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CONCERNS Birmingham School of Architecture and Design Annual Review 2017-18


CONCERNS Concern(s): verb (INVOLVE) Front Cover Dave Baldock, MArch Architecture Back Cover Soteris Yerosimou, MA Landscape Architecture Concerns: Birmingham School of Architecture and Design Annual Review 2017-18 Edited by Tom Tebby and Ed Pearson Designed by Tom Tebby Text © Birmingham City University and the authors Images © Birmingham City University and the authors All rights reserved

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

to relate to; be of importance or interest to; affect. (usually followed by with or in) to involve or interest (oneself): he/she concerns him/herself with…. – n. something that affects or is of importance to a person; affair; business. regard for or interest in a person or a thing. important bearing or relation. an annual review by the Birmingham School of Architecture and Design.

BIRMINGHAM SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN ANNUAL REVIEW 2017-18 1


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Contents 5 6 9 11 13 14

Introduction Annual School Awards RIBA BIM EXPO | aae BIM CAMP association of architectural educators (aae) Research Co.LAB Design Through The Scales

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BA (Hons) Landscape Architecture MA Landscape Architecture BA (Hons) Architecture (RIBA Pt. I) MArch Architecture (RIBA Pt. II) Pg Dip Architectural Practice (RIBA Pt. III) MA Conservation of The Historic Environment BA (Hons) Interior Architecture and Design MA Interior Architecture and Design BA (Hons) Product and Furniture Design MA Product Design MA Design and Visualisation MA Design Management

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Introduction

Welcome to the 7th edition of Concerns, the Birmingham School of Architecture and Design Annual Review. This 2017/18 edition captures the range of subject disciplines in the School: Landscape Architecture, Architecture, Conservation of the Historic Environment, Interior Architecture and Design, Product and Furniture Design, Design Management, and Design and Visualisation. As ever it’s been a very exciting year in the School and the student work at the end of year shows in June looked terrific! The various year groups and design studios marked student’s individual identities with fantastic combinations of thinking, drawing, and making real characteristics of the School. It was also very rewarding for us to see our students grow as people, prepare themselves for the outside world, and perhaps most importantly, enjoy themselves….. most of the time! As a School we never stand still and continue to innovate. We launched a part-time course in Interior Architecture and Design at SHAPE in Hong Kong to supplement our existing full-time delivery and also validated a full-time Interior course at the Malaysian Institute of Art in Kuala Lumpur. September 2017 saw the launch of a new Foundation in Architecture and Design and we appointed Myles Cummings from Raffles University Iskandar to lead the course. We are also in the process of validating a new BA (Hons) Design Management pathway as an option for our 3rd year students as well as students from elsewhere. We have also made some key strategic appointments within the School, Dr Matthew Jones joined as the new Director of Technical Studies and for the first time in the School’s history we’ve appointed a Digital Design Coordinator, Jason Taylor. Jason will be pushing things forward in terms of CAD, BIM, visualisation, digital fabrication, and VR.

Numerous other appointments were made in the summer of 2018 including new Course Directors Katriona Byrne (MA Conservation and the Historic Environment) and Korina Zaromytidou (BA Interior Architecture and Design), as well as a number of others across the School. We also had some notable retirements and departures in the shape of Professor Richard Coles, Mark Cowell, Jim Sloan, Professor Lubo Jankovic and Harriet Devlin, all of whom gave distinguished service to the School – we thank you for your contributions. The annual staff awards marked achievements in the team ethic that is prevalent in the School. The team led by Professor Christian Frost that organised and hosted the AHRA Architecture Festival City conference in November 2017 scooped the top prize. The runner-up awards went to Delia Skinner for her work as Learning and Teaching Co-ordinator, and to Kathryn Jones for stepping in to run Level 6 Interior Design at short notice. I’d like to thank everyone who has contributed to the School this year including the core staff team, visiting tutors, specialist tutors, volunteer critics, workshop staff, colleagues in ADM and across the University. A big thanks also to the work placement practices who have hosted over 100 of our Architecture, Landscape and Interior Design students. We are privileged to have such support. Finally, thank you to the generous sponsors of prizes and events. There are far too many to mention here but special thanks as ever to Ibstock who continue to sponsor the MArch Architecture trip to New York, and to Niyaa People and Interface for their sponsorship of the Summer Ball. I hope you enjoy the work and talent featured inside.

Professor Kevin W Singh Head of Birmingham School of Architecture and Design

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Landscape Architecture Tyler Grange Landscape Masterplan Award: Winner Ivelina Ivanova Tyler Grange Landscape Masterplan Award: Runner Up Rebecca Rickard Tyler Grange Landscape Masterplan Award: Runner Up Soteris Yerosimou Atkins Future Vision Award Ella Scott Atkins Future Vision Award Phey Voen Ong Arup Award Rebecca Rickard Landscape Institute Midlands Branch John Knight Prize BA Soteris Yerosimou Landscape Institute Midlands Branch John Knight Prize MA Fiona Lock

Architecture BA (Hons) Architecture

Birmingham & Five Counties Architectural Association Michelle Gartside Trust Green Book Award Winner Birmingham & Five Counties Architectural Association Rihards Saknitis Trust Green Book Award Commended Oscar Naddermier Medal Huma Mahmood Niyaa People Award Winner Winner Lauren Owen Niyaa People Award Winner Runner Up Ryan Steed RIBA Bronze Medal Nomination James Timmins Steph Moore MArch Architecture RIBA Drawing Prize Anastasia Stupnikova RIBA Silver Medal Nomination Unit 4: Matthew Moran Unit 1: Ryan Gormley RIBA President’s Award Disseration Nomination Ryan Gormley 3D Reid Award Oktay Balkandzhiev New York Photo Comp Stefan Fratila (BA Architecture) New York Photo Comp Runner Up Ilze Kasa (BA Architecture) Associated Architects Prize Tom Brooks Hays Architecture Award Abdul Zamin Peter Broad Memorial Design Award Oktay Balkandzhiev Louisa Ann Ryland Laura Nicula

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Annual School Awards 2018

Interior Architecture and Design

Materials and Making Maximillian Rai-Quantrill Concept Emily Hesketh Creativity and Communication Helena Thornton Ripple Effect Amy Walsh Most Inspiring Student Tiffany Chan

Product and Furniture Design

BSoAD Studentship Awards Glen Powis and Lauren Owen Making Scott Ridgway Most Improved Student Simran Gill Digital Making Md Sayed Uddin Presentation Skills Hugo Parnell-Hopkinson

HS2 Hoarding Design Commission Architecture Rihards Saknitis Runner Up Daniel Duca Interior Architecture and Design Helena Thurnton Runner Up Maximillian Rai-Quantrill Landscape Architecture Soteris Yerosimou Runner Up Phey Voen Ong Product and Furniture Design Hugo Parnell-Hopkinson Runner Up George Hopkins

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RIBA BIM EXPO | aae BIM CAMP

The event welcomed over 500 architecture and design students from the UK and South America alongside 200 built environment professionals. This made the two days one of the largest BIM (Building Information Modelling) Expo’s in Europe. The BIM Expo looked at endless possibilities within BIM including demonstrations, presentations of live and past case studies, workshops and a variety of other educational activities to help guests both learn about BIM and aspire to achieve best practice. The RIBA BIM Expo featured over 20 key BIM pioneers alongside special guest keynotes from the Heatherwick Studio and Gensler. The RIBA BIM Expo showcased a unique insight from world class designers and BIM managers practicing BIM on projects across the world.

photos: Rihards Saknitis

Over the last two years, Victoria Farrow, Course Director of the BA (Hons) Architecture course at Birmingham School of Architecture and Design and Conor Nolan, Project Manager at the Royal Institute of British Architects have worked to develop and shape an event that looks to meets the needs of industry professionals and students. Following the huge successes of the January 2017 event, the pair decided to work on engaging even bigger numbers and offering opportunities for more students and practitioners to become involved in BIM 2018. Victoria Farrow

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association of architectural educators (aae) 2017-18

As Co-Chair of the aae I am pleased to report on another fruitful and successful year.

The 4th aae international peer reviewed conference under the title architecture connects held at the Oxford Brookes School of Architecture in September 2017 was a resounding success with over 150 delegates. Keynote speakers were Tatjana Schneider, a researcher, writer and educator then based at the School of Architecture in Sheffield, now Professor and Head of the Institute for History and Theory of Architecture and the City (GTAS) at the Technical University Braunschweig in Germany. Joining Professor Schneider was Columbian architect, urban designer and educator Carlos Hernรกndez Correa, based at the Faculty of Architecture and Design of the Pontificia Universidad Javeriana of Bogotรก in Colombia (PUJ). The proceedings and video interviews are available at https://aaeconference2017.wordpress.com. Selected papers will be published in the aae journal, Charrette. The most recent issue of Charrette Global Practices, Transnational Pedagogies edited by Mรณnica Pacheco, is available free online at www.ingentaconnect.com/content/arched/char along with all published issues, including Architectural Education in Scotland. The 5th aae conference will be hosted by Westminster University at the Department of Architecture and Interiors, under the theme of learning through practice in April 2019. The conference invites contributions from educators, researchers and practitioners on the theme of contexts for learning architectural practice and how the nature of these contexts shape the nature of form of the learning itself. Details are available at https://aaeconference2017.wordpress.com

The conference will be a place to reflect on both the signature traditions of studio-based teaching and alternative emerging models of architectural education. To explore means by which practice based research can be articulated in an academic context and vice versa, and to ask how do these very different contexts shape the research being undertaken. We are currently inviting expressions of interest to host the following aae conferences in September 2020 and April 2022. The next aae Forum will take place at Falmouth University in 21/22 March 2019. Details are available from Tom Ebdon at Falmouth. Victoria Farrow, Events Manager of the aae, organised the second international BIM in Birmingham Event, at the Birmingham School of Architecture and Design in January 2018, which was attended by over 380 students and 120 staff and practitioners. Keynotes from Heatherwick Studio and speakers from Cullinan Studio, BDP, Gensler and many others contributed to a range of lively debates. The third international BIM in Birmingham event will take place in January 2019, welcoming speakers and special guests from Foster and Partners, Zaha Hadid Architects and BDP together with international guests from Chile, South Africa and India. We look forward to the up and coming event!

Hannah Vowles Co-Chair association of architectural educators

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Research

2017-18 was a truly fantastic year for research in the Birmingham School of Architecture and Design. Each of our research centres hosted international conferences which both established our research interests and capabilities on the international scale and forged new connections which are developing into new research collaborations:

past case studies, workshops and a variety of other educational activities to help guests both learn about BIM and aspire to achieve best practice. The event brought together many high-level practitioners and included a keynote address from Cristiano Cecatto of Zaha Hadid Architects.

Cultural Context Research Group

CATID

In November 2017 the Cultural Context research Group hosted the 14th Annual Architecture and Humanities Research Association Conference entitled Architecture, Festival and the City. Presentations from academics, practitioners, dancers, activists and artists and associated exhibition took hold of the Parkside building for three days, with keynote lectures from choreographer Rosie Kay, academics Dr Ray Lucas and Professor Mari Hvattum, and architect Eric Parry being particular highlights. Papers from the conference will be published in a Routledge Architecture, Festival and the City, and a special edition of the Journal Architecture and Culture.

In June the School hosted the Landscape and Infrastructure Conference, an interdisciplinary event that drew upon the creativity and knowledge of an internationally renowned constellation of policy makers, practitioners and academics operating at the cutting edge of new way of looking at landscape, transformation and change. The conference explored a number of transformative agendas that aim to establish the West Midlands Combined Authority (WMCA) at the forefront of planning and regeneration. Proposals discussed at the event included plans for a National Park for the West Midlands Plateau, the opportunity to provide a unique and enduring legacy for the Commonwealth Games 2022, and the need to respond to the changing physical, social and economic geography that will occur with the arrival of HS2. Guest speakers included many significant international practitioners including James Corner the Founding Partner of Field Operations.

Design Pedagogy January 2018 Saw the second BIM in Birmingham conference hosted by the Birmingham School of Architecture and Design in association with the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA). The event welcomed over 500 architecture and design students from the UK and South America alongside 200 built environment professionals. This made the two days one of the largest BIM Expo’s in Europe. The BIM Expo looked at endless possibilities within BIM involving demonstrations, presentations of live and

Professor Christian Frost

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Collaborative Laboratory (Co.LAB)

Birmingham School of Architecture and Design occupies a distinctive territory between the study and practices of the creative arts with the built environment professions. Links with the professional context and are reinforced through alumni, renowned tutors, events and live research projects. Equally, the School’s position within the Faculty of Arts, Design and Media (ADM) means that students and staff are well connected to the creative scene of the city. Collaborative Laboratory (Co.LAB) is an interdisciplinary design and research initiative within the School that seeks to directly engage students and staff with this dynamic context. We focus ‘liveness’, or a relevancy, to current issues surrounding design and architecture with external collaborators to deliver outcomes across a range of scales and formats. This year, Co.LAB set up cross-departmental projects within ADM to develop new strategies in collaborative practice. There has been a focus on design through research - exploring the cultural heritage of the city, alongside ongoing projects in making with new EDIT/or

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projects on prototyping products with well-known manufacturers. Our projects have contributed the cultural offering of the city – notably working with the REP’s Youth Theatre programme in a sold-out production of Antigone over Easter. Undergraduate students from BA (Hons) Architecture, BA (Hons) Landscape Architecture, BA (Hons) Interior Architecture and Design and BA (Hons) Product and Furniture Design participated alongside postgraduate programmes MArch Architecture and MA Product Design courses. Co.LAB continues to work on a number of larger scale projects with our consultancy arm - using academic expertise alongside skills of our staff and students to help inform new design strategies for our partners. This includes the opening of STEAMhouse, a unique

incubation facility in the city centre to help small and medium sized enterprises prototype new products and ideas using a steam approach of combining the arts with science, technology, engineering and mathematics. We have expanded our Knowledge Exchange initiative to build on our ethos of blurring the boundaries between academia and practice. Similar to the larger, Government-led Knowledge Transfer Partnership (KTP), interested part-time students identify an issue to explore with their employing practice using expertise at the School and University, hereby developing an interest in business matters and practice management.

Elective projects this year: Grade Separation partner: C100 collective Part-time Critical Pedagogies partner: BSoAD Research Knowledge Exchange partner: BSoAD Research Bhm Mid Mod Map partner: Birmingham Modernist Society The Unfinished Article partner: BSoAD Research Keeley Travel partner: Tom Keeley Edit/Or partner: AHRA Conference Antigone partner: REP Youth Theatre Programme 100 Stories partner: Birmingham Museums & Art Gallery Future Workspace partner: HIP Coworking Locations Innovative Urban Lighting partner: Phillips Lighting The Brick Project partner: Ibstock Bricks Playground of Hyper Realities partner: King’s Heath Primary School Wellbeing Community Gardens partner: Woodrush Community Hub

find us online: w: birmingham-colab.org fb: facebook.com/birmingham.colab tw: @bham_colab bl: http://liveprojectsnetwork.org/ insta: BHAM_CoLAB

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T

Grade Separation

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Antigone

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100 Stories

Woodrush Community Hub


Critical Pedagogies

Urban Lighting

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Bhm Mid Mod Map

Ini7al Proposals  The  idea  of  AR  on  the  hut   plans  to  encourage  team   work  games,  inspired  by  the   need  to  have  a  certain   number  of  players  to  begin   a  game  on  a  ps4/  xbox   game,  similarly  the  hut   requires  a  certain  number   of  children  for  the   augmented  reality  to  come   alive  and  games  begin.

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Hyper Reality Playground


Knowledge Exchange

The Brick Project

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and has ork, with mas and extended buildings admired

dys and ht. More mlines, so have lost gs found s around sisting of nd bustle b damage as.

I will now ask you to take a sharp right down Bull Street, you are now entering into the bustling shopping district of the city. As you approach the junction with Corporation Street you will find yourself sandwiched between Rackhams and Lewis’s department stores, the busiest intersection in the city. Lewis’s first opened in 1885 and has given Birmingham a taste of New York, with legendary celebrations around Christmas and Easter. The building has recently been extended into the surrounding unoccupied buildings creating a ‘superstore,’ becoming the most admired department store of the century. Continue down Bull Street past Preedys and Tabaco onto the High Street to the right. More shoppers flood this street as well as tramlines, so stay aware. By this point you will see we have lost some of the grandeur of the stone buildings found up by St Phillips Cathedral. The buildings around this area are of Victorian character, consisting of predominantly brick. Between the hustle and bustle of trade you will also see reminisce of bomb damage as this was one of the worst hit areas.

Keeley Travel

PROJECT DEVELOPMENT

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FURNITURE DESIGN OUTCOME

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Group A: Da'Costa, S. Kitchen, D. Luo, B. Wang, M. Zhao, Y.

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Future Workspace


process outcome Figures 29 + 30.

by Natalie Marsh

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The Un/Finished Article Figures 31 + 32.

by Natalie Marsh

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Design Through The Scales Landscape Architecture Architecture Interior Architecture and Design Product and Furniture Design Design and Visualisation Design Management

Stephanie Moore BA (Hons) Architecture

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Landscape Architecture

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Tutors: Lucas Hughes Eccles Ng Simon Ronan Adam Carthy Dr Ying Li David Sharpe Dr Jieling Xiao Zuby Ahmed Claire Hunt Graham Woodward John Newman Paj Valley

BA (Hons) Landscape Architecture

BA (Hons) Landscape Architecture

The graduate show demonstrated the broad range of talent and ideas coming out of Landscape Architecture this year. As a team, we were especially pleased to hear that almost all of the students had secured a job, or had arranged further study, by the time of their graduation ceremony. This was particularly demonstrated by three studentselected and award winning projects:

The Landscape Institute’s John Knight prize winner; developed a place and peace based solution to reintegrate northern and southern Cyprus, though sensitive reuse of heritage city defences. The Atkins design award winner; which tested and reimagined an iconic post-industrial site in the North of England, for ecological-led destination for visitor’s experience. The Tyler-Grange award, which came with a paid placement; awarded for sensitive regeneration of a river island in Bulgaria, using integrated design thinking and refined approaches to graphic representation.

Final Year Over the summer, students were tasked with defining a subject of particular interest to take to their final year. They were asked to consider something that might be valuable to the profession, to their development and above all, something that they would love to do.

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BA (Hons) Landscape Architecture

Students developed a broad idea for their own research opportunity and design project site options. They considered links between theory and practice, ideas that connected their increasingly in-depth research (the questioning) to their increasingly dynamic practice (the doing). The research emphasis was that of having a ‘practice-base’ of questions and method that sat within their discipline. Might there be new ways to innovate their own process, through experimentation and expectation of interaction with a wider audience?

detail, toward the human scale and the real-world experience of the end user. In the final stage of this process, students demonstrated how the material composition of their project would be realised. This included both living and manufactured components, the soft green planting and the hard variety of constructed elements. Drawings and specifications were also included which could be taken by a contractor to move the project from theory into a real world outcome. Second Year

Students looked at a large scale site, analysing the layers of physical and social conditions to form a strategic framework for their design. They compared and contrasted values, their own views and of those who may be affected, to define what was best for the site. What it could be? What it should be? In creating a vision for what they might do, students were asked to create a concept or tell a story, something meaningful about the site that would engage and hopefully inspire future visitor. Students were asked to combine the abstract, the pragmatic, the current social-historical and natural values and character. They defined what their site design would be in practical sense and in terms of meaning, how it would be experienced as a sequence of spaces and, what it may look like.

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Taking this forward, it was refined and tested against a variety of needs relating to the site and a desire to maximise the value based on a range of appropriate attributes. Sites needed a range of experiences and functions, each integrated via the conceptual framework defined earlier. Designs were realised in increasing

The students now more seasoned, embarked on a sequence of modules where techniques became increasingly integrated. Approaches were formed to align the Context module’s specific project aims. For example; material studies, advanced to principles of construction and were applied further into a design for a large urban space, which linked to wider areas of theoretical study. The Co.LAB and Praxis modules advanced appreciation of the real-world nature of the course, not only theory and personal experiment but clients, political systems and the general public to consider when putting a design together. The culmination of the year, a strategic approach to Ecology, aimed to re-link natural and human systems as part of a step toward a more sustainable future for urban and landscape planning and design.


Work Placements Practice representatives from different scales and sector focus’ were brought in to each run a practice day over consecutive weeks. This included part of the landscape team from WSP and the landscape team from ADP Architecture. The learning mode was that of simulation, a day-in-the-life of a specific practice that does certain types of work and completes them in a certain way. This prepared students for their upcoming placements as part of developing their appreciation of life in a landscape architecture practice. This gave an insight into the variety of work and types of focus available. The students then went into practice for two weeks, joining a local or national firm, to support with their work. The morning of their return to the University, they had prepared a fast paced Petcha Kutcha presentation. We simply discussed what they had done and the ins and outs of the ‘real world’ of work. Everyone’s experience was completely different and uniquely valuable in its own way. Being able to share this with those who’d had a similar experience was perhaps just as important. It was great to see the buzz and excitement of sharing their real-world experiences. First Year Students explored ‘what is landscape architecture?’ in a fundamental way. Linking key skills to stimulating design productions delivered through workshops, presentation and discussion. Hand drawing skill stood out as the most important skill for students to deliver their own unique design communication approach,

building from this in digital graphics, CAD, physical and digital modelling from this characterful foundation. Exercises and submission were a mixture of task-based and problem based approaches. Students enjoyed various workshops (for instance Origami workshop, conceptual thinking workshop, module making workshop, technical workshop), stimulating experiences from desktop study to on-site, first hand research, building up confidence in presentation their ideas. Students had the opportunity to get the first-hand experience of bricklaying with a professional and to visit commercial tree nursery, providing an important lesson about the realities of turning architectural drawings into built construction. Vienna Study Trip (2017-18) In April 2018, BA (Hons) Landscape Architecture students spent several days on a group selected study trip to Vienna. The trip engaged students to experience changing contexts of the city, from bustling urban centre to quiet localised outskirts. Through a dynamic external environments, students investigated the design approaches and cultural contextual studies, the learned tourist, soaking in the local character: sights, sounds and tastes for later design inspiration. There were a number of site visits related to the previous lectures in the course, which further consolidated students’ knowledge. Students were able to share their experiences, discuss and better get to know students from different years and groups. Lucas Hughes Course Director, BA (Hons) Landscape Architecture

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Harry Silcock

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Kirsty Howarth


BA (Hons) Landscape Architecture Year 1

Kirsty Howarth

Abigail Baines

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Roberto Alico

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Sam Brittain


BA (Hons) Landscape Architecture Year 2

Daniela Teleku

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Masterplan

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Adam Rumble


Alexandra Ford

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Vestina Cizevskaja

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BA (Hons) Landscape Architecture Year 3

Soteris Yerosimou

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Soteris Yerosimou

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Ivelina Ivanova


Yuting Cai

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Viewing the Form of Place : The Green Network

Green Networking

Hydrology Existing, Expanding and Surface Level movement,

By Rebecca Rickard S15147776

Flow, Movement and Focal View Points

The concept of the reconnection and restoration of a concrete suburb has brought to life a new channel of green network which enables the expansion on the definition of suburban life. Re-linking this old 1970s town with its surrounding rural exterior to create a gateway flooded with green infer structure to enable a positive and more natural setting for this compacted urban town. The conceptual consideration included; - Re-linking the rural setting to its overpowering hard suburban jungle. - Expansion of view points giving an endless channelling of green networking. - To create a more diverse range of product activities, as well as emphasising the current limitation of green pocket spaces. - To provide a sense of place.

Directio

n of Lan

d Fall

The Master-planning breaks down the overall site and create 5 key areas to help show the characteristics that flow throughout the site.

Key

Key : Diagram of master-plan, point out the key areas of green networking, expressing the new green hots-hops, the direction of green infrastructure as well as the smaller green path ways which also provide opportunity for new or existing habitats.

Main Green focal points throughout the sight. Ecological areas, and habitat stop off points throughoutGreen BridgSecondary

The Canal being the main focus which is sitting west of the site it was important to think about the other run off points and water feature opportunity throughout the site. This diagram also demonstrates run off area and the direction of the fallen level change throughout the site.

Main Green Networking Flow

Highly Dense Woodland Area., Ideal as a Habitat Corridor

Industrial Estate

Shared Surface, with soft scape to help break down speed and rush through this busy town centre as acting like a speed bums they create a narrow structure to enable drivers to think with more caution when entering the site.

Existing Football club and Pitch facility

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The diagram above is helping to demonstrate what has been gathered from the research module to help physically show the aimed flow and movement that will be focused on when designing the site.

Showing Main Direction and Movement

It also picks up of these movement trails linking with key areas of focal points that extend the views of this particular area.

Showing Secondary movement and more pedestrian flow Key Focal Points some refelctiong key areas.

Key Are 5: Who roundabout

Existing Forest Copse, with added MUGA ( Multi-Use Games Area) Shrubs and Woodland Planting SUD’s with natural wetland planting and high grassland, with high opportunity for habitats to develop

Section Line

Existing natural water system Existing or additional drainage points for surface run off. Land fall to natural water points

es

Key Area 1 : Woodland Walk, onto Canal front

Key Possible Area to introduce water

New Adapted Community Area and Social Club, with a rear Allotment Gardens, off road parking and a soft view over into the Park Way.

This is one to the main entrances by vehicle to the site so it way important to focus on this and create a contemporary safe environment for all who use it.

New Shopping Complex with bespoke street furniture. Main vehicle entrance point the gateway into the site.

Channel Cafe, a Canal front cafe with a more simplistic design to try to eliminate the feeling of design structure.

Shared Surface

Green Roofs.

Pocket Walk, creating small pockets of habitats and feature, breaking down structural design to express a more rural landscape.

Raised and Lowered Planting and setting areas.

ion

Sect

Line

B

Key Area 2: The Mound Cafe, a relaxing spotting point for everyone, with the raised ground, the extreme view over the Cloud Parkway.

Main Gateway, beginning of green Strategic flow from a more formal structured urban centre to a more naturalistic rural parkland.

Exsisting Residental space

Existing Estate, With new adapted access point into the Park way

Direct Path way to Cafe , directed and structured with Long meadow grass. Mown Path way through Orchard Trees and soft planting to create a natural flow of direct and movement, as well as enhancing as a scenic route.

Listed Building.

New Parking Point To create an easy access to the children woodland play area.

Buffered Wild Flower and Woodland Mix to create a soft horizon to the train tracks.

Habitat Hotspots Wild flowers and Meadow Mix Grassland

SCALE OF OVERALL MASTERPLAN AND SECTIONLINES 1:1250

Key Area 3 : Cloud Parkway Play Area, Adapting a naturalistic style of play with woodland walks and natural materials such as stones, wood, trees and planting to maximise peoples experience of outdoor adventure.

Tree avenues between buildings to help with the flow of direction and creating the picturesque channelling that gives a soft edging, reflects on the rural agricultural surroundings.

Green Roofs, with the refurbished parking area, to allow roof parking, to help with congestion in the lower streets.

Key Area 4: Library Street, a Quiet but busy cut through from the gateway park to the town centre.

Formal Amenity grass, with possibility for informal play and planting.

Section Line starting level 165M (above sea level)

Section Line A

Section Line ending level 145M (above sea level)

Section Line starting level 155M (above sea level)

Section Line B

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Section Line starting level 150M (above sea level)


Rebecca Rickard

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Yucong Li


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Phey Voen Ong

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Robert Colbourne


Tutors:

Conversion Year:

Russell Good Mark Cowell Kathryn Moore Sandra Costa Eccles Ng Ula Butajskaite Ying Li Patrick Pietrioni Merrick Denton-Thompson (President Landscape Institute) Kay Hawkins Harriet Devlin

Students undertaking the Conversion year initiated their learning journey into the realms of the profession and towards the accredited MA in Landscape Architecture.

MA Landscape Architecture

MA Landscape Architecture

The learning journey is an exciting discovery of the principles, fundamentals and tools that are involved in place making and in designing landscapes at different scales and in different contexts. The learning curve, the students say, is a very steep one, and reflects the diversity of projects which grow in scale and complexity whilst gaining an understanding of the design process and of the professional communication skills. This has been an exciting year with the curriculum being transformed to accommodate two comprehensive and complementary modules that are designed for the student to develop a diverse range of skills and techniques typically used in Landscape Architecture: the Designed Ecologies and the Designed Geographies. Throughout the Designed Ecology module, students developed an appreciation of the visual language of natural systems and how these can be used to explore concepts and design solutions that facilitate the creation of new and inspiring landscape experiences. The Designed Geographies module, on the other hand, is seen as a conduit to increase understanding on human, cultural and urban systems at city scale. The Icknield Port Loop and Reservoir project provided fantastic ground to allow exploration of processes rooted in urban regeneration and of challenges associated with “water systems� as resources for recreation but also as means to achieve resilience in cities in the face of climate change.

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MA Landscape Architecture

MA Landscape Architecture: The accredited MA in Landscape Architecture is a place for the in-depth exploration of the current global issues and real-life scenarios that relate to Landscape Architects such as climate change, health, wellbeing and landscapes, and food production. Our students were encouraged to be innovative in their thinking, getting out of their comfort zones and make evidenced design decisions. The River Rea axis across Digbeth was the laboratory to explore the overarching theme of “Healthy Urban Landscapes”, inviting the students to rethink culverted rivers and urban landscapes and how these can be designed for promoting healthier lifestyles whilst solving urban and social issues. Some of the concepts emerging were looking into tackling mental health, obesity and loneliness. Another highlight of the year was our Collaborative Laboratory (Co.LAB) project whereby the students worked alongside colleagues from the Harper Adams University to create the “Ultimate Urban Greenhouse”. This project was launched as a competition by Wageningen University and required students to rethink a tower in the infamous ‘Bijlmerbajes’, a prison complex in the South-East of Amsterdam which was built in the 1970s. The aim was to design an urban greenhouse and a food production system with the capacity to connect with local energy systems and contribute to a circular neighbourhood whilst encouraging citizens to engage with sustainable production and consume healthy food. In the Design Studio it has been another year of amazing concepts. This included exploring the ideas of food production in future urban landscapes that are contained and lack space, as well as potential changes in diets. The “Bug to Cake” design project is an excellent example of this. The design proposals showed the complex nature of integrating natural systems like green infrastructure, green energy, cannabis for wellbeing, settlement design with designs testing ideas that combined a high level of experimentation, technicality and innovative thinking was unprecedented.

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Bijlmerbajes Group Project

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RESEARCH

CASE STUDY

GREEN TOWN

CONCEPT

TEAM MEMBER CATRIN MENZIES GAVIN PERRY JIN XIAO

Green Town Group Project

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PHILIP SIMPKIN QIANG ZHANG


bee infras t ruct ure

CONCEPT

T ea m Amb i t i o n S t a t emen t

M.R.B.L.H.C Group (HG Esch, (2018), urban-rainforest-landscape-architecture-singapore-07 [ONLINE]. Available at: http://www.landezine.com/index.php/2018/01/marina-one-by-gustafson-porter-bowman/ [Accessed 20 March 2018].)

We wa nt to design a n iconic urba n greenhouse. As a biophilic group we a re highly motiva ted by the idea of being pa rt of a n interdisciplina ry tea m, who ha ve the opportunity to explore a nd respond to design criteria tha t fa ll outside our previous perspectives. T he proj ect competition is a ttra ctive beca use it is impera tive tha t we develop link s a nd pa rtnerships with experts in a very contempora ry technica l doma in tha t complements our design sk ills. It is a lso a ttra ctive to pa rticipa te in a n interna tiona l proj ect tha t encoura ges us to rea ch out a nd ga in experience work ing a cross cultura l borders a nd ba ck grounds. We look forwa rd to responding to the needs of a heterogeneous a nd evolving urba n community.

Marina One

pro ces s diag ram

Vertical farms, green roofs, green walls and towering buildings of glass, are all synonymous with the 'Future City', the world we will soon find ourselves in. As landscape architects, our designed landscapes have moved vertical and 30+ storeys up in the sky, our public spaces are slowly moving away from the ground as space becomes a luxury in our crowded cities.

BASE IMAGE: Google (2018) Google Maps.[IMAGE] Available online at: https://www.google.co.uk/maps/place/Bijlmerbajes,+H.J.E.+Wenckebachweg+48,+1096+AN+Amsterdam,+Netherlands/@52.3381671,4.9214608,815m/ data=!3m1!1e3!4m5!3m4!1s0x47c60bd14b891fbd:0xba8644ee0dd59b3e!8m2!3d52.3392089!4d4.9242081 [Last AccesseD 21st March 2018] Lars Roest-Madsen (2017). Cricket Juice Tastes Way Better Than It Sounds. [image] Available at: https://munchies.vice.com/en_uk/article/gvkbqx/cricket-juice-tastesway-better-than-it-sounds [Accessed 18 Mar. 2018].Rimamonsta (2014) INSECTS FOR FOOD-PREP. 101. [image] Available at: http://www.instructables.com/id/Insects-forFood-Prep-101/ [Accessed 18 Mar. 2018].Jacqueline Detwiler (2018). Cooking With Crickets Will Save The World Here's How You Do It. [image] Available at: https:// www.popularmechanics.com/home/food-drink/a26083/eating-cricket-flour/ [Accessed 18 Mar. 2018].crickets in industrial farm. (2017). [image] Available at: https:// www.shutterstock.com/video/clip-9724616-stock-footage-crickets-in-industrial-farm.html [Accessed 18 Mar. 2018].symbibiological (2016). Dehydrating Crickets. [image] Available at: https://symbibiological.com/2016/07/29/dehydrating-crickets/ [Accessed 18 Mar. 2018].

We think a tower dedicate to farming insects can be an approach tailored to any location. The output can be any typical indigenous food and food culture. In this case the tower farms flour and protein from crickets, soldierfly larvae and mealworms. Honey is obtained from the hives located throughout the building. This is a good basis for traditional Dutch cakes and desserts such as Tompoezen, Appeltaart, Poffertjes and Pepernoten.

PARTIC IPATION

Fruit can come from orchards grown in exterior spaces. Fruit such as strawberries, blueberries, courgettes and herbs can be grown in interior spaces. These form extra ingredients for those Dutch cakes and treats sold in the cafe and community spaces. Soldier fly larvae are also excellent composters and produce an odourless fertilizer from waste animal and vegetable matter. Tiger worms can also back up the blackwater composting on site and encourage local people to use worm composters.

DESIGN s y mb i o tic con cept

PRINCIPLES

L I G H T AND S P A C E V E R T I C A L L Y - WALK HORIZONTALLY INTERIOR & EXTERIOR

1. MAXIMISE 2. GROW

3. All Images have been created by the team unless stated otherwise, further citation in supporting workbook

4.

PERMEABILITY 5. TEMPERATURE CONTROL 6. CIRCULARITY

Bijlmerbajes Group Project

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58


Kika Vernon

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ncing hancing biodiversity biodiversity in our in our cities. cities. Masterplan +103.33

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Synthesis to Detail, LAN 7344 Caroline Wiles Student number:17152374

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Recesed Recesed LED LED strips strips along along riverriver to emphasise to emphasise the River the River Rea Rea

60

ScaleScale 1:500 1:500


Bridge Bridge railing railing withwith LED LED as a as a wayfinder wayfinder

changing changing intensity intensity and and colur colur temperature. temperature.

Greenhouses Greenhouses withwith LED LED lighting. lighting.

Caroline Wiles

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62


Muhan Huang

63


64


Chantelle Harris

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66


Chantelle Harris

67


Synthesis Synthesis to to detail detail Synthesis to detail Child’s Child’s playplay is play aiscrucial a crucial component component in the growth in the growth andand development and development of the brain, of the brain, Child’s aiscrucial component in the growth development of the brain, body and body intellect. and intellect. Studies Studies show that show children that children cancan acquire can acquire a vast aamount vast amount of of of body and intellect. Studies show that children acquire a vast amount knowledge knowledge through through exploring, exploring, risk-taking, risk-taking, andand gross and motor gross development motor development during during knowledge through exploring, risk-taking, gross motor development during outdoor outdoor play. For play. example, For example, physically physically demonstrating demonstrating words words such as such stomp, as stomp, outdoor play. For example, physically demonstrating words such as stomp, pounce, pounce, stalk, or stalk, slither or slither andand descriptive and descriptive words words such as such smooth as smooth andand strong and strong pounce, stalk, or slither descriptive words such as smooth strong means means the the words the words are are used are and used learned and learned in context. in context. Learning Learning by doing by creates doing creates means words used and learned in context. Learning by doing creates more neural more neural networks networks in the brain in the and brain throughout and throughout the the body the making body making the the entire the entire more neural networks in the brain and throughout body making entire body abody tool for a tool learning. for learning. body a tool for learning. TheThe garden The garden follows follows the the narrative the narrative of the children’s of the children’s book ‘We’re book ‘We’re going on going a onbear a bear garden follows narrative of the children’s book ‘We’re going onbear a hunt’, which hunt’, tells which thetells story the ofstory aoffamily a as family they as pass they through pass through different different landscapes landscapes hunt’, which tells the story aoffamily as they pass through different landscapes such as such mud, as rivers mud, and rivers woodland and woodland in search in search of aofbear. a The bear. story, The phonetics story, phonetics such as mud, rivers and woodland in search aofbear. The story, phonetics andand illustrations and illustrations are are soft, are sensory soft, sensory andand naturalistic; and naturalistic; the the sensory the sensory garden garden looks to looks illustrations soft, sensory naturalistic; sensory garden looks to to capture capture these qualities these qualities andand bring and the bring book the tobook life -toallowing life - allowing children children to discover to discover capture these qualities bring the book to life - allowing children to discover similar similar experiences experiences andand qualities and qualities of these of natural these natural landscapes landscapes thatthat they that may they not may similar experiences qualities of these natural landscapes they may not not findfind in the find city. in the in the city.city. Inspirational Inspirational images from images thefrom book: the Children book: Children can can be seen can be amongst seen amongst longlong grass, long climbing grass, climbing overover rocks over and rocks getting and dirty getting in the dirty in mud the mud Inspirational images from the book: Children be seen amongst grass, climbing rocks and getting dirty in mud the

Experiences Experiences withwith nature with nature cancan provide can provide realreal lifereal context life context for children’s for children’s books books Experiences nature provide life context for children’s books as well as and well help and tohelp reinforce to reinforce concepts concepts whilst broadening whilst broadening the the context the context of their of their as well and help to reinforce concepts whilst broadening context of their learning. learning. (Bullock, (Bullock, 1994) 1994) learning. (Bullock, 1994)

• • • • •

Design Design development development Design development For For theFor design the design to become to become a reality a the reality original the original concept concept the design to become a reality the original concept sketch sketch developed developed significantly. significantly. Originally Originally a timber a play timber sketch developed significantly. Originally a timber playplay trail trail formed trail formed the the 'woodland' the 'woodland' landscape. landscape. Further Further research research formed 'woodland' landscape. Further research into into fall into distances fall distances revealed revealed this this would this need would toneed be toreduced be reduced fall distances revealed would need toreduced be considerably considerably given the given limited the limited space. space. TheThe trees The also trees considerably given the limited space. trees alsoalso required required a larger a space larger for space rooting, for rooting, which the which original the original required a larger space for rooting, which the original planting planting bedbed didbed not did provide. not provide. In response, In response, the the woodland the woodland planting did not provide. In response, woodland planting planting bedbed increased bed increased in size. inIt size. became It became a multi-use a multi-use planting increased in size. It became a multi-use space which space functions which functions as aaspath, aplanting path, planting bed,bed, tree bed, pit tree space which functions aaspath, planting tree pit pit andand playand trail. play Bark trail. mulch Bark ismulch used isasused aas bedding a bedding material, material, play trail. Bark mulch is used aas bedding material, pathpath material path material andand softand fall soft surface. fall surface. It’s development It’s development leadleadlead material soft fall surface. It’s development to atomuch amore much engaging more engaging andand coherent and coherent design with design an with atomuch more engaging coherent design with an an immersive immersive treetree canopy tree canopy andand increased and increased opportunity opportunity for for for immersive canopy increased opportunity

•Create Create an engaing an engaing sensory sensory garden garden for children for children aged 2+ aged that 2+ explores that explores sight, sight, •Create an engaing sensory garden for children aged 2+ that explores sight, sound, sound, movement, movement, taste and taste texture and texture - using -materials using materials as close astoclose their to their sound, movement, taste and texture - using materials as close to their natural natural state as state possible as possible natural state as possible •Create Create a garden a garden which allows which allows children children to discover to discover a vast range a vast of range plants of and plants •Create a garden which allows children to discover a vast range of plants andand theirtheir individual their individual qualities qualities individual qualities •Encourage Encourage ‘messy ‘messy play’ and play’ anand active an approach active approach to children’s to children’s learning learning •Encourage ‘messy play’ and an active approach to children’s learning •Design Design a garden a garden thatthat complies that complies withwith British with British safety standards safety standards •Design a garden complies British safety standards •Explore Explore the the constraints the constraints andand opportunities and opportunities of rooftop of rooftop design design •Explore constraints opportunities of rooftop design

plant discovery. plant discovery. plant discovery. Concept Concept sketch sketch Concept sketch

Problem Problem solvin s Problem solv

Materiality Materiality visual shows visual how shows the how different the different colours, colours, forms and forms Materiality visual shows how the different colours, forms and and textures textures come together come together to create toa create rich sensory a rich sensory experience experience textures come together to create a rich sensory experience

Soft Soft Soft

Light Light && Shade & Shade Light Shade

Scent Scent Scent

Taste Taste Taste

Tall Tall Tall

Water Water Water

'LONG 'LONG WAVY WAVY GRASS' GRASS' 'LONG WAVY GRASS' Features Features different different species species of tall, of tall, Features different species of tall, textured textured grasses grasses textured grasses

'THICK 'THICK OOZY OOZY MUD' MUD' 'THICK OOZY MUD' Mud kitchen Mud kitchen play tops play to tops learn to learn Mud kitchen play tops to learn about about different different soilsoil types soil types andandand about different types textures textures textures

Smooth Smooth Smooth

'A DEEP 'A DEEP COLD COLD RIVER' RIVER' 'A DEEP COLD RIVER' Water Water play channel play channel andandand Water play channel interactive interactive water water wall. Features wall. Features interactive water wall. Features smooth smooth pebbles pebbles for for sitting for sitting smooth pebbles sitting

H

Balance Balance Balance

'A BIG 'ADARK BIG DARK FOREST' FOREST' 'A BIG DARK FOREST' Woodland Woodland trailtrail with trail balancing with balancing Woodland with balancing logs, shady logs, shady planting planting andand sensory and sensory logs, shady planting sensory trees trees trees

TEXTURE PLANTING TEXTURE PLANTING TEXTURE PLANTING

SKYSKY GARDENS SKY GARDENS GARDENS Gillespies Gillespies Gillespies Planting Planting depth isdepth Planting depth is is increased increased by creating by creating increased by creating retaining retaining walls that walls hold that retaining walls that holdhold large amounts large amounts of soil -of soil large amounts of soil - therefore therefore the the planting the planting is is is therefore planting slightly slightly elevated.Plants elevated.Plants slightly elevated.Plants feelfeel slightly feel slightly ‘off ‘off limit’ ‘off slightly limit’limit’

CROWN CROWN SKYSKYSKY CROWN GARDENS GARDENS GARDENS Mikyoung Mikyoung kimkimkim Mikyoung Is aIssensory a sensory garden garden aIssensory garden designed designed for children. for children. designed for children. It uses Itinteractive uses interactive It uses interactive walls and walls bright and bright walls and bright colours. colours. Designed Designed to to to colours. Designed be part be of part Chigagos of Chigagos be part of Chigagos childrens childrens hospital, hospital, playplayplay childrens hospital, offers opportunity offers opportunity for for for offers opportunity development development development

68

'A NARROW, 'A NARRO G 'A NARROW, Climbing Climbing wallwall and wal Climbing anr sittis

BIRMINGHAM BIRMINGHAM BIRMINGHAM LIBRARY LIBRARY SECRET SECRET LIBRARY SECRET GARDEN GARDEN GARDEN Creates Creates a more a more Creates a more natural natural setting setting withwithwith natural setting ground ground level planting. level planting. ground level planting. It increases It increases planting planting It increases planting depths depths by mounding by mounding depths by mounding the the soilthe soil soil

SCENTED PLANTING SCENTED PLANTING SCENTED PLANTING

Wet Wet Wet

Touch Touch Touch

Colour Colour Colour


The roofgarden The roofgarden is entered is entered through through a smalla transition small transition space.space. Natural Naturalthrough a small transition space. Natural The roofgarden is entered stone stone pavingpaving sets the sets tone thefor tone a high for aquality high quality landscape landscape and is and resistant is resistant stone paving sets the tone for a high quality landscape and is resistant to heavy to heavy footfall. footfall. to heavy footfall. The gardens The gardens narrative narrative beginsbegins with a with grassy a grassy meadow. Long grasses Long grasses Themeadow. gardens narrative begins with a grassy meadow. Long grasses tower tower aboveabove children, children, rustle rustle in the in wind theand windcreate and create winding winding paths.paths. tower above children, rustle in the wind and create winding paths. Planted Planted in blocks, in blocks, they create they create dramatic dramatic displays displays of individual of species. species. Planted in individual blocks, they create dramatic displays of individual species. Accompanied Accompanied by an by interactive an interactive 'music'music wall' this wall' area thisfocuses area focuses onan interactive on Accompanied by 'music wall' this area focuses on textures textures and sounds. and sounds. textures and sounds. The Mud TheKitchen Mud Kitchen allowsallows children children to learn to about learnThe about different different types and types and Mud Kitchen allows children to learn about different types and consistencies consistencies of mud. of Playtops mud. Playtops with varied with varied heights heights invite children invite children to Playtops to consistencies of mud. with varied heights invite children to discover discover new and newsurprising and surprising effects, effects, both visual bothdiscover visual and tactile; and such as such as effects, both visual and tactile; such as newtactile; and surprising mixingmixing with water with water from the from nearby the nearby 'river' and 'river'exploring and exploring material material with no mixing with water fromnowith the nearby 'river' and exploring material with no predefined predefined outcome. outcome. predefined outcome. Smooth Smooth pebbles pebbles provide provide soft, cold soft,surfaces cold surfaces forSmooth touching for touching and seating. and seating. pebbles provide soft, cold surfaces for touching and seating. They lead Theytolead the to water the water play channel; play channel; slightlyslightly sunken and to tilted, and tilted, water water Theysunken lead the water play channel; slightly sunken and tilted, water runs from runsthe from pump the pump between between embedded embedded rocks runs towards rocksfrom towards the the interactive theinteractive pump between embedded rocks towards the interactive 'water 'water wall'. Itwall'. allows It allows children children to control to control water water flow and flow develop and develop skillschildren in skills into control water flow and develop skills in 'water wall'. It allows problem problem solving. solving. problem solving. A log bench A log bench marksmarks the entrance the entrance to the to woodland the woodland trailbench which trailmarks which unfolds unfolds A log the entrance to the woodland trail which unfolds under under a low tree a lowcanopy; tree canopy; exploring exploring shadyshady planting planting and sensory and sensory trees. trees. under a low tree canopy; exploring shady planting and sensory trees. EdibleEdible fruit, textured fruit, textured bark and barkuncurling and uncurling ferns are ferns some are some of textured the of features thebark features Edible fruit, and uncurling ferns are some of the features which which createcreate a memorable a memorable experience experience and opportunities and opportunities for adiscovery. for discovery. which create memorable experience and opportunities for discovery. TimberTimber balancing balancing logs allow logs for allow motor for motor development. development. Timber balancing logs allow for motor development. Further Further opportunity opportunity for motor for motor development development andFurther problem and problem solvingsolving is for motor is opportunity development and problem solving is provided provided in the in ‘cave’ the ‘cave’ landscape landscape through through the inclusion the inclusion ofinathe climbing of‘cave’ a climbing provided landscape through the inclusion of a climbing wall. Rocky wall. Rocky boulders boulders set theset scene the scene and provide and provide seating. seating. wall. Rocky boulders set the scene and provide seating. 1:500 General 1:500 General arrangement arrangement plan plan

1:500 General arrangement plan

The bear, The made bear, made from clipped from clipped box, isbox, found is found on the on story the lawn. story lawn. The bear, madeVelvety from Velvety clipped box, is found on the story lawn. Velvety grass grass is enclosed is enclosed by a 1.5m by a high 1.5mbookshelf. high bookshelf. Colourful Colourful planting attracts grass is planting enclosed by a attracts 1.5m high bookshelf. Colourful planting attracts bees, bees, butterflies butterflies and insects. and insects. It creates It creates a relaxing abees, relaxing space space for reading. for butterflies andreading. insects. It creates a relaxing space for reading. The last The surprise last surprise is the scent is the garden. scent garden. Stepping Stepping stones lead the lead way The laststones surprise is the the way scent garden. Stepping stones lead the way through through a jungle a jungle of fragrant of fragrant planting, planting, with liquid withthrough amber, liquid amber, jasmine and and planting, with liquid amber, jasmine and ajasmine jungle of fragrant honeysuckle honeysuckle overhead. overhead. honeysuckle overhead.

Problem solving

Movement

TREES

TREES

TREES

Children Children who experience who experience nature nature education education are more are morewho experience nature education are more Children likely tolikely develop to develop positivepositive attitudes attitudes about themselves, about themselves, likely to develop positive attitudes about themselves, naturalnatural life, andlife, theand earth the(Bullock, earth (Bullock, 1994) Plants 1994) are Plants living are living natural life, and the earth (Bullock, 1994) Plants are living organisms organisms and help andintroduce help introduce childrenchildren to the effects to the organisms effects of of and help introduce children to the effects of weather, weather, habitatshabitats for wildlife for wildlife and natural and natural cycles cycles such suchhabitats for wildlife and natural cycles such weather, as pollination as pollination and lifeand cycles. life cycles. It is important It is important to ensure to ensure as pollination and life cycles. It is important to ensure childrenchildren are aware are aware and respectful and respectful of the world of the around world aroundare aware and respectful of the world around children them asthem we face as we soface many soenvironmental many environmental crisis today. crisisthem today. as we face so many environmental crisis today. Four different Four different plantingplanting groupsgroups have been have selected been selected to different to Four planting groups have been selected to suit their suitmicro-climate their micro-climate and follow and the follow stories the stories narrative. narrative. suit their micro-climate and follow the stories narrative. Individual Individual plant species plant species have been have selected been selected for their for their plant species have been selected for their Individual unique unique qualities qualities such assuch the soft as the texture soft texture of lambs ofear lambs and ear and unique qualities such as the soft texture of lambs ear and the waxy theleaves waxy leaves of hart-tongues of hart-tongues ferns - ferns we understand - we understand the waxy leaves of hart-tongues ferns - we understand things better things through better through contrast. contrast. things better through contrast.

Synthesis Synthesis to Detail to Detail Ella Scott Ella Scott

Synthesis to Detail Ella Scott

PLANTING

BEES & BUTTERFLIES BEES & PLANTING BUTTERFLIES PLANTING

'A BEAR!' Story lawn enclosed by bookshelf featuring topiary bear

PLANTING

re e with lanting. anting unding

SCENTED PLANTING

M CRET

TEXTURE PLANTING

GLOOMY OW, GLOOMY CAVE'CAVE' 'A BEAR!' 'A BEAR!' 'A NARROW, GLOOMY CAVE' gllrough and rough boulders boulders for for Climbing wall Story lawn lawn enclosed by by bookshelf andStory roughenclosed boulders forbookshelf ingsitting featuring featuring topiary topiary bear bear ry sitting

StudiesStudies carriedcarried out by out Forest by Forest Research Research show show Studies carried out by Forest Research show that forest that forest schoolsschools increased increased confidence, confidence, that forest schools increased confidence, independence, independence, social social skills, skills, communication communication independence, social skills, communication and motor and skill motor development skill development in children. in children. It also It also and motor skill development in children. It also allowedallowed them to them acquire to acquire knowledge knowledge of theirof their allowed them to acquire knowledge of their naturalnatural surroundings surroundings and develop and develop respectrespect for for natural surroundings and develop respect for the environment. the environment. Trees Trees in thisinscheme this scheme are are the environment. Trees in this scheme are used toused display to display individual individual characteristics characteristics and and used to display individual characteristics and have been haveselected been selected for theirforsensory their sensory qualities. qualities. have been selected for their sensory qualities. Liquid Liquid amber amber and cherry and cherry for scent for and scent colour. and colour. Liquid amber and cherry for scent and colour. FruitingFruiting trees for trees taste. forBirch taste.for Birch the for colour the colour and and Fruiting trees for taste. Birch for the colour and texturetexture of theirofbark theirand bark Amelanchier and Amelanchier for their for their texture of their bark and Amelanchier for their seasonal seasonal interest. interest. seasonal interest.

Shapes

SHADY WOODLAND PLANTING SHADY WOODLAND PLANTING

Shapes Shapes Hard

HardHard

Rough

PLANTING

Rough Rough

BEES & BUTTERFLIES PLANTING

Movement Movement

SHADY WOODLAND PLANTING

solving ng

Ella Scott

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Robert Colbourne

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Robert Colbourne

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Architecture

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James Timmins


Tutors: Victoria Farrow Tom Tebby Ollie Chapman Joan Kerr Ashley Ball Tom Froggatt Jennika Parmar Miles Weber Kasia Nawratek Catherine Watton Holly Doron Alessandro Columbano Andy Hilton Mat Lucas Anna Parker Jose Marquez Rob Jones Rebecca Walker Paul Wakelam Jim Sloan Jieling Xiao David Sharpe Christian Frost Ian Shepherd Kevin Singh

BA (Hons) Architecture

BA (Hons) Architecture RIBA Part I

We began the new academic year with mobilising agendas and clear themes for Year 1, 2 and 3: Principles - Process – Exploration. These themes would shape our starting studios and focus our attention on a complexity appropriate to each level of the course towards the latter part of 2017. From the beginning of 2018, we looked to explore a wide range of projects, from small pop-up structures, to dwellings and other residential buildings, public buildings and mixed use. We saw a rich variety of investigations across the course, nurtured by collaborative practice and professional practice both inside and out of the classroom. The year concluded with modules in Design Resolution 1, 2 and 3. Year 1 allows new students to gently embark on their journey into architectural education by learning and discovering its basic principles. The first year students completed many exciting projects and continued to explore new design and communication techniques through their designs, which grew in complexity as they advanced through the exercises. Building skills in hand-drawing, sketching, orthographics, modelmaking, Computer-Aided-Design (CAD) in two and three dimensions, material crafts and rendering. First year students enjoyed gathering a range of different presentation and representation techniques to gain confidence in communicating ideas. Documenting this journey together with their design development process online via blogs provides the group a good foundation for portfolios and helped students embed good practice for the future. The quality of the students work was commended by external examiners once again this year, who described the work as “phenomenal for first year level”. The students’ presentations were also complimented widely on Twitter and Instagram.

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BA (Hons) Architecture Alex Williams

Projects in Year 1 are intertwined with classes and workshops in technology and cultural context modules, with studio projects absorbing this knowledge and application. This pattern repeats itself at Year 2 and Year 3 where students are encouraged to feel confident having already practised similar ways of working in the previous years. As each student moves steadily through each stage of their course, building upon previously established ideals that continue to be reinforced and stretched. With new confidence, Year 2 students embraced the architectural design process. Students are exposed to real life practice scenarios, which are enriched by their time spent in work placements and modules such as Co.LAB, which provides a vehicle for collaboration and experimentation. As a lively and active part of the year the cohort gained better understanding of their place within the world of architecture. Working with engineering students from the University of Birmingham alongside design studio projects, which required consideration of environmental design, communities, urban space and the public realm, the delivery created a solid stepping stone towards Year 3. Year 2 culminated with a Pecha Kucha and a celebration of Praxis work, where both Year 1 and Year 2 students engaged in discussions about professional practice and work placements. 78

In the Final Year, the course required more independence from students. The suite of modules included cultural context, technology and design studio, allowing students to discover their own values, set agendas and put forward more complex design proposals both conceptually and technically. Four design studio units encouraged production and the exploration of architectural schemes, which have been detailed to an appropriate level for Year 3 students. Preparing the cohort further for professional practice following their experiences in Year 2, Year 3 promotes creative thinking, furthering confidences and constructs an environment for decision-making. This year we landed in Bewdley for the Year 2 site where students laid down their proposals following agendas informed by studios Move : Nowtopia : Tangible / Intangible and Shop House. From the beginning of the course, a high emphasis is placed on students making their own choices. Upon departure from the University, the cohort is ready to embark on whatever challenge should present itself when in the world of work. Victoria Farrow Course Director, BA (Hons) Architecture


BA (Hons) Architecture Year 1

Ahmed Hamid

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Diana Grigorie


Ahmed Hamid

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Diana Grigorie

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Group Project: Equilbrioception

Ahmed Hamid


Sehama Nuur

Sehama Nuur

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Reuvie Barbon


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Dan Ward

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Michelle Gartside: Nowtopia


BA (Hons) Architecture Year 3

Year 3 Design is divided into four distinct studio groups led by a tutor with support from technology tutors and visiting critics. Each studio responds to this year’s overarching theme of identity. All studio groups were located in Bewdley, Worcestershire as it prepares itself for the bicentenary of John Ruskin’s birth. The Georgian town has a long historical relationship with the respected polymath and art critic, and his legacy in craftsmanship remains strong to this day. All sites of investigations take a speculative process of investigation, as they explore the transformation of urban conditions of the town and nearby Wyre Forest. The student projects reside in an emerging context of a picturesque but static rural-urban fringe as it sits within distinctive geographic features. The challenge to students was to explore how architectural proposals can bring liveable and dynamic urban spaces and functions in response to a conspicuous historical context. Students initially investigated studio-specific design processes before adapting a brief dedicated to an art centre and ‘Festival of Making’ hub celebrating Ruskin’s legacy in the region.

Studios for 2017-18: MOVE Tutors: Alessandro Columbano / Rebecca Walker The imagined and re-imagined stories of spaces in dynamic sequences around a contemporary gallery and art-house cinema, Ruskin archive and collection display alongside the Festival of Making. NOWTOPIA Tutors: Mat Lucas / Rob Jones Emergent low-fi economies, new technological landscapes, displaced economies and ecologies - working with Bewdley’s Transition Town status and its values of resilience and self-sufficiency. SHOP-HOUSE Tutors: Anna Parker / Arat Patel Re-imagining a traditional shop-house typology to empower household networks or creating participatory con structs in local production and industry. TANGIBLE/INTANGIBLE Tutors: Jose Marquez / Paul Wakelam A game of opposites within a thin line that requires Emotion and Precision exploring the contemporary definition of heritage focusing on Bewdley town and its essence and character within its physical and cultural territory.

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Edward Revans

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End of Year Award Winners

RIBA Bronze Medal School nomination Stephanie Moore Studio: MOVE Tutors: Alessandro Columbano / Rebecca Walker Project Title: Framing Bewdley Set in Bewdley, Worcestershire, Framing Bewdley aims to change the perception of its residents by reinstating the town’s picturesque surroundings. Based on photographic references, the narrative draws on the idea of creating uncertainty. It is crucial that a visitor feels an element of doubt, created by the dramatic change in light quality and organisation of each space, before the view is revealed.

RIBA Bronze Medal School nomination James Timmins Studio: Tangible/Intangible Tutors: Jose Marquez / Paul Wakelam Project Title: Patterned Essence The Cultural Centre for Bewdley is an exploration of craftsmanship within a continuing heritage. Created within, and extended from, an existing, historic 18th century structure, the centre is inspired by values of culture, community and heritage. Studios and exhibition spaces provide a place for members of the community to come together to share, learn and celebrate the craftsmanship of the new and the old.

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Oscar Naddermier Award Huma Mahmood Studio: Shop-House Tutors: Anna Parker / Arat Patel Project Title: Secret Ceramic Service This project envisioned a secret society of female craft makers, who together, worked to share ceramics skills with the local community. Located behind an existing ceramics shop on the high street, the structure conceals key functional rooms for the society through a series of complex spaces and arched entrances. Its materiality is expressed through tessellating ceramic tiles applied throughout the core textured concrete structure – playing a part in the initiation of members through crafted symbols needing to be decoded to unlock the building’s secrets.

Green Book Award Michelle Gartside Studio: Nowtopia Tutors: Mat Lucas / Rob Jones Project Title: Plastic-Algae Transitions Helping aid sustainability on a small scale can make differences for the Transition Towns movement that has been introducing sustainability on manageable levels that anyone can contribute to. The movement is an organisation that brings communities together to be resilient in climate destruction and make sure their actions don’t contribute to the destruction of the environment. The building, a retreat for artists and creatives, is powered from biogas created from algae making the building self-sufficient and includes other sustainable features like sustainable material sources and processes.

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Unit 2: Laura Nicula Architectural Speculations 155


MArch Architecture

MArch Architecture RIBA Part II

Welcome to MArch Architecture at Birmingham School of Architecture and Design. The MArch is designed to offer increasing specialisation and choice over its duration, placing our students at the forefront of the discipline. We explore a long history of applied arts in Birmingham, of a synergy between art and industry, culture and production, and ‘learning though making’ forming a central practice of our course. We draw on this heritage and the creative context of the Faculty of Arts, Design and Media. We are interested in making connections, within and beyond the academy, of sharing our position as an independent space to think, learn, act and make. The ‘research by design’ pedagogy foregrounds the idea that the design work undertaken has value and potential impact beyond the course, with relevance to contemporary issues, with opportunities for transdisciplinarity in the creation of traditional and nontraditional forms of knowledge. We have a wide range of formal and informal partners including educators, manufacturers, creative practitioners, charitable groups, and are able to add value to projects, places and lives through collaboration. Some are short-term, others go on to leave a clear legacy, such as STEAMHouse; a workspace for creativity, technology and business support for the region. Presented here is a selection of student work from our four design units. These are the result of a yearlong exploration into topics, sites and ideas made through cross level collaborative working, participatory practices, material experimentation, design resolution and speculation on a range of future visions for the city. Mike Dring Course Director, MArch Architecture 117


MArch Architecture

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Unit 1: Chelmsley Wood Soft Map


MArch Architecture Unit 1 / Structuralism, Housing & The Commons

Year 5 Coordinator: Rob Annable, Axis Design Architects Year 6 Coordinator: Mike Dring Technology Integration Tutor: Matthew Hayes, Architype

Unit 1 is concerned with housing and ideas surrounding ‘the commons’. This year we have been exploring these topics through the architectural manifestations of structuralism, testing our understanding through interventions and projects at Chelmsley Wood (north Solihull), supported by research into sites and resources in the Netherlands. The critical questions surrounding housing – access, affordability, adaptability – frame our studies. There is a growing movement for the provision of new homes through self and custom build. These are often through the identification and disposal of suitable Council owned sites, to help meet the needs of a growing population, to promote skills, employment and the local economy, and the health and wellbeing of citizens. The idea of the city as ‘common ground’ is an ethical concept that invokes the one thing a city ought to grant – a depth that accommodates with dignity the diversity of its people and their histories (Carl, p.67). Working with the B37 Project at Chelmsley Wood, we have 119


Precedents studies at scale of 1:1 to 1:200 were used to explore these vectors to ground our understanding of the structural tendencies of such works and the ‘reluctant use of materials’ that (arguably) foregrounds human interaction above and beyond architectural style or expression.

been developing a working taxonomy of ‘the commons’ in relation to the resources, conventions and rituals involved in their creation and operation with a particular concern for the ‘green estate’. This was explored through participatory mapping processes in an attempt to interpret the conditions and lived experiences of the city, and to inform future propositions.

Our field trip to the Netherlands supported and directed our studies. We visited TU Delft for a discussion on the commons, and the structuralism archive at Het Nieuw Instituut, Rotterdam, along with other key examples of structuralist architecture in Amsterdam, Hengelo and Delft.

In parallel, we considered communality in architecture and landscape architecture, with specific reference to structuralism. Described as “a willful shift from objects and towards relationships between them, a shift from function to structure” (Voileau quoted in Structuralism Reloaded, p.222), structuralism lacks a single definition. Instead, it is seen as a principle of ordering, characterised by openness for appropriation and opportunity for human encounter as a critique of the modern movement (Avermaete in Structuralism Reloaded, p.181).

The work presented here is representative of the units collaborative outlook and concern for how we live together in an open city with its inherent complexity. HSHA CHELMSLEY WOOD

According to Avermaete’s reading of Habraken and SAR, there are opportunities to explore three vectors of structuralism in relation to ideas of the commons; 1. 2. 3.

Structure/support - concern for balance between action of the community and that of the individual inhabitant. User participation - call for democratic processes, “creative participation” (Giancarlo de Carlo in Forum, no.XXIII, 1972, p.8-20), and three-dimensional framework for circulation and amenity. Context, texture - contradicting the ‘object’ character of the works of modern architecture (the object in the field, Chelmsley Wood as case study), and the ‘texture’ character of the pre-nineteenth- century traditional city.

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Unit 1: Chelmsley Wood Window

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Railway poster style promotion of HSHA Chelmsley Wood

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Kimran Farooq


It is difficult to determine the exact density of the proposal due to changeable nature of the design. While the density of the proposal is 56 dwellings per hectare, one quadrant can house up to 3-4 people while 2-3 would be the ideal occupancy if private living space is needed.

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The Luxury Model THE LUXURY ESTATE 1:50 PHYSICAL SUPERBLOCK MODEL

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Ryan Gormley

9W Social Tower Spaces - pink 9W highlighted changes from basic model Social Tower Spaces - pink highlighted changes from basic model Gormley, 2018 Gormley, 2018

10A ‘The Luxury Estate’1:50 Physical Model - Communal Gardens Gormley, 2018


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Despite the slight variance in façade finishes throughout the Chelmsley Wood estate the construction technique remains consistent throughout. The estate is built using cross wall construction. This is evident throughout the superblocks which consists of both terraces and apartments. Additionally, the FOG – flat over garagestructure features cross wall construction on top of a one storey pre-cast concrete structure. The concrete structure provides space for garages and access.

O Cross Wall Construction - FOG Gormley, 2018

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CONSTRUCTION SECTION AND ELEVATION Not to scale - refer to T5 : Construction


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Roof Buildup: OSB3 board internal lining forming VCL 235mm engineered joist zone fully filled with insulation 15mm Sheathing board DPM waterproofing layer 50mm ventilated batten zone 18mm plyboard Standing seam zinc Semi concealed zinc gutter

Timber pergola structure providing shade and frames for growing plants

Full height glazing with glazed door Balcony Buildup: VCL bonded to 175mm domestic visual quality (underside only) CLT floor panel 50mm vacuum packed high performance insulation 25mm rigid insulation overlay and perimeter boards Waterproofing layer lapped up over sheathing boards at perimeter 50mm joist zone for external decking 20mm composite decking Note: Overall buildup laid to fall towards channel gutter at crosswall beyond where RWP takes water to ground level

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Precast concrete entrance porch structure assembled on site with possibility to enclose at later date

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Bespoke cast concrete entrance seat cad in terrazzo cement tiles with integrated secure storage space for deliveries etc.

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MArch Architecture Unit 2 / XL: Encounters With HS2

Year 5 Coordinator: Andy Hilton Year 6 Coordinator: Kasia Nawratek Technology Integration Tutor: Martin Mence, FB Architecture Ltd

Unit 2 is located at an interesting temporal intersection. On the one hand the city is the location of huge global issues such as rapidly growing urban population, mass migration, homogenous neoliberal urbanization, rising social inequality and devastating climate change. This results in an urgent demand for equitable, resilient and innovative urban development strategies to steer the growth of our cities. However, such strategies are commonly used as political apparatus to drive investment, which, through implementation, are subsequently subdivided into smaller more restricted narratives often becoming disconnected from the critical concerns they are meant to address. On the other hand we have witnessed a diminishing of the architect’s role in the production of the urban environment, to be replaced largely by administrators, managers and facilitators. As an increasing number of specialists emerge the architect finds themselves having to collaborate with a much wider range of actors as traditional authorial responsibilities diminish and become a negotiated series of relationships.

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Unit 2 explored scenarios in which the architect is repositioned as an inter-scalar urban strategist, balancing the demands of design collaboration and multiple architectural narratives and processes with the challenges of developing innovative and culturally critical urban strategies. The core values of Unit 2 were to mobilise the role of the architect, erode or profane traditional disciplinary boundaries and to engage with the multiple challenges of urbanization. To reconnect with architect as planner, strategist, thinker, teacher, negotiator and facilitator of urban processes as spatial and non-spatial events, and to draw upon the potentiality of the architect as mediator or intermediary within Bruno Latour’s Actor Network Theory. In The Social Logic of Space, Bill Hillier and Julienne Hanson declare that architecture is not a ‘social art’ simply because buildings are important visual symbols of society, but also because, through the ways in which buildings, individually and collectively, create and order space, we are able to recognise society: that it exists and has a certain form. (Hillier & Hanson 1984. p3). Our unit placed an emphasis on architecture and urban design not as isolated objects and spaces but as a sequence of interrelated events and D E V E LO P M E N T social interactions.

During the year, students worked closely together to study the potentiality of infrastructure as a non-human urban actor and as a facilitator for urban transformation generator of alternative subjectivities. Using a range of computational and graphical analytical tools and theoretical approaches such as space syntax (axial maps, isovist fields, visibility graphs, agent based simulation etc) Actor Network Theory alongside more traditional forms of diagrammatic urban analysis, we proposed a critical appraisal, the Birmingham Big City Plan, and developed alternative urban strategies for the Curzon HS2 area. We engaged with the city using both qualitative and quantitative forms of enquiry, producing cartographies, actor narratives and urban spatial analysis. Our European case study trip, a Great Train Journey taking in Kings Cross/St Pancras – Euralille (France) – Antwerp (Belgium), explored the relationship between infrastructure and urban regeneration. Alongside our own studio projects we worked closely with planning students to explore the collaboration and discourse between disciplines, modes and levels of study.

DIAGRAMS

Lewis Buckley

EX I STI NG CO N T E X T SPAC E SYN TAX: I N T E G R AT I O N

Lewis Buckley

E N T E R I EXIST N G INTGHCON E PT EXUTB- LOPEN I C VIAD R E AUCLTSM F R O M H S 2 SPACE SYN TAX: IN T EGR AT ION Experemental study exploring the connectivity results of opening all viaducts

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Our London response is a distorted view of the city that is experienced through moments of distraction, Ourand London is a distorted view of the city movement play.response These moments will provide the that the is experienced through moments basis of how new city infrastrucutre will look.of distraction, movementinfrastructure and play. These moments will provide the The emancipatory builds on the existing basis of how theforms new new city infrastrucutre constructs in place and spatial condi-will look. The emancipatory on the existing tions to challange structuralinfrastructure sustainability builds currently place spatial condiin place.constructs The nodesinare partand of aforms widernew connected tions to challange structural sustainability currently network that distribute and share resource. in place. The nodes are part of a wider connected network that distribute and share resource.

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Thomas Brooks


MArch Architecture Unit 3 / Dialectic Utopia

Year 5 Coordinator: Mark Rousseau Year 6 Coordinator: Matt Lucas Technology Integration Tutor: Barbara Bott

“The task is to pull together a spatiotemporal utopianism - a dialectical utopianism - that is rooted in our present possibilities at the same time as it points towards different trajectories for human uneven geographical developments” Harvey (Spaces of Hope) Can architecture be an instrument of emancipation? We have been exploring the fundamental concerns of migration (political / climate / economic), scarcity (resources / culture / identity), political structures – ideas of how people engage with power structures and who controls the narrative. Joseph – (The New Human Rights Movement) – suggests a new socioeconomic structure will eliminate our detrimental practice of rewarding scarcity, exploitation, and ecological disregard, replacing it with one that respects habitat, sustainability and creates proper healthy sociological conditions. If this utopia is possible what will be the role of architects?

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Context and Sites The New North – The World in 2050 and The New Human Rights Movement as a basis for future speculation, provided the social, economic, political, and climatic backdrop for our exploration. We visited COBE in Copenhagen to explore progressive models of social housing, renewable and zero carbon technology, as well as Christiania to explore alternative low-tech approaches.

We explored the relationship between land use, technology, and labour. The synthesis of inherent cultural identity. Cities, generally considered resilient to rapidly transient conditions are in constant flux, exposed to their own geo dynamics, shifting patterns of behaviour and demographics. We explored an architecture that is open ended, architectural propositions that can adapt, mutate, and respond to the dynamic nature of the restless landscape of capital. Methodology and Tactics

Findings were overlayed on London in a Post-Grenfell context, informed by meetings with Architects for Social Housing and Concrete Action to develop tactics for “Resistance by Design” to develop programme and response.

We have used theoretical tactics such as Harvey’s – Seven Theatres (The Insurgent Architect at Work), combining them with Architects for Social Housing resistance by design approach to create dynamic, adaptive, and optimistic visions of the future.

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INTERVENTION 2 [COPENHAGEN]: NYHAVN

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Olivia Myttion


MArch Architecture Unit 4 / Digbeth City Block: Treshold and Taxonomy

Year 5 Coordinator: Luke Nagle, MW Architects Year 6 Coordinator: Prof. Christian Frost Technology Integration Tutor: Pete Jennings, Piercy&Co.

“If we are to address the ordinary pleasures of our time directly and try to make places absolutely specific to them, we should act no differently to the architects of Bath in the seventeen hundreds or Urbino in the fourteen hundreds: each separate act of placemaking, sometimes volumetrically insignificant in itself, is seen as a response to what already exists....landform, buildings, activities. In times of hardship, the means, the physical size of the act may be very small indeed, but this is when the urbanism of specific response can best show its effectiveness.� Alison and Peter Smithson, Italian Thoughts. This year, Unit 4 has been investigating the diversity of city life that supports the city block. Detailed studies of existing site conditions developed an informed taxonomy of some key blocks in Birmingham and London which then formed the basis of the design strategy for the remainder of the year. In the deep block structure of Digbeth there remains an eclectic mixture of activities. Amongst the new

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residential projects and alongside decaying buildings and vacant lots there remain light industrial workshops, a few offices, some studios, and lots of pubs. Even though this diversity survives, it is under threat from developers intent upon turning this diverse city landscape into something more palatable for new residential investors. Consequently the area has already lost some of its more radical institutions such as Halal abattoirs where sheep from Shropshire were brought in for slaughter in the early hours of the morning, mixed with trucks loaded with flowers destined for the city’s florists. This permissive and varied atmosphere is gradually becoming sanitised in preparation for an eventual redevelopment for offices and residential flats. Unit 4 asked whether these different activities are necessarily mutually exclusive, or if different sorts of development can occur within this segment of the city allowing the continuing existence of diverse occupations

in the face of economic gentrification. This could involve the proposed development of new institutions or particular types of buildings designed to perpetuate and nurture the diverse community already in existence. Our initial studies entailed the detailed qualitative analysis of existing conditions using photos, sketches, models, and drawings. The aim of this work was to discover a taxonomy of the fringes of Digbeth. During the year the Unit organised studio day visits to London. Research into the form and history of these city blocks was developed along with detailed façade studies which formed the ground for technical model-making at the end of the semester. These unit site models, façade models and research documents led to a 5th year brief to design a Museum of the Applied Arts whilst 6th years developed briefs for a range of sites across Digbeth. 1:10 scale Bar

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S I T E | Precedents & Construction Process

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Aria, 168 Upper Street, Islington, N1 1US | Groupwork + Amin Taha 1:1 casting process using robotically routed polystyrene formwork sections.

C E S S | Plaster Casting Finishes

Section of layered facade model with decorative components in place. Elements of the facade are removable which attempt to demonstrate the ordering of the facade through its layered approach to its build up.

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Existing View of Site

1:50 Model Photograph of Site Entrance in Context

Site Framed by Viaduct on Hack Street

Breaking the relationship between activity and street already present along Allcock Street, the hedges, high garden wall and side entrance suggests a familiar domesticity.

I found that urban scenery was often framed either the arches of the viaducts or by large shutter door openings. This analysis reinforces the framed world created during room model tests and the site

location. The museum entrance is framed by a Viaduct on Hack Street, this is significant because this the most likely route to the museum for pedestrians traveling from the centre and the Custard Factory. Through the arch the first brick tower and it’s entrance located to the side is clearly visible. The viewer also glimpses two Isometric Drawing of Structural Elements of the three brick towers set back from the street.

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A UB 356 x 171 x 51 B UB 254 x 146 x 37 C UB 254 x 102 x 25 D UB 457 x 191 x 89 E UC 203 x 203 x 60 F SHS 80 x 80 x 3.0 Timber - Joists, Rafters and Wall Plate Load Bearing Masonry Wall Reinforced Concrete Lintel Cross Laminated Timber Sheet

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1:100 Section Through the Central Viewing Tower.

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Fig 27a.

Proposed Lower Trinity Street Cross Section. Scale 1:100. Authors Own Illustration.

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Proposed Lower Trinity Daytime Street Scene Authors Own Illustration.

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Proposed Longitudinal Site Section Scale 1:200. Fig 34a. Proposed Longitudinal Site Section Scale 1:200. Authors Own Illustration. Authors Own Illustration.

Myles Sharples

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Tutors: Ian Shepherd Anthony Clerici Amanda Jones

This professional practice course can be commenced following 24 months’ relevant practice experience and includes personal reflection, a case study, practice and professional examination and an oral exam.

Invited Speakers: Michael Dunn Michael Hardiman John Jacobs Walter Menteth Robin Nicholson Bob Pritchard Matt Lucas Sarah Parker David Simpson Chris Johnston Rachel Hobbis Tom Taylor Hans Haenlein Anthony Lavers Kevin Singh

The course duration is two years, however, it can be completed within 10 months. Enrolment takes place in the Autumn and Spring of each year.

PG Dip Architectural Practice

PG Dip Architectural Practice RIBA Part III

The course that prepares students for the exams is delivered through a number of two-day modules at the School, and is disseminated by a range of specialist speakers who are experts in their field. The modules are spread over several months and lead to the oral exam which can be taken in December or June This fully accredited course covers the criteria set down by the Architects Registration Board (ARB) and adopted by the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA), giving exemption from the RIBA Part III examination. On completion, successful candidates can register with the ARB entitling them to use the title ‘Architect’. They can also apply for chartered membership of RIBA.

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PG Dip Architectural Practice

The course aims to provide education in architectural practice that enhances skills, knowledge and understanding that are not only for the purposes of professional qualification, but that can be taken forward in to practice to form the basis of life-long learning and professional development.

To achieve this, the course provides students with:

• • • • •

Knowledge and support for professional experience to enable students to satisfactorilycomplete the final examination and join the ARB. Ability to act in a professional manner and in accordance with the codes and standards of the profession. Critical understanding of the requirements of the legal framework for practice, practice management and construction procurement. Ability to identify good practice and excellence and adopt it in their professional life. Ability to identify their future learning needs and the opportunities of specialisation and diversification in their careers.

The Course Director will provide guidance and support throughout the course.

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Professional Examiners

Beyond Graduation

Madeleine Dring - D5 Architects LLP Helen Rea - Glazzard Architects Ltd John Norfolk - Associated Architects Daniel Mulligan - Glen Howells Architects Amanda Harmer - Harmer Fitz Architects Robert Hopkins – AHR Manchester Amanda Jones - Troyka Associates Ltd Bob Ghosh - K4 Architects Paul Hewes - IBI Group Simon Jesson – Glancy Nicholls Architects Martha McSweeney – McSweeney Architecture Sandy Greenhill - Vivid Architects Ltd Satwinder Samra - University of Sheffield Natalia Maximova – Sheppard Robson Daniel Mulligan – Glenn Howells Architects

Our Beyond Graduation programme provides support for those either working in practice or looking for work including those seeking to develop a career outside of architecture. The programme runs at both Post-Part I and Post-Part II levels as a non-credit based delivery to help support students through their early career choices.

External Examiner Kathy Gal – London South Bank University

As part of the Beyond Graduation programme, the School provides a Professional Studies Advisor (PSA) to guide students through the process as well as careers support in addition to validating practical experience through the PEDR’s. Students will also continue to be able to access to library facilities and IT resources. The School has a wide network of contacts to help support students into work. Ian Shepherd Course Director Contact: ian.shepherd@bcu.ac.uk (Parts II & III) ant.clerici@bcu.ac.uk (Part I) 161


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The postgraduate courses in Conservation of the Historic Environment, recruited well this academic year – with 15 new applicants in Year 1 of the two-year, part-time degree. The course is aimed at mid-career professionals or contractors with a delivery format of Friday and Saturday teaching, so most of the students are in full-time employment. This leads to a fascinating cross section of skills and professional knowledge. The course fits in well with the expanded Birmingham School of Architecture and Design, with courses in historic landscapes and historic interiors, as well as a strong emphasis on conservation philosophy and understanding the significance of exisiting buildings and their sustainable futures. The course continues to offer Continuing Professional Development (CPD) for architects, surveyors, engineers or home owners. One of the important aspects of the courses is the number of specialist lecturers used to deliver the workshops, all experts in their fields and some at the forefront of new research. Site visits and tours were led by conservation architects and conservation officers and demonstrated conservation in practice on the ground. Another is the practical nature of the course, with students getting hands-on experience and understanding of traditional building materials. The knowledge of lime as a mortar, plaster, render or limewash is the cornerstone of working with pre-1919 buildings and structures, and all students have a go at mixing mortars, as well as plastering onto lath, and repointing stonework at Llanymynech Limeworks in North Shropshire. There were several highlights to the practical workshops this year, including hands-on chain and nail making at the Black Country Living Museum for the metals course. The partnership with the Canal and River Trust led to two fascinating days at the Dudley Canal and Tunnel Trust - with students legging the

MA Conservation of The Historic Environment

MA Conservation of the Historic Environment

narrow boat through the tunnel during their course on the heritage of canals. Another real privilege was the enormous generosity of the owners of Pitchford Hall in Shropshire, one of the most remakable buildings in Britain, that has just been bought back by the former family after 25 years of neglect. The owners allowed the students to explore the attics of the mansion for their timber framing course, and to visit the 17th-century tree house. A second visit was made for the Building Recording course – with students trying to understand the chronology of construction of this extraordinary building. The decay and remediation of building stones is also studied with demonstrations from masons to understand both material defects and the palette of repair techniques. Likewise with ceramic building materials – tiles are studied at Jackfield Tile Museum in the Ironbridge Gorge and the students worked with a conservation bricklayer to understand terracotta and brick. Other topics include the conservation of 20thcentury buildings, historic interiors and historic parks and gardens – all expanding the students’ knowledge and understanding of different aspects of the historic environment. Understanding and improving the financial and environmental sustainability of historic buildings is another important part of the course, and students have been working with Building Preservation Trusts to consider options appraisals for both redundant places of worship and secular buildings. Katriona Byrne Course Director MA Conservation of The Historic Environment Tutors: Harriet Devlin Katriona Byrne 163


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Interior Architecture and Design

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Tiffany Chan

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Tutors: Glenda Strong Tony Salmon Kirsty Parsons Kayla Rees Denise Bowen Harriet Lazzeri Maria Martinez Sanchez Jo Coldicott Tony Kerby Kathryn Jones Alexandra King Ashley Wilson Paulina Milde-Jachowska Julie Widdowson Laura Sherratt Kevin Singh

BA (Hons) Interior Architecture & Design

BA (Hons) Interior Architecture and Design

As another year comes to a close and we celebrate the work of our students and the course team, there’s no better place to begin than with our award winners: For Creativity and Communication, winner Helena Thornton was inspired by the visual arts and disused midlands Art Deco cinema buildings. Helena expressed outstanding aesthetic style and individuality in her final presentation and was then selected for the HS2 artwork commission soon to be displayed on the new station hoardings. For Concept, winner Emily Hesketh set her sights on an investigation of opposing psychological responses to aviation travel. Milly is recognized for her meticulous approach to concept where she creatively transformed two dimensional diagrams into complex three dimensional outcomes. For Materials and Making, Maximillian Rai-Quantrill demonstrated a highly innovative approach to concept as part of his final major project. The theme ‘breaking cycles’ enabled him to explore three-dimensional modelling using a diverse range of techniques and materials. For Leadership, Amy Walsh is recognised for her systematic organisation and coordination of the Interior Design Graduation Show. Amy’s professionalism resulted in efficient preparation and the involvement from the entire level six cohort in the assembly of an excellent exhibition. Thank you Amy!

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BA (Hons) Interior Architecture & Design Entanglement

Finally, Most Inspiring Student (Professional Development), Tiffany Chan, acknowledged for her professional development, enthusiasm and unwavering passion for Interior Design. Tiffany’s commitment not only to her own work but helping others discover their potential is highly commendable. On behalf of the entire team, I would like to extend warmest congratulations to the whole graduating year. A body of work that began three years ago when they arrived as first year students. A story that starts here: Beginnings: First Steps into Industry

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When students first arrive, they are always keen to get their hands on some real world problems. This year we collaborated with the team from Architects for Health, who as an important stakeholder, were involved in the project briefing process and set out the aspirational tone of the project. Students were asked to propose a meaningful intervention within a space that would explore a creative narrative relating to the

needs of patients, staff and visitors with a view towards creating a place that supports healing and recovery. By incorporating material and media innovation, students used their projects to explore and communicate the values of the project and the organization to its patients, staff, visitors and the community. First year student Hannah Border took home the award for Best Concept. As the year progressed the projects grew in complexity as well as user group; from the design of a single person apartment, a workspace for students, leisure and hospitality space through to experiential retail space. First year students rose to the challenges of the year and with final projects encompassing both their new skill sets and their creativity. The Middle: Becoming a Professional This year our second year students stretched their conceptual muscles with a new brief focusing on design processes, while enjoying the specificity of a winery with an additional layer of their own choosing. They then went on to work collaboratively with MA students from the Royal Birmingham Conservatoire in the set design of


Entanglement by The Infinite Opera. Student led teams collaborated with the composer, musicians and singers to design pneumatic structures for the third act of the opera. Entanglement was part of the Royal Birmingham Conservatoire’s opening ceremony and was showcased at the Tête Opera Festival in London in August 2018. They also collaborated with our Landscape Architecture students to produce a smellscape based on the Birmingham Christmas markets. We like to challenge the idea that interior design is all about what we see, in that the most interesting interiors will engage all of our senses, even taste.

Dhabi and Dubai. There were lots of positive outcomes including some students returning to these firms for summer jobs. A semester long Erasmus exchange programme is also offered in second year and some of our students were selected to study abroad in various European architecture and design schools in cities including Rome (Italy), Madrid and Alicante (Spain). Other students from our Erasmus partner institutions joined us from Roubaix (France), Kouvola (Finland) and Birzeit (Palestine). And Finally: The Exhibition

This year’s international study trip was to Portugal. We went to Porto, where we had the opportunity to meet Alvaro Siza and see Lisbon. We visited many cutting edge contemporary architectural icons such as Casa da Musica, the Expo Pavilions and the Swimming Pools in Leça da Palmeira. Continuing our strong links with industry, Green Room Design joined us to launch a project incorporating designing for big brands. Students further developed their own online professional portfolios and went on a two-week work placement. This is a most valuable and grounding experience to see the industry for real and the highlight of second year. By way of a debriefing they presented their work placement reflections to our first year students with enthusiasm and all round positivity. While most work placements took place in Birmingham and London some students went as far afield as Abu

The year culminated in a very successful degree show, where we took a moment to celebrate the journey that our final year students have undertaken with some inventive, unique, and commercially savvy projects on show. The response has impressed all of our visitors, and we hope that their time with us will now take them to the very heights of their career ambitions. This year saw the pilot of a new opportunity open to all final year students on the course in the form of a study trip where five students had the chance to collaborate with final year pupils from Hong Kong over an eightday trip. This provided students a fantastic chance to experience and understand the industry within a different culture. Glenda Strong Course Director, BA [Hons] Interior Architecture and Design

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BA (Hons) Interior Architecture and Design Year 2

CONCEPTUAL SKETCHES

Simiarly to the automative drawing, I did some conseptual sketches to support my idea. Painting also took part in developing

CONCEPT

the concept as the action of pouring wine into a glass best describes my idea.

Whenever I can’t find an inspiration, I paint. Painting is the main source of inspiration in all my designs. Same goes for this one, but this time, it was different. The vrush did it’’s thing and everything came so naturally. I was inspired by the way wine flows into a glass so I painted it. The following thing was a paper concept model which explains my idea even better. Then, in my head, the space was filled with this wine-like fabrix ‘flowing’ in the rooms.

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Letting go of everything that’s in your head and allowing the pen to play with the white paper in front of you is a beautiful thing. Inspiring, too! This is another inspiration which later on I used for creating the main parts of my project. Go on and you will see..

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BA (Hons) Interior Architecture and Design Year 3

Maximillian Rai-Quantrill

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Qianqian Zhang

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Emily Cowgill

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Yakuta Alibhai

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Tutors: Delia Skinner Dr Jieling Xiao Rui Yang David Sharpe Tamadher AlFahal Jason Taylor

MA Interior Architecture & Design

MA Interior Architecture and Design

Diversity and distinctiveness make for a richer world – “The art of thinking differently together”. Malcolm Forbes This academic year has seen the transformation of this postgraduate course. As one of the world’s leading authorities on entrepreneurship and organisational change, Malcolm Forbes’ work has inspired us to take a fresh look at all of the positive impact that ‘designing together’ actions can have on designers and how these respectful encounters, can inform the unique directions and cultural identity of each individual and the evolution of their praxis. Acting as a creative catalyst, our Industry Champions, Alumni, and Academic Mentors have generously and enthusiastically helped the postgraduate students and staff team to hone a new future focused course to be even more responsive and relevant. As stakeholders, this collaborative team have been keen to establish a much more flexible delivery that can be tailored to suit the needs of all of our students. By placing ‘choice’ at the heart of this student-centred curriculum, each module can be tailored to meet the study and creative aspirations of each postgraduate. A key aspect of the transformation of the course has been to change the name to embrace a focus on ‘Interior Architecture’. We believe that this new title better reflects the dynamic bridges that we foster both within Birmingham School of Architecture and Design, as well as in the creative workplace between the two intertwined service sectors of spatial design and architecture. 185


MA Interior Architecture & Design

This year we have seen our postgraduate students develop holistic career plans whilst simultaneously refining their professional praxis. By asking “what does being an interior architect mean to me?”, “what contribution do I want make in the world?” and “with whom do I want to work?” our students have been able to better define their ambitions. Discourse and debate about ‘legacy’ and ‘joy’ as essential features in the creative process has helped our students to explore the significance of design values and prompted these international designers to refine unique cultural identities as interior architects.

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The course requires students to engage in the formation of persuasive and graphically ingenious self-directed ‘Signature Projects’ that capture and convey their innovative design processes, unique proposals and astute insights that academically, professionally and creatively test their particular Design Hypothesis. The production of a distinctive and creative ‘Practice Portfolio’ has allowed them to showcase their unique design talents and the influence that this has had on others, shifting the perceived boundaries of the interior design profession towards new horizons.

Students on MA Interior Architecture and Design have reported excellent student satisfaction results for the fifth year in a row and have achieved an outstanding 100% employment rate. After a period of only six months, our alumni have let us know that they have secured industry roles as interior designers, business managers and educators. These alumni regularly tell us that they have benefited from the programme, and specifically the experience of the support of design practitioners, architects and designers across a range of interior design fields. When working at Masters level, it is common for our students and alumni to progress onto a higher academic level. This year, we are proud to announce that another student has chosen to pursue a PhD. This student is currently being mentored by three other alumni who are currently engaged in their own doctorial research. Delia Skinner Course Director, MA Interior Architecture and Design


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Live Project – Jelley’s Vodka - artisan distillers of a Premium British Vodka. The Interior Architecture and Design masters degree sits within Birmingham School of Architecture and Design. This vibrant community is made up of staff, students, designers, researchers and industry partners. Strong creative bridges between postgraduate courses enables our students to tailor their learning to suit their unique professional ambitions. We encourage and support our postgraduate students to work collaboratively with other creative people both inside and outside the University. By doing this they cement rich cultural, creative and professional design networks. The Rationale for the Design Systems Module: Engagement with industry and industry-based scenarios is a key aspect of this module. This industry orientated assignment focused the attention of our students on the retail sector and ‘experience economy’. This short five week assignment required them to conduct research about how niche ‘pop-up’ retail interventions are being situated within global, regional, national and international contexts. Throughout the module students needed to prove their appreciation of international commercial cultures by justifying the potential connections that this research could have, with new market opportunities and experiential design innovations. 188

Establishing the Brief: Students were asked to create an imaginative design scheme for a particular hospitality market sector. This needed to be a commercial viable offer - a branded retail orientated business opportunity, that would launch a new brandscape for: “Jelley’s Vodka”. In this project, our students refined the brand identity to reflect the philosophy and culture associated with the local entrepreneur – Ben Jelley. Ben is an Interior Design Alumni and appreciates the creative and technical nature of the design task. He briefed the students about how they might consider his business values and the special characteristics associated with Jelley’s Vodka brand, and how these could be represented in the interior design concepts that they developed. Rewarding Excellence: At the end of the assignment, Ben participated as an expert judge at our studio crit. This was a very special day and each creative team professionally pitched their conceptual design to Ben.By presenting their creative adventures as a movie, each team were able to tell their design story and professionally present the rationale for their interior proposal. Ben supported the students by creating his own pop-up Vodka bar at the 2017-2018 Birmingham School of Architecture and Design Graduation Show.


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Yifan Li - NHS Night Club


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Cheng Xiong - Xing Shi Ceramic Exhibition


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Shuhan Li - ‘Zhang YeYe’ Noodle Bar


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Product and Furniture Design

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Alex Ward


Tutors: Jason Nicholson Natalie Cole Wayne Pottinger Malcolm Hastings Nuno Lourinho Richard Underhill David Muston Brian Adams Dean Cain William Wofford Benjamin Banks Chris Emmett

BA (Hons) Product and Furniture Design

BA (Hons) Product Design BA (Hons) Furniture and Lifestyle Products BA (Hons) 3D Designer Maker

Product and Furniture Design has continued to provide students with the core skills and design approaches in order to develop creative, contemporary and innovative products and furniture. Students consider user centred design, social context, ethical and sustainable issues while developing a commercial understanding. With the new Product and Furniture Design degree underway, first years experienced an intensive ‘skills building’ first semester followed by exploration of scales of manufacture and material understanding. From watches, speakers and headphones to slip cast vessels, plywood moulded furniture and water bottles, projects have helped students explore a wide range of design opportunities to define areas of specialism. Second year students developed professional practice though collaborative projects with the Birmingham School of Architecture and Design Collaborative Laboratory (Co.LAB) module. Industry links were also developed through a large-scale conceptual development brief with Philips Lighting. During the year, there have also been numerous opportunities for students across year groups to engage with industry partners through study visits to some of our local manufactures. Third years continued to develop their individual design approaches through live briefs including the Royal Society of Arts Student Design competition and a design for retail opportunity which culminated in a major selling exhibition in Birmingham’s Jewellery Quarter. Semester 2 saw students develop large scale ‘signature’ design projects, ranging from high end luxury speakers to a modular sofa systems.

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BA (Hons) Product and Furniture Design

FOLI UM A series of 5 shelves, with 3 concealed pockets, rotating around an axis. A tactile form that is composed by the user.

Alex_Ward

Students have also participated in shows and events, including New Designers exhibition in London and The Worshipful Company of Furniture Makers Student Design Tour and Design Awards and of course, the fabulous graduate shows at the Parkside building. This has provided valuable opportunities to showcase their work at a local and national level. At the close of the academic year, we learned that both Product Design and Furniture and Lifestyle Products had achieved a 100% NSS satisfaction score, which is testament to the hard work and effort of all our staff and students across the course. We are all truly excited about what the future holds for Product and Furniture Design as we build on this and previous successes within the Birmingham School of Architecture and Design.

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Drawing to an end of another year for product, furniture, maker courses, it’s time to reflect on the amazing achievements and successes of our students. Thanks to everyone that has worked with us and made 17/18 an amazingly successful academic year.

Alice Evans


Nina Naversnik

Nina Naversnik

RSA Student Design Awards 2018

After feeling a bit lost and struggling with university it has definitely reassured me that I am on the right course and I am doing something that I have a passion for. It has made me much more open minded and excited about trying new things/thinking about a future career. I feel that I have so much more to learn. I hope that I am able to get the chance to go on more visits to factories and have the opportunity to speak to professionals as I did on the trip.” Kelly Hartland – Second year student

Hugo Parnell Hopkinson received a commendation for his entry ‘The Legacy Brush’. The concept addresses the emotional connection with users have with utilitarian objects, fulfilling requirements for functionality, materials and inclusivity. The design’s beech wood shaft used pays homage back to traditional hard woods used in cleaning brooms and brushes. This ‘nostalgic’ re-work of a ubiquitous product, incorporates a contemporary outer shell and ergonomically designed handle that reduces stress for arthritis users. The brush sits out from the wall as a beautifully designed functional display product. The Royal Society of Arts Student Design Awards ‘Hygienic Home’ brief asked for concepts to make cleaning easier for the older generation and an ageing population. Hugo received the commendation following an interview with industry experts at the RSA, London. Worshipful Company of Furniture Makers Two students were selected by the course team to take part in the yearly Worshipful Company of Furniture Makers Tour. The four-day tour takes students around North West furniture businesses to see how the industry operates. “I just wanted to say that I feel honoured to be chosen to have gone on such a valuable experience. I enjoyed every minute of the few days and learnt a huge amount.

Minima During February and early March, Product and Furniture Design at Birmingham City University exhibited and sold their work at Minima; one of Birmingham’s key contemporary design showrooms. Fifteen selected students displayed their work at a preview event with the work continuing on display and for sale. Objects in the collection include table-top products, desk and pendent lighting designs, furniture and homewares. “As aspiring designers, our students aim to create objects which can be touched, lived with and worn. Being able to show their work within a collective of designers is a powerful experience; it’s a boost of energy to any designer to be celebrated and seen.” Richard Underhill, Level 6 Coordinator and Lecturer. Madrid Study Trip Students studying on the Product and Furniture Design course spent five days in Madrid. Based centrally at the Hotel Mediodia, close to Madrid’s art museum district,

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students were able to immerse themselves in Madrid’s vast creative, artistic, and cultural district. Days were used for inspiration for future course work. Evenings were spent enjoying the Spanish cuisine, culture and atmosphere that Spain’s capital had to offer.

SwimLight By Scott Wilks

SwimLight is a revolutionary training aid that uses retrofit technology to create an immersive, interactive swimming experience.

Study trip highlights included visits to the inspiring Andy Warhol Exhibition at the Caixa Forum. Walks along the Madrid Rio Park to the Matadero, Madrid’s former slaughterhouse which has now been converted to an arts centre. Viewing a plethora of artwork at the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reine Sofia. Students also loved exploring Retiro Park, taking in the crisp winter air whilst boating on the lake or cycling in groups around park. The trip was organised by Richard Underhill (Lecturer and Level 6 Leader) and open to all students across the course.

Philips Lighting

Scott Wilks

This years’ Industry Collaboration element gave Year 2 students the opportunity to gain experience of working with and designing for Philips Lighting. Philips Lightings cutting edge technological developments and products, such as motion sensors, luminous textiles and LED carpet tiles, amongst other technological lighting advancements, were explored by the students to develop human centred applications for the company.

ALEXANDER WARD

Alex Ward

The output from the Level 5 cohort was broad and encompassed the made object in the form of task lighting and personal lighting, through to more conceptual future gazing responses. Throughout the project key members of staff from Philips Lighting provided students with feedback as well as technical guidance. The project also provided students with the experience of pitching and presenting their ideas to an established global company, which enriched the overall project from a student perspective.

1. Insert

3. Push

I.P.P

3

Small things are important...

Kyriakos Sergi

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2. Pull


ERGO

ERGO

Toothbrush

Peeler

ERGO toothbrush deconstructs the stigma usually created by products tailored for arthritic people through sculptural, intelligent design.

ERGO peeler is designed for indiciduals who suffer from arthritis and aims to reduce any stigma linked to the condition through its design.

Sculptural Comfortable Inviting Smooth Fluid Tactile Ergonomic Easy Inclusive Functional

Scott Wilks

Scott Wilks

Students meet Dieter!

New Designers

Dieter Rams, is one of the most recognised and influential designers of the 20th Century, and our BA (Hons) Product and Furniture Design students recently had the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to meet the German industrial designer.

Once again, a number of students were selected to exhibit at New Designers, one of the country’s major graduate design exhibitions, which brings together more than 3,000 of the brightest and most radical new creative minds. The exhibition sees students from the UK’s leading design courses unveiling never-beforeseen work to thousands of industry professionals and design consumers. This year’s line-up featured a range of design responses, including lighting, furniture, consumer products and bespoke designer maker objects. A highlight from this year’s show was the work of George Hopkins, which featured on the cover of the New Designers 2018 Show Guide.

Rams was in the UK for the opening of The Strong Collection at Vitsoe, in Leamington Spa. Collector Tom Strong spent 50 years assembling and using this astonishing 250-piece collection of Braun appliances, all designed by Dieter Rams. He has gifted this incredible group of objects to Vitsoe, ensuring the collection is permanently open to the public for the benefit of future generations of design students. A number of our first-year students were invited to the exhibition opening following a study visit and lecture at Vitsoe earlier in the year. As well as having the opportunity to be amongst the first to see the exhibition the lucky students got to meet Dieter Rams, who gave them some poignant tips for the future and wished them luck in their further studies.

Jason Nicholson Course Director BA (Hons) Product and Furniture Design

“It really was an amazing opportunity for the students to meet one of the most influential industrial designers in the world; an experience I’m sure they will never forget!” Natalie Cole, Lecturer. Future BA (hons) Product and Furniture design students will now have the chance to access this stunning set of objects for their studies, allowing them to understand the objects in detail and further develop their industrial design knowledge.

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George Hopkins

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Glen Powis

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Lauren Owen


Lydia Phillips

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Hugo Parnell-Hopkinson

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Mona Lee


Scott Ridgway

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Tutors: Nuno Lourinho Wayne Pottinger Graham Powell Dean Cain Evy Dutheil

MA Product Design

MA Product Design

Looking back, the 2017 – 2018 academic year allowed us to continue to engage with external partners and provide ‘real’ collaborations with our MA Product and Furniture Design students. In particular, it is worth highlighting the Co.LAB project developed with Philips Lighting which focused on urban furniture. The projects developed this year continue to explore how both theory can inform the real-world practice and also how studying people and experiences can lead to new knowledge. By focusing on student professional development, the course has encouraged and enabled ‘us’ to take part in the debate and analyses to create new concept proposals. This year, our students have pursed design proposals that explored self-assembled furniture, augmented reality or innovative user interactions amongst others. As in previous years our students have experimented with a diverse design culture that embraced different design perspectives and identities. We not only celebrate the diversity of our students but also encourage sharing personal design practices. Students have embraced Birmingham City University values and enhanced our School’s unique geographical culture. In short, this means contributing to the design field on an international level wile embracing both heritage and cutting-edge local expertise. There’s no doubt that our students’ achievements have made us proud and we are looking forward to build on this for the future. Nuno Lourinho Course Director MA Product Design

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MA Product Design

Thom Hughes

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Yun Cai

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Camille Cosson


Lei Gu

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Design and Visualisation

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Design and visualisation plays a key role in many of today’s businesses and organisations. From designing complex animations, brand identity, 3D products, virtual interiors, landscape, architectural visualisation and new conceptual designs, employers look for graduates with creativity and knowledge-based software skills. This year students on the course were able to choose an individualised programme of study chosen from a variety of cross disciplinary MA modules and learnt how to apply design visualisation techniques and strategies to areas such as product design, interior design, graphic design and various other specialisations. Students on this course further develop their skills and competencies as 3D design visualisers with an understanding of the design process. They are taught how to make important and critical decisions, how to devise visualisation strategies, design methods and how to use these skills across a range of disciplines. On completion of the course, students are able to evaluate, choose and apply relevant theories, concepts and techniques to the solution of design and the knowledge that underpins it. This knowledge and transferable skills helps our graduates succeed in a competitive industry. Every year students have the chance to engage with live projects that offer unique opportunities to experience working on real projects for real clients within the curriculum. Students learn how to place equal emphasis on the process of development, rather than just focussing on the final outcome. Importance is also placed not only on design quality, but also on engagement practice, creative participation and how the design is developed. The course provides the framework for reviewing,

MA Design and Visualisation

MA Design and Visualisation

reflecting, analysing and critiquing existing designs and techniques that equips our graduates with a solid understanding of design visualisation, as well as how to apply different visualisation techniques in specific situations. Students study in our exciting city centre campus Parkside Building, a five-floor building with space studios and social space for students and staff to engage in creative ideas. The course that our students study on has the following characteristics:-

• • • • •

Contemporary, relevant and cutting-edge curriculum exposing students to a variety of new technologies. Engaging study sessions that ensure students learn a range of vital skills needed for various design positions. Excellent links with industry and employers. Our graduates move on to successful careers where they apply their knowledge and ‘Toolbox’ of skills. Our campus is based in the centre of a vibrant cosmopolitan city.

Dr. Panch Suntharalingam Course Director, MA Design and Visualisation

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MA Design and Visualisation

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Competition

Chia-His Wei (Tanya)

Chia-His Wei (Tanya)

Jingjing Xu (Sky)

Jingjing Xu (Sky)

Jingjing Xu (Sky)

Jingjing Xu (Sky)


Chao Zhou

Chao Zhou

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Design Visualisation

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Chao Zhou

Chao Zhou

Chao Zhou

Chao Zhou


Binh Le Thanh

Binh Le Thanh

Yuxin Guo

Pooja Tulsidas

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Co.LAB

Chia-His Wei (Tanya)

Chia-His Wei (Tanya)

Hangyu Huang (Hang)

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Hangyu Huang (Hang)


Jie Bai

Siqi Wang (Vivien)

Jie Bai

Siqi Wang (Vivien)

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Design Realisation

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Hangyu Huang

Hangyu Huang

Jie Bai

Jie Bai

Qiqian Chen

Qiqian Chen


Siqi Wang

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Major Projects

Bingjie Hu

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Jie Bai


Bingjie Hu

Jie Bai

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Chia-His Wei

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Siqi Wang


Chia-His Wei

Siqi Wang

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Design Management

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Tutors: Caroline Norman Nick Irvin

MA Design Management

MA Design Management

Welcome to the Master’s in Design Management which has now been established for over 20 years. The course responds to the design industry’s concern that many designers don’t have sufficient understanding of business and marketing. Our aim is to accelerate designer’s careers by providing the knowledge and skills to work and communicate effectively across design and business disciplines. MA Design Management has a distinctive professional focus and embraces business management, marketing, design strategy, entrepreneurship, innovation, sustainability, design leadership and design practice including project management, intellectual property law and finance. Strong emphasis is placed on the development of evidence based decision making, high level leadership and communication skills. You can study full-time, part-time or via work-based learning which allows you to study whilst continuing in full-time practice. UK and EU based students can commit to the full Master’s course or start with the Postgraduate Certificate and continue on to the Postgraduate Diploma and Master’s if they wish. The course offers four pathways: Professional Practice, Entrepreneurship and Innovation, Sustainable Design Policy and Service Design. The pathways reflect the changing nature of the global design context and create opportunities to specialise. Students can focus within their chosen area of specialisation and work-based learning students relate their study directly to the workplace. 243


MA Design Management

MA Design Management in Hong Kong Design Management is a growing discipline and in January 2017 we opened the Master’s in Design Management at Hong Kong Design Institute in partnership with the School of Higher and Professional Education (SHAPE). We look forward to seeing our first cohort graduate in 2019.

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Our students One of the course’s greatest strengths is the quality of the student cohort. We attract students from all design disciplines from all over the world, many of our students are already established in design practice. Full-time, part-time and work-based learning students study together which makes for a rich student cohort and provides current design experiences and challenges for students to share.

MA Design Management alumnus awarded President’s Trophy Ambika Thandavan is a designer with an inherent passion towards design innovation in the realm of luxury jewellery and precious objects. She completed her Master’s in Design Management from Birmingham City University in 2011 and currently heads the Design Studio of Ganjam, a renowned fine jewellery brand in Bangalore, India. Her design for a cuff titled ‘Duet’ has been awarded the President’s Trophy in the International Division of the IPDC 2018-19, an annual pearl jewellery design contest conducted by the Cultured Pearl Association of America. The elegant creation was inspired by Duality and conceptualised in 18kt rose gold with pink and cream-coloured Akoya pearls, pink tourmalines and diamonds.

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Kaifa Huang (Kelvin), Senior Graphic Designer, Sales and Marketing Department, Mumbai Region, Country Garden Group Kaifa graduated in 2016 and is now working as a Senior Graphic Designer for a global real estate company. His key role as a graphic designer comprises internal collaboration with the in-house marketing and creative design team as well as the project lead to deliver desirable and marketable design solutions which strategically arouse a visual resonance on the target audiences. Other than conceptualisation, delivery of creative strategies and guaranteeing consistent communications, he also has to make sure the design messages are understood across the teams, amongst the outsourced vendors, and all the design deliverables are on-time and within-budget. “Quite often, you have to link what you do as a design practitioner together with what you’ve learned and advised to do from the MA Design Management. It really gets you to think how better you can keep the balance between the “business” side and the “design” side of what you are aimed to achieve. It is nothing but a mindset that helps you leverage the profit, obtain greater influences, and keep going sustainably as/for a business whilst using design as a tool and/or strategy to make this mindset a key enabler. I also think that the more experienced you go, the better you know how to use this mindset as a habit to lead, manage, influence, and reflect.”

Design Management alumnus shows at Paris Fashion Week MA Design Management alumna Grasheli Andhini recently had her work featured on the catwalk as part of Paris Fashion Week. Graheli’s ‘Love Affair’collection was included as part of The Fashion Division show held in the Haussmannian mansion area of the Hôtel Le Marois. Reflecting on her time on Design Management, Grasheli explained how the course made a significant impact on her career: “Coming from a creative discipline with little knowledge of the business side, Design Management was the perfect course. It gives creative people an insight into industry, allowing them to learn about processes and procedures. This course facilitates the exploration of business in creative industries.” It doesn’t stop here though for Grasheli: “I’m planning to expand the business, reaching bigger markets and keep on offering new innovative designs periodically.”

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Korrakot Kulkraisri, Brand Strategies and Designer, Oglivy & Mather / Brand Union “My current role requires strategic planning skills, research and the development of product branding opportunities, and management skills focusing both on start up business and re-branding. I handle design visual identity and create branding concepts for clients. “One of the most important highlights from my time on the course would definitely be my lecturers and friends. I don’t think I could get better support from Caroline and Nick – they are always there whenever we struggle with the work. The variety of students coming from different parts of the world and backgrounds broadened the scope of the course and opened up the real meaning of design. “The live project to re-brand GKN was something new and challenging. This group project opened up opportunities for us to work on real situation and solves complex issues through design thinking and design theory. It is one of the reasons I decided to start my career as a brand strategist.” Jaini Shah, Furniture Designer, Kenya After completing a BA in Product Design, Jaini joined the Master’s in Design Management and graduated in 2018. Jaini is now working back in her home country, Kenya, designing a new range of furniture for Shah Timber Ltd where she is introducing new practices based on what she learned during her postgraduate studies. During the course Jaini’s undertook a placement at HF Contracts where she gained a deep insight into how furniture companies are run. “I learned a lot during my Master’s degree and it was the best decision I made, the tutors were very helpful and supportive and that is what has got me here.” Looking to the future, Jaini plans to build her experience over the next two years before setting up her own manufacturing business.

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Read our previous Annual Reviews and Grad Show gazettes on the Birmingham School of Architecture and Design Issuu page: www.issuu.com/bsoad Visit our course pages on the Birmingham City University website: www.bcu.ac.uk/architecture-and-design

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Profile for Birmingham School of Architecture and Design

Concerns 2017-18, Birmingham School of Architecture and Design Annual Review  

Annual publication celebrating the work of undergraduate and postgraduate students from across the School.

Concerns 2017-18, Birmingham School of Architecture and Design Annual Review  

Annual publication celebrating the work of undergraduate and postgraduate students from across the School.

Profile for bsoad