Issuu on Google+

DN TUESDAY, MARCH 12, 2013

THE DAILY NEWS

BSUDAILY.COM

SPRING TRAINING

CARDINALS JOIN IN CONCLAVE

Immersive class travels to Florida to cover three baseball teams

No front-runner seems to be apparent in election to be the next pope

SEE PAGE 3

SEE PAGE 4

UPD officers don’t find reported gunman Man with handgun reported by uncertain female student CHRIS STEPHENS AND DEVAN FILCHAK | news@bsudailynews.com

A series of emergency notifications sent to students through email and text messages to the community that left many students not attending class and wondering if there was an actual lockdown. Joan Todd, executive director of public relations, said around 7:30 a.m. on Monday morning, a man was spotted carrying what looked to be a firearm. Students received emails and texts around 8 a.m. warning of a man with a gun seen north of Bracken Library and telling students to stay secure in a safe place. A later message from the university at 8:32 a.m. gave students a descrip-

North Korea nullifies armistice

tion of the suspected gunman, although the message said he was not threatening. At 9:27 a.m., an “all clear” was called, which Todd said meant the University Police Department searched and secured the area. Gene Burton, director of public safety, said a female student called UPD that morning. Burton interviewed her before UPD began the search for the alleged gunman. Officers determined the campus was safe following a search of the area of Bracken Library and Noyer Complex, where the gunman was reportedly walking toward, and all of campus north of Riverside Avenue. Burton said the factors of not receiving any further reports of a gunman, not seeing more action once the description was released to the public and the trepidation of the initial witness made the department feel the campus was safe. “She just thought; she wasn’t positive she saw

a gun,” he said. “We were confident with all of those factors taken into account that the campus was safe, and we were able to resume normal activities.” Burton said while he doesn’t believe the report was a prank, the student could have been mistaken. “[The alleged gunman] didn’t talk to her; they didn’t say anything; they didn’t make any gestures or waving the object around,” he said. “There was no obvious actions of the person; they were just walking in front of the library. But at the time of the call [it] is not the time to sit and think about whether the person was right or not.” Burton said the emergency notifications completed the appropriate purpose, while it never declared a lock down of campus, as many students thought.

BREAKDOWN Around 7:30 a.m. A man was spotted carrying what looked to be a handgun.

8:32 a.m. A message was sent out giving students a description of the suspected gunman.

8 a.m.

7 a.m.

Around 8 a.m. A message was sent out warning of a report of a man with a gun seen north of Bracken Library.

9 a.m.

9:27 a.m. An “all clear” issued after University Police Department searched and secured the area. DN GRAPHIC

See GUNMAN, page 4

POWERBALL Gilbert’s record part of bigger picture in Ball State softball program

U.N. spokesman says country cannot unilaterally call off truce | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS SEOUL, South Korea — A state-run newspaper in North Korea said Monday the communist country had carried out a threat to cancel the 1953 armistice that ended the Korean War, following days of increased tensions over its latest nuclear test. A U.N. spokesman said later in the N. KOREAN day, however, that ACTIONS North Korea can• Armistice reportedly not unilaterally disnullified solve the armistice. • Red Cross hotline shut North Korea also down followed through • Several threats were on another prommade, including to ise: It shut down a launch a nuclear strike on the U.S. Red Cross hotline that the North and South Korea used for general communication and to discuss aid shipments and separated families’ reunions. Enraged over the South’s current joint military drills with the United States and last week’s U.N. sanctions imposed on Pyongyang for its Feb. 12 nuclear test, North Korea has piled threat on top of threat, including a vow to launch a nuclear strike on the U.S. Seoul has responded with tough talk of its own and has placed its troops on high alert. Tensions on the divided peninsula have reached their highest level since North Korea rained artillery shells on a South Korean island in 2010.

See KOREA, page 4

BILL WOULD REMODEL FINANCIAL AID

Plan includes new stipulation of total credit hours completed | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FORT WAYNE, Ind. — A bill making its way through Indiana’s General Assembly would change the laws governing need-based state financial aid to add more requirements for students. Indiana’s two largest grant programs would see new stipulations for credit hours that a student must successfully complete to remain eligible, The Journal Gazette reported . Those enrolled in the 21st Century Scholars program would drop down to the Frank O’Bannon grant if they complete fewer than 30 credit hours a year. O’Bannon grant recipients who complete fewer than 24 credit hours a year could lose their scholarship. A recent survey of 9,000 Indiana college students who are receiving state financial aid found that only half are taking enough courses to graduate in four years.

See AID, page 4

DN FILE PHOTOS JONATHAN MIKSANEK

Hanne Stuedemann, Jennifer Gilbert and Taylor Rager go up to bat in a home game against Central Michigan on April 22, 2012. The three girls’ power hitting helps to make up the core of the Cardinals’ offense, with Gilbert holding the school’s record for home runs. MELEAH FISHBURN STAFF REPORTER | mcfishburn@bsu.edu

W

hen left fielder Jennifer Gilbert blasted a tworun home run over the left-center field wall in the fourth inning against Florida International on March 5, she put herself atop Ball State’s record book for most home runs in a career. And she’s only a junior. The home run was her sixth of the season, but the 39th in her career at Ball State. For a player that has broken a school record in her junior season, she’s only developed her power in the last few years. “I actually didn’t start to hit home runs until my senior year of high school,” Gilbert said. Her recent power source has helped Gilbert break a school record that was set in 2012 by former teammate Amanda Montalto. With another season and a half left of her Ball State career, Gilbert will only continue to pile onto a record that’s already hers. Power isn’t just new to Gilbert, it’s a fairly new concept for the entire Ball State softball team. In 2012, the team broke the school record for home runs in a season by a team and end-

2011

2012

CONTACT US

News desk: 285-8255 Sports desk: 285-8245 Features desk: 285-8247

Editor: 285-8249 Classified: 285-8247 Fax: 285-8248

2013

28 44 70 21 (after 59 games)

2010

(after 58 games)

(after 55 games) (after 20 games)

TEAM SLUGGING PERCENTAGE

2011

2012

2013

(after 58 games)

(after 55 games)

(after 20 games)

.457 .472 .543 .510

(after 59 games)

2010

TEAM BATTING AVERAGE

2011

2012

2013

(after 58 games)

(after 55 games)

(after 20 games)

.303 .320 .318 .315 (after 59 games)

See SOFTBALL, page 5

THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS

MUNCIE, INDIANA

I KNEW YOU WERE A GOAT WHEN I WALKED IN.

ed with 70 home runs in 55 games. In the two seasons before 2012, the team hit a combined 72 home runs; 44 in 2011 and 28 in 2010. After 20 games this season, Ball State has hit 21 home runs, seven coming from Gilbert’s bat. “I think she’s seeing the ball pretty well,” Ball State coach Craig Nicholson said of Gilbert. “She’s staying patient at the plate.”

2010

TEAM HOME RUNS

PHOTO GALLERIES

Go online to see photography from campus, community events. Visit bsudaily.com and click on multimedia.

VOL. 92, ISSUE 92 TWEET US

Receive news updates on your phone for free by following @bsudailynews on twitter.com.

FORECAST

TODAY High: 41, Low: 27 Partly cloudy

TOMORROW High: 32, Low: 24 Few snow showers


PAGE 2 | TUESDAY, MARCH 12, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM

ONLINE NEWS

DN

ONLINE

Here’s a sneak peek at the Daily News you can only see online. Connect with web-exclusive content, such as interactives, video and audio slideshows.

TOP CLICKS | MONDAY

BSUDAILY.COM

1 2 3 4 5

SERVICE DIRECTORY

ONLINE EXCLUSIVES BSUDAILY.COM

BALL STATE TIED FOR THIRD

POSTAL BOX The Daily News offices are in AJ 278, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306-0481. Periodicals postage paid in Muncie, Ind. TO ADVERTISE Classified department 765-285-8247 Display department 765-285-8256 or 765-285-8246. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday.

911

TO SUBSCRIBE Call 765-285-8250 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Subscription rates: $75 for one year; $45 for one semester; $25 for summer subscription only. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Daily News, AJ 278, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306.

334

178

The Ball State men’s golf team finished Monday’s action tied with UNCG at the Pinehurst Intercollegiate Meet, where Tyler Merkel is currently at the No. 1 spot.

133

66

0

200

400

600

800

1000

US TO CENSOR RECORDS

Federal government to censor more public record documents, citing the reasoning to protect national security and internal deliberations.

1. Campus now secure after man with gun reportedly seen near Bracken Library 2. Spokesperson says emergency alerts effective 3. Planning commission members look to improve Village area 4. Alternative Spring Break takes students to a secluded small town in West Virginia 5. WCRD News Brief - 3-11-13

DN OOPS!

THE DN WANTS YOU TO

JOIN OUR STAFF!

Find a mistake? Email us at oops@bsudailynews.com or tweet with #DNoops.

PHOTOGRAPHERS n REPORTERS n DESIGNERS COPY EDITORS n VIDEOGRAPHERS n CARTOONISTS

Stop by AJ 278 and say hello!

Make sure to follow us on our various social media accounts. @bsudailynews @dn_campus @dn_sports @dn_editor

facebook.com/ BSUDailyNews

BACK ISSUES Stop by AJ 278 between noon and 10 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and afternoons Friday. All back issues are free and limited to two issues per person.

EDITORIAL BOARD EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Andrew Mishler

PHOTO EDITOR Bobby Ellis

MANAGING EDITOR Steven Williams

ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR Corey Ohlenkamp

NEWS EDITOR Devan Filchak ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR Evie Lichtenwalter

WE ARE ALWAYS IN NEED OF:

GET CONNECTED

The Ball State Daily News (USPS-144-360), the Ball State student newspaper, is published Monday through Thursday during the academic year and Monday and Thursday during summer sessions; zero days on breaks and holidays. The Daily News is supported in part by an allocation from the General Fund of the university and is available free to students at various points on campus.

@dn_features @72hrsonline @dn_visuals

DAY EDITOR Sara Nahrwold SPORTS EDITOR Mat Mikesell ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR Matt McKinney FEATURES EDITOR Lindsey Gelwicks ASSISTANT FEATURES EDITOR Anna Ortiz 72HRS EDITOR Michelle Johnson

DESIGN EDITOR Stephanie Meredith ASSISTANT DESIGN EDITOR Emily Theis GRAPHICS EDITOR/ SOCIAL MEDIA COORDINATOR Adam Baumgartner VIDEO EDITOR Kellan Deam FORUM EDITOR/ COPY CHIEF Kelly Dickey SENIOR COPY EDITORS Marisa Hendrickson Daniel Brount

LET US KNOW Insta

Instagram: bsudailynews

Have any meetings or events coming up? Email us at editor@bsudailynews.com.

breaking news Crossword

Sudoku

By Michael Mepham

Level: Mild

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

SOLUTION FOR WEDNESDAY.

ACROSS 1 ZION NATIONAL PARK’S STATE 5 “LIQUID DIET” DRINKERS 9 LOW-PRESTIGE POSITION 14 ACTRESS ROGERS 15 FRONT OF THE BOAT 16 RIVER IN LYONS 17 PRIME HOURS FOR TELEVISION BROADCASTERS 20 SNORKELING SPOT 21 QUAINT “BEFORE” 22 SCISSORS SOUND 23 DOWN IN THE DUMPS 27 SCRAPE TOGETHER, WITH “OUT” 28 GOOGLER’S SUCCESS 29 SKINNY OLIVE 30 TRANSFERRED, AS PROPERTY 32 SMALL AMOUNT 34 GM NAVIGATION SYSTEM 37 “GREETINGS, PADDY!” 42 LIST OF CORRECTIONS 43 CREATED, AS A WEB 45 JIM OF “LIAR, LIAR” 48 DREAMER’S ACRONYM

51 DEDICATED LINES? 52 CONQUISTADOR’S TREASURE 53 MOONSHINE, OR A SODA NAMED FOR IT 57 CONNECTING POINT 59 GAME WITH SKIP AND REVERSE CARDS 60 SHOW ONE’S PEARLY WHITES 61 CONDUCT OBSERVED DURING INTERNATIONAL NEGOTIATIONS 66 DELTA RIVAL, AS IT USED TO BE CALLED 67 SOUTHERNMOST GREAT LAKE 68 TOP DRAFT STATUS 69 DEBUSSY’S “SLOW” 70 STUDIO PAYMENT 71 MORE-CALORIC EGG PART DOWN 1 “STEEE-RIKE!” CALLER 2 ACCESSORY WITH A WINDSOR KNOT 3 LIQUEUR SOMETIMES USED

IN AMANDINE SAUCE 4 BACKPACKERS’ OUTINGS 5 ALL GUSSIED UP 6 FORTY-NINER’S PAY DIRT 7 BEACH BRING-ALONG 8 MARBLE CAKE PATTERN 9 FLAVOR-ENHANCING ADDITIVE 10 MAINE COON AND MANX 11 SIGNED UP FOR 12 READY FOR RECORDING 13 ALERTED, IN A WAY 18 LEGISLATIVE TURNDOWN 19 MUST 23 ILL. METROPOLIS 24 LAUGH-A-MINUTE TYPE 25 WAHINE’S GREETING 26 IN THE VICINITY 31 COASTAL DIVERS 33 MIMIC 35 HOOPS DANGLER 36 SHREWD 38 CITY NEAR PROVO 39 BETA-TEST 40 LITTLE MUSIC PLAYER 41 NOT DECENT, SO TO SPEAK 44 STILL IN THE PACKAGE

45 GOVERNMENT OFFICIAL WORKING OVERSEAS 46 INSPIRE, AS CURIOSITY 47 FORMER NBAER DENNIS 49 PREDATORY HATCHLING 50 SURREALIST JOAN 54 LESS THAN 55 BÊTE __ 56 “STAR TREK” CO-STAR OF SHATNER 58 RADIATE 62 ANGER 63 TAILOR’S FASTENER 64 TOON COLLECTIBLE 65 TALK AND TALK

SOLUTION FOR WEDNESDAY.

bsudaily.com


TUESDAY, MARCH 12, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM | PAGE 3

FEATURES

WEDNESDAY Spring cleaning consists of more than dusting your room. Clear the cobwebs out of your life with these tips.

FEATURES@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/DN_FEATURES

THURSDAY After four years, comedian Brian Regan returns to John R. Emens Auditorium to entertain and amuse.

In training E

ANNA ORTIZ ASSISTANT FEATURES EDITOR

|

Get prepared for the day of shamrocks and leprechauns with some traditional Irish grub and drink.

Immersive class brings baseball’s spring training from Florida to Indiana

features@bsudailynews.com

ight years ago, Drew Bogs watched Jose Contreras pitch game one in the 2005 World Series for the Chicago White Sox. This past week while covering the Pittsburgh Pirates spring training, Bogs got to shake Contreras’ hand, something he said he never imagined he would get to do. The telecommunications and news major was a part of the special topics immersion class that ditched the five inches of snow that carpeted Indiana and headed to Florida, where the temperatures were in the 60s and they had to worry about sunburns, not frostbite. But they were there for the baseball diamond, not the beach. The 16 students and two instructors embarked on the 17-hour drive to Florida for the Grapefruit League 2013 baseball spring training — a trip that was equal parts camaraderie and tailing professional athletes. “It’s a relationship, an experience, that only those 16 kids will have,” said Suzy Smith, assistant professor of telecommunications. They were there for the common goal of bringing Florida spring training to Indiana through multimedia reporting, whether it was to get one-on-one with players or spend time with the die-hard fans on the stands. Smith said the trip was about making the transformation from fan to journalist and pure perseverance. “The trip created a situation that pushed boundaries, where everyone’s learning something new,” Smith said. “It’s about expanding the boundaries in each person’s craft.” The students came from different backgrounds such as photography, public relations, journalism, history and actuarial science. Smith and instructor of telecommunications Tim Underhill guided the students. For many, this was their first time entering the professional sports world. Bogs said when he received his first media pass in Pittsburgh, it was a pivotal moment. He was a professional journalist. “The most memorable thing is that I didn’t feel like a student,” Bogs said. “I felt like a working, paid journalist, like I graduated and worked for ESPN.” Bogs interviewed infielder and Indiana-native Clint Barmes, who played baseball at Indiana State University. One thing that surprised Bogs is how many Hoosiers were in the forefront of baseball. This is the second year that Ball State has done the spring training immersive learning experience. Senior telecommunications major Brad Huber went on the first trip and got to see some of his favorite Boston Red Sox players, David Ortiz and Manny Ramirez. He also met a man who owns a baseball museum in Cincinnati, Ohio, and donates artifacts to the Baseball Hall of Fame. When Huber went, the students had to pay all of their expenses, but because of the $20,000 Provost Immersive Learning Grant this year students didn’t need to carry the bulk of the finances themselves. “I make fun of Drew [Bogs] by telling him ‘You better thank us who went on the trip last year, because this year you got to go for free,’” Huber said. The past year the students worked with five teams; however, this year they had only three teams: the Pittsburgh Pirates, Tampa Bay Rays and the Houston Astros. This was because of packed schedules and the World Baseball Classic, which was happening at the same time. “It’s about building good relationships,” Smith said. “This year we built up the relationships we have with the Astros, the Rays and the Pirates. As we go along, we’ll get more and

BSUDAILY.COM BSUDAILY.COM BSUDAILY.COM BSUDAILY.COM BSUDAILY.COM BSUDAILY.COM BSUDAILY.COM BSUDAILY.COM BSUDAILY.COM BSUDAILY.COM Breaking news, comments, interactive graphics and more.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF SUZY SMITH

TOP: Jessie Mills and Hannah Carlock film at McKechnie Field in Brandenton, Fla. The immersive learning group traveled to the Pittsburgh Pirates’ spring training. ABOVE: Hunter Petroviak films at the Pittsburgh Pirates’ minor league complex in Brandenton, Fla.

BY THE NUMBERS «Ibuilt t’s about building good relationships. This year we up the relationships we have with the Astros, 16 the Rays and the Pirates. As we go along, we’ll get more and more teams to work with us. » 2 17 3 students in the immersive class

instructors leading the group

SUZY SMITH, assistant professor of telecommunications

more teams to work with us.” The group stopped in Atlanta and toured CNN’s news headquarters, where three Ball State alumni currently work. From there they headed to Pittsburgh and then to Florida, zigzagging from training camp to training camp while hitting up journalist havens such as Poynter Institute and the CBS Channel 10 Tampa Bay newsroom. The group also got to see the Baltimore Orioles play Spain in the World Baseball Classic. Smith said this trip is also a way to get Ball State’s name out there and has actually helped a student get an interview with a Toronto Blue Jays player whose hometown

was Anderson. For Smith, this was a way to revisit her field without immersing herself back into her 19year career as a CNN sportscaster. She said she wants to see change in the sports reporting world. This opportunity teaches students how to enter the field on the right foot. “There are a lot of people out there that don’t do [sports reporting] in a journalistic fashion,” Smith said. “I want to make sure these students do it right... We need to be transparent about the way things are presented.” Bogs ultimately described the trip as “a dream come true.” He is a fan across the board; there isn’t a season when he isn’t some

hours for the drive from Indiana to Florida

teams interviewed at spring training

type of sport. He said the trip confirmed that he is in the right profession. “This for me, is the ‘I don’t want to grow up job,’” Bogs said. “You get to be a kid and an adult at the same time. What’s more like that than being able to watch sports for a living?”

YOC is looking for Child Care Specialists to work directly with at-risk youth in a residential treatment setting. Applicants must be 21 years of age or older; have at least a high school diploma or GED; and a valid driver’s license. Experience in childcare or completion of related college courses preferred. We are hiring for all shifts with an emphasis on 2nd Shift (2:30p-10:30p) and weekend availability. Base pay for these positions start at $8.00/hr. PAID training will take place over a two-week period of which you must be available Monday-Friday from 8:00A-5:00P. Successful candidates must pass a pre-employment drug-screen and a complete criminal history background check, which includes data from the FBI, Department of Child Services (DCS), Child Protective Services (CPS), and the National Sex Offender registry. The Direct Care Hiring Fair will take place on Tuesday, March 12, 2013 from 12p-4p at: Youth Opportunity Center, Inc. Entrance #4 (follow signage) 3700 W. Kilgore Ave. Muncie, IN 47304. EOE Be prepared for a potential interview!


PAGE 4 | TUESDAY, MARCH 12, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM

NEWS

Conclave opens to elect pope Church leadership destabilized after surprise resignation | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS VATICAN CITY — Cardinals enter the Sistine Chapel today to elect the next pope amid more upheaval and uncertainty than the Catholic Church has seen in decades: There’s no front-runner, no indication how long voting will last and no sense that a single man has what it takes to fix the many problems. On the eve of the vote, cardinals offered wildly different assessments of what they’re looking for in the next pontiff and how close they are to a decision. It was evidence that Benedict XVI’s surprise resignation has continued to destabilize the church leadership and that his final appeal for unity may go unheeded, at least in the early rounds of voting. Cardinals hosted their final closed-door debate Monday over whether the church needs more of a manager to clean up the Vatican’s bureaucratic mess or a pastor to inspire the 1.2 billion faithful in times of crisis. The fact that not everyone got a chance to speak was a clear sign that there’s still unfinished business on the eve of the conclave. “This time around, there are many different candidates, so it’s normal that it’s going to take longer than the last time,” Cardinal Francisco Javier

Errazuriz of Chile told The Associated Press. “There are no groups, no compromises, no alliances, just each one with his conscience voting for the person he thinks is best, which is why I don’t think it will be over quickly.” None of that has prevented a storm of chatter over who’s ahead. The buzz in the papal stakes swirled around Cardinal Angelo Scola, an Italian seen as favored by cardinals hoping to shake up the powerful Vatican bureaucracy, and Brazilian Cardinal Odilo Scherer, a favorite of Vatican-based insiders intent on preserving the status quo. Scola is affable and Italian, but not from the Italian-centric Vatican bureaucracy called the Curia. That gives him clout with those seeking to reform the nerve center of the church that has been discredited by revelations of leaks and complaints from cardinals in the field that Rome is inefficient and unresponsive to their needs. Scherer seems to be favored by Latin Americans and the Curia. He has a solid handle on the Vatican’s finances, sitting on the governing commission of the Vatican bank, as well as the Holy See’s main budget committee. As a non-Italian, the archbishop of Sao Paolo would be expected to name an Italian as secretary of state — the Vatican No. 2 who runs day-to-day affairs — another plus for Vatican-based cardinals who would want one of their own running the shop.

HOW DOES A POPE GET ELECTED? WHO VOTES

•Only cardinals who are younger than 80 may vote •Pope Paul VI set the maximum number of electors at 120

VOTING STARTS

Each cardinal gets a ballot card, fills out their canidate of choice and places the folded ballot onto a plate, which is then tipped into a chalice BALLOTS ARE COUNTED

Three cardinals read the name of the cardinal who received the most votes and tally the ballots. The ballots are burned, but a record is kept for archives. VOTING SCHEDULE MCT PHOTO

Pope Benedict XVI arrives for a ceremony for the canonization of seven new saints on Oct. 21, 2012 in St. Peter’s Square in Vatican City. The conclave to elect a new pope will begin today.

The pastoral camp seems to be focusing on two Americans, New York archbishop Timothy Dolan and Boston archbishop Sean O’Malley. Neither has Vatican experience. Dolan has acknowledged his Italian isn’t strong — seen as a handicap for a job in which the lingua franca of day-today work is Italian. Canadian Cardinal Marc Ouellet is well-respected, stemming from his job at the important Vatican office that vets bishop appointments. Less well

known is that he has a lovely singing voice and can be heard belting out French folk songs on occasion. If the leading names fail to reach the 77 votes required for victory in the first few rounds of balloting, any number of surprise candidates could come to the fore as alternatives. It all starts today with the cardinals checking into the Santa Marta residence on the edge of the Vatican gardens. The rooms are simple and impersonal, but a step up from the cramped

Sandusky lawyer outlines basis for defense appeals Defendent attorney says victims waited too long to report | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS HARRISBURG, Pa. — Former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky’s “major claims” as he appeals a child sexual abuse conviction include the many years that went by before accusers notified authorities, according to a pair of defense filings Monday. Attorney Norris Gelman listed the failure to report — specifically, the judge’s refusal to instruct jurors on the issue — as a critical element of Sandusky’s effort to overturn the 45-count conviction. Gelman also argued that the defense lawyers lacked sufficient time to prepare for the three-week trial last summer. He revisited arguments previously rejected by the judge who presided over the trial, John Cleland. The new filings set the stage for formal appeals before Superior Court. Sandusky was convicted of molesting 10 boys over a period of several years in a case that brought down Hall of Fame coach Joe Paterno and led to sanctions against Penn State’s storied football program. Sandusky, 69, is serving 30 to 60 years at a state prison. He acknowledges showering with boys but insists he

didn’t molest any of them. Penn State’s costs from the massive fallout from the scandal topped $41 million as of the end of December, the university posted Monday on a website. The latest disclosure offered more itemization for certain costs, including the $8.1 million bill for the internal investigation led by former FBI director Louis Freeh. Gelman, in the court filings, listed the reporting delays by the eight young men who testified against Sandusky. He said only one of them reported allegations of abuse promptly, while the others waited between four and 14 years. “Reversible error was committed when the trial court refused the defense request to give jury instructions on the failure of the alleged victims to make a prompt complaint to authorities based on its view of ‘the research’ which led the court to believe that in the area of child sexual abuse such an instruction was not ‘an accurate indicia of honesty and may be misleading,’” Gelman wrote. The state attorney general’s office, which prosecuted Sandusky, offered no immediate comment on the Sandusky filings, one made to the trial judge and the other to Superior Court. Attorney Jeff Anderson, who represents two people with claims related to Sandusky, said the prompt complaint issue was unlikely to

MCT PHOTO

Jerry Sandusky arrives for his hearing on Jan. 10 at the Centre County Courthouse in Bellefonte, Pa. Sandusky’s defense team is focusing on the fact that several plaintiffs waited years before filing suit against the former assistant coach.

result in a new trial. “I think it’s a shallow and predictably made legal argument that has to be made, but it will effectively go nowhere,” said Anderson, whose clients are not among the eight who testified at trial. Gelman also said the trial judge should have given Sandusky’s attorneys more time to prepare for trial. “No attorney should be forced to defend without basic preparation and time to integrate discovery material into a defense,” Gelman wrote. Other grounds include a prosecutor’s reference during closing argument to Sandusky giving a television

interview shortly after he was arrested. Gelman said in an interview on Monday that the message to jurors was that Sandusky had spoken about the allegations on TV but not in court. “That’s a body blow,” Gelman said. “You just don’t do that.” His new filings also argued the trial judge erred by allowing hearsay testimony about a shower attack witnessed by a Penn State janitor. He said Monday that the next step is for the judge to either stand by his previous ruling or issue a supplemental ruling. After that, he said, Sandusky will file his appeal to Superior Court.

GUNMAN: Students criticize dispersing of information

| CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 “What we are trying to do with the initial text message is to get the desired action that we need which was for your safety, stay out of the area,” he said. “We understand that everyone has a desire to know more of what’s going on, but at that point, what to do is mitigate the situation and keep the area as clear as possible and to do that as quickly as possible.” Residence halls locked down and did not allow students to leave or enter for the duration of the search. Burton said the decision to lockdown for residence halls is a decision made by their own protocol, separate from how academic buildings reacted. Forest Bender, a senior philosophy major, said he believed the messages should have been clearer and offered more information. “Them saying all clear was extremely diluting to the situation,” Bender said.

“The man had not been found at the time. The police, it seems, just walked through campus and just didn’t find anyone with a gun.” Several students, like Kayla Aaron, a senior public relations major, looked to social media for more information. “As much as I trust my friends, I don’t trust the Internet,” Aaron said. “I wanted to know firsthand if we were on a lockdown, and if so, what we were doing about it.” Aaron said the emails she received, while giving information about the gunman, were not clear whether she was expected to attend class or if she should stay in her off-campus home. “Everything just seemed very up in the air – as if Ball State did not want to say we were on a lockdown,” Aaron said. Todd said students were directed in the texts to visit the Ball State website for further information and to review the university’s procedures for emergencies.

Bender said he believed that while the police department may have deemed it safe to be on campus, the campus should have been closed for the day. “Personally all my classes were canceled today because my professors took it into their own hands after Ball State didn’t do so,” Bender said. Todd said she believes the emergency warnings worked as they are intended Monday, offering all students the knowledge they need to remain safe. “Our number one priority is student safety,” Todd said. “[The university] acted out of an abundance of caution, sent out emergency alerts and once we felt the police had secured the area it was lifted.” Burton said UPD and other departments will reflect on the handling of the incident, as they do with all critical incidents. He said UPD will raise patrol of the area and academic buildings and have a heightened sense of awareness following the event.

conditions the cardinals faced before the hotel was put to use in 2005, when long lines would form at the Apostolic Palace for using bathrooms. At 10 a.m., the dean of the College of Cardinals, Angelo Sodano, will lead the celebration of the “Pro eligendo Pontificie” Mass — the Mass for the election of a pope — inside St. Peter’s Basilica, joined by the 115 cardinals who will vote. This is followed at 4:30 p.m. with a procession into the Sistine Chapel.

The first vote is taken on the first afternoon, but if no one receives the vote by twothirds, voting will take place again twice every morning and afternoon. After three days, if no pope is elected, they take a break for the day. They continue to break after every seven unsuccessful votes. THE WINNER IS CHOSEN

The next pope must have the votes of at least two-thirds of present cardinals. However, after 30 unsuccessful votes, they are allowed to agree to accept a majority, half of those present plus one. SOURCE: CATHOLIC.ORG

DN|BRIEF

SVS SEEKS DONATIONS FOR SHOP EVENT

Student Voluntary Services placed barrels for donations throughout residence halls before Spring Break and will place barrels in the academic buildings on campus starting next week for Lend a Hand Day. SVS and the Muncie Young Women Christian Association will host their own thrift shop where Muncie residences in need can pick up the donations. The YWCA determines who qualifies for the donations. The event served about 175 residences last year. Students, faculty and staff can donate items such as gently used clothing, new toiletries, baby products and nonperishable food until March 30. Michelle Kailey, adviser for the Lend A Hand Day committee, said SVS needs more donations to meet this year’s demands. “I think in the beginning it’s a little bit slower especially right before Spring Break and things are really crazy and people are focusing on homework and don’t have time to go through their closets,” Kailey said. SVS is expecting the usual amount of people. “Every year there is always a line out the door of people waiting to get into the store because all the items are free,” Kailey said. Each person gets a 30-gallon trash bag to put clothes into. They also receive two regular grocery bags they can fill with other items. The Lend A Hand Day committee is looking for student volunteers to help the day before and the day of the event on April 6. If students are interested in volunteering for the event or any others the information is available at bsu.edu/svs – OLIVA GUIDI

AID: Current students would not be affected | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 “We have to do something different to encourage kids to get in and out in four years,” Rep. Tom Dermody, R-LaPorte, told The Journal Gazette. “We’re focusing on the kids progressing toward a degree.” Dermody is sponsoring the bill, which passed the House 77 to 18 and is now in the Indiana Senate. Indiana spends about $250 million a year on the O’Bannon and 21st Century Scholars programs. More than 73,000 students are enrolled in the two programs. The 21st Century scholars pro-

gram provides full tuition and fees at public universities for students who sign up in middle school and meet certain character requirements. These grants, on average, are worth about $7,600 a year. The O’Bannon grant provides a maximum of about $3,900 a year. Both are need-based programs with income requirements. Current college students will not be affected. The bill also would create incentives for students who do well. The O’Bannon grant would provide an additional $1,400 to students who graduated high school with an honors diploma.

KOREA: Officials don’t make comment on armistice

| CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 The North Korean government made no formal announcement on its repeated threats to scrap the 60-yearold armistice, but the country’s main newspaper, Rodong Sinmun, reported that the armistice was nullified Monday as Pyongyang had said it would. The North has threatened to nullify the armistice several times before, and in 1996 it sent hundreds of armed troops into a border village. The troops later withdrew. Despite the North Korean report, U.N. spokesman Martin Nesirky said the armistice is

still valid and still in force because the armistice agreement had been adopted by the U.N. General Assembly and neither North Korea nor South Korea could dissolve it unilaterally. “The terms of the armistice agreement do not allow either side unilaterally to free themselves from it,” said Nesirky, the spokesman for U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon. Ban urged North Korea “to continue to respect the terms of the armistice agreement as it was approved by the General Assembly,” Nesirky said, adding that officials at U.N. headquarters were unaware of any operational changes.


TUESDAY, MARCH 12, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM | PAGE 5

SPORTS

Details will fuel Ball State’s season SOFTBALL: Coach doesn’t Cardinals involved in close losses in early-season games POLASKI STAFF REPORTER | DAVID @DavidPolaski

Ball State led Coastal Carolina 3-0 in the sixth inning. Facing one of college baseball’s powerhouses, the Cardinals had them on the ropes with the bases loaded and nobody out. Senior Wes Winkle grounded into a double play, and then freshman Sam Tidaback followed up with another out to end what could have been a huge inning. Coastal Carolina then answered in the seventh and eighth innings with five runs, and took the game 5-3 on March 8. Another hit in the sixth could have broken the game wide open and achieved a big win for a Ball State program that’s in need of revival. “We had a shot to beat them on their home field, we were

playing better than they are,� Ball State coach Rich Maloney said. “We just couldn’t finish it up ... We didn’t score any runs after that.� Ball State fell the next day to Ohio State, also 5-3, and they left 10 runners on base. Both games, they led late, but couldn’t tack on extra runs and wasted solid starts by seniors Chris Marangon and Jon Cisna. Growing pains are to be expected from a team that’s won just 29 out of 100 games over the last two seasons. Maloney hopes that as the season progresses, so does the late game execution from his team. “I think we’ll get better as the season goes,� Maloney said. “The idea is having a few guys hot every weekend, then not having too many that have bad weekends.� Ball State has played 14 games so far, and many of them have been decided by just a few runs. Although they’ve been on the losing end of a few close games this season, they’ve gotten that game-breaking hit a few times as well. In its first game in a series

want power hitting to be team’s offensive identity | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 The improved hitting, along with the power, has been attributed to a simple concept: practice. “The big thing for our hitters is they know that they are going to get swings every day [in practice],� Nicholson said. “They get a chance daily to work on things and to feel good about what they are doing as a hitter.� Nicholson said he works his hitters on hitting different pitches, in different zones, at different speeds. He’s also had Gilbert work on adjusting to pitchers that will pitch around her because of her power. The work put in at practice has paid off, as the team’s slugging percentage has increased every season since 2010. Ball State had a slugging percentage of .543 in 2012 and currently has a slugging percentage of .510

DN FILE PHOTO JONATHAN MIKSANEK

Billy Wellman gets ready to hit a pitch during a game against Kent State on April 1, 2012. The team has faced multiple close games this season.

against Morehead State, redshirt junior Billy Wellman slammed the ball down the left field line to clear the bases and give Ball State a 4-1 lead. Wellman leads the team with 12 RBI and has made a number of big plays through the first month of the season. To Maloney, making that one critical play at the end of a game

Don’t forget your friend’s birthday! 6HQGDFODVVL¿HGELUWKGD\ZLVKLQ WKH'DLO\1HZV

consistently will come with time, and the key is to stay patient as the season continues. “Over time, my hope is that we’ll improve in that area,� Maloney said. “If we want to take this program to the next level as far as winning goes, we’re going to have to execute a little bit better in some of those situations.�

this season. Nicholson has said he doesn’t prefer to have a team that is heavy on power. He prefers to have speed and hitters that can slap-hit. But he also said it’s important to be able to adapt to his team’s strengths. “Every hitter that comes up there has the ability to drive the ball,� Nicholson said after a game last season. “Even our kids at the bottom of the order that might not hit a ton of home runs or slap hits, they can hit the ball to the fence and they can get three bases.� While Gilbert already has the Ball State home run record, she isn’t concerned about tacking onto her record for the remainder of her career. “I am going to continue to do my thing and try to be successful at the plate,� she said. “Keep putting the ball in play, getting on base and scoring some runs.�

FREE! FREE! FREE! ABSOLUTELY FREE! $UH\RXJLYLQJVRPHWKLQJDZD\" New Category in the DN Classifieds! Absolutely Free

Make checks payable to: The Ball State Daily News

DN Classifieds

‡)UHHOLQHFODVVLILHGOLPLWHGWRGD\VSULQW ‡)UHHGD\VRQOLQH ‡SNJSHULWHP ‡LWHPVSHUVHPHVWHU ‡HPDLOLWHPVWRGQFODVVLILHG#EVXHGX DORQJZLWKQDPHDGGUHVVDQGSKRQHQXPEHU



 

AJ 276 Muncie, IN 47306 Phone: 765.285.8247 Fax: 765.285.8248

Need Rmmte for 2nd semester, South of Campus 765 744 4649, 358 4924

  

! 1 Bdrm 1 blk. from campus, very nice, & very large DR & laundry w/ A/C, May or Aug. 765-760-4434 ! 3 bdrm, 1 blk from campus. Only $275 ea. All util. includ. laundry, off strt prking, 760-4434 ! A 2 bdrm in village, all utils incl., A/C, new carpet, laundry, off st. prkg. may or aug. 760-4434. ! A 3 bdrm in village, 1 blk from campus all utils incl, new carpet, A/C, off st. prkg. aug. 760-4434 ! A 4 bdrm in village, all utils incl, A/C, new carpet, D/W, laundry off st. prkg. 760-4434 ! A 5 bdrm in village, all utils incl, 2 baths,D/W, W/D new carpet, off st. prkg. 765-760-4434 !3 bdrm, 1 ba, W/D, walk to BSU, lg bdrm, prking, Aug lse, 275$/ ea util included. 284 3646 or 744 5008 *****1 bdrm apt, close to village, avail May or Aug, A/C, off-st prking, Util paid, free wi-fi, 765 760 4529 *****1, 2 & 3 BR avail. May/Aug Great floor plan, AC, DW only 3 blks to campus! THE 400 APARTMENTS - (765)288-6819 www.400apartments.com ****Running out of time! 3 bdrm apts avail. Off st prking, walk to BSU, Asset Mgmt (765) 281-9000

  

Office Hours: Monday - Friday, 8 am - 5 pm www.bsudailynews.com/classifieds

  

***RATCHFORD PROPERTIES*** •Great Apts. & Houses! •Best Locations on & Near Campus •Affordable Prices! •Some Utilities Paid! Laundry Facility, NO Pets. ***CALL OR TEXT 748-6407*** www.ratchfordproperties.com *1 bdrm, 3 blk from campus, only $325/mo. incl free heat. Also studio for only $225/mo. Call 760-4434 *2 Bdrm 3 Blocks from campus large, laundry, only $200 per month each. Aug lease 765-760-4434 *BSU apts, close to campus, 1,2&3 bdrm,utils includ off-st prkg, Call765-228-8458 or 765-749-4688 1 & 2 bdrm apt, Aug 2013ʟ Super nice, All Amenities, 765 717- 9331 housesnearbsu.com 1 Bdr. Apt. Walk to BSU. W/D, DW, Micro, Aug.lease $450/mo. 765-717-9332 www.greatmuncierentals.com 1 bdrm in village, 1 blck from campus, A/C, laundry all utilites included. May or Aug lease 760-4434 1-8 blk to BSU 1,2,3,& 4 brd Apts. for rent. No Pets. Some with W/D Call 289-3971 3 bdr near BSU W/D, A/C, Large bdrms, $840/m Utils includ Aug lease Call765-288-6628 3 bdrm apt., W/D, Walk to campus, off st. prkg., Call today for an appointment! 877-867-5118 Aug lease, 2 & 3 bdrm. 1 blk South of BSU Village.$250-350/mo ea. +Utils. No pets. 765-288-3100 AVAIL NOW 1-2 bed apt.VERY NICE quiet building, 314-882-3124 1 mile to BSU, Heat/Water Paid

***1 bdrm apt. 1 free mo, Aug lse. Ashland Ave. Some utils pd. Walk to BSU. No Dogs. 317-727-5847

Cardinal Villas 2/3 bdrm apts. free wifi, blowout prices, call today! 765-729-9618 $300 signing bonus until 2/28

*2 lg 1 Rm furnished apts. All util includ also cable TV, AC, wireless Internet. Avail Aug 1! Call 289-0294

Deluxe 1 Bdrm 1 Blk from BSU $395/mo + utlits - Avail Now, May, or August Lease 765-808-6054

 

*Ad must be submitted to dnclassified@bsu.edu to be eligible. * The Daily News has the right to revise or reject any advertisements. * The Daily News assumes no liability for content of the advertisement.

FREE INTERNET! Clean & quiet 1 bdrm apts, close to BSU. On site WS/DR,cedarsatbsu.com,286 2806

!5 Bdrm, 2 1/2 ba, walk to BSU, w/d, c/a,w/ deck, prking, aug lse. 290/ea plus util,284 3646 744 5008

3 Bdrm, 2 Ba., Nice! Walk to BSU, UTIL pd! W/D, A/C, avail aug, No pets. $990/mo. (317) 326-7373

Large 3 Bdrm, 1 block from campus, $325 a month each, all utilities included, Aug. lease. Call 760-4434

!6 bdrm, 2 lg ba, walk to BSU, front porch, w/d, d/w, air conditioning, prking, aug lse. 300/ea. gas/water included, 284 3646 or 744 5008

3 bdrms 2 bath 3 blks 2 Student Center C/A W/D GAR $225 per + util 317-594-5512

Nice 1 bdrm apt. for rent, near BSUVillage, $315/mo, +elec. 749-5052. Nice 3 bdr. Close to BSU. 2 ba. Avail. Aug. A/C, W/D. $350/ea, utils incl.765-348-6413, $ Reduced Deposit wwwjahrentals.com.

$300 signing bunus thru 2/28 Quality Houses & Apartments University Village Apts. Cardinal Villas Apts. Individual Houses 2,3,4 & 5 Bedrooms GREAT Locations www.BSURentals.com or 729-9618

Paid High Spd Internet + Electric Quality 2-3 bdrms. From $210 each W/D, D/W, 765-744-1079 joecoolproperties.blogspot.com

 

$$ Save $$ 4 or 5 bdrm, 2 ba, 2 kit, bsmt, nice, clean, close to BSU, 317-727-7653 or visit www.ballurentals.com **750/mo all utilt. pd.** Very Nice 3 Bdrm. W/D A/C Avail. Aug. Close to BSU 765-717-5868 Off st. pk. **Nice large 5 bdrm, 2 kitch. 2 bath 709 Riverside.C/A, W/D, off st. park 765-228-8458 or 765-749-4688.

3 BIG BEDROOMS 4 BLOCKS TO BSU!

ABSOLUTELY BEAUTIFUL

New Windows and Doors. Remodeled W/D, C/A, BIG LiViNG RM & PORCH. GARAGE. $300 ea. Aug. 749-9792

3/4 bdrm houses, close to BSU, $300/person, Call today for more info, 729 9618

**Running out of time! 2,3,5,6 bdrm houses avail. Off st prking, walk to BSU. Asset mgmt (765) 281-9000

4 Bdr. 2 Ba. house. Walk to BSU. W/D, D/W, Micro, Aug. lease $1200/month 765-717-9332 www.greatmuncierentals.com

0/2 blks from village. 3,4 bdr houses. A/C & W/D, no pets. very clean. Ava. Aug. 1st. Call 286-2808

4 Bdrm house, W/D, walk to campus. off st. prkg., Call for an appointment today! 877-867-5118

1005 Bethel Ave. 3 br Aug-Aug $275/per student includes utils w/d, off st pkrg 765-215-3327

4 bdrm, 2 ba Very nice, off st. prkg walking distance. $300/ea. +util. No pets.W/D Call 765-729-1724

2,3 Bdrms. Lease 2013-2014 www.clunerentals.blogspot.com 765-288-1347

4 Bdrm, 2 Ba., Nice! Walk to BSU, UTIL pd! W/D, A/C, avail aug, No pets. $1080/mo. (317) 326-7373

! 3 bdrm, 1 blk from campus. Only $275 ea. All util. includ. laundry, off strt prking, 760-4434

2301 N. Hollywood. 3bdrm, 2 ba, + Lg bonus rm. util rm w/ W/D, screened porch, walk to BSU. $750/mo. Avail June or July. Call 765-288-7251

! A 3 bdrm in village, 1 blk from campus all utils incl, new carpet, A/C, off st. prkg. aug. 760-4434

2bdr house 2 blk from campus Nice with A/C, Utils inclu .Aug lease Call 765-760-4434

! A 4 bdrm in village, all utils incl, new carpet, D/W, laundry off st. prkg. 760-4434

3 bdm 2405 N. Hollywood 630/mo + utils. 9mo or yr lse. Start May or Aug call after 5. 765-759-5017

! A 5 bdrm in village, all utils incl, 2 baths,D/W, W/D new carpet, off st. prkg. 765-760-4434

3 bdrm 3 blks from campus Avail Aug all util pd w/d, d/w, a/c, gar,no pets,760-4529

!!!A+ Convenience. 3&4 Bdrm, NY &Bethel, Off Strt Prkng, D/W, W/D, C/A, New Remodel, 317-507-1490

3 Bdrm House full basement Near BSU campus off street prkg W/D, A/C,Aug-Aug 765-215-4591

620 Almada, 5 bdrm, 2 ba, lg kitchen, 2 refridges, W/D, frnt porch, priv. fence, Chris 289 4964

!4 bdrm, 2 ba,walk to BSU, w/d C/A.prking, Aug Lse, 290/ea plus util,284 3646 or 744 5008

3 bdrm house, W/D, Walk to campus, off st. prkg., Call for an Appointment today! 877-867-5118

By Kinghorn.3 or 6 bdrm houses, Off st pk, A/C, gas heat, appl furn 748-9145, 749-6013, 282-4715

4 Brm House @1220 Neely. Avail July 1st, 2013. $1200/mo + utils 765-649-8377 4, 5, or 6 bdrm. Lrg. rooms, 2 lrg. ba., W/D, off st prkg, all utils includ. 501 N. Alameda. (765) 744-8269. 401 N. Martin, Aug. lease, 4 bdrm, A/C, W/D, $300/month each + Utils. No pets. Call 765-288-3100 6 bdrm 3 blks from campus awsome lg house Avail Aug All Util pd w/d, d/w, a/c, 2 car gar, 3-1/2 ba. no pets. $335/ea 765 760-4529

 

Beautiful 5 bdrm-914 W University Just became avail. for Aug 2013 Newly Remodeled - Stove, Fridge, D/W, Microwave, Gar. Disposal, W/D, $350/person, UALA Mem. www.bsubeachfronthomes.com 765-741-9959

Cute 2 bedroom, close to campus, $650 a month, plus utilities, please call 765-618-7080

Extra nice 2204 N.Maplewood Ave. Close to BSU 2 bdrm, W/D, fridge, stove, off-st prkg. No pets, no smoking. $250/each +util. Aug to Aug lease. UALA member. Call 288-2663 or 730-2237 For Rent 3 bdrm, 2.5 Car Garage, Utility Rm with W/D, C/A, Rex St, Walk to Campus, 765-520-9404

Great 4-6 bdrm. 2 ba. Dill St. C/A, W/D, crpted bsmt, good prkg, Aug. lease., $250-270/each, no pets. 765-396-9308 , 317-979-4335

Large 3 Bdrm, 1 block from campus, A/C, $325/mo, all utilities included, Aug. lease. Call 760-4434

Must see!!! 6 bdrm newer house. 825 University, $325/ea. + utilities. Aug.2013. lease 744-5600 Near BSU. Nice! 3 or 4 bdrm. W/D, furnished, pet friendly. Aug to Aug Lease. Call 765-282-8606 Nice 4 bdrm near campus. W/D. fridge, stove, C/A. 749-5052

Nicest houses on campus. Many extras. Even a 6 bdrm. Also student parking available. Call 286-5216. Now renting for Aug. 2013. 1,2,3,4,&5 bdr. No pets. All have W/D & A/C 1-8blk to BSU. Call 289-3971 Pd. Utilties & High Spd Internet Qlty 3-6 bdr. From $300 ea. Some hottubs 765-744-1079 joecoolproperties.blogspot.com

Premiere student living. 1-5 bdrms, new updates, W/D, plus some utls included.765-286-2806 (Lv. mg.)

Renting for next year, 4 bdrm homes in Ball State area. 765-729-1067 kp-properties.net

Visit us online! Today’s birthday (3-12-13) ___ (c) 2007, Tribune Media Services Inc. Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Information Services.

To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.

Mars is in Aries now, giving great energy to inward reflective pursuits, like education and learning. Launch your new plan after March 17. A spotlight shines at work; group effort makes gains. Home delights occupy you until summer, when fun calls you out to play.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Today is an 8 -- Self-esteem and confidence grows. Make sure you can cover expenses before spending. Devote yourself to a passion. Beauty need not be the most expensive choice. Relax and play for a brilliant idea. Aries (March 21-April 19) Today is an 8 -- For about six weeks, focus on personal development, as energetic Mars is in your sign. The next few days should be especially active and fun. Don’t spend more than you bring in. Taurus (April 20-May 20) Today is a 7 -- The time is ripe to clean house and create new space for opportunities. It’ll be easier to throw things away. Clean closets, garages and attics.

Gemini (May 21-June 21) Today is an 8 -- You have more friends than you realized. Treasure them. With Mars in Aries, help your team find opportunities and advance. Together, it’s all possible. Cancer (June 22-July 22) Today is a 7 -- You’ll be tested for the next couple of days. There’s nothing to fear; your team’s hot. Pour energy into your career now. Adapt to any plan changes.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)Today is an 8 -Heed the call of the wild and launch your next adventure.You have a lot to explore. By now you know what you truly want. Go for it.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Today is a 7 -- Handle financial matters today and tomorrow, and make plans for the future. Use your curiosity to create in this regenerative process. Don’t let a windfall slip through your fingers. Action is required. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Today is an 8 -- Mars enters Aries: to manage this next phase, delegate more to your team. Accept assistance to be free to grab opportunities. Physical activity is more fun, too. It’s a good time to get a message out. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Today is a 9 -- Today and tomorrow, you’re in super-creative work mode. Seek more information, work faster and make more money. There’s a dramatic shift in energy. Concentrate on a new assignment.You’re hot.

www.bsudaily.com

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Today is an 8 -- Make long-term plans with someone you love. Provide excellent service. With Mars in Aries, give in to your passion. Success is your reward. Dance. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Today is an 8 -- Your heart is at home. Come up with a plan to fix everything in the house. Emotions could run high. Exert your will power to improve living conditions. Do it with love. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Today is a 9 --You’re spurred into action with renewed energy. Learn what you’ll need to know to make a desired change. Study the facts to get to the bottom line.


PAGE 6 | TUESDAY, MARCH 12, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM

FORUM OPINION@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/BSUDAILYNEWS

| THE DAILY NEWS COMIC

Austin Russell draws “Existentia Academica” comics for the Daily News. His views and opinions don’t necessarily agree with those of the newspaper. Write to Austin at abrussell@bsu.edu or follow him on Twitter @arussthebus.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

A CASE FOR CONCEALED CARRY

Monday morning marked yet another moment this year where I have sincerely worried about my safety at Ball State University. I am usually not one of those girls. I don’t worry about being home alone, I don’t worry that someone walking behind me on my way home is out to get me, that’s not how I am. I try to be aware of my surroundings, travel in groups, or “talk” on my cell phone if something feels abnormal, but I know how to protect myself, so normally I am not afraid to go anywhere. Monday morning, if I had been walking out of a professor’s office hours in WB or out of the library after printing something off, and the alleged gunman had wanted to shoot me, he could have. I would’ve been a 90lb unsuspecting target, and the self-defense classes I’ve taken wouldn’t have helped me. The mace I carry wouldn’t have helped me. None of these things would have helped any one of us. On the other hand, the fact that I, like many other students, own and know how to use a handgun is one thing that COULD have helped me, but that’s a skill that I am not permitted to use to save my life on Ball State’s campus. This isn’t a political issue. This is a safety issue. Ball State and UPD are all we have to protect us, because we’re not allowed to protect ourselves. Maybe it’s just me ... but that thought isn’t helping me sleep at night. Kayleigh Mohler kcmohler@bsu.edu

WEB COMMENTS

FORUM POLICY

Letters to the editor must be signed and appear as space permits each day. The limit for letter length is approximately 350 words. All letters must be typed. The editor reserves the right to edit and condense submissions. The name of the author is usually published but may be withheld for

The Daily News encourages its readers to voice their views on legislative issues. The following legislators represent the Ball State community:

SEN. TIM LANANE Indiana Dist. 25 200 W. Washington Street Indianapolis, IN 46204 1-800-382-9467

The Daily News forum page aims to stimulate discussion in the Ball State community. The Daily News welcomes reader viewpoints and offers three vehicles of expression for reader opinions: letters to the editor, guest columns and feedback on our website.

REP. SUE ERRINGTON Indiana District 34 200 W. Washington St. Indianapolis, IN 46204 1-800-382-9842

U.S. SEN. DAN COATS 493 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, DC, 20510 (202) 224-5623

compelling reasons, such as physical harm to the author. The editor decides this on an individual basis and must consult the writer before withholding the name. Those interested in submitting a letter can do so by emailing opinion@bsudailynews.com or editor@bsudailynews.com

U.S. SEN. JOSEPH DONNELLY B33 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, DC 20510 (202) 224-4814 U.S. REP. LUKE MESSER U.S. 6th District 508 Cannon House Office Building Washington, DC 20515 (202) 225-3021

BSUDAILY.COM BSUDAILY.COM BSUDAILY.COM BSUDAILY.COM BSUDAILY.COM BSUDAILY.COM

Breaking news, comments, interactive graphics and more.

FACEBOOK.COM/BSUDAILYNEWS

IN RESPONSE TO: “Do you think

tweetitorials

the emergency alert system is effective? Why or why not?” Monday

your comments @bsudailynews

The alert did not include the university’s reaction. So students were confused if we were under official lockdown or if classes were cancelled. We knew there was a gunman. That was it.

Share your thoughts, 140 characters at a time. In response to: “Sound off. Who received emergency notifications? Who didn’t? What and how did you know about the reported gunman? Tweet it.”

Kayla Kennedy

I don’t think it is effective. It didn’t work because the email wasn’t sent to all of the students. I was fortunate enough to have subscribed to the text message service.

Monday

Alexander Salmins

@dn_campus BSU is sending as much information as they can to the students. All clear is probably all the police said, they can’t tell it all

I know several students didn’t even get emails. Yes, thats super effective. I know several more who are signed up for the emergency texts and did not receive one.

@nickjacksonD

@dn_campus Got the texts. No emails (opted in on both) found out through others on twitter. No notification of res hall lockdown.

Olivia Sweets

@BSU_BrianCook

JOIN THE

So @BallState @dn_campus out of all the pointless emails that fill our inboxes. We have to subscribe to get ones about gunmen?

CONVERSATION

@V4Albert

THE DN WANTS YOU TO

SEND US YOUR IDEAS!

Tweet us @bsudailynews or email at opinion@ bsudailynews.com

WHAT DO YOU WANT TO SEE? Email news@bsudailynews.com

You

BALL STATE+ONLINE

SUMMER Make it your summer to go. Whether you’re going hiking or biking, interning or earning (cash for college), you can still go to class and keep on your academic track when you go online. • Choose from more than 200 online courses. • Fulfill a core curriculum requirement or two. • Save on courses with no maincampus fees. • Learn more from your Ball State professors. • Stay on course to graduate. So go online, go to class, and . . . have some fun, too!

can avoid

Registration begins March 13.

this... ...by leasing with us. Colonial Crest offers affordable one and twobedroom apartments. Two-bedroom apartments from $555 a month. For 2 roommates, that’s only $277 each! Make the intelligent choice for living before it’s too late! Sign y Toda

COLONIAL CREST

Sign Toda y

©

Phone: (765) 289 0565 Location: 405 S. Morrison Rd., Muncie, IN 47304 Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8:30AM-5:30PM Sat. 10AM - 3PM

www.bsu.edu/distance/summer


DN 03-12-13