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DN TUESDAY, MARCH 19, 2013

SUCCESS IS IN THE DRESS SEE PAGE 6

THE DAILY NEWS

Daniels cuts pay increases for staff Former Indiana governor says Purdue to focus on affordability | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. — Purdue University President Mitch Daniels on Monday eliminated merit raises for administrators earning more than $50,000 annually over the next two years in the first in a series of cost-cutting moves to cover the estimated $40 million cost of freezing tuition rates through 2015. Purdue posted a letter from Daniels on his web page Monday saying the move will apply to senior administrators, deans and administrative and professional staff. It will save the university $5 million over the next MITCH DANIELS Purdue Univertwo years, he said. “It has been too easy in higher sity president education for institutions to de- will cut administrative pay cide first what they would like to spend, and then raise student bills to produce the desired funds. That approach has run its course,” Daniels wrote in the letter. “At Purdue, we will make our first goal affordability, accommodating our spending to students’ budgets and not the other way around.” The merit raise elimination doesn’t apply to faculty or clerical and service staff, Purdue said. Other cost-cutting moves will be announced in the coming weeks and will address expenses and practices across all central university units, Daniels said. Every academic, administrative and auxiliary unit of the campus will be asked to closely examine all activities and their costs. The cost of the tuition freeze represents 1 percent to 2 percent of the university’s base budget over the biennium, Daniels said, and Purdue should be able to cut more than that. “I believe we should set our sights higher and work to create savings above the $40 million that can be used to augment our inadequate funds for scholarships and/or to extend the tuition freeze further,” he wrote in his letter. Daniels announced March 1 that it would freeze the cost of tuition at its main campus in West Lafayette over the next two years because of the lingering weak economy. The cost of basic in-state tuition there will remain about $10,000 a year until the end of the 201415 school year. The last year without a tuition increase on the main campus was 1976. Daniels became Purdue’s president in January after completing two terms as Indiana’s governor.

SOFTBALL

Ball State records 7 RBI in win

COSTS (PER 5 MINUTES) FOR SKIPPING CLASS Based on a 15 credit hour course load for students paying in-state tuition.

Skipping class can impact more than students’ grades

S

kipping one hour of class a week costs Ball State students about the same amount as two movie tickets, a fifth of alcohol, dinner or an iPhone case. For a student taking 15 credit hours in a semester, a three-credit hour class costs $55.44 each week. Dividing the cost of tuition each semester by the number of credit hours per week breaks down the exact cost of each class. Ball State’s in-state tuition, excluding extra fees, financial aid and room and board, is $4,159 per semester for the 2012-2013 academic year. At this rate, skipping a three-credit hour lecture class just one time costs about $18.48. For out-of-state students the cost more than doubles because tuition is $11,494, without fees or room and board, and the cost for a three-credit hour lecture class is $153.27 per week. Sophomore architecture major Max Wurster said he knows that without a college degree, people in the job market won’t consider him, so he feels the money is worth it. “I am fortunate enough to have my parents pay for it and [going to class] is something I feel I owe to them,” Wurster said. “It’s not healthy to throw away money like that.“ Dan Boylan, a finance instructor, said he would recommend strong students in manageable subject areas take the maximum 18 credit hours, getting more classes for the

same amount of money. “I just think students need to get the most out of their money at school,” Boylan said. “There are so many programs, so many opportunities, so many leadership conferences; they need to take everything in. That’s what it’s here for.” Michael Hicks, director of the center of business and economic research, said high costs can be a motivator for students to attend class. “Skipping rates at more expensive universities are much lower and graduation rates at more expensive universities are much lower,” Hicks said. “It is probably the more expensive college is, the more seriously students tend to take their part of their education.”

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See COSTS, page 4

MUNCIE, INDIANA

DN PHOTO ERIC DEBUYSSER

$25 to a borrower on the other side of the globe. It has lent out more than 400 million loans as of Monday. However, Jackley had not always had this plan in mind. She graduated from Bucknell University with a Bachelor

TODAY IS GONNA BE THE DAY THAT THEY’RE GONNA THROW IT BACK TO YOU.

CONTACT US

of Arts in philosophy and political science where she said she “never had any interest in [business] at all.” Before she created Kiva, she worked as a temporary assistant at the Stanford School of Business in the Center for

News desk: 285-8255 Sports desk: 285-8245 Features desk: 285-8247

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DN ILLUSTRATION MICHAEL BOEHNLEIN

$8.75 $10.30

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1 week*

1 hour

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$69.33 $63.99 $59.40 $55.44 $51.99 $48.93 $46.20

$23.11 $21.33 $19.80 $18.48 $17.33 $16.31 $15.40

$0.38 $0.36 $0.33 $0.31 $0.29 $0.27 $0.26

Social Innovation. “It sort of hit me all at once as I was sitting there one day. I looked around and suddenly saw that I was around a lot of people that resonated with me and that I considered my heroes,” Jackley said. Three years passed before Jackley decided to quit her job and jump into the world of microlending. “I begged my way into an internship that gave me an excuse to go talk to 150-or-so entrepreneurs that got $100 grants to start their businesses,” Jackley said.

See EIL, page 4

AP| BRIEF

PASTOR: FAITH NOT A FACTOR IN DEATHS

NEW ALBANY, Ind. (AP) — A southern Indiana man whose wife and two children were found dead in a creek last week said he has no idea what happened to them, but the family’s pastor said he doesn’t believe faith played a role in their deaths. Pastor J. Todd Nichols of Greater Faith Church in New Albany told WHAS-TV for a story Monday that the deaths of 35-year-old Jamie Clutter, 10-year-old Brandon Clutter and 6-month-old Katelyn Clutter have been painful for the church. The nude bodies of the Clutters were found Wednesday in a shallow New Albany creek. Police say they found a baby harness and a Bible nearby. Nichols said Jaime Clutter was a deeply spiritual person but that he and her husband, Michael Clutter, don’t think faith played a role in her death. “Obviously the situation is very grave and painful for our church,” he said. “We have no idea how things turned out the way they did or why they did, and we just ask the community to pray with us to find the truth.” Autopsies showed the children had drowned. Jamie Clutter’s cause of death is still undetermined. Investigators are waiting for more information from toxicology reports, which could take several weeks. The Clutter family had recently moved to New Albany from Washington state. Michael Clutter said he doesn’t “have a clue” why his family was killed. Their bodies were found in a park less than a mile from their apartment. “My wife was just a very sweet person and she was the best mother to the kids that anyone could ever have,” Clutter said. “I wish somehow I could have them back,” he said. “I would give anything to have them back.”

THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS

Editor: 285-8249 Classified: 285-8247 Fax: 285-8248

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* for a 3 credit hour class

JESSICA JACKLEY, founder of Kiva

Jessica Jackley, the founder of Kiva.org, speaks about her experience founding the organization. Jackley’s organization helps entrepreneurs in developing countries by connecting them with investors willing to help the businesses get off the ground.

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AVERAGE COST FOR FULL-TIME, IN-STATE STUDENTS

a dream job and you get something close, sometimes that can be all you need. »

ARIC CHOKEY STAFF REPORTER | aachokey@bsu.edu

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$1.55 $3.10 $4.65 $7.20

« If you’re aiming for

Business owner uses microlending to alleviate poverty

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EMMA KATE FITTES CHIEF REPORTER emfittes@bsu.edu

Entrepreneur shares ‘Kiva’ mission

Being paid in joy and fun was almost enough for the cofounder of Kiva.org, an organization that utilizes microlending to finance entrepreneurs and their start-ups in developing countries. Jessica Jackley shared her experiences of being an entrepreneur and her founding of Kiva, as well as some of her other projects. Her presentation took place Monday evening in Pruis Hall as part of the Excellence in Leadership speaker series. Jackley said the mission of Kiva is to “connect to people through lending to alleviate poverty.” The project is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization that connects microfinance institutions to lenders who can then lend as little as

SEE PAGE 3

IT COSTS TO CUT

Credit hours per semester

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Make a lasting first impression the right way at your next job interview with these fashion tips

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TOMORROW High: 28, Low: 18 Scattered Flurries


PAGE 2 | TUESDAY, MARCH 19, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM

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‘LANGUAGE OF ANGELS’

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Go online to see a photo gallery of Cave Theatre’s dress rehearsal of “Language of Angels.” The play opens at 7:30 tonight.

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1. Indiana Excise Police find 80 minors at Indy bar 2. ATHLETICS: Rewards program fuels rise in student attendance at sporting events 3. UPDATED: Ex-Oklahoma QB killed in plane crash in Indiana 4. Twitter considered for emergency notifications 5. MEN’S BASKETBALL: Scholl pursuing assistants, current and former head coaches for vacancy

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Sudoku

By Michael Mepham

Level: Mild

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

SOLUTION FOR MONDAY.

ACROSS 1 AL WHO CREATED FEARLESS FOSDICK 5 SIGN BETWEEN VIRGO AND SCORPIO 10 SAILBOAT’S TEAM 14 TRAC II SUCCESSOR 15 SEE EYE TO EYE 16 “DIVINE SECRETS OF THE __ SISTERHOOD” 17 PLAY SOME B-BALL 19 WELL, IN PARIS 20 BRAIN SCAN LETTERS 21 WHAT A RED “X” MAY MEAN 22 CHARGED ATOMS 23 TAVERN GAME 25 TINTED FEATURE OF SOME CARS 28 MOTLEY 31 __ OF SPEECH 32 “OMG, STOP WITH THE DETAILS ALREADY!” 33 SUPPORT COLUMN 36 HAMILTON’S BILL 37 INFALLIBLE, AS A SCHEME 40 NERVOUS MANNERISM 43 PLUTO, FOR A TIME

44 CURVY LETTER 47 THE NEGEV’S NATION 49 PUT UNDER 51 “THE HUSTLER” SETTING 54 SPINNING DIZZILY 56 __ LINDA, CALIFORNIA 57 “LIKE, OBVIOUSLY!” 60 NUTRITIONAL NO. 61 SMALLISH IPOD 62 CEREAL WITH A SPOKESTOUCAN 64 PAC-12 TEAM SINCE 2011 65 BOXER MIKE 66 RUN AMOK 67 WITH 5-DOWN, COWARDLY LION PLAYER 68 BIG NAME IN FARM EQUIPMENT 69 649,739 TO 1 AGAINST BEING DEALT A ROYAL FLUSH, E.G. DOWN 1 LOOKED FOR SECURITY CAMERAS, SAY 2 IN THE MOST BASIC WAY 3 USHER’S HANDOUT 4 KUNG __ CHICKEN

5 SEE 67-ACROSS 6 “WHAT HUMP?” LAB ASSISTANT 7 UMP’S PLATE CLEANER 8 COPY, BRIEFLY 9 ‘50S DEM. PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE 10 BIONIC WOMAN, FOR ONE 11 REASON FOR A TARP-COVERED FIELD 12 CONDEMNED BUILDING, MAYBE 13 PASTY-FACED 18 SKILLS EVALUATION 22 __ MONTOYA: “THE PRINCESS BRIDE” ROLE 24 “ABOUT TIME THE WEEK ENDED!” 26 DESERVING ATTENTION 27 WETLAND 29 HUNKY GREEK GOD 30 __ MONSTER: LIZARD 34 HOSP. STAFFER 35 TICKS OFF 38 “CARMEN,” FOR ONE 39 PHOBIA 40 INSIDER’S HINT

41 CUT OFF FROM OTHERS 42 MICHAEL BUBLÉ, E.G. 45 DRUG BANNED BY MOST PRO SPORTS 46 BEAN CONTAINER 48 NEARLY 50 WRITER ROALD 52 HOW PASTRAMI MAY BE SERVED 53 CARIBOU COUSIN 55 HAS A LONG SHELF LIFE 58 WAY IN 59 __ READER: ECLECTIC MAGAZINE 61 MUCH-USED PENCIL 62 BOUQUET DELY. FACILITATOR 63 GOLD, IN GRANADA

bsudaily.com

SOLUTION FOR MONDAY.


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TUESDAY, MARCH 18, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM | PAGE 3

WEDNESDAY If you like it, then you should put a ring on it. Some feel the pressure to get engaged before graduation.

Who is Catherine Winters? Author and professor Colleen Steffen shares the missing girl’s tale in her new book.

THURSDAY Shhh... don’t tell. PostSecret’s creator discusses the empowerment of secrets at Emens Auditorium.

KEEP IT CLASSY

FOR THE JOB KOURTNEY COOPER THE FASHION FIX KOURTNEY COOPER IS A JOURNALISM AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS MAJOR AND WRITES ‘THE FASHION FIX’ FOR THE DAILY NEWS. HER VIEWS DO NOT NECESSARILY AGREE WITH THOSE OF THE NEWSPAPER. WRITE TO KOURTNEY AT KRCOOPER2@BSU.EDU.

First impressions are everything, especially in an interview. It only takes 30 seconds for an employer to get a first impression that filters through the entire interview, said Diana Saiki, a family and consumer sciences associate professor. Saiki said students have a habit of dressing too casual when business attire is required. SUIT AND TIE AFFAIR

Justin Timberlake isn’t the only guy rockin’ the “Suit and Tie;” it is the staple for a man during an interview. A dark colored suit is best. Black suits are most common, but grey or navy is also acceptable. A general rule for suit jackets is to only leave the bottom button unfastened for a clean and tidy look. Your socks, shoes and belt should match the color scheme of your suit and tie. White socks and tennis shoes are for the gym, not the workplace; stick with dress shoes. Also, avoid mixing black and brown.

THE DRESS FOR SUCCESS

Women have more options for interview attire, which can lead to confusion. Because you may be interviewing for the same

position as a man, matching his basic formal attire is best. Women can wear a pantsuit or a skirt suit that stands within a few guidelines. In a skirt suit, the skirt should not be too tight and should hit around the knee in length. Be weary of slits that are too high; you never want to come off as trying to dress “sexy” in the workplace. In a pantsuit, the pants should not be too tight and should not drag to the floor. Overall, the fit of the suit should be both comfortable and conservative. A collared shirt underneath a suit jacket looks most sophisticated, because it is most similar to a man’s suit and tie. Some women find a collared shirt too stuffy and opt for a blouse instead; a blouse is okay, however, it will not look as polished. Either way, do not bear any cleavage.

DO

DO IRON YOUR OUTFIT. Your mom is no longer there to press those pants; it’s your job to make sure your suit is crisp looking. DO WEAR COMFORTABLE SHOES. Women should avoid “hooker heels” and stick with shorter kitten heels or flats. But don’t get too comfortable; an employer will not be impressed by your squeaky Crocs.

DO WEAR APPROPRIATE UNDERGARMENTS. Sheer clothing can be awkward for both you and an employer, so don’t forget to wear a tank top or slip if necessary. Men may wear an undershirt if they find it more comfortable; however, keep it plain white unless you’re Superman. DO MATCH YOUR TIE TO YOUR BUTTON-DOWN. If there is any doubt about color-coordination for men, remember a white button-down can match any tie. Also, do not wear a clip on tie. If you can’t tie it yourself, head to YouTube. DO TUCK YOUR SHIRT IN. A shirttail hanging underneath a suit jacket looks sloppy, like you scrambled to get ready.

DON’T DON’T BE TOO TRENDY. You don’t want to be remembered by your crazy outfit, but by your qualifications. Unless you’re going into a creative field, most business owners don’t wear or approve of our generation’s trends. DON’T WEAR STARTLING COLORS. Refrain from hot pink or orange because they can be a distraction. Only Elle Woods can pull off the pink suit. DON’T MISTAKE PARTY CLOTHES FOR PROFESSIONAL ATTIRE. Your sequin spandex skirt snagged you that boy at the club, but it will not snag you a job.

Ghost story featured in Cave Theatre Actors focus on subtle nuances in ‘Language of Angels’ play McAULEY STAFF REPORTER | CHRIS cmcauley@bsu.edu

Tommy loves Danielle. Sean loves Kendra. JB loves Joline. Billy loves Allison. Sean loves Celie, forever and ever. These expressions are spray painted onto a cave wall with the memories lingering far beyond the words. After a night filled with drugs and alcohol, Celie disappears into the darkness and is never found. Years pass, and all but a few of the teenagers have died dark and mysterious deaths. This is the setting for “Language of Angels,” the latest production put on in the Cave Theatre. “The play is ambiguous, and as a director the biggest challenge is to find out what it is about,” director Audrey Eldridge said. The junior directing major had to bring together actors of different grade and experience levels, from senior acting major LaKecia Harris to freshman meteorology major Chris Oechsel. Oechsel, who plays JB, said the show will make people think, but not in the intellectual sense. “It’s interesting trying to figure out the intricacies in the last part of the play,” Oechsel said. “There are lots of subtleties, and the hardest part is finding the right path to take.” Freshman acting major Ashley Greenwood, whose character Danielle is still alive, enjoys the space of the Cave Theatre and believes it contributes to the experience. “The play is more intimate between the audience and the actors, and if you’re in a bigger audience, it is more difficult to connect and to entertain,” Greenwood said. Playing a strong-willed and brash character, Greenwood has to be seen in the show as the boldest of the bunch. “Language of Angels” leaves the audience to figure out what happened, she said. Harris, who plays the ghost and angel Celie, said she puts layers of herself into each character she plays. But this time she hasn’t had to enforce age barriers. “I’ve been a 16-year-old one-eyed girl, a 60-year-old Catholic nun, and now I’m playing a ghost closer to my age,” Harris said. Harris said everything in the play is ghostly, and there’s a natural curiosity to be filled. She said the play teaches that sometimes life works out, and sometimes it doesn’t. “It’s not lighthearted, but it’s fun,” Harris said. Freshman design tech major Stuart Wilson said the play’s special effects particularly add a dramatic mood. “The goal is to make the director’s vision for the play come to life and realized for its full potential,” Wilson said. Eldridge said the effects were difficult to understand, but they helped open up her mind. In the end, though, she wants it to be about the work. “I had to put trust into the actors that they would grasp onto something about this play [and run with it],” Eldridge said.

A HAUNTING TALE

DON’T LET UNDERGARMENTS TAKE THE PLACE OF CLOTHES. If a skirt is too short, adding dark colored tights will not make it appropriate. Period. DON’T FORGET TO BE CONFIDENT! Take a long look in the mirror, flash those pearly whites and tell yourself “I look good.”

DN PHOTO TAYLOR IRBY

Billy, played by James Best, shows off his gun during a run of “Language of Angels” Monday night. Michael, played by Jake Milligan, reacts behind him. “Language of Angels” opens tonight in the Cave Theatre.

WHAT

“Language of Angels,” written by Naomi Iizuka and directed by Audrey Eldridge WHERE

Cave Theatre, AC 007 DN PHOTOS JORDAN HUFFER

WHEN

7:30 p.m. Tuesday to Saturday, 2:30 p.m. Saturday to Sunday COST

$6, available at the door or University Theatre Box Office


PAGE 4 | TUESDAY, MARCH 19, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM

FORUM/NEWS OPINION@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/BSUDAILYNEWS

| THE DAILY NEWS COMIC

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

WEEKENDS IN COLLEGE ARE ALWAYS THE SAME Every weekend is the same. The whole campus appears in the windows of the houses on the outskirts of the academic buildings, raising red plastic cups to their lips. The deteriorating, crippled houses play host to anywhere between 10 and 100 college students. Well, it’s almost the whole campus. You remain in your dorm room, watching B movies on Netflix. Every weekend is the same. Thus far, the college life has been downright impossible to adjust to. It’s not like high school, and now you are hours away from the unconditional support of your family. If you’re being completely honest with yourself, you feel utterly lost. College isn’t at all what you expected, hoped, it would be. And now here you are again, another weekend wasted watching Netflix alone in your room. You tell yourself, “Next weekend will be different, I’ll make sure of it.” So you decide to go to one of the parties in the crippled houses, being put on by one of the clubs you’re in. You walk in the door and are greeted by convincing smiles and drunken shouts. “Hey! It’s…” And you realize that they don’t remember your name. You’ve seen them every Wednesday evening since the first semester, but they still can’t remember your name. But you decide to let it slide this time, because at least you’re out of your room. You float through the house, trying to be social, but that’s not a skill that comes naturally to you, and so you end up standing against the wall awkwardly, hoping to just go by unnoticed. You begin to wonder why you came out tonight at all. You’re starting to miss the comfort of your lonely little room. “I noticed you don’t have a drink in your hand, can I get you something?” Shocked that somebody noticed you, even more so that they spoke to you, you don’t say anything right away, but then you release the three fatal words, “No thanks, I don’t drink.” This shouldn’t be a big deal, right? You are in college and you don’t drink, you should be proud right? Well, this guy certainly doesn’t think so. The look on his face projects that he has been horribly and personally offended by your last statement. “Oh, well here! Try my drink.” It’s a mix of cheap whiskey, quail and cookie dough-flavored vodka, and pop, or whatever. You laugh awkwardly. “I don’t drink. Thanks, though.” Again, he is so hurt by these words. “How about this, I’ll go mix up a <insert alcoholic beverage here> in the kitchen and I’ll be right back.” B movies on Netflix are starting to sound pretty good right about now. He makes his way back to the kitchen, leaving you standing there, debating whether or not you should run for it. You don’t choose quickly enough, though, and he comes back bearing a red cup in each hand. “It’s a mix of blank, blank, and blank. It’s delicious!” He’s making it awful hard to reject his offer, but you stand your ground. “You can go ahead and have it, since I’m not going to, thanks.” All around you can hear slurred words and shouting. People are dancing to the music, bass shaking the walls. People running to and from the bathroom. Eventually, the guy will give up on his noble quest to cure your sobriety and begin chugging down the drink he made for you — the chosen one that would surely change your mind. He moves on to find someone less “boring,” aka “sober.” Standing against the wall again, you give yourself a goal time. “I’ll stay for x more minutes before I go home.” Shortly before you reach your goal time, however, that guy from earlier falls and hits his head on the table on his way down as he passed out. Immediately, you rush over to him. The only other people who saw his fall were laughing in their drunken stupor. You check to make sure that he’s not bleeding, and thankfully he just has a bump on his forehead. You roll him onto his side to make sure that he doesn’t choke on his own vomit. Then you see someone on the couch starting to retch. You run and grab a trashcan and put it in front of her. “Can somebody give me a ride home?” you hear someone shout over the music. “I’m too drunk!” A unanimous response. All except one. You find the poor, slobbering bloke and tap his arm, “I’m sober and can take you home.” So you load him into your car (and give him a napkin to wipe away his drool). When you arrive at his house, you help him to his door and tell him to drink some water before he goes to bed. He turns and says, “Hey, I know I see you every week, and I’m sorry that I don’t remember your name — you’re real quiet — but thank you.” You drive back to your dorm with a sense of accomplishment, and contentment that he made it home safely. And you realize that even though you aren’t into the “party culture,” that you still have a place within it, a role you can play. Furthermore, that in the end, the very people who try to push you to get drunk may be the ones who benefit most from your sobriety. Eva Cross egcross@bsu.edu

Austin Russell draws “Existentia Academica” comics for the Daily News. His views and opinions don’t necessarily agree with those of the newspaper. Write to Austin at abrussell@bsu.edu or follow him on Twitter @arussthebus.

FORUM POLICY The Daily News forum page aims to stimulate discussion in the Ball State community. The Daily News welcomes reader viewpoints and offers three vehicles of expression for reader opinions: letters to the editor, guest columns and feedback on our website. Letters to the editor must be signed and appear as space permits each day. The limit for letter length is approximately 350 words. All letters must be typed. The editor reserves the right to edit and condense submissions.

The name of the author is usually published but may be withheld for compelling reasons, such as physical harm to the author. The editor decides this on an individual basis and must consult the writer before withholding the name. Those interested in submitting a letter can do so by emailing opinion@bsudailynews.com or editor@bsudailynews.com

The Daily News encourages its readers to voice their views on legislative issues. The following legislators represent the Ball State community:

U.S. SEN. DAN COATS 493 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, DC, 20510 (202) 224-5623

REP. SUE ERRINGTON Indiana District 34 200 W. Washington St. Indianapolis, IN 46204 1-800-382-9842

U.S. SEN. JOSEPH DONNELLY B33 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, DC 20510 (202) 224-4814

SEN. TIM LANANE Indiana Dist. 25 200 W. Washington Street Indianapolis, IN 46204 1-800-382-9467

U.S. REP. LUKE MESSER U.S. 6th District 508 Cannon House Office Building Washington, DC 20515 (202) 225-3021

COSTS: Professors say full class time is important

| CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

Hicks said although skipping classes could be costly to the university by lowering graduation rates, the real damage is to student’s academic performance. “As a professor, I assume that students are rational adults and if they choose not to attend, they are making their own benefitcost analysis,” Hicks said. “When students don’t attend, I don’t formally grade upon it, but I can tell you lack of attendance is probably the leading indicator of failing a class or doing very poorly in it.” Cierra Payton, a freshman communications major, said the amount of money she is paying for class wouldn’t really change her mind about skipping class. “In the morning, when I am really tired and I don’t really want to go [to class], I don’t

think I would think about that,” Payton said. Boylan motivates his students to attend his class by telling all of his Personal Finance for Fiscal Wellness classes what they pay each week to take his onecredit hour course. “When I announce how much it costs to be in my class for a day I think sometimes there is some surprise, but I think they are also kind of like, ‘Wow, they’re trying to get my money’s worth out of the class. And I’ve never thought about a class in that term,’” Boylan said. When Gabriella Snyder, a freshman business major, looked at how much individual classes cost in her business class, she decided not to skip many classes. “I didn’t really think about it as a money figure, so it was interesting to think about that way,” Snyder said. “I will pay my

student loans after I graduate. I think its more important to go because it affects [my] future.” Boylan said he also tries to make the most out of the time he has with students. “I believe that I am ripping [students] off if I cut class early,” Boylan said. “I believe that I need to work the entire time. I want to give you your full $50 worth.” In-state students pay about $0.31 per minute of class time in a 15-credit hour course load. Terry King, provost and vice president for academic affairs, said teachers cannot change their class from the scheduled time without approval from his office. “The vast majority of faculty members are quite diligent about meeting their classes — which must be their highest priority,” King said. “Occasionally a faculty member might

miss a class due to illness, or a professional obligation may require a faculty member to be away from class. In these cases it is the obligation of the faculty member to contact the department chair ahead of time, if possible, and advise how the class is being covered. If a student thinks that a class is being canceled for an inappropriate reason, then I encourage the student to let me know.” According to the Faculty and Professional Personnel handbook, professors are given only 12 sick days every year, in the hopes of discouraging them from canceling too many classes. Hicks said he very rarely cancels class. “As a professor, I am very anxious to have every opportunity to explain my discipline to students. The only thing that would make me cancel class would me being very ill,” Hicks said.

Ball State graduate immortalizes EIL: Speaker encourages students to have goals David Letterman in comic biography | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

Vancouver company produces illustrated stories of celebrities RACHEL PODNAR CHIEF REPORTER | rmpodnar@bsu.edu

A Ball State alumnus was working on a comic book about late-night television host David Letterman when he realized he had a personal connection with a location in the book. Fall 2011 graduate David Hopkins, who currently interns for Washington-based Bluewater Productions and their Fame comic line, did not expect to find a personal connection to Ball State when he was assigned to the Letterman comic. “I didn’t really think anything about it,” Hopkins said. “When I started looking at the art I was like ‘Holy crap, I was here, I was there.’ I was a TCOM major and all of my classes were in [Letterman’s] building. I remember

when he was there, walking by in the crowd.” Bluewater Productions publisher Darren Davis said the Fame line continues a tradition of biographical comics that began in the 1940s. Their books are available as iBooks on the app store, as part of the digital publishing revolution. The company has also written about celebrities like Nicki Minaj and Justin Bieber. Hopkins wonders if Letterman will see his work and said he thinks he would appreciate it. “I think he would like it only because it’s in favor of Letterman,” he said. “Even when they highlight things in his life the sex scandal, it is portrayed in light of he made a mistake, he owned up to it and America forgave him.” Davis said it is likely Letterman will see his comic. Bluewater has had contact with him in the past on other comics and has contacted him several

BLUEWATER PRODUCTIONS WHO

Lady Gaga, Justin Bieber and and the cast of Glee have two volumes WHAT

FAME series WHEN

Started in May 2010 HOW MANY

More than 30 biographies SOURCE: bluewaterprod.com

times about his own. Sometimes celebrities partner with Bluewater and a portion of sales are donated to a charity of the celebrity’s choice. “I was a Sigma Chi and he was also a Sigma Chi in college, I wanted to help a brother out,” Davis said. “I grew up obsessed with celebrities in LA. [To hear Hopkins had a connection with Letterman], I was really happy.” Hopkins lettered the comic—

meaning once the writing and art was assembled, Hopkins worked on the layout and added in extras like dialog, text and sound effects. Although a letterer’s work is not what a comic reader notices first, the telecommunications video production major compares the importance of his work to a video editor. “If an editor is doing their job well, you don’t even know there is an editor but soon as they mess up, it is really jarring and it jolts you right out of the movie,” Hopkins said. “That’s how it is for comics. [As a letterer], you want to keep it seamless and make sure the reader is engaged in that world.” While at Ball State, Hopkins started a weekly comic online called Super Cute, with a college friend. That initial interest in comics led to a comic-focused podcast, which now has a following of around 7,000. The podcast led him to his internship at Bluewater Productions.

Three years passed before Jackley decided to quit her job and jump into the world of microlending. “I begged my way into an internship that gave me an excuse to go talk to 150-or-so entrepreneurs that got $100 grants to start their businesses,” Jackley said. The people she talked to were taking grants and not loans, which is a process that does not fall into the microlending category. Jackley said that it was “close enough.” “If you’re aiming for a dream job and you get something close, sometimes that can be all you need,” she said. Sticking to that dream and what is most personally rewarding is one goal that Jackley said seems to be most important in her experience. “A lot of people make bets on how they spend their time or how they choose their careers based on either what they know can work and not on

DN PHOTO ERIC DEBUYSSER

Jessica Jackley speaks during the Excellence in Leadership presentation Monday in Pruis Hall. Jackley emphasized that workers should focus on what they enjoy to be more productive in business.

what is enjoyable or what is rewarding,” Jackley said. “I think the people that do that are a lot happier and are showing out a lot more creatively.”


TUESDAY, MARCH 19, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM | PAGE 5

STATE/NATION

Weapons, explosives found in dorm on University of Central Fla. campus Studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s suicide sparks evacuation, inspection of hall | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS ORLANDO, Fla. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Authorities investigating the apparent suicide of a college student discovered weapons and explosive devices in a dorm on the University of Central Florida campus in Orlando early Monday, and hundreds of students were evacuated, though the school said there was no immediate threat. University police were called to the dorm around 12:20 a.m. after a fire alarm went off, UCF spokesman Grant Heston said. While they were on their way to the scene, a 911 call came in

about a man with a gun. Arriving officers found a man dead from what appeared to be a self-inflicted gunshot wound inside a residence at the Tower 1 dorm. Heston said the man was a student at the university. Heston said the dorm has suites, with a main kitchen and living area, along with four bedrooms. The dead man was inside one of the rooms. Inside the room, police also found what they described as an assault weapon, a handgun and improvised explosive devices. Heston said the Orange County Sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office and the FBI are helping with the investigation. About 500 students were evacuated from the dorm and an adjacent parking garage was closed initially. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t believe there is any imminent threat to the cam-

pus,â&#x20AC;? Heston said. The university canceled classes through noon Monday as a precaution. Flashing signs around the campus alerted students and staff about the canceled classes. Antonio Whitehead, 21, a junior from Hollywood, Fla., said he heard the fire alarm go off after midnight and thought it was a routine alarm. He headed outside where he saw a crowd already heading across the street from the dorm. â&#x20AC;&#x153;All of a sudden, I felt the crowd move a little faster. And a police officer with a machine gun or something told everyone to start moving a lot faster,â&#x20AC;? he said. Whitehead, who has lived in the dorm for two years, said the students were moved to an open area about 1,000 feet from

Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget your friendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s birthday! 6HQGDFODVVLÂżHGELUWKGD\ZLVKLQ WKH'DLO\1HZV

AP | BRIEF

GEICO EXPANDS TO IND., ADDING JOBS

CARMEL, Ind. (AP) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Geico plans to open a customer service center just north of Indianapolis, creating as many as 1,200 jobs by 2016, Gov. Mike Pence and company Chairman Tony Nicely announced Monday. The Washington, D.C.-based consumer insurer will invest millions of dollars to lease, renovate and equip the 109,000-squarefoot center, the company and the Indiana Economic Development Corp. said in a joint news release. The center is expected to open by late April, and will house agents, trainers, supervisors and support staff. The IEDC offered Geico up to $10 million in conditional tax credits and $400,000 in training grants if Geico can show it fills the jobs as promised. Geico, which currently has 27,000 employees across the country, said it plans to begin recruiting immediately. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We chose central Indiana because we know there is a talented and well-educated workforce in this area and we want to offer people long-term career opportunities as we continue to expand,â&#x20AC;? Nicely said in a prepared statement. Pence credited the quality of Indianaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s workforce, its fiscal stability and low taxes. The IEDC said Indiana has the highest concentration of insurance education programs in the nation, with insurance degree programs offered at Ball State, Indiana State University in Terre Haute and Butler University in Indianapolis. Geico, part of the Berkshire Hathaway family of companies, has more than 11 million private passenger customers and insures more than 18 million vehicles.

UCF Arena. The area is a busy section of the campus, with restaurants and shops nearby. Grant Hernandez, 20, a sophomore from Orlando who also is a resident at the dorm, said he woke up sometime after midnight when police were evacuating the building. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t allowed to get our cars. We werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t allowed to get our personal effects,â&#x20AC;? Hernandez said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;All we saw were people running, and they were not telling us what was going on,â&#x20AC;? he added. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We were left unsure of things. It wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t till about 6 oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;clock that we got more information and a clearer picture.â&#x20AC;? He said officers on the scene began providing more information, and students checked updates on the universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website.

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Ball State Students! Want a "Cool" Job this Summer? Apply at www.homecityice.com Home City Ice Co. in Muncie is now Hiring for Route Delivery Drivers. Weekends and Holidays in summer are a Must. Clean Driving Record a Must. 50-60 hours a week in Summer, and part time around your classes in Spring and next Fall. Pay averages between $8 and $14 per hour. This is hard work, and rewarding for those who are motivated to succeed. Apply Online Today! SUMMER OF YOUR LIFE! CAMP WAYNE FOR GIRLS -- ChildrenĘźs summer camp, Pocono Mountains, PA. 6/15 - 8/11. If you love children and want a caring, fun environment we need Counselors, Instructors, and other staff for our summer camp. Interviews on Ball StateĘźs campus March 23rd. Select The Camp That Selects The Best Staff! Call 1.215.944.3096 or apply at www.campwaynegirls.com

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! A 2 bdrm in village, all utils incl., A/C, new carpet, laundry, off st. prkg. may or aug. 760-4434. ! A 3 bdrm in village, 1 blk from campus all utils incl, new carpet, A/C, off st. prkg. aug. 760-4434 ! A 4 bdrm in village, all utils incl, A/C, new carpet, D/W, laundry off st. prkg. 760-4434 ! A 5 bdrm in village, all utils incl, 2 baths,D/W, W/D new carpet, off st. prkg. 765-760-4434 ! A1 bdrm apt. 1 free mo, Aug lse. Ashland Ave. Some utils pd. Walk to BSU. No Dogs 317-727-5847 *****1, 2 & 3 BR avail. May/Aug Great floor plan, AC, DW only 3 blks to campus! THE 400 APARTMENTS - (765)288-6819 www.400apartments.com ****Running out of time! 3 bdrm apts avail. Off st prking, walk to BSU, Asset Mgmt (765) 281-9000 ***RATCHFORD PROPERTIES*** â&#x20AC;˘Great Apts. & Houses! â&#x20AC;˘Best Locations on & Near Campus â&#x20AC;˘Affordable Prices! â&#x20AC;˘Some Utilities Paid! Laundry Facility, NO Pets. ***CALL OR TEXT 748-6407*** www.ratchfordproperties.com *1 bdrm, 3 blk from campus, only $325/mo. incl free heat. Also studio for only $225/mo. Call 760-4434 *2 Bdrm 3 Blocks from campus large, laundry, only $200 per month each. Aug lease 765-760-4434

1 bdrm apt, Aug 2013Ęź Super nice, All Amenities, 765 717- 9331 housesnearbsu.com 1 bdrm apt, corner of Wayne and New York, Laundry and cable provided, off st prking, rent 540 to 580/per mo, No pets, 765 744-9405 1 bdrm in village, 1 blck from campus, A/C, laundry all utilites included. May or Aug lease 760-4434 1-8 blk to BSU 1,2,3,& 4 brd Apts. for rent. No Pets. Some with W/D Call 289-3971 2 bdrm sublet to July 31 AVAIL NOW Reduced Rent..Some Util Included 314-882-3124 2 bdrm, last one avail, 1215 W. Wayne, 750/mo, util & cable prov. Laundry, no pets, 765 744 9405 2 bdrm. apartment on 101 S. Talley .$500/mo. Pet friendly.All utilities included. Call Kasey at Aug lease, 2 & 3 bdrm. 1 blk South of BSU Village.$250-350/mo ea. +Utils. No pets. 765-288-3100 Cardinal Villas 2/3 bdrm apts. free wifi, blowout prices, call today! 765-729-9618 $300 signing bonus until 2/28 Clean 1 bdrm apartment, all utilities included $450/mo. avail. 8/01/2013 call kasey at 405-1220 FREE INTERNET! Clean & quiet 1 bdrm apts, close to BSU. On site WS/DR,cedarsatbsu.com,286 2806 Landlord pays utilities, 2 bdrm apts. 811 W. Main Street, 765-744-0185, bsuoffcampus.com Large 3 Bdrm, 1 block from campus, $325 a month each, all utilities included, Aug. lease. Call 760-4434 Lrg 2 bdrm apt. Close to campus. A/C, Util paid, off-st. prkg. $700/mo Aug. lse. NO pets. 288-9521.

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! 3 bdrm, 1 blk from campus. Only $275 ea. All util. includ. laundry, off strt prking, 760-4434 ! A 3 bdrm in village, 1 blk from campus all utils incl, new carpet, A/C, off st. prkg. aug. 760-4434 ! A 4 bdrm in village, all utils incl, new carpet, D/W, laundry off st. prkg. 760-4434 !!!A+ Convenience. 3&4 Bdrm, NY &Bethel, Off Strt Prkng, D/W, W/D, C/A, New Remodel, 317-507-1490 !5 Bdrm, 2 1/2 ba, walk to BSU, w/d, c/a,w/ deck, prking, aug lse. 290/ea plus util,284 3646 744 5008 www.munciecollegerentals.com $$ Save $$ 4 or 5 bdrm, 2 ba, 2 kit, bsmt, nice, clean, close to BSU, 317-727-7653 or visit www.ballurentals.com Call for details on Free MonthĘźs Rent

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401 N. Martin, Aug. lease, 4 bdrm, A/C, W/D, $300/month each + Utils. No pets. Call 765-288-3100

1 Bdrm. Aug. Lease, 215 N. Dicks Util. Included, $475/mo. 765-434-3640 2 bdrm 211 N. Calvert. $350/ea util included. W/D. Call 765-434-3640. Please leave message. 2301 N. Hollywood. 3bdrm, 2 ba, + Lg bonus rm. util rm w/ W/D, screened porch, walk to BSU. $750/mo. Avail June or July. Call 765-288-7251 2bdr house 2 blk from campus Nice with A/C, Utils inclu .Aug lease Call 765-760-4434 3 bdm 2405 N. Hollywood 630/mo + utils. 9mo or yr lse. Start May or Aug call after 5. 765-759-5017 3 bdrm 3 blks from campus Avail Aug all util pd w/d, d/w, a/c, gar,no pets,760-4529 3 Bdrm, C/A, W/D, close to BSU, wrap-around deck, 2216 Rosewood, newly renovated, $300/each+utilities 765-744-4823 3 bdrm, high end deluxe unit, completely remodeled, new appli. fireplace, May or Aug lse. 765 749 5646, www.bsurentals.info 3 bdrm. avail Aug. utils included, W/D, $350/ea. 215 N. Dicks, 765-434-3640. Leave message. 3 bdrms 2 bath 3 blks 2 Student Center C/A W/D GAR $225 per + util 317-594-5512 3,4,5 Wanted, 5 bdrm, 2 ba, w/d. 2 refridges, prv fence, fro porch, off st. prking, Aug to Aug, 620 Alameda, 289 4964 3/4 bdrm houses, close to BSU, $300/person, Call today for more info, 729 9618

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924 W. Neely. spacious 4 bdrm. 3 blks to BSU. 1100/mo. Avail 8-1-13. midwestrealestatellc.com,765-2747422 Aug. Lease, 3 bdrm, 2 ba., $975/ mo.,utils. includ. A/C, no pets. 924 Marsh. Call 282-7332, 713 3636 Beautiful 5 bdrm-914 W University Just became avail. for Aug 2013 Newly Remodeled - Stove, Fridge, D/W, Microwave, Gar. Disposal, W/D, $350/person, UALA Mem. www.bsubeachfronthomes.com 765-741-9959 By Kinghorn.3 or 6 bdrm houses, Off st pk, A/C, gas heat, appl furn 748-9145, 749-6013, 282-4715 Large 3 Bdrm, 1 block from campus, A/C, $325/mo, all utilities included, Aug. lease. Call 760-4434 Near BSU. Nice! 3 or 4 bdrm. W/D, furnished, pet friendly. Aug to Aug Lease. Call 765-282-8606 Now renting for Aug. 2013. 1,2,3,4,&5 bdr. No pets. All have W/D & A/C 1-8blk to BSU. Call 289-3971 Pd. Utilties & High Spd Internet Qlty 3-6 bdr. From $300 ea. Some hottubs 765-744-1079 joecoolproperties.blogspot.com Perfect for couple 1 1/2 bdrm garage in basement, 505 S. Hutchinson 744-0185, bsuoffcampus.com Premiere student living. 1-5 bdrms, new updates, W/D, plus some utls included.765-286-2806 (Lv. mg.) Renting for next year, 4 bdrm homes in Ball State area. 765-729-1067 kp-properties.net VERY NICE 1,2,&3 bdrm homes and Apts near campus. May&Aug Leases, taycorpinvestments.com for info and appointments call Cedric, 765-281-0049

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Get into homely pursuits for the first half of the year, enjoying family and friends. A remodel or home addition could be in the works. You get itchy feet in June, ready for exploration through travel or study. What you learn now reaps rewards later.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Today is a 7 -- Continue to resolve issues creatively. Ask a female friend for advice.You have better luck for the next two days, every little bit counts. A financial shortfall is temporary.Your understanding continues to increase all week. Aries (March 21-April 19) Today is an 8 -- Better stay close to home now and avoid arguments. Travel can be challenging, too ... a walkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nice for a change of scenery. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no need to worry, though, especially about money. Keep your promises. Taurus (April 20-May 20) Today is a 9 -Continue to be respectful and increase your career stature. Nowâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the time to study and focus on the future. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no need to buy toys just yet; you could compare costs.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Today is a 9 -- There could be a setback. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t let this dissuade you from manifesting a dream. Discuss shared finances, and continue to limit spending. Be gracious in a heated moment. It will work out. Get some rest. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Today is a 9 Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Today is a 9 -- Heed your mateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s concerns. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t -- Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not a good time to travel yet. splurge on treats. But pursue romance! Cut the fluff, but donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t worry about money now. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a challenge coming, What you start can continue to increase later. Family matters vie with and you can forge ahead. Meditate for work for your attention. Postpone a harmony. financial discussion for later.

Gemini (May 21-June 21) Today is a 9 -- Strive for harmony and joy at work. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s possible and profitable. Continue to increase intimate connections. This is not something you can fake, so donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t try. Focus on pleasant interactions. Travel later. Cancer (June 22-July 22) Today is a 7 -- Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re moving fast and things seem easy, but donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fall asleep at the wheel. Intimate relationships could use some attention. Listen like your life depends on it, or like love does.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Today is an 8 -- Listen to words of advice from your friends. They have a lot to contribute, if you let them. Then return the favor. Continue to decrease clutter this week, to create new space.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Today is an 8 -- Feeling the love may require some concentration, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s there. Notice the magnetism. Spend some time with a favorite person and replenish you spirit. Acknowledge them for who they are for you.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Today is an 8 -- Consider options and investigate possibilities carefully. Odd circumstances increase your vigilance.Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll find what you seek. A female asks the burning question. Continue to check things off your list.

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Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Today is an 8 -- Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re luckier than usual today and tomorrow, and your self-confidence increases all week. Hold on to your money, though. There could be hidden difficulties. The more thorough youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been with a job, the better.


PAGE 6 | TUESDAY, MARCH 19, 2013 | THE BALL STATE DAILY NEWS | BSUDAILY.COM

SPORTS SPORTS@BSUDAILYNEWS.COM TWITTER.COM/DN_SPORTS

/////////// THE

HAPS

EVENTS THIS WEEK

WEDNESDAY Baseball will play Butler at 3 p.m. at home. It will be Ball State’s first home game of the season.

THURSDAY Riding a fourmatch winning streak, the men’s volleyball team will play at 7 p.m. at IPFW.

FRIDAY The Ball State women’s basketball team will play its WNIT matchup at Minnesota against the Gophers.

Ball State looks for doubles to improve Cardinals have lost four of their last five doubles matches BRIAN WEISS STAFF REPORTER | @bweiss14

DN FILE PHOTO JONATHAN MIKSANEK

Taylor Rager eyes the pitch in the game against Central Michigan on April 22, 2012. Rager scored the winning run against Iowa on Monday.

Bickel’s RBI finishes off Iowa in comeback win Pair of freshmen pitchers earning quality playing time FISHBURN STAFF REPORTER | MELEAH mcfishburn@bsu.edu In need of a deciding run, junior third baseman Audrey Bickel crushed a single past Iowa’s first baseman in the bottom of sixth inning, sending junior first baseman Taylor Rager home to score the seventh and final run needed for a Cardinals (13-10) victory over the Hawkeyes. “Whenever they scored runs, we answered right away,” coach Craig Nicholson said. The teams stayed toe-totoe for the majority of the game as Iowa took advantage of Ball State errors made in the field. Despite falling behind 3-1 in the top of the third, Ball State answered with three runs to

DN| BRIEF

take back the lead in the bottom of the frame. The Cardinals maintained the lead and avoided errors to hold the Hawkeyes to five points in the final inning. “We are having much better at bats than we were having a couple weeks ago,” Nicholson said. “We are a little bit more relaxed in situations.” The Cardinals recorded seven RBI throughout the contest. They also chipped in a double, raising the team total on the season to 45. “We trust what our offense is capable of doing,” Nicholson said. His team has learned to be patient and relaxed at the plate and remember that there are good hitters throughout the lineup if other players are not hitting well. The team was unable to make plays and score runs at crucial times against Wisconsin on Saturday, though the team corrected those errors

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL EARNS WNIT BID

Despite falling short of the Mid-American Conference finals on Friday, the Ball State women’s basketball team’s season isn’t over yet. The team learned late Friday that it would be participating in the Women’s National Invitation Tournament. Ball State will play Minnesota in the first round of the WNIT. The game will take place this Friday at Minnesota. The Gophers went 18-13 overall and 7-9 in the Big Ten. They lost to Ohio State in the Big Ten finals, 58-47. Also participating in the WNIT are fellow MAC teams Akron, Bowling Green, Miami (OH) and Toledo. The MAC sent five teams to the WNIT. It tied with CUSA and A10 with the most teams in the tournament. Other Indiana teams in the WNIT are Butler, Indiana State, IUPUI and Saint Mary’s. Ball State went 15-14 in the regular season and 12-4 in the MAC, but lost to Akron in the tournament semifinal, 70-61. Ball State coach Brady Sallee’s former team, Eastern Illinois, is also in the WNIT. It will play at Missouri on Wednesday. The only way for Ball State to play Eastern Illinois is for both teams to win three games in the tournament and meet in the Elite 8. – MATT MCKINNEY

during Monday’s game. “They understand that if they make a mistake, we are likely going to make them pay for it,” Nicholson said. Freshman pitcher Kelsey Schifferdecker improved her personal record to 6-1 on the season and brought home the win in the circle. She held the Hawkeyes to five hits and four runs with two strikeouts. Freshman Nicole Steinbach finished the game and earned her second save of the season. She finished out the game giving up just one hit and one run with two strikeouts in the last three innings. The freshmen pitchers have had an accelerated learning experience thanks to the amount of innings they have been throwing, Nicholson said. “We just need to continue to do what we are doing,” he said. “Continue to have quality at bats, continue to put pressure on people, continue to grow as a team.”

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It’s no secret that the Cardinals have struggled this season in doubles action. They have found themselves trailing after the first point eight times this year. Fortunately for Ball State, they have dug themselves out of the early hole and recorded victories three times in that scenario this season. However, the team needs to find some consistency in doubles action before Mid-American Conference play. Injuries have played a key role in deciding whom coach Bill Richards puts out on the court for doubles. He has used 12 different combinations of teams in the spring season with only one of those duos playing more than six times together. Richards hasn’t been shy in switching up the lineup to try and find a suitable fix to the consistency problem. “I just thought we were getting a little stale with a couple of our teams,” Richards said. “Thought we might switch it up a little bit and see if we could get a little more chemistry going.” Richards has had a full squad

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DN FILE PHOTO BOBBY ELLIS

Sophomore Ray Leonard and senior Dalton Albertin congratulate each other after winning a doubles point in a match against Detroit Mercy on Jan. 25. Despite its struggles in doubles, Ball State has won three of its last four matches.

to choose from for the past five matches. The team has dropped four of the last five doubles matches. It’s essential that the Cardinals are clicking on all cylinders come MAC play. With only two matches left before that happens, it’s time to pick a rotation and stick with it. Chemistry is hard to acquire when the teams are switched up every other match. With the lack of productivity in doubles, Richards has a hard decision to make over the next few weeks. Either he continues to test new scenarios in hopes

DOUBLES RESULTS

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of finding the perfect fit, or he picks a previous rotation and rides it out because the inconsistency is killing the Cardinals. “Not sure where we’ll go from here with the doubles, but we have a lot of options,” Richards said.

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DN 03-19-13  

The print edition of the Ball State Daily News on March 19, 2013.

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