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DN MONDAY, MARCH 11, 2013

THE DAILY NEWS

BSUDAILY.COM

Excise releases annual report

TEACHERS: COLUMNIST WRITES ABOUT STARTING SALARIES PG. 6

UNEXPECTED TRIPS AFTER SLOW STARTS TO THEIR SEASONS, THE MEN’S AND WOMEN’S BASKETBALL TEAMS PUNCH TICKETS TO CLEVELAND

Surprising conference stretch gives Cards No. 2 seed in MAC

NO. 2 SEED IN MAC TOURNAMENT RECORD ON DEC. 30, 2012: 3-10 Jan. 10 vs. Miami W 62-59

Jan. 16 at Bowling Green L 73-42

Jan. 13 at Northern Illinois W 57-51

MATT McKINNEY ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR | @Matt_D_McKinney

Jan. 23 at Buffalo W 69-55

Jan. 26 vs. Ohio Jan. 31 at W 77-46 Western Michigan W 73-50 Feb. 3 at Eastern Michigan W 56-41

Jan. 19 vs. Kent State W 59-44

Feb. 7 vs. Central Michigan W 68-61 Feb. 10 vs. Toledo L 68-64

Junior guard Brandy Woody leads the team with 3.7 assists per game helping to secure them the No. 2 seed.

Feb. 16 at Akron L 64-52

DN FILE PHOTO JONATHAN MIKSANEK

Feb. 20 vs. Eastern Michigan W 56-34

Feb. 23 vs Northern Illinois W 64-54 March 6 at Toledo L 63-39 DN FILE PHOTO COREY OHLENKAMP

An excise officer examines an ID during a run Oct. 14, 2012. The number of alcohol-related crashes involving underage drinking has dropped more than 50 percent in the past year.

March 3 vs. Western Michigan W 60-46

When the final buzzer sounded, the Ball State women’s basketball team would be heading to Cleveland as the No. 2 seed in the Mid-American Conference Tournament. But it wasn’t the buzzer to Ball State’s game. It was the final buzzer to the Central Michigan-Eastern Michigan game. The Chippewas won, 63-56. A Central Michigan victory meant Ball State was in a 3-way tie for the No. 2 spot, along with Akron. Ball State has a 2-1 record against those teams, so it moved ahead of Central Michigan and will get a bye until Friday afternoon. The No. 2 seed is the best Ball State has had since the 2008-09 season, when it was also the No. 2 seed. That team beat Bowling Green to win the MAC Championship and move on to the NCAA Tournament, where it famously upset Tennessee in the first round. One member of the 2008-09 team was Audrey McDonald. McDonald ended her career in the top ten in Ball State’s scoring totals, and is now director of Basketball Operations for the current women’s basketball team.

See CLEVELAND, page 3

Feb. 28 at Central Michigan W 67-63

RECORD ON MARCH 6: 15-14 (12-4)

Alcohol-related crashes decrease in 2012, fake ID charges increase DEVAN FILCHAK NEWS EDITOR | news@bsudailynews.com

Scaife leads Ball State in final 8 games, team earns bye CONOR HOCKETT CHIEF REPORTER | @ConorHockett

While the amount of many types of underage drinking tickets rose across Indiana at college campuses, the amount of alcohol-related car accidents with intoxicated drivers was cut by half last year. Indiana State Excise Department released an annual report in February that reflects the amount of activity and enforcement the department achieved during CHARGES AND the calendar year of CRASHES BY YEAR 2012. In 2011, excise of50 ficers encountered 41 15 alcohol-related 40 crashes with intoxicated minors ages 29 30 15-20 in Delaware County. Only seven 17 20 15 instances happened in 2012. 7 8 10 The amount of underage drinking 0 2010 2011 2012 tickets and arrests for possessing fake YEARS identification and Charges for false IDs or furnishing alcohol to false statements of age minors rose. TwenAlcohol-related crashes ty-nine people were with minors ages 15-20 charged for having a fake ID or telling an officer their wrong age in 2011, compared to 41 people charged in 2012. In 2011, 25 people were charged for furnishing alcohol to minors or inducing to possess in Delaware County where as 81 people were charged in 2012. Excise officer Brandon Thomas, who is in charge of Delaware County enforcement, said finding people with fake IDs in the Ball State area is a focus of his.

While it was arguably the ugliest of Ball State’s eight Mid-American Conference victories this season, Saturday’s 53-51 win over Northern Illinois was undeniably the most important. A slip up against the worst team in the MAC West Division would have dropped the Cardinals from a No. 5 seed in the MAC Tournament to a No. 8 seed, forcing them to host a first round game today. The team managed to secure a season sweep over the Huskies, however, advancing them to the second round of the tournament in Cleveland. “Getting that win helps us know what it feels like to grind out games,” said senior guard Jauwan Scaife. “Our confidence is still the same, we’ve still won seven out of our last eight. Everything is still going well, we’re still working hard and nothing is going to change going into the MAC Tournament. For a team that’s won four straight games in league play, change isn’t necessarily a good thing. Ball State plays the winner of today’s game between Buffalo and Central Michigan on Wednesday to try and keep that streak alive. While the team is a combined 1-2 against the Bulls and Chippewas, the Cardinals side of the bracket seems more favorable for a run in the tournament.

NO. 5 SEED IN MAC TOURNAMENT RECORD BEFORE OHIO LOSS: 8-13 (2-7)

Feb. 16 vs. Eastern Michigan L 56-50

Feb. 9 vs. Western Michigan W 65-62

Feb. 13 at Northern Illinois W 56-52

After 69-42 loss vs. Ohio on Feb. 6

Senior guard Jauwan Scaife has averaged 24 points per game in the last eight games.

Feb. 23 at Southeast Missouri W 85-82

DN FILE PHOTO COREY OHLENKAMP

Feb. 27 vs. Central Michigan W 95-90

March 2 at Toledo W 86-72 March 5 at Western Michigan W 89-85

March 9 vs. Northern Illinois W 53-51

RECORD AFTER OHIO LOSS: 7-1 (6-1)

See STREAK, page 3

See EXCISE, page 4

Muncie committee looks toward Village renovations City council to vote on overlay district proposal near campus EVIE LICHTENWALTER ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR | news@bsudailynews.com A plan to redevelop the Village is one step closer to city council after being approved by the Delaware-Muncie Metropolitan Plan Commission on Thursday. All voting members of the commission who were present voted in favor of recommending the proposed university village overlay district to the city council to review during their meeting on April 1 at 7:30 p.m.

MUNCIE, INDIANA

CARPE DIEM.

The new plan splits the Village into four distinct areas, with Area 1 including the commercial and retail section. Marta Moody, executive director of DMMPC, said they want to make the area more attractive while creating a distinct brand and identity, with an emphasis on walkability, bikability and sustainability. “Whatever is done should be comprehensive in scope and it will achieve a change in perception for the area,” Moody said. “It’s centered around the idea of a vibrant commercial core.” A task force created by the DMMPC in 2012 held a public input session in November that supported and reaffirmed the basic principles of the overlay project, Moody said. New development companies wishing to invest

in the area must submit a development plan and be approved by a five-person council. Existing developments will not be affected by the plan’s restrictions unless they want to expand their property by more than 20 percent. The plan has received support from interested investors and Muncie residents alike, including David Brint of Brinshore Development, a real estate development company based in Northbrook, Ill. “The development standards called for in your proposed overlay district will not discourage investment from occurring,” Brint said in a letter written to the commission. “Our experience with DN FILE PHOTO JORDAN HUFFER similar projects has shown these standards are seen as a positive factor for encouraging high Signs of now closed businesses still remain in University Square. The Delaware-Muncie Metropolitan Plan Commission

See ZONING, page 4 voted Thursday to recommend a village overlay district.

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TODAY High: 52, Low: 33 Few showers

TOMORROW High: 43, Low: 29 Partly cloudy


PAGE 2 | MONDAY, MARCH 11, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM

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MEN’S BASKETBALL Go online to see a photo gallery of men’s basketball’s win over Northern Illinois on Saturday in Worthen Arena.

CARDS END BREAK WITH WIN

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Ball State improves to 6-8 after grabbing a win against Harvard, ending a run of 14 straight games on the road.

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breaking news Crossword

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

Sudoku

By Michael Mepham

Level: Easy

SOLUTION FOR THURSDAY.

ACROSS 1 MONEY UNDER A MATTRESS, E.G. 6 POSES A QUESTION 10 HIRED RIDES 14 SINGER LENA 15 APT NAME FOR A WINDSTORM? 16 HOLLYWOOD CELEB 17 CYCLONE CENTER 20 SPOTTED 21 PITCHER’S MISTAKE 22 FERAL NO MORE 23 ADDS HIGHLIGHTS AT THE SALON 25 SOURCES OF STORAGE CHEST WOOD 26 ROY ORBISON HIT FEATURED IN A GERE/ROBERTS FILM 31 BY SURFACE AREA, SECOND-LARGEST GREAT LAKE 32 RENT-A-CAR CHOICE 33 APPLY DAINTILY 36 LADDER RUNG 37 TAJ __

39 GOSPEL SINGER WINANS 40 NEEDING NO RX 41 LATE-NIGHT JAY 42 COFFEES, IN SLANG 43 EXERCISER’S MOTTO 47 SHIPPING CONTAINER 49 INAUGURAL PLEDGE 50 SARANDON OF “THELMA & LOUISE” 51 CHANNEL FOR BUSINESS TYPES 53 MAGNA __ LAUDE 56 DEBTORS’ DOCUMENTS SUGGESTED BY THE SEQUENCE OF THE FIRST WORDS OF 17-, 26- AND 43-ACROSS 60 50-AND-OVER ORG. 61 1,000 METERS, BRIEFLY 62 HINDU GURU 63 LOCH OF LEGEND 64 “BY JOVE!” 65 EXTREMELY PALE DOWN 1 HER, SUBJECTIVELY 2 HOT WHEELS AND HULA

HOOPS 3 REGION 4 FLOWER THAT USUALLY BLOOMS IN WINTER 5 PLAYBOY FOUNDER, FOR SHORT 6 THUNDERSTRUCK 7 BELLOW IN A LIBRARY? 8 SPOCK’S CAPTAIN 9 PHOTOG’S CAMERA CHOICE 10 LARGE, NOISY INSECT 11 STARTERS OF THE FIRST RACE? 12 SILLY MISTAKE 13 WINTER COASTERS 18 HELP ILLEGALLY 19 LIST COMPONENTS 24 JAPANESE MONEY 25 SPIRAL SHAPE 26 TOO-TOO 27 SCI-FI’S JABBA THE __ 28 FORERUNNERS 29 SEARCH ENGINE NAME 30 APPALACHIAN STATE: ABBR. 34 BERRY IN MODERN DIET SUPPLEMENTS 35 OSCAR CATEGORY WORD

37 CHOW __ 38 PICNIC PEST 39 RELIABLE MONEYMAKERS 41 TÉA OF “TOWER HEIST” 42 SCRIBBLE (DOWN) 44 POSTAL PURCHASES 45 DRINK NAMED FOR A SCOTTISH HERO 46 LIKE SOME NIGHTIES 47 CHANNEL FOR POLITICAL TYPES 48 PSYCHIC GLOWS 51 FORENSICS TEAM MEMBERS: ABBR. 52 THE BIG EASY ACRONYM 54 THE BEEHIVE STATE 55 KID’S ENTHUSIASTIC “I DO!” 57 COMPETE IN A SLALOM 58 CLANDESTINE GOVT. ORG. 59 ADMISSION IN A CONFESSIONAL

bsudaily.com

SOLUTION FOR THURSDAY.


MONDAY, MARCH 11, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM | PAGE 3

SPORTS

/////////// THE

HAPS

EVENTS THIS WEEK

ONLINE Read to see how the Ball State baseball team fared during its Spring Break games in South Carolina.

Read how the men’s swimming and diving closed its season out at the MAC Championships.

TODAY Men’s golf continues play in the second round of the Pinehurst Intercollegiate in North Carolina.

UPSET WIN SPORTS@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/DN_SPORTS

Starting the season 8-0, Ball State finally gets marquee win by beating Penn State in four sets as team dominates the No. 10 team in the country at Worthen

TEAM ATTACK BY SET BALL STATE

SET

|

Division-I athletics are usually looked at through a lense that makes it a job. Athletes perform rather than play, and the word game is a misnomer. But after Ball State’s men’s volleyball team’s 3-1 (2520, 25-17, 18-25, 25-20) win over No. 10 Penn State, Worthen Arena hosted a jovial atmosphere that had 2 0 - s o m e t h i n g - ye a r - o l d s jumping around like 6-yearolds in a moon bounce. “That was fun,” coach

CLEVELAND: Cardinals won’t play until MAC semifinals | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

Ball State will play at 2:30 p.m. Friday against Buffalo, Miami or Akron, depending on how the Wednesday and Thursday games turn out. Ball State went 2-1 against that trio of teams, its loss coming at Akron on Feb. 16. The Cardinals beat the RedHawks in its MAC opener at home on Jan. 10. Ball State beat Buffalo on Jan. 23, with the help of junior Brandy Woody’s 29 points, 11 rebounds and seven steals. Senior Shanee’ Jackson was honored on senior day on March 3. She has scored more than 500 points and grabbed more than 300 rebounds, but when asked of her favorite moment in her Ball State basketball career, she is quick to answer. “This season,” she said. One team Ball State may not want to see in the tournament is Toledo. Ball State went 0-2 against Toledo in the 2012-13 season, most recently in the season finale on March 6. Toledo is the No. 1 seed in the tournament, and will play its semifinal game just before Ball State at noon Friday. Ball State coach Brady Sallee said he would like to face Toledo again, but not to get revenge. “That would mean we’re playing in the MAC Championship,” Sallee said about the possibility of facing the Rockets. “We just want to go up there and win the first one, and see if we can get to the championship. You never know what happens after that.”

2 13

3 10

4 12

ERRORS

4

3

3

3

TOTAL ATTACKS

31

24

20

28

PERCENTAGE .452 .375 .350 .321 PENN STATE

SET KILLS

1 11

2 10

3 14

4 14

ERRORS

6

5

5

7

TOTAL ATTACKS

24

31

25

39

PERCENTAGE .208 .161 Senior Matt Leske goes in the kill against Penn State on Sunday. Ball State defeated the No. 10 team 3-1.

EVAN BARNUM-STEGGERDA CHIEF REPORTER @Slice_of_Evan

KILLS

1 18

Joel Walton said with a Cheshire grin. The Cardinals enjoyed their fun at the expense of the Nittany Lions, who looked troubled and uncomfortable on the floor for a majority of the match. In the first two sets Penn State made Ball State look like the No. 10 team in the country. The first time Penn State even tied the game after 0-0 was at 1-1 in third set. “This is how we play,” junior setter Graham McIlvaine said. “This is how we know we can play every time we step out onto the court.

“This proves how good we are, and how good we can be.” McIlvaine’s 39 assists and 10 digs for his third doubledouble of the season were only the tip of the iceberg in a gaudy statistical night for the Cardinals. Ball State hit .379, a full .155 higher than its season average. Senior outside hitter Jamion Hartley led the way for the Cardinals with a match-high 18 kills and hit .368. This weekend Walton started Hartley and moved senior Greg Herceg, who is

STREAK: Toledo’s ban helps Ball State get No. 5 seed | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 A potential semifinal game against No. 1 seed Akron became more attractive after the Zips star point guard Alex Abreu was charged for marijuana-trafficking on Thursday and suspended from the team indefinitely. Ball State’s personnel seems better suited for an upset over Akron rather than No. 2 seed

Ohio. The Bobcats’ backcourt dominated the Cardinals in their 69-42 win in Worthen Arena on Feb. 6. Despite Akron’s troubles off the court, coach Billy Taylor said his team doesn’t favor one opponent over another. “We’re just happy to go to Cleveland,” Taylor said. “It doesn’t matter who’s in front of us, we’re going to try and win four games in four days.”

Tony Sisson

Attorney at Law

BSU Discount Misdemeanor/Felony Related Offenses Representing Ball State students since 2009 Former Muncie Police Detective/Patrolman Current Muncie City Court Public Defender

.360 .179

DN PHOTO JORDAN HUFFER

third in the nation with 4.21 kills per set, over to the left side in an attempt to generate more offense. “Two powerhouse hitters makes it a lot easier on me,” McIlvaine said. Ball State came out and played like a team with nothing to lose, unleashing powerful jump serves that kept Penn State out of system. “One of the reasons they are such a great offensive team is because they pass so well, so we knew we had to keep the service pressure on them,” Hartley said. Ball State took the first two

sets in dominant fashion, leading both sets the entire way. In the third set the Cardinals started to look a little complacent and tightened up. This allowed the Nittany Lions to settle in and look like a nationally ranked team that has won their conference 27 out of the last 31 years. The fourth set saw a sideout battle, with Ball State never being able to extend a lead. With the score at 21-20 and Hartley toeing the line to serve for Ball State, the Cardinals strung to points

together that elicited a timeout from Penn State. In the one minute and 15 seconds allotted, McIlvaine had one simple message for his team. “I said, ‘Guys, push two points and we are going to beat the No. 10 team in the country,’” McIlvaine said. With its first win over a ranked opponent since March 18, 2012 over thenNo. 10 Ohio State, Ball State’s marquee victory has it teeming with the optimism felt after its 8-0 start. “I’m just so excited,” Hartley said. “I think we can go even higher.”

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PAGE 4 | MONDAY, MARCH 11, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM

NEWS

Center announces new projects Immersive courses aim to enact change throughout Indiana RACHEL PODNAR CHIEF REPORTER | rmpodnar@bsu.edu Students with the Virginia Ball Center will embark on projects dealing with sustainable agriculture, the history of Indiana, Brown County and the Indiana Dunes next year. The Virginia Ball Center announced next year’s four immersive learning sessions. The two Fall Semester projects deal with advocating for sustainable architecture and creating a fourth-grade textbook on Indiana’s history. Ron Morris, a history professor who is spearheading the

textbook effort, said he taught fourth grade in the past and there is a widely-recognized need for a new textbook — a demand his team can fill. Morris wants to create sample chapters of an online textbook with video clips, Web links and a Spanish version. “Indiana is not a populous state so textbook publishers don’t put an emphasis on [us],” Morris said. “People have dreamed of doing an Indiana text for elementary students but the roadblock has been cost of full color printing. Now that we’ve moved beyond that, we have the opportunity to do something very different. The goal behind this is to [give] students a richer experience with text.” He also wants sample chapters to model the complete text and generate more interest and

support for a continued project. Andrea Wolfe, an assistant professor of English, will lead a team of students in research on sustainable agriculture, traveling to Virginia and Washington, D.C. After the research phase, the students will form an idea for a public policy change to positively impact sustainable agriculture and create a website and videos to promote the idea. She wants their work to reach legislators, educate the public and possibly enact change. “Engaging the public with the idea of sustainability in farming [is one of my goals],” she said. “I don’t think many of us are really that aware where our food is coming from; we aren’t in touch with what is on our plate. We should be and in order to move towards sustainability, this is one thing we

Ind. relationship with federal money grows State government opposes spending, expands lobbying | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS INDIANAPOLIS — On the same day last week that state budget director Chris Atkins announced Indiana would be able to tough out a series of automatic federal budget cuts, Lt. Gov. Sue Ellspermann announced the creation of a new office that will lobby for more federal defense spending. That dichotomy — saying the federal government is spending too much money, while looking for as much of that money as possible — is old hat around the Indiana Statehouse. Former Gov. Mitch Daniels wrote a book dubbing unchecked federal spending the country’s next “red menace” shortly after accepting billions in federal aid with the caveat that he’d be a fool not to take the money if it’s being offered. Gov. Mike Pence has softened Daniels’ assertion that “government never created a job” to say that “government has never created a job, other than a government job.” But the value of that “government job” is still very much in question. The almighty federal dollar is one Indiana leaders love to hate, and hate to love.

John Ketzenberger, later complain that president of the Intheir state’s harddiana Fiscal Policy earned tax dollars Institute, points out flow to Washington that Indiana’s dewhile they get little fense industry has in return. rippled out beyond “The Economist” simply arming the magazine checked troops in places SUE that balance in a like northern Indi- ELLSPERMANN 2011 study of U.S. ana, where Hum- Lieutenant Census and IRS data vees were converted Governor compiled from 1990 from military use for of Indiana to 2009. The donors, public sales. But the states like New Jerstate’s leaders are nothing if sey, sent hundreds of billions not fiscal conservatives. of dollars more than they got “How important is fed- back from Washington. And eral money to the economy, takers, like West Virginia, colthrough all these various lected billions more than they means? I think it’s very im- put into the national pot. portant from an economic Indiana came in about even perspective,” he said. “So over those two decades, that’s the conundrum.” sending $632 billion in tax That dance is not limited dollars to Washington and to defense spending. Law- collecting back $642 billion makers pondering the cost in federal spending. of expanding Medicaid for Despite getting back almost 400,000 residents have been exactly what the state puts lobbied hard by the Indiana in the national pot, Indiana Hospital Association. leaders still like to razz the Complaining about Wash- feds for only handing back ington’s dysfunctional roughly 92 cents of every spending habits, while look- federal road dollar Hoosier ing for a bit of the action, is motorists kick in. hardly an Indiana phenomJohn L. Krauss, director enon. Political leaders in of the Indiana University every state tout their ability Public Policy Institute and to pass balanced budgets — a former lieutenant to forthey all must, because they mer Indianapolis Mayor Bill can’t print money — at a Hudnut, said federal spendtime when the federal gov- ing isn’t the sole answer, ernment can’t even approve but it is part of the solution an out-of-whack budget. when it comes to building a Many of those leaders stable economy.

EXCISE: Annual report shows decrease among drunk drivers under age 20 | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 “Used to, you had to know somebody who knew how to make a false ID just to get one or have someone who sort of looked like you who’s 21 let you borrow their ID. But now, it has changed the game a little bit with the online purchases of false IDs,” he said. Thomas said the rise in alcohol-related charges could be contributed to the Intensified College Enforcement, or ICE, program that ran for a large part of 2012. The program’s purpose was to reduce the amount of underage people obtaining and consuming alcohol, as well as making the communities around college campuses safer. Thomas said he has received feedback from people in the community about the excise enforcement in Muncie.

“Every time I’m inside a grocery store or a liquor store ... somebody will usually come up to me and say what a positive impact, particularly our department, has had in the area, and that’s stuff just little like reduced noise around the campus as far as where the residential areas are, a lot less trash on people’s lawns, some of the [bad] behavior has gone down a little, they’ve said they’ve had to clean up less as far as stuff like that, disturbances late at night,” he said. “As long as we have that kind of impact, we’ll always have a focus on college areas.” The ICE program is funded by a federal grant that was awarded to Indiana’s excise department twice in 2012. Thomas said the goals have been achieved in the past, and the grant has provided money to send more officers to college-town areas.

Thomas said he is not sure if the numbers will be as high next year, based on factors including the fact the department has not received a grant for the ICE program for 2013. “We haven’t had a renewed grant,” he said. “I’m not sure if we are going to get a renewed grant.” Excise officers will continue to monitor college campuses regardless of the grant. Thomas said the most activity in Muncie is in residential areas and the Village. “We get a lot of disorderly conduct and things like that around the bars, around the residential areas and especially around the streets, particularly around the Neely Street area,” he said. “That’s usually where our highest area of activity is, especially during the move-in times [and] Halloween.”

ZONING: City of Muncie looks to renovate BSU Village with interested investors

| CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 quality new investments in neighborhoods.” Brinshore had hoped to start construction on an 80-unit lowincome housing project near the Village this year, but were denied the proper tax credits. Chase Sorrick of Investment Property Advisor, said the company he works for is planning a multi-million dollar investment in the Village area

and have worked with similar overlay standards in other communities. “[Past] developments that we’ve done, and this one that we plan, would not have been possible without overlay standards that we’re talking about here,” Sorrick said. Sorrick said IPA wants to begin construction in the area by August or September. Muncie resident Deb Wise, who owns commercial prop-

erty in the Village with her husband Jerry, said she supports the overlay plan and believes the new standards will take away the risks from developments. “If we want to see improvement, and we don’t want to keep getting what we got, we can’t keep doing what we’re doing,” she said. If city council approves the plan in April, it will have a chance for final action on May 2.

need to become aware of.” Jenn Blackmer, associate professor of theatre, will lead a team of students to explore the history of Brown County and Nashville, Ind., through creating an original musical in spring 2014. It will premiere in a staged reading at the Brown County Playhouse. Also during the spring, students with landscape architecture professor Christopher Baas will create short animations, posters, a documentary and children’s book to recreate a Prairie Club trip from Chicago to the Indiana Dunes. The Prairie club, which was a group of distinguished Chicago citizens, tried to preserve the dunes as a national park. Projects through the center are funded mainly through the Edmund and Virginia Ball Foundation. Each year, four projects

submitted by faculty are chosen, with two running each semester. Each project has around 15 participating students. Students interested must apply and be chosen by the professor leading the project. Joseph Trimmer, Virginia Ball Center director, said professors lay out the groundwork for their sessions with the topic they want to focus on and a final project, but students also have input. “Professors announce the theme of the project, whether they want to do a film or a play or whatever but the students shape the way in which it is created,” Trimmer said. “The faculty member quickly becomes a student in his or her own class and they all work together. The operative word out here is ‘we.’ They collaborate together.”

SPRING 2014 PROGRAMS THE LIARS’ BENCH AND OTHER STORIES: THE LEGACY OF BROWN COUNTY

Jenn Blackmer (Theatre) Blackmer will lead a team of students to explore the history of Brown County and Nashville, Ind., through an original musical which will premiere in a staged reading in Brown County Playhouse. PRAIRIE CLUB EXCURSIONS TO THE INDIANA DUNES: EXPERIENCING THE LEGACY OF LANDSCAPE CONSERVATION

Christopher Baas (Landscape Architecture) Baas and his students will create short animations, posters, a documentary and children’s book to recreate a Prairie Club trip from Chicago to the Indiana Dunes. It will explain how the Prairie Club —a group of distinguished citizens from Chicago — attempted to preserve the dunes as a national park.

MCT PHOTO

Venezuelan Vice President Nicolás Maduro, Nicaragua’s first lady Rosario Murillo and Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega pay honors for Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez on Friday at Military Academy in Venezuela. Venezuelan opposition leader Henrique Capriles is set to run against Chavez’s handpicked successor.

Capriles set to run in Venezuelan race Politican will attempt to succeed Chavez 6 months after loss | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS CARACAS, Venezuela — Venezuelan opposition leader Henrique Capriles is set to announce he will run in elections to replace Hugo Chavez, setting up a make-or-break encounter against the dead president’s hand-picked successor, a close adviser to the candidate says. “He will accept” the nomination, the adviser told The Associated Press. He spoke Sunday on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss the decision publicly ahead of a formal announcement scheduled for later in the day. Other opposition sources refused to comment, but a political consultant at ORC Consultores, which advises Capriles, also said he would run. “He will put himself forward,” said Oswaldo Ramirez. “History is giving Capriles Radonski an important role.” Venezuela’s election commission has set April 14 as the

date of the vote, with formal campaigning to start just 12 days earlier. Ramirez said the 40-year-old opposition leader would demand that officials extend the campaign period by moving up the start date by more than a week, and that acting president Nicolas Maduro not be allowed to abuse state resources to boost his chances during the campaign. Maduro has already announced his intention to run as the candidate of Chavez’s socialist party. On Sunday he picked up the support of Venezuela’s small communist party as well. In a speech accepting the party’s nomination, Maduro insisted he was running for president out of loyalty to Chavez, not vanity or personal ambition, and called on the people to support him “I am not Chavez,” Maduro said, wearing a simple red shirt. “In terms of intelligence, charisma, historical force or capacity to lead ... But I am a Chavista and I live and die for him.” Capriles faced a stark choice in deciding whether to compete in the vote, which most analysts say he is sure to lose amid a frenzy of sympathy and mourning

for the dead president. Some say a second defeat for Capriles just six months after he lost last year’s presidential vote to Chavez could derail his political career. But staying on the sidelines also would have put his leadership of the opposition. “If he says he doesn’t want to run I could totally understand that,” said David Smilde, an analyst with the U.S.-based think tank the Washington Office on Latin America. “He is likely going to lose and if he loses this election he’s probably going to be done.” On a personal Twitter page that bore all the rah-rah adornments of a campaign site, Capriles wrote Saturday afternoon: “I am analyzing the declaration of the [electoral commission setting the date] and in the next hours I will talk to the country about my decision.” A spokesman said Capriles would make an announcement in the early evening. Analysts predict the next five weeks will increase the nasty, heated rhetoric that began even before Chavez’s death Tuesday after a nearly two-year fight with cancer.

search afterward. Harvard will not comment on personnel matters or provide additional information about the board cases that were concluded during the fall term, Michael Smith, dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, said in an email Sunday. If the committee’s work were compromised, Harvard College would protect the process, he said. “[The process] is designed to protect the rights of our students to privacy and due process,” he said. Smith’s office and the Harvard general counsel’s office authorized the search, the Globe reported. Harvard spokesman Jeff Neal did not specifically address the allegations but denied any routine monitoring of emails.

“Any assertion that Harvard routinely monitors emails — for any reason — is patently false,” he said in an email. Sharon Howell, Harvard’s senior resident dean, criticized Harvard administrators and said they owed the deans an apology for failing to notify the email account holders until after gaining access to the emails. “They don’t seem to think they’ve done anything wrong,” she said. Harvard University said last month that it issued academic sanctions against 60 students. The inquiry started after a teaching assistant in a Spring Semester undergraduate-level government class detected problems in the take-home test, including that students may have shared answers.

HARVARD OFFICIALS SEARCH 16 DEANS EMAILS IN SCANDAL

Ivy league school continues inquiry into cheating case | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — Harvard University administrators secretly searched the emails of 16 deans last fall, looking for a leak to reporters about a case of cheating, two newspapers reported. The email accounts belonged to deans on the Administrative Board, a committee addressing the cheating, The Boston Globe and The New York Times reported, citing school officials. The deans were not warned about the email access and only one was told of the


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STUDENTS GIVING BACK

Millennials triumph in generosity Students and statistics weigh in as to whether Generation Y is selfish or selfless WATSON STAFF REPORTER | BRITTANY bmwatson4@bsu.edu Growing up in a time where nearly everything has been readily available at one’s fingertips hasn’t caused Generation Y to be any less appreciative. The feeling of civic responsibility is estimated to be the highest it has been in over 25 years. According to the Washington Times, 75 percent of this generation is making charitable contributions, and Ball State is no exception. Rather than students having to seek out opportunities to make a difference, volunteering has become a part of normal extracurricular choices, with Ball State organizations and classes requiring philanthropies. Now that Gen Y is entering college and the workforce, when someone is in need they are capable of making the change they wish to see. “We are young and feel that this is our time to make sure that things are positively bustling and thriving,” said Angelina Zulas, Student Voluntary Services president and program coordinator. “We are very energetic souls with a passion to build up from where our forefathers left off.” According to online business news media site fastcompany.com, Generation Y has caused volunteering to increase by 25 percent since 2002. Along with doing physical labor, such as the efforts of the latest Alternative Spring Break trip to Caretta, W.Va., this generation is also able to be philanthropists through consumerism. Companies whose sole purpose for existence is to make a difference in the world has generation Y quickly jumping aboard, such as the booming ethical fashionableness of TOMS shoes. TOMS uses profits to supply impoverished areas with clothing, hygiene products and other resources. “I wear them because I get to put my money towards something worthwhile,” sophomore graphic arts management major Olivia Schuman said. “When I wear them, people ask me about them. EDITOR’S NOTE:

This is the final story in a four-part series featuring Ball State students who dedicate their time volunteering at local organizations.

PHOTO PROVIDED BY COURTNEY WINTER

A student builds a wheelchair ramp for a home through Rebuilding Together. Young people increasingly find it their responsibility to give back and as a result national volunteerism has seen a rise.

It starts important conversations to spread the word.” Once a year on April 16, One Day Without Shoes have people taking a walk in someone else’s absence of shoes for a day. These events are held in cities and on college campuses, including Ball State. Last year, people went without shoes at more than 1,000 events in more than 25 countries, according to TOMS. Whether a monetary donation or a few hours spent with the organization of choice, generation Y is making strides in bettering the world. “I see a strong desire within people of our generation to please others and desire for reassurance of being needed,” Courtney Winter, a junior social work major and SVS program coordinator, said. “What I learn while volunteering simply can’t be learned within a classroom.” Zulas does not see this as a blip on the generational radar, but a transformation that has begun to change the future. “Our generation is inspired by those who went above and beyond their expectations, overcame destitution and oppression, passed the animosity and the lack of support in order to make the world a better place,” Zulas said. “We hope to become just a fragment of a civil revolution.”

ONLINE

Ballet Theatre

ONLINE Get a closer glimpse at Caretta, W.Va., the locals and the students who spent their Spring Break giving.

BSU Students: $5 (adv)/$10 (door)

CINDERELLA March 18 at 7:30pm

Reserved Seating: Adult $23 (adv)/$28 (door) Youth $10

Tickets available at the Emens box office, all Ticketmaster outlets, charge-by-phone at (800) 745-3000 or online at www. ticketmaster.com. For more information call (765) 285-1539 or visit www.bsu.edu/emens.

TUESDAY Get a cardinal’s eye view of Florida spring training as students share their time with baseball’s star players.

Students make the difficult decision to either keep or lose the faith they grew up with as they step onto campus.

THE SPRING BREAK THAT CHANGED LIVES FOREVER 8 DAYS • 17 HOURS ON THE ROAD 6 PITSTOPS • 32 PEOPLE 5 HOUSES • 0 CELLPHONE SERVICE 1 UNFORGETTABLE EXPERIENCE I’ve traveled the world with my family for the past 20 years and been on various school trips and vacations in the past, but none compare to this. My dad is in the military and we’ve moved from Alaska to six continental states and Germany over the years. My mom has passed along her love of travel so whenever we get an opportunity to, we do. I have traveled all throughout the world, around Rome, Portugal and Ireland, to name a few. That being said, this is one of the first volunteer trips that I’ve been on and come back with more friends, intangible life lessons and progressive ideas for the future. The Alternative Spring Break celebrated its 10th year anniversary in Caretta, W.Va,, and I embarked on a journey that would change my life forever. From the moment we walked into the Big Creek People in Action facility, we felt at home because the head director Ms. Marsha was there to greet us with open arms, literally. She hugged each and every one of us as we lugged our bags up the stairs. Each day there would be a wake-up call, breakfast, work site assignments, free-time, dinner and reflections. Reflections each day were structured to allow us to learn more about ourselves in relation to the other 31 people and those who lived in Caretta, where we expressed our deepest secrets and fears and vowed not to let that information leave the room. I can’t recall one that didn’t bring tears to at least one person’s eyes. We became close. I think the biggest shock for our group was the quality of the houses of the people who worked for BCPIA. The two or three guys that provided us with tools and basic skills to complete the tasks has the homes that were in the worst conditions because they constantly put others before themselves. I was also surprised at the large number of houses that were in bad condition and the lack of health care. That was evident when talking to people at first, and later reaffirmed by a resident who said the nearest hospital was 45 minutes away. On Monday night there were special guests that came to play country music and teach us the basics of flat-foot dancing. Chester Ball was the lead singer and guitar player who had white hair on his face and vibrant blue eyes. After each song he would continuously show his appreciation by telling us stories of the people and all that they had gone through. He also gave us advice about life, love and counting all of our blessings. “That’s one thing you’ll find in West Virginia is people with big hearts, full of love,” Ball said. Which we can all bear witness to, because although they might not have much, we encountered some of the sweetest people. Other events that we were able to be a part of were visiting farm animals, climbing a mountain in War (the most southern city), taking a nature hike around Berwind Lake, reading Dr. Suess books playing basketball with elementary school kids and talking to a senior class about secondary education. The trip was so inspiring because all 32 people were there with one common goal: to do work and make a difference. But not as many of us expected to be changed ourselves, which was much more than we could have ever accomplished on a beach in Florida. We did not go in as the college kids attempting to re-enact “Extreme Makeover: Home Edition” but to help those in need by giving our time and resources. In return we formed relationships with the families whose homes we worked on to be more suitable for living.

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MONDAY, MARCH 11, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM | PAGE 5

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DN PHOTOS CARIEMA WOOD

TOP: Elyse Brenner and Mayu Watanabe shovel $6,000 worth of coal into a furnace. This is the 10th year of Ball State’s Alternate Spring Break program. ABOVE: Chester Ball (second from right) and his group play music for the students involved in the Alternate Spring Break. The initiative provided more than service and allowed those involved to connect with others in the program.

At different homes in the area we insulated rooms, painted, repaired roofing, shoveled coal and built handicap ramps, walls and floors. The difference we made in each home is just one small amount of change that was set in motion, but the work definitely doesn’t stop there. They need helping hands to rebuild their community, which is prone to flooding, natural disasters and a thwarted economy. The amount of people that we touched by the work we did and the way it impacted the lives of the Ball State students is unforgettable. Not one of us wanted to leave Saturday morning, and a couple of us walked away with such enlightened purpose and drive. We have exchanged contact information with the people we worked with and someone has already emailed the group about sending pictures and coming back in the summer for warm weather and four-wheeling.

CARIEMA WOOD DOING THE ALTERNATIVE

CARIEMA WOOD IS A SOPHOMORE JOURNALISM AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS MAJOR AND WRITES ‘DOING THE ALTERNATIVE’ FOR THE DAILY NEWS. HER VIEWS DO NOT NECESSARILY AGREE WITH THOSE OF THE NEWSPAPER. WRITE TO CARIEMA AT CWOOD@BSU.EDU.


PAGE 6 | MONDAY, MARCH 11, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM

FORUM OPINION@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/BSUDAILYNEWS

PERCEIVED ‘PREDATORS’ HELP FREE MARKET, ALL AMERICANS NATHAN BROWN AHEAD OF THE CURVE NATHAN BROWN IS A SENIOR ECONOMICS, ACCOUNTING AND FINANCE MAJOR AND WRITES “AHEAD OF THE CURVE” FOR THE DAILY NEWS. HIS VIEWS DO NOT NECESSARILY REFLECT THOSE OF THE NEWSPAPER. YOU CAN WRITE TO NATHAN AT NBROWN2 @BSU.EDU.

Capitalism is the foundation of which America has been built upon; helping it to become the most prosperous nation in history. However, it is often associated with extortion and inequality. People tend to forget that the invisible hand, more often than not, finds a way to improve the lives of everyone in our society. Payday lenders, used-car salesman and rent-to-own businesses are often the subject of media attacks. These institutions are known for their “predatory” strategies as they often “take advantage” of unsophisticated consumers. Contrary to this standard belief, these predatory acts actually are a great example of the reason capitalism is successful. A 2000 study by the Federal Trade Commission found that only 2.3 percent of American households had used a rent-to-own transaction, but 73 percent of those that did had a high school education or less, and 59 percent had an annual income of less than $25,000. In tough economic times such as now, these numbers increase and most likely include people with a higher level of education that are finding it tough to make a decent living. You don’t have to search hard to find the articles and consumers who proclaim that these institutions overprice their items up to 100 percent of their retail value in addition to customer service that leaves much to be desired. These factors make them an easy target for criticism. The greatest asset of a free market, capitalist economy, is that people are free to make choices. The reason these institutions continue to thrive despite their well-publicized weaknesses is that they provide a service that many people desire. People are free to choose to do business with them. Low-income families or those with little to no access to credit are able to go out and improve their standard

of living and happiness with items that they want but cannot afford to purchase outright. A free market economy provides the incentive and opportunity for some entrepreneurial citizen to recognize there are people all over the country who are more than willing to pay a premium in order to receive items that they believe will make them better off. No one is a victim in the open market if their wants are fulfilled. In a free market system, any person who is able to recognize and satisfy an unmet desire of society can go into business. Therefore, it is in anyone’s self-interest to do what’s best for society as a whole. Profit-seeking individuals only interested in their personal gain end up benefiting everyone whether they intend to or not. The trickle-down effect of individual success is, in part, responsible for the high standard of living that even American citizens at the bottom of the income scale enjoy. We can compare poverty in our country to poverty in worse-off countries to see this. Approximately 97 percent of all American households own at least one television while around 15 percent of them live in what is classified as poverty. In countries without the economic institutions of a capitalist society, citizens living in poverty often not only do not have televisions, but also lack access to basic amenities such as electricity and shelter. It would be naïve to ignore the fact that there are Americans who cannot make ends meet, let alone have the certainty of where their next meal will come from. However, the true beauty of our system is that any individual with the drive and determination can work hard to change their situation. That’s why we should embrace our economic freedoms and always remain true to the principals this country was founded upon.

SAVING MONEY IS VITAL FOR EDUCATION MAJORS With Spring Semester halfway over and many education majors far into their student teaching, many are starting to think about their future in the education field. While some may move right into grad school, others are looking for jobs in the field, and many factors are helping them decide where they want to apply — salary being one of the big factors. According to the National Education Association, the average beginning teacher’s salary in Indiana is $32,761. This leaves me wondering, is this even enough to live on in the state of Indiana? With the average one parent, one child yearly budget being $32,013, according tofindthedata.org, first year teachers are cutting it close with their starting salaries. For many educators, especially those new to the profession, “they simply can’t raise a family on that based on beginning teacher salaries,” Nate Schnellenberger, president of the Indiana State Teachers Association, said in an Associated Press article . Even further, teachers’ salaries are now being based on student performance, which comes with the implementation of the RISE evaluation and development system put into place by the Indiana Department of Education. Teachers are now being held further accountable for the their teaching and for their students’ success. Teachers’ scores are largely based on standardized test scores, but with disciplines such

FORUM POLICY The Daily News forum page aims to stimulate discussion in the Ball State community. The Daily News welcomes reader viewpoints and offers three vehicles of expression for reader opinions: letters to the editor,

guest columns and feedback on our website. Letters to the editor must be signed and appear as space permits each day. The limit for letter length is approximately 350 words. All letters must be typed.

The editor reserves the right to edit and condense submissions. The name of the author is usually published but may be withheld for compelling reasons, such as physical harm to the author. The editor decides

this on an individual basis and must consult the writer before withholding the name. Those interested in submitting a letter can do so by emailing opinion@bsudailynews.com or editor@bsudailynews.com

as art, journalism and physical education there is a lot of gray area since there aren’t standardized tests for them. I, like many other future educators, worry that once I get into the profession my salary will not cover my living, let alone cover the supplies and extras I must purchase for my classroom. When I think about my future as a teacher, I don’t want to have to worry about how I am going to put food on my table, appropriate clothes on my body and make sure my students have pencils to do their work. Instead, I want to worry about how I will provide a top-quality education for the students in my classroom. My advice to education majors, and really any student at Ball State, is to start saving now, so that when you do enter your chosen profession you already have some money put away. By doing this you will be ahead of the game, and will not necessarily be forced to live paycheckto-paycheck, like many do after college. Also, make yourself as well-rounded as possible. The more you know and can teach, the more likely you are to be hired and make more money. We are taught in our classes how to apply different methods to our lessons, and how to deal with disruptive students, but maybe we should be required to take a class on how to survive with a starting teachers pay if we are really going to make it in the education profession.

The Daily News encourages its readers to voice their views on legislative issues. The following legislators represent the Ball State community:

SEN. TIM LANANE Indiana Dist. 25 200 W. Washington Street Indianapolis, IN 46204 1-800-382-9467

REP. SUE ERRINGTON Indiana District 34 200 W. Washington St. Indianapolis, IN 46204 1-800-382-9842

U.S. SEN. DAN COATS 493 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, DC, 20510 (202) 224-5623

SAMANTHA DEANE EDUCATION POINT VIEW SAMANTHA DEANE IS A JUNIOR JOURNALISM EDUCATION MAJOR AND WRITES “EDUCATION POINT VIEW” FOR THE DAILY NEWS. HER VIEWS DO NOT NECESSARILY REFLECT THOSE OF THE NEWSPAPER. YOU CAN WRITE TO SAMANTHA AT SRDEANE @BSU.EDU.

U.S. SEN. JOSEPH DONNELLY B33 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, DC 20510 (202) 224-4814 U.S. REP. LUKE MESSER U.S. 6th District 508 Cannon House Office Building Washington, DC 20515 (202) 225-3021

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MONDAY, MARCH 11, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM | PAGE 7

SPORTS

Cardinals go 3-1 at FAU Tournament Team on pace for most home runs, doubles in season FISHBURN STAFF REPORTER | MELEAH mcfishburn@bsu.edu The Florida Atlantic Tournament in Boca Raton, Fla., came to a close on Saturday as Ball State softball suffered a loss to Kansas. The team defeated Michigan State (7-2), Stony Brook (5-2) and Florida A&M (9-0), though fell to Kansas (7-8) during the three-day tournament. The Cardinals overall season record is now 11-9. “I feel like we are in a pretty good place right now,� coach Craig Nicholson said of the team at the current point in the schedule. Ball State remained strong at the plate throughout the competition. The Cardinals hit eight home runs in the three-game weekend

bringing the team’s overall total for home runs to 21 on the season with a .315 batting average. The Cardinals are well ahead of last year’s pace for home runs and doubles as they reached 42 team doubles during the FAU Tournament after 20 games. Last season Ball State had 100 doubles all year. Senior center fielder Amanda Carpenter recorded her second career grand slam against Michigan State as she drove the ball over the left field wall, helping boost the team to a 7-2 victory over the Big Ten opponent. “We hit great all weekend and we made some very good adjustments against some very good pitching,� Nicholson said. The pitching of freshmen Nicole Steinbach and Kelsey Schifferdecker also ended on a high note after the weekend with 18 combined strikeouts. The duo pitched a combined 2.80 ERA over the weekend bringing the overall total to 2.85. “We made some errors at bad

BY THE NUMBERS

40

hits on the weekend

6

batting errors

.311

batting average on the weekend times that really cost us some games on this trip,� Nicholson said. Despite errors made in the field, the Cardinals managed to come out of the second weekend maintaining a winning season. The team is currently .955 in the field with Carpenter, sophomores Jessica Craft and Loren Cihlar and freshman Sasha Margulies each fielding 1.000 “My big thing on this trip was just to continue to grow as a team and I think that we definitely did that as we went through the week,� Nicholson said.

Don’t forget your friend’s birthday! 6HQGDFODVVL¿HGELUWKGD\ZLVKLQ WKH'DLO\1HZV

DN FILE PHOTO JONATHAN MIKSANEK

Amanda Carpenter slides home to score the second run for Ball State during the game against Central Michigan on April 22, 2012. Carpenter blasted her second career grand slam against Michigan State, helping the team to a 7-2 victory.

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Cardinal Villas 2/3 bdrm apts. free wifi, blowout prices, call today! 765-729-9618 $300 signing bonus until 2/28 Clean 1 bdrm apartment, all utilities included $450/mo. avail. 8/01/2013 call kasey at 405-1220

Deluxe 1 Bdrm 1 Blk from BSU $395/mo + utlits - Avail Now, May, or August Lease 765-808-6054

FREE INTERNET! Clean & quiet 1 bdrm apts, close to BSU. On site WS/DR,cedarsatbsu.com,286 2806

Landlord pays utilities, 2 bdrm apts. 811 W. Main Street, 765-744-0185, bsuoffcampus.com Large 3 Bdrm, 1 block from campus, $325 a month each, all utilities included, Aug. lease. Call 760-4434

Nice 3 bdr. Close to BSU. 2 ba. Avail. Aug. A/C, W/D. $350/ea, utils incl.765-348-6413, $ Reduced Deposit wwwjahrentals.com. Paid High Spd Internet + Electric Quality 2-3 bdrms. From $210 each W/D, D/W, 765-744-1079 joecoolproperties.blogspot.com

  

$300 signing bunus thru 2/28 Quality Houses & Apartments University Village Apts. Cardinal Villas Apts. Individual Houses 2,3,4 & 5 Bedrooms GREAT Locations www.BSURentals.com or 729-9618

*Ad must be submitted to dnclassified@bsu.edu to be eligible. * The Daily News has the right to revise or reject any advertisements. * The Daily News assumes no liability for content of the advertisement.

 

**Running out of time! 2,3,5,6 bdrm houses avail. Off st prking, walk to BSU. Asset mgmt (765) 281-9000

Aug. Lease, 3 bdrm, 2 ba., $975/ mo.,utils. includ. A/C, no pets. 924 Marsh. Call 282-7332, 713 3636

1 Bdrm. Aug. Lease, 215 N. Dicks Util. Included, $475/mo. 765-434-3640

Beautiful 5 bdrm-914 W University Just became avail. for Aug 2013 Newly Remodeled - Stove, Fridge, D/W, Microwave, Gar. Disposal, W/D, $350/person, UALA Mem. www.bsubeachfronthomes.com 765-741-9959

2 bdrm 211 N. Calvert. $350/ea util included. W/D. Call 765-434-3640. Please leave message.

Spacious 1 bdrm, util paid. avail now through July, 811 W Main St. 765 744 0185 bsuoffcampus.com

2301 N. Hollywood. 3bdrm, 2 ba, + Lg bonus rm. util rm w/ W/D, screened porch, walk to BSU. $750/mo. Avail June or July. Call 765-288-7251

 

2bdr house 2 blk from campus Nice with A/C, Utils inclu .Aug lease Call 765-760-4434

! 3 bdrm, 1 blk from campus. Only $275 ea. All util. includ. laundry, off strt prking, 760-4434

3 bdm 2405 N. Hollywood 630/mo + utils. 9mo or yr lse. Start May or Aug call after 5. 765-759-5017

! A 3 bdrm in village, 1 blk from campus all utils incl, new carpet, A/C, off st. prkg. aug. 760-4434 ! A 4 bdrm in village, all utils incl, new carpet, D/W, laundry off st. prkg. 760-4434 !!!A+ Convenience. 3&4 Bdrm, NY &Bethel, Off Strt Prkng, D/W, W/D, C/A, New Remodel, 317-507-1490 !3 bdrm, high end deluxe unit, completely remodeled, new appli. fireplace, Aug lse. 765 749 5646, www.bsurentals.info !4 bdrm, 2 ba,walk to BSU, w/d C/A.prking, Aug Lse, 290/ea plus util,284 3646 or 744 5008 !5 Bdrm, 2 1/2 ba, walk to BSU, w/d, c/a,w/ deck, prking, aug lse. 290/ea plus util,284 3646 744 5008 !6 bdrm, 2 lg ba, walk to BSU, front porch, w/d, d/w, air conditioning, prking, aug lse. 300/ea. gas/water included, 284 3646 or 744 5008 $$ Save $$ 4 or 5 bdrm, 2 ba, 2 kit, bsmt, nice, clean, close to BSU, 317-727-7653 or visit www.ballurentals.com Call for details on Free MonthĘźs Rent *****NEWER 4 BDRM Houses***** Grt location/cond., many extras. Aug lse. David 317-640-1627 ********$200 gift card w/ lse********

 

3 bdrm 3 blks from campus Avail Aug all util pd w/d, d/w, a/c, gar,no pets,760-4529 3 Bdrm, C/A, W/D, close to BSU, wrap-around deck, 2216 Rosewood, newly renovated, $300/each+utilities 765-744-4823 3 bdrm. avail Aug. utils included, W/D, $350/ea. 215 N. Dicks, 765-434-3640. Leave message. 3 bdrms 2 bath 3 blks 2 Student Center C/A W/D GAR $225 per + util 317-594-5512 3/4 bdrm houses, close to BSU, $300/person, Call today for more info, 729 9618 4 Bdr. 2 Ba. house. Walk to BSU. W/D, D/W, Micro, Aug. lease $1200/month 765-717-9332 www.greatmuncierentals.com 4 bdrm, 2 ba Very nice, off st. prkg walking distance. $300/ea. +util. No pets.W/D Call 765-729-1724 4 Brm House @1220 Neely. Avail July 1st, 2013. $1200/mo + utils 765-649-8377 4, 5, or 6 bdrm. Lrg. rooms, 2 lrg. ba., W/D, off st prkg, all utils includ. 501 N. Alameda. (765) 744-8269. 401 N. Martin, Aug. lease, 4 bdrm, A/C, W/D, $300/month each + Utils. No pets. Call 765-288-3100

By Kinghorn.3 or 6 bdrm houses, Off st pk, A/C, gas heat, appl furn 748-9145, 749-6013, 282-4715 Extra nice 2204 N.Maplewood Ave. Close to BSU 2 bdrm, W/D, fridge, stove, off-st prkg. No pets, no smoking. $250/each +util. Aug to Aug lease. UALA member. Call 288-2663 or 730-2237 For Rent 3 bdrm, 2.5 Car Garage, Utility Rm with W/D, C/A, Rex St, Walk to Campus, 765-520-9404 Large 3 Bdrm, 1 block from campus, A/C, $325/mo, all utilities included, Aug. lease. Call 760-4434 Near BSU. Nice! 3 or 4 bdrm. W/D, furnished, pet friendly. Aug to Aug Lease. Call 765-282-8606 Now renting for Aug. 2013. 1,2,3,4,&5 bdr. No pets. All have W/D & A/C 1-8blk to BSU. Call 289-3971 Pd. Utilties & High Spd Internet Qlty 3-6 bdr. From $300 ea. Some hottubs 765-744-1079 joecoolproperties.blogspot.com Perfect for couple 1 1/2 bdrm garage in basement, 505 S. Hutchinson 744-0185, bsuoffcampus.com Premiere student living. 1-5 bdrms, new updates, W/D, plus some utls included.765-286-2806 (Lv. mg.) Renting for next year, 4 bdrm homes in Ball State area. 765-729-1067 kp-properties.net VERY NICE 1,2,&3 bdrm homes and Apts near campus. May&Aug Leases, taycorpinvestments.com for info and appointments call Cedric, 765-281-0049

Visit us online! Today’s birthday (3-11-13) ___ (c) 2007, Tribune Media Services Inc. Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Information Services.

To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.

With the New Moon in Pisces today, consider where you’d like to be in a year. Home life has your focus until June, when adventure calls. Roll with financial changes; travel and education now lead to career results later. Grow your skills, and follow a dream.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)Today is a 7 -- Arguing doesn’t work so well in the heat of the game. Debate could actually be fun, if you keep it light. Let a common vision inspire. Pursue personal goals. Keep the faith.You’re gaining wisdom. Proceed with caution. Aries (March 21-April 19) Today is an 8 -- Not everything is perfect, but you can ride out the bumps with grace. There’s room for romance, when you think about it. Follow a person who cares about you. Consider new options. Taurus (April 20-May 20) Today is a 6 -New opportunities to complete upsets emerge this coming week, especially in terms of romance. Use your emotional powers. And put a sweet spin on your sales pitch.

Gemini (May 21-June 21) Today is a 9 -Your treasure is at home. Share feelings with your partner and be rewarded. You bring out the best in each other. There’s a completion and a new beginning of a spiritual nature. Cancer (June 22-July 22)Today is a 9 -- Your fears are not necessarily real. Have someone listen to them, then step beyond your comfort zone to discover something surprising. It’s a good time to fix things. Everything gets worked out. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Today is a 9 -- A change of procedures may be in order, but that’s no problem.You’re brilliant. The money’s there, but don’t get pushy. Do the math, and stick to the rules. There’s a lucky development.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Today is a 7 -- You can do it, with their help. Even work seems like fun now. Study with passion, renewed excitement and enthusiasm. Working at home increases your benefits. Repeat strategies that worked before. Accept encouragement. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Today is a 9 -- New data support your intentions, and there’s more work coming in. Love is the bottom line; communicate this. Assign a designated driver before, and take it to the top. Don’t overextend. Re-evaluate what you have. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Today is a 9 -- Choose your battles well. Accept a challenge, or an excellent opportunity. Keep track of what you’re learning. Fix things up the way you’ve always wanted. Gather as much as you can. Count your blessings.

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Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Today is an 8 -- Push past old barriers and gain career stature with a surge of energy. Don’t give up.You’ve got the right stuff. Discover another way to save. Revise your routine with new options. A social event sparks romance. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Today is a 9 -- You have the power to succeed. Review your budget. Send out feelers. The New Moon in Pisces could inspire new income. Play an ace you’ve kept hidden. Go for the gold! Don’t touch savings, though. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Today is a 9 -- The more, the merrier. Intimidate the competition with your great attitude. Compromise to make sure. Go the extra mile for your friends. Run reality checks. Buy love. Take time to be certain and make the commitment.


PAGE 8 | MONDAY, MARCH 11, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILYNEWS.COM

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DN 03-11-13