately a lot of people.� “There were insufficient and poorly lit exits,� he added. Two firefighters who allegedly tried to show that the nightclub had passed safety inspection tests were charged with evidence tampering. Police have said that minimum safety and fire prevention measures were not in place. An accountant and a former partner of the nightclub were charged with perjury. Brazilian authorities have often turned a blind eye to

safety and infrastructure concerns about public gathering places. The disaster, the worst fire of its kind in more than a decade, raised questions about whether safety can be ensured in such venues as the country prepares to host next year’s World Cup and the 2016 Olympics. Prosecutors have asked police to investigate the involvement of four additional people in the nightclub fire. They are the mother and sister of one of the owners who are listed as partners in the nightclub and the two city officials who granted the club an operating permit. Prosecutors filed the charges with a state judge who is expected to rule in about two weeks. Police said on March 22 the mayor and fire chief of Santa Maria could also be held responsible for the accident because of the faulty safety inspections of the nightclub.

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State governor asks officials to remove harboring from bill

BY THE NUMBERS

8 people

have been charged in Brazil nightclub fire

| THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

241 people

SAN FRANCISCO — The federal government argued Tuesday that a section of Arizona’s 2010 immigration law that prohibits “harboring� people living in the country illegally should be blocked. A three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals heard arguments from attorneys over a section of the state’s law that penalizes those who give rides to, house or otherwise “harbor� people in the country illegally. The harboring law was in effect from July 2010 until a lower court last year barred police from enforcing it. Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer has asked the 9th Circuit to overturn the lower court’s ruling.

were killed in the fire

50 victims

were found in the bathrooms Mayor Cezar Schirmer is an elected official, and only the Rio Grande do Sul State Supreme Court and the city’s legislature can determine if he will be charged. Only a military court can charge the fire chief, because the department is under the control of the police, which is part of the military. About 50 victims were found in the club’s bathrooms, where they crowded after smoke evidently caused them to believe the doors were exits.

Lawyers for Brewer said the law applies only to people violating other criminal laws who also are harboring someone in the U.S. illegally, and it doesn’t conflict with federal immigration laws. The Republican governor’s attorneys also said there’s no evidence that the ban has been enforced against any people or organizations represented by a coalition of civil rights groups that have challenged the law in court. The U.S. Justice Department, which has challenged Arizona’s immigration law in court but isn’t a party in Brewer’s harboring ban, successfully petitioned the appeals court to take part in the arguments. Mark Stern, a DOJ attorney, argued that the federal government was meant to enforce immigration laws, not states, because of its close relationship to foreign policy and other related matters.

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Visit us online!

Your connections keep you participating and involved. Ease with communications empowers queries, launches, promotions and networking. The second half of the year focuses more on home and family. Pay off debt and review investments and insurance. It’s a personal growth and love year.

Aries (March 21-April 19) Today is a 7 -- Persistence pays off with a breakthrough. Push ahead and results add up. Don’t be stopped by old barriers. Release pent up tensions, and exceed expectations. Keep studying to increase your theoretical understanding. Taurus (April 20-May 20) Today is a 7 -- Holding your tongue surpasses annoying moments with minimal damage. Take care not to provoke jealousies. Spend time with a partner, and advise caution with their next move. There’s plenty for all. Shift perspective and relax. Gemini (May 21-June 21) Today is a 7 -- Take slow, calculated actions and anticipate resistance. Have a backup plan. Use time-tested methods. Don’t give up or overspend. Mull it over. It’s a good day for figuring out all the angles.

 

Cancer (June 22-July 22) Today is an 8 -Draw your line in the sand. Decrease personal obligations in the coming week.Your time is precious. This goes for your money, too. Scrutinize repeating expenses that may not be necessary. Savings happens naturally. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Today is an 8 -- Keep increasing your skill level this week. Shift your emotional direction. Reduce doubt. Argue key points in your head, first. Don’t tell anyone about your lucky break yet.You feel better after exercise. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Today is a 7 -- There’s a temporary domestic meltdown. Learn a new balancing act. Compromise isn’t possible yet. Aim high and add elbow grease to do it right.Your money isn’t required, but patience is. Clean up messes.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)Today is a 6 -- You’re entwined in a controversy. Move quickly, without promising money. Decrease financial risk-taking this week, and increase cash flow. Stay flexible and attentive. Add to recent home improvements; it’s appreciated. Organize books and papers. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Today is an 8 -- Reduce your personal workload this week. No need to participate in gossip; it’s a time suck. Find resources nearby, and complete the job. Despite a temporary setback, all ends well. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)Today is a 7 -- Resolution is possible soon, although an attempt doesn’t work. Don’t run away from your work or controversy. Advance to the next level with persistence. Then celebrate with the friends who always had your back.

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Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Today is a 7 -Get cozy. Traveling or fast motion could provide hazardous, so take it easy. A secret gets revealed that provides an advantage. Work through some old business. Listen, and discover a clue through being observant. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Today is a 7 -- Wait to see what develops. Worrying messes with your dreams. Patient, careful measures succeed. Cross things off your private list, and hold out for the best deal. Invest in your home, and enjoy it. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Today is an 8 -- Request participation. Increase your social activities, while cautiously making commitments.Your team will make it happen, if they’re invested. Don’t finance it. If there’s enough interest, it’ll go. Underline the benefits.


PAGE 6 | WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM

FEATURES

ONLINE Check out what the Asian American Student Association has planned for its annual fashion show.

THURSDAY Discover more about the local band Scarlet Hill and what they have planned for the future.

MONDAY Om nom nom! Take your grilled cheese from greasy to groumet with these easy recipes.

Fashion

FEATURES@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/DN_FEATURES

faux pas

When it comes to rules, I follow only one:

rules are meant to be broken The difficult part about fashion is the constant shift; the rules are always changing with the newest trends. A select few rules have transcended time and become fashion faux pas. From the runway, to Vogue, to department stores, to my grandma’s closet, fashion rules have trickled down the line, leaving our fashion knowledge outdated. While some classic guidelines are essential to follow, the next seven rules are dying to be eradicated.

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KOURTNEY COOPER FASHION FIX Rule No. 1: You can’t mix patterns or prints KOURTNEY COOPER IS A SOPHOMORE JOURNALISM; TELECOMUNICATIONS MAJOR AND WRITES ‘FASHION FIX’ FOR THE DAILY NEWS. HER VIEWS DO NOT NECESSARILY AGREE WITH THOSE OF THE NEWSPAPER. WRITE TO KOURTNEY AT KRCOOPER2@BSU.EDU.

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DN PHOTOS COREY OHLENKAMP

3

Whoever created this rule is boring. Try a polka dot skirt and a floral tank top. A plaid flannel and a striped T-shirt. A chevron dress and a lace scarf. A striped button-down and a paisley tie. Try mixing two or three prints of the same color scheme along with neutrals for a funky look. But don’t go overboard mixing four or five prints, or you’ll look like a fabric store threw up on your body.

4

Rule No. 2: You can’t wear white after Labor Day

Two words: winter whites. Why let those white jeans sit in your closet all winter? Pair them with a bulky sweater and some riding boots. Wearing dark, dreary colors all winter is depressing; liven up a snowy day with bright whites or another bright color. If you’re too scared to rock the white pants, try an oversized cream sweater with leggings or a fluffy white scarf. The one exception is white linen pants ­– save those for summer.

Rule No. 3: You can’t wear denim on denim

We can blame the ‘90s boy bands for our denim trust issues. While wearing a denim ball gown is never a wise decision (Britney Spears, I’m talking to you), mixing different washes of denim is. Jeans have come a long way from our parents’ day. Take advantage of colored jeans, patterned jeans and distressed jeans. Try dark jeans with a lighter wash denim shirt or colored jeans with a white jean-vest. The key is multiple washes. You don’t want to look like you’re wearing a denim jumpsuit.

Rule No. 4: Less is more

No, more is more. When it comes to jewelry, pile it on. Arm candy is in — and lots of it. Sleek or chunky watches are both functional and fashionable, so accompany that watch with a few bracelets. Bold, statement necklaces are flashy and can add to a plain neckline. Bright colored earrings are also a great route. My only rule is to avoid dangly earrings and stick with subtle studs if you choose a bulky necklace.

Rule No. 5: You can’t wear black with brown or black with navy

LIVE YOUR LIFE

AT AMERICAN COLLEGIATE COMMUNITIES

Last time I checked, these colors are neutrals and neutrals are made to mix. Try a black dress with a chestnut belt, or black jeans with a navy top. Animal prints, such as cheetah, often incorporate multiple neutrals and can tie brown boots in with a black top. Shoes that mix brown and black tones are versatile and can be a wardrobe staple. Be careful mixing too many neutrals though; black, brown and navy in the same outfit just makes you look trend confused.

• Spacious 2 and 3 bedroom

For years, gold and silver jewelry have been singing, “Why can’t we be friends?” Gone are days of choosing between the two. Wear them together, and while you’re at it, throw in some copper, bronze and rose gold. If you’re weary about this trend, buy jewelry that mixes the metals for you. Try a bracelet with gold and silver charms or try metallic flats.

• Computer lab with printer, copier &

Rule No. 6: You can’t mix metals

Rule No. 7: You can’t pull that off

If I had a dollar for every time I heard, “That looks great on you, but I could never pull that off,” I could buy out Louis Vuitton. OK not really, but you get the point. Don’t be scared to try new trends. The best way to discover personal style is to try the current trends and develop a sense of knowing what works for you. Be self-assured and open minded when trying news looks, because when you feel confident in an outfit, it shows.

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DN 04-03-13  

The print edition of The Ball State Daily News on Wednesday, April 3, 2013.

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