Issuu on Google+

Greetings Professor Keahi Renaud, My name is “Dr. XX” PhEd, and I’m writing to you as the Chaminade Hawaiian Cultural Professional and I request your counsel and assistance with cultural wisdom: Background: For the last year, I leased office space/property in Ewa from Bishop Estates in order to run a small merchandising business. In November of last year, without any apparent justification, Bishop Estate refused to renew the lease which subsequently required that I vacate the property by December 31. Unfortunately, I was traveling and could not complete this unexpected move. Instead, I offered an opportunity of rehabilitation to an ex-convict by hiring him to pack-up the premises. Upon my return in late December, I realized that the employee had abandoned the job site having made little progress. I made every reasonable attempt to still meet the deadline. However, acquiring the rental trucks, orchestrating storage space, and lack of adequate time during the “holiday season” had posed a made for unavoidable barriers along with a brief personal illness. Nonetheless, the property was completely vacated by January 4th. Since January 1st was Saturday (holiday) and 2nd was Sunday (non business day), I was only ONE business day beyond the deadline (Jan 3rd to 4th). Much to my dismay, the Estate issued me a $20,000 bill (per contractual small print of $5,000/day penalty) immediately due and payable. Request: As you and I are educated people, I wanted to provide you a small retainer

fee to conduct research in support of my case refuting this exorbitant penalty fee. Though born and raised on the mainland, I have lived in Hawai’i for over 20 yrs. This Hawaiian Estate should surely realize that even the State Constitution provides protection for “traditional and customary practices.” As a cultural expert you are, I wanted you to provide support for the obvious concept that “Hawaiian Time” is one of those cultural understandings which justifies the ever so slight but unintended delay in vacating the property. Afterall, the Aloha-spirit and warm demeanor characterizes that which makes Hawaii‘i the most special place in the world and why we both call it our ‘aina, our home. Dr. XX, PhEd


Chaminade University, Honolulu Adjunct Professor, Department of Humanitiies Hawaiian Language, Leadership, Religion, and Oral History

THE RITE TIME FOR H AWAIIAN TIME? I believe that in the content of „Hawaiian Time,‟ it was appropriate in this situation. You were not present to receive the final vacancy notice for the space you requesting to obtain further more. I don‟t agree with the fact they had fined you a huge amount of money when you were not able to be there to receive finals notice on the sp ace. They should have given an extended time for you because of your absence from the island. As you arrive back and return to the place, they should have given you a fair chance for you to avoid a fine payment from the state. It‟s not fair that they leave a notice for you when you are away and sign a specific day for you to evacuate the space when you are not present. It doesn‟t show considerate thought to their costumers who rent spaces from them when they show that kind of action towards someone who requested to use the space for a long while more. I feel that they should have let it be cleared when you were able to get the space vacated. M any people from different cultures sometimes don‟t understand the term „Hawaiian Time‟. Hawaiian Time comes from a local way of saying we will get something done when we are able to fully commit ourselves. However, M a Ka Hana Ka‟ike is what most people depend on when something big needs to get done. You asked for assistance in clearing out the space thinking that when you get back, majority of the work will get done although, it wasn‟t the type improvement you were looking for. In contrast I also see that, M ai kali a pau ka niho shouldn‟t be pushed back further. M ai kali a pau ka niho is a good example in this sense because there was a deadline to meet but couldn‟t be met because of prior engagements. Everything has changed in the way of our local living. M any prefer deadlines and specific dates while others feel that it shouldn‟t have to be like that but rather a time that we feel we can fully put our effort in and provide with our all. Our culture differences on the view of Hawaii have changed drastically. For example, the story you told about Sylvester Stallone running late for an event that you were preparing for and bringing in the Hawaiian culture to a blessing. He was running late and someone had mentioned him being on Hawaiian time and that made you and Kumu Lake realize that all the Hawaiians are here so we can get started. Things shouldn‟t be waited upon when you know that everyone who you were waiting for is present. Culture has changed over the years and through generations. We begin to fall into a sense of a more controlled and demanding stage as to where back then we did what we could in a certain time on our time. Now days, everyone controls certain things and certain situations. Our society is becoming more profound and state directed and making time according to their needs and wants rather than to what we are more comfortable with and can commit too. 32/40 (to be added to FINAL score )

Chaminade University Fall 2010, Dept of Humanities

ralphkeahi.renaud@adjunct.chaminade.edu

(808) 927-1619 (personal) (848) NATIVES {628-4837}

Comment [P1]: Did you mean “context”? Comment [P2]: It is excellent that you make your position known and clearly state it up front.

Comment [P3]: Did you mean “vacate”? Comment [P4]: Did you mean “customer”?

Comment [P5]: Whose definition are you using here? Comment [P6]: I am glad you are seeking to apply those proverbs you have become familiar. I‟m not entirely sure I understand why you are making reference to it here and for what purpose. Comment [P7]:

Comment [P8]: This idea of “feeling” when is the right time can be abused, sloppy, and problematic. Are you really suggesting it?

Comment [P9]: Kumu Lake was offended that Hawaiians were to be blamed for the rudeness and tardiness of Sylvester Stallone. Why were Hawaiians blamed for Mr. Stallone‟s lateness when the Hawaiians were courteous enough to show up ON TIME. It seems you think that blaming Hawaiians for “Hawaiian Time” lateness of foreigners (Prof XX) is A-Okay.


Chaminade University, Honolulu Adjunct Professor, Department of Humanitiies Hawaiian Language, Leadership, Religion, and Oral History

The Rite Time to be the Wrong Hawaiian? Since when has tardiness ever been a “traditional and customary practice” used by Hawaiians? As someone who was born here and raised here for 23 years, I have never met a kupuna or kumu who has taught me that procrastination and laziness is an acceptable behavior. Not only that, but the opposite principle, pono, has been the one instilled in Hawaiians. On my trip to M aui, I read an article in a magaz ine on my return trip back to O„ahu about a winery and in huge print across the article I read “Wine is Aloha” under a picture of a big bottle of wine. My first thought was, “damn, that‟s offensive.” Before that, I saw a story on the local news where an NFL coach stuck the middle finger in a game and the announcer called it “flipping the Hawaiian bird.”<link > How could a word that symbolizes the exchange of life and mana between people be associated with alcohol or a gesture that means the utmost disrespect be associated with Hawaiians? This Dr. “XX” wanted to warrant his own tardiness by using a Hawaiian cultural practitioner to justify his own faultiness by using the Hawaiian culture as an excuse. The story of Kumu Lake about to do the blessing at Planet Hollywood is the story that has completely annihilated the thought of “Hawaiian time” being acceptable in my mind. Hawaiian time is the pono time. After 20 y ears of claiming to live in Hawai„i, this Dr. has built a distorted picture of what the “Aloha spirit” is and who Hawaiians are. This reminded me of the iceberg where the bottom portion of the iceberg slowly melts away as the tip of the iceberg starts to become the bigger part of the iceberg. These faulty associations with Hawaiians begin to spread unless we have the bottom of the iceberg in place to fall back on and disassociate such things. There are „ōlelo no„eau that can dispute this man‟s claims as procrastination being a Hawaiian cultural tradition and they are “Mai kali ā pau ka niho” and “Mai maka‘u ka hana, maka‘u ka moloā”. These very „ōlelo no„eau teach Hawaiians to not put off the work. I remember my brother told me a story of when he worked at a hotel in Waikiki and he and a co-worker of his heard a complaint by a tourist where the tourist had a bad trip and ended blaming all of her mishaps on the local people saying that she had the worst trip and that all Hawaiians were so lazy. My brother‟s co-worker confronted the woman and said, “As I (am) Hawaiian I find that statement offensive. And on behalf of all Hawaiians, I would like to say that you are no longer welcome back to these islands.” Stories like that and like Kumu Lakes‟ are ones that really stay with me because they are empowering. 39/40 (to be added to FINAL score )

Chaminade University Fall 2010, Dept of Humanities

ralphkeahi.renaud@adjunct.chaminade.edu

Comment [P1]: And so in we perpetuate that which is right and true.. That which is “pono”.. But how.. but first being patient, tolerant, and humble… to a point that it does not allow perpetuation of a wrong or promulgation of a falsity. Then we step in to teach. This is where the “healing” becomes relevant. “Doctor” doesn‟t derive from Latin “docere” meaning “teacher” by accident and neither is the word “patient” homonymous by accident. Comment [P2]: Instilled in “some” Hawaiians. Comment [P3]: „A‟ohe pau ke „ike …. This is a moment of patience. Would it have been any more acceptable to say.. “Awa is Aloha”? Kamehameha himself had a disciplined taste for hard beverage. Comment [P4]: I mean not to debate nor antagonize. Recognize, as you may well already do, that taking “offense” is an action which originates from “within” you, not from “without” you. The fire which rages from being offended is one that burns both ways. Comment [P5]: Now this is plain ignorant. Mahalo for sharing the magnitude of this insensitive expression. Indeed the tip of a fast-melting iceberg. But can you see how we need to call upon the “warrior teacher” rather than the “warrior yeller.” Comment [P6]: Yes… it does in fact teach that. Or at the least, it teaches that if you become toothless, don‟t blame somebody else for not brushing your own teeth in a timely manner. LOL… make sense? Comment [P7]: This friend of your brother speaks strongly and resolutely. But there is room for mistakes on both sides. She wrongly speaks in generality and that will likely be her burden and poor worldview. But this Hawaiian speaks without authority… and that is something we also need to be careful of. “I ka „olelo no ke ola… I ka „olelo no ka make”. Allow me to humbly say that Kumu Lake speaks to “heal” (ola). And though I don‟t fault the “friend”… it isn‟t quite the same… but he may speak from his own mana on his own behalf. We should remain prayerful of the lady who feels so unloved in an island full of aloha. Comment [P8]: This is my path. Let‟s know deeply that when attacking is easier but yet instead we choose to “teach”… we become empowered and transcend the wrong. To do otherwise… we may become trapped and less able to lead Hawaiians from their lazy choice of violence and disempowerment. This doesn‟t mean “war” is avoidable.. it simply emphasizes the intellect as the forst weapon of choice. Violence first destroys from within. The iceberg continues to melt no less. Nānā i ke kumu a he mai‟a, ua pa‟a i ke ko‟o !!

(808) 927-1619 (personal) (848) NATIVES {628-4837}


Chaminade University, Honolulu Adjunct Professor, Department of Humanitiies Hawaiian Language, Leadership, Religion, and Oral History

The Rite Time to be the Wrong Hawaiian ? Getting a bill waved or a second chance from some companies can be very difficult. Especially when the worker or manager is not an is lander makes situations a lot harder to customers. Other ones, on the other hand, can be very kind to the point where they could give you some s lack. When s ituations like this happen, especially when you have to get things done and your plans are in the way with holidays, bus inesses would most likely give you a week of extension. In relation to my knowledge of the Hawaiian culture, when you go to a bus iness for help and you’re kama’aina, you will either get some percentage off of your bill or get the help you asked for. However, we’re talking about the Hawaiian Estate. These people when they do bus iness, they mean business. Once they settle on an agreement, they will stick to it. However, I s till think that the deadline they made was s lightly unfair. First of all, you had just come back from a trip. Secondly, most bus inesses usually don’t count holidays as their bus iness days. It would have been more understanding if they at least extended another two days for you to work because of the two non bus iness days . Another problem I saw in your s ituation is the penalty fee. I don’t have much knowledge of how much Estates give for penalty fees, but I thought the penalty was a little too pricey. $5,000 penalty is definitely high, especially for a daily fee. I believe and feel that the Hawaiian Estate should give you an extens ion of another few days and some percentage off of you bill.

32/40 (to be added to FINAL score)

Comment [P1]: You need to be very careful that that sensing your culture makes you vulnerable or that for those who don’t exercise precautions are not acting in a culturally appropriate way. Comment [P2]: Though this sounds familiar and maybe even common, we need to also recognize that this is somewhat prejudicial and unethical. We need to strive to treat everyone equally special, equally worthy, and equally worthwhile. That is Hawaiian. I would have liked you to think about the “Hawaiian Time” story I shared with the class. I didn’t see it mentioned here in your essay. Comment [P3]: We likely all think alike. Who wants to see a person who was trying to do good with his work and well-intended by hiring a convict. But we should note, (1) When using “high risk” people (ex-convict) - we TRUST but VERIFY. (2) MAI KALI A PAU KA NIHO by not procrastinating… this is more Hawaiian than “Hawaiian Time” (3) Whether it is an Hawaiian organization or not, good business practice is good business practice. Comment [P4]: Even though I would tend to agree with you about wanting to reduce the FINE. I can in no way justify this reduction by forcing some misplaced concept of Hawaiian Time. In essence, he is saying because Hawaiians are always late (which is false)… He should allowed to be late. If we buy this false argument, then we must buy into a true one. He would have a stronger case for killing in Germany… with the Nazi’s… because they were all killing Jews… he should be allowed to do so also.

Chaminade University Fall 2010, Dept of Humanities

ralphkeahi.renaud@adjunct.chaminade.edu

(808) 927-1619 (personal) (848) NATIVES {628-4837}


Chaminade University, Honolulu Adjunct Professor, Department of Humanitiies Hawaiian Language, Leadership, Religion, and Oral History

The Right Time for Hawaiian Time ? This story is much like that of the story told about Kumu Lake and his dedication of the new Planet Hollywood in Waikiki. The story goes that Kumu Lake was going to chant at the opening of the new restaurant. He had arrived and was ready to proceed by one of the famous actors had not arrived. The manager approached Kumu Lake multiple times saying that it should only be a few more minutes. Finally when the actor arrived his excuse was that he was on Hawaiian time. Kumu Lake’s response to this was, “the Hawaiians are already here.” This story describes Hawaiian time as not necessarily meaning late, but the idea of pono, or right time. This could mean arriving early to help out family or friends, arriving late, or just not arriving at all. The Hawaiian time that you are referring to is a cultural stereotype that has developed over the years since Hawaii has become characteriz ed as the laid back, easy going island life. However, this stereotype is due to the Hawaiian culture being a task–oriented society. Instead of the Western idea of working for a certain amount of time, for example 8AM -5PM workdays, the Hawaii society is based on working until the job is finished. The idea of Hawaiian time has become a stereotype of the Hawaiian p eople being lazy. Using these cultural aspects, I feel that the fine is appropriate. You signed the contract and agreed to comply with the following obligations. It was your responsibility as the leasee to abide by the regulations laid out in the contract. Using the concept of Hawaiian time is just culturally stereotyping Hawaii and its people instead of taking responsibility for your actions. The idea of Aloha spirit and love of the land is very true of the people residing on the islands, however, you are trying to abuse the stereotype in order to get out of paying the fine you are legally responsible for. The idea of Hawaiian time is a stereotype that has little to do with the actual culture of Hawaii and its people. As a cultural professor you should understand that, so I respectfully decline supporting your cause to get out of the fine.

39/40 (to be added to FINAL score)

Chaminade University Fall 2010, Dept of Humanities

ralphkeahi.renaud@adjunct.chaminade.edu

(808) 927-1619 (personal) (848) NATIVES {628-4837}

Comment [P1]: Excellent recollection of the facts and the context of this story which became an epiphany in my way of thinking and the source of a cultural problem I had not been aware.

Comment [P2]: FAVOR: Could you email me to tell me where you drew this terminology from. Others used this term and I’m presuming that it comes from Bailey’s class. Comment [P3]: “Lazy” sure.. but also undisciplined, inconsiderate, and “slow.” The real question is why and by whom is it being perpetuated? Comment [P4]: “terms”

Comment [P5]: I did likewise. I was hoping to hear about the logical short-term/long-term consequence of subscribing to this ideology.


Chaminade University, Honolulu Adjunct Professor, Department of Humanitiies Hawaiian Language, Leadership, Religion, and Oral History

The Right Time for Hawaiian Time ? One of the most beautiful aspects of Hawaiian culture is the overwhelming sense of Ohana that is present all throughout the islands. Ever since I moved here 4 years ago, I have felt a sense of safety and security that reminds me of what the mainland must have been like years ago (before everyone got sue happy and became only interested in themselves and money). Out here everyone is your neighbor, and there is resp ect for what is right and a wonderful sense of how to make people feel welcome.

Comment [P1]: Warm and fuzzy but what about the assertion that he should be afforded more time based on the culturally held belief that Hawaiian Time is de facto law of the land?

Small “mom and pop” businesses seem to be the norm out here (well its either mom and pop or totally franchised). It is with this mom and pop business attitude that most stores and organizations are run. It is about quality and I think people really have a sense of the purpose of why they are doing business in general. Of course, no one wants to get screwed out of money that they earned, but overall I think that people seem to really hear others’ stories and help when they can. M y advice would be to talk to the owner of the rental space. If it is a locally owned company, it is very likely that they will empathize with your situation because of the Ohana values that they were raised believing. However, if the owner is from the mainland, you’re screwed. If that is the case, you have to find a legitimate legal loophole to jump through to avoid the overwhelmingly unfair fee associated with this nonsense.

Comment [P2]: Ma and Pa stores are a rare and dying specie of mercantilism due to the ubiquity of Large Stores.

32/40 (to be added to FINAL score)

Comment [P6]: If you read closely, I believe the legal loophole he is trying to invoke is the “Hawaiian Time” defense. The assignment was to address this loophole.

Comment [P3]: Is this an economic term? Comment [P4]: What are you basing this assumption on? It would appear that he is backed up against a law and now he is invoking legal recourse. Comment [P5]: There’s this word again. This is shaky ground here. We need to recognize that not all legal issues are prejudicial. Not all arrangements based in a Western context is haole. This statement you yield and wield here is a double edged sword where all will be cut deep.

Comment [P7]: This is another strong statement. The “unfair fee” was contractually established and agreed upon. Not between an illiterate hillbilly and an attorney. This petitioner seems to have a PhD and is now pleading that it was unavoidable, he was unaware, and not should be held not accountable pursuant to exercising the “Hawaiian Time” clause of his own construction. Comment [P8]: Would Kumu Lake consider nonsense the “fine” or would he consider it nonsense.. “Hawaiian Time”?

Chaminade University Fall 2010, Dept of Humanities

ralphkeahi.renaud@adjunct.chaminade.edu

(808) 927-1619 (personal) (848) NATIVES {628-4837}


Chaminade University, Honolulu Adjunct Professor, Department of Humanitiies Hawaiian Language, Leadership, Religion, and Oral History

The Rite Time to be the Wrong Hawaiian ? The letter from “Dr. XX” PhEd, brings up certain lessons or proverbs we have learned in class. If I were to respond to such a letter, I would tell them to look at the facts and be aware of what the situation is. The first idea that pops up into my mind from reading this letter is the concept of not procrastinating. In class we learned the lesson of not waiting till the last moment to finish things because if you do, then everything will fall apart (Mai kali a pau ka niho). This is what happens to Dr. XX. Yes, there were other things that came up that he had to do and he was probably very busy but he should have thought of what his priorities were. These ties into what our choices are in life. “Your choice in priorities determines when or if you will ever get there (where you want to be/go)”. Also “your choice to sacrifice determines who you will be when you arrive”. If he chose to sacrifice his time and effort, to check in on the progress, than he may have had more workers helping. If he chose to sacrifice money and hire more people to work, than he could have had it done in time because “many hands make light the heavy load” (‘A‘ohe hana nui ke alu ‘ia). He should not have feared the work, but feared the laziness (Huli ka lima i lalo e ola, huli ka lima i luna e make) because if he was not lazy then he could have prevented this situation. Another response that could be used in this situation is the idea of the cultural iceberg. In the last part of this request letter, Dr. XX makes a statement that represents what stereotypes people have of the islands. “As a cultural exp ert, I wanted you to provide support for the obvious concept that “Hawaiian Time” is one of those cultural understanding which justifies the ever so slight by unintended delay in vacating the property”. This statement represents the cultural iceberg in many ways because this person, right now, is thinking at the very top of the iceberg. He says he has lived in Hawai‟i for over 20 years but many people still do not understand what is under the surface of the stereotypes of the cultural and lifestyle here. This is a different topic because there are different definitions of what is considered to be “local”. M any generations, both non-Hawaiians and Hawaiians have lived here but it does not mean that they are all “in tune” to what the actual lifestyle is. They do not know the deeper meanings of certain concepts. This “Hawaiian Time” does not represent what Hawaiians are. “Afterall, the Alohaspirit and warm demeanor characterizes that which makes Hawaii, the most special place in the world and why we both call it our „aina, our home”. Different people have very different views on this because the “Aloha Spirit” can have different meanings to a person just visiting here and to a Kumu who has put their life into actually learning their culture. There are people who look to magaz ines and pictures to get an idea of what they believe the “Aloha Spirit” is to them. The there the people like Kumu Lake who go deeper in finding what the true meaning of being a Hawaiian is. These people are at the bottom of the iceberg because they see what other cannot. In one of the stories we heard in class about Kumu Lake, he reminds us that “the Hawaiians are already here”. The Bishop Estate refused to renew his lease because they knew he was the one that was not on time. He did not come through with what he had to do and this is why he could not renew his lease.

39 /40 (to be added to FINAL score)

Chaminade University Fall 2010, Dept of Humanities

ralphkeahi.renaud@adjunct.chaminade.edu

(808) 927-1619 (personal) (848) NATIVES {628-4837}

Comment [P1]: Yes, excellent reference

Comment [P2]: This Prof had made a number of choices which were not optimal and clearly self-destructive.

Comment [P3]: Wow, Hawaiian, I should have made you do a cumulative review for the class based solely on the deeper ancestral knowledge noted by your essay.. that is the essence of “Nānā i ke kumu” Comment [P4]: OKAY…. why don‟t you speak in class the same way as you write here. This is exactly the concept dealing with “Hawaiian Time.” Comment [P5]: In this particular case, you‟re correct to discern that this person is thinking superficially. He invokes this concept because he was too lazy to face the faxts… “Mai maka„u ka hana, maka„ u ka moloā”

Comment [P6]: Indeed, Kumu Lake changed my whole perspective and to not allow others rudeness to be pinned on some misperceived concept of untimeliness. We should all be held accountable to our deeds and misdeeds… it is our “hana” which makes the legacy of our “mana..” This means we should not blame others or even some derogatory remarks as is seen with “Hawaiian Time.” It would have been nice to have expounded a bit on this, but you had already clearly did an in depth analysis.


Chaminade University, Honolulu Adjunct Professor, Department of Humanitiies Hawaiian Language, Leadership, Religion, and Oral History

The Wrong Reason for the Right Hawaiian Time ? Let me start by saying,” WOW ….” 20,000 dollars for an extra day? Although it is under contract, it is borderline extortion. I don’t know where this man went wrong; perhaps he should have explained the situation better to the leasers. Maybe he should have not trusted the ex-convict with such an important task. Although I agree with the man’s point of view, Aloha spirit and Hawaiian time, I don’t know how that would work in a legal s ituation like this one. If these people are billing him this much as it is , I doubt they will lis ten to any cultural understanding or for that matter, any type of reason. Sounds like a no nonsense-money hungry company. If this letter were sent to me, I would try my best to help him out with suggestions , advice, or just some type of plan. Chances are this man could have a good case for himself if he fought the bill in court. Other than that, this is one of those screwed up real world s ituations . I’d really like to know how this turned out for him if you have the chance to email me back.

ralphkeahi.renaud@adjunct.chaminade.edu

Comment [P2]: This is the focus of this letter. All the other arguments you mention and that he rationalizes is common in many contractual disputes. But what is unusual here is the invoking of Hawaiian Time. I think you might have missed that point. - Is Hawaiian time an actual: (a) Cultural Stereotype (b) Theoretical concept/construct (c) Traditional/Customary Practice I looked for Hawaiian Time addressed as: -Why would this be a strong argument? Why not? - What are the short/long-term consequences.

32/40 (to be added to FINAL score)

Chaminade University Fall 2010, Dept of Humanities

Comment [P1]: I would’ve like d to hear about with what you precisely “agree” in terms of this author’s argument?

Comment [P3]: What suggestion might you provide ? It is a contractual conflict prestipulated in clear terms by reasonable and exceedingly educated signateurs.

(808) 927-1619 (personal) (848) NATIVES {628-4837}


Chaminade University, Honolulu Adjunct Professor, Department of Humanitiies Hawaiian Language, Leadership, Religion, and Oral History

The Rite Time to be the Wrong Hawaiian ? I unfortunately cannot agree to help Dr. XX because he was given adequate time to vacate the property. Although he was traveling, it is his own kuleana to make sure that he was out of the office space by December 31. It was also his own fault for hiring a ex convict to do the work for him. Dr. XX should have known that Bishop Estate can choose not to renew his contract and that by law he needs to comply. When I hear the phrase “Hawaiian Time” I think of the blessing that Kumu Lake did at Planet Hollywood when the man said that he was late because he was on Hawaiian Time. Kumu Lake then said “The Hawaiians are here” and I feel like this situation relates perfectly. I believe that Hawaiian Time is not something that you can use to argue a case and it is offensive to the Hawaiian people in a sense. Granted Hawaiians used to be task oriented so time was never on their mind, but I find it offensive that people want to use that for a valid excuse now days. Dr. XX says, “Afterall, the Aloha-spirit and warm demeanor characterizes that which makes Hawai„i the most special place in the world and why we both call it our „aina, our home”. This I found really offensive because he is saying that we need and should be nice and show aloha towards him, but this man is trying to use the Hawaiian culture to get us to feel bad and I don‟t support that. This mess was Dr. XX fault and he needs to take responsibility like a man and just pay the fine for not following the rules.

38/40 (to be added to FINAL score)

Chaminade University Fall 2010, Dept of Humanities

ralphkeahi.renaud@adjunct.chaminade.edu

(808) 927-1619 (personal) (848) NATIVES {628-4837}

Comment [P1]: It is good to express your position right up front.

Comment [P2]: Absolutely, and a great recollection. But what precisely do you feel is wrong with saying this statement? Can a Hawaiian use this statement with fear of reprisals?

Comment [P3]: Essentially, he is asking to be “late” because Hawaiians are ALWAYS late. If Hawaiians were actually ALWAYS late, does this make the Hawaiians right? Does it then allow him to be right to be late? Comment [P4]: Careful, Cultural Warrior.. this smacks of sexism… lol.. though you are right.


Chaminade University, Honolulu Adjunct Professor, Department of Humanitiies Hawaiian Language, Leadership, Religion, and Oral History

The Wrong Reason for the Right Hawaiian Time ? This is a tough, sticky s itiuation for me to deal with. I understand the circumstances under which Dr. XX, PhEd was subjected to by the Bishop Estates. It is a shame that he was somewhat evicted from his piece of land. However, the Bishop Estate has the power to do as they please.

Comment [P1]: It is always good to state what it is you understand. That way the reader can set a common foundation of your perspective.

In addition, regardless of the holiday season and all the other little occurrences that came up, Dr. XX, PhEd is still respons ible for following the rules of the contracted lease.

Comment [P2]: Technically, he wasn’t evicted (punitive), but his lease was not renewed upon expiration.

The use of "aloha" and the "Hawaiian spirit" as means of leniency is void. A person cannot s ite aloha as a reason or even an expectation. Unfortunately for Dr. XX, PhEd, the way I see it is , he is respons ible for the timely move from the property as well as the fine that was given to him.

32/40 (to be added to FINAL score)

Chaminade University Fall 2010, Dept of Humanities

ralphkeahi.renaud@adjunct.chaminade.edu

(808) 927-1619 (personal) (848) NATIVES {628-4837}

Comment [P3]: You probably mean “terms” Comment [P4]: “spirit” or “Hawaiian Time”? I was hoping a developed explanation of the future consequence and outcome once we buy into the idea of “Hawaiian Time”. Comment [P5]: He submits that “as Hawaiians customarily and traditionally practiced ritual today, he should have the ability to engender that latitude in moving out.


Chaminade University, Honolulu Adjunct Professor, Department of Humanitiies Hawaiian Language, Leadership, Religion, and Oral History

FINAL EXAM ESSAY The Rite Time to be the Wrong Hawaiian? I do not believe that research should be conducted on this topic. The professor was given adequate time to remove his things and he signed a contract. The owner is allowed to withdraw his commit with a renter if they plan on doing something else with the building. That is why they require you to remove your things from the property within the time given. It may not seem fair or the “Hawaiian way” but it is how business is done. If you want to argue the money situation, then that needs to be handle in court, saying that the money is an unreasonable punishment for the days remaining in the building. Or try to s trike another deal with the owner. This story only reminds me of the s tory told in class about Kumu Lake doing a ceremony and the people were late. He man tried to justify the men being late by saying they were going by “Hawaiian time”. But the Hawaiians were already there, therefore; trying to use the idea of Hawaiian time as an argument only further empowers the Hawaiian s tereotype of being lazy. The concept of time oriented task in Hawaii came from the Calvinist missionaries in the 1820’s . Before this, Hawaiians were task oriented. The term “Hawaiian time” came about from the Hawaiian supposedly not being able to adjus t to the Calvinis t way of life. Therefore by supporting this case with evidence that tardiness is okay, would be supporting the notion of s tereotypes.

ralphkeahi.renaud@adjunct.chaminade.edu

Comment [P2]: This was the cultural epiphany for me Comment [P3]: The term is probably more like “degrade” because it “degrades” Hawaiian Cultural values by perpetuating negatively prejudicial stereotypes Comment [P4]: “…were MORE task-oriented…” Comment [P5]: “negative” stereotyping

37/40 (to be added to FINAL score)

Chaminade University Fall 2010, Dept of Humanities

Comment [P1]: Careful that this may appear to be describing a Hawaiian Way is being unstructured or unplanned. Cultural references are best made only in a cultural context… not as a business one.

(808) 927-1619 (personal) (848) NATIVES {628-4837}


Chaminade University, Honolulu Adjunct Professor, Department of Humanitiies Hawaiian Language, Leadership, Religion, and Oral History

The Rite Time to be a Wrong Hawaiian This letter sounds like Dr. XX was begging for peoples help, when he knew that he had a deadline to meet. Dr. XX should have taken care of his situation as soon as he could. When I first started to read the letter I felt really sorry for Dr. XX and wanted to help, but when it came to the end and he said he wanted you to help vouch for “Hawaiian Time” I changed my feeling to a “are you serious?” reaction. For him is use “Hawaiian Time” as an excuse is crazy because he is not going to win. He knew he had a deadline and if he needed help he should have asked someone he trusted. I know he was trying to do the right thing and help a convict, but he also should have someone to help the convict just in case something like that happened. Which did and he got a big fine in the end. If Dr. XX had a better excuse then maybe he could fight it but not the excuse of “Hawaiian Time”. When I read this I was shocked that he would use “Hawaiian Time” as a cultural understanding for his lateness. “Hawaiian Time” to me is not a Hawaiian cultural understanding it is a more local saying that everyone who grew up in Hawaii understands. “Hawaiian Time” is mostly used when you are late for your tutu’s birthday party or for meeting up with some friends. It shouldn’t be used for any serious timing like an important meeting or deadline. The Bishop Estates is Hawaiian but it will not accept the “Hawaiian Time” as a justification. They probably would laugh at this saying.

33/40 (to be added to FINAL score)

Chaminade University Fall 2010, Dept of Humanities

ralphkeahi.renaud@adjunct.chaminade.edu

(808) 927-1619 (personal) (848) NATIVES {628-4837}

Comment [P1]: Yes, he was very serious. He was so serious, he was willing to pay me to prove he was “seriously” correct. Comment [P2]: You mention it is crazy because he will lose. But then.. why will he lose? Or what is so crazy?

Comment [P3]: It seems you believe the same thing he does in that Hawaiian Time is arriving late and that it is “okay” in the end. Do you think that Kumu Lake would agree with you here? Comment [P4]: Do you remember the story of Hawaiian Time in class? When Kumu Lake responded to the manager… nobody laughed… and my life changed.


Chaminade University, Honolulu Adjunct Professor, Department of Humanitiies Hawaiian Language, Leadership, Religion, and Oral History

The Rite Time to be the Wrong Hawaiian ? (note) After reading this essay, I’m shocked that the Bishop Estate would handle business like that, it’s embarrassing and sad. It’s rather unprofessional and there’s a lack of certain courtesies that should be very apparent with business’ in Hawaii – there’s no aloha spirit. Being that we are in Hawaii, the use of Hawaiian time is used and many times accepted, but anywhere else or in the “real world” Hawaiian time is not acceptable or appropriate for business practices. In this particular situation, I don’t think culture has anything to do with it. He’s an entrepreneur that has clearly entered into a clearly stated written agreement which indicates that he understood the contractual guidelines of this property he was leasing. Bishop Estate, nor any company does not have to inform why they are not renewing the lease. As a business owner he was adequately informed that his lease was not goin g to be renewed regardless of where he was at the time and Bishop Estate did not tell him who to hire in order to vacate the property. The responsibility was laid clearly on him. When you are under a contract, you agree to the terms and condition to the lease agreement, you should know at any time that there could be no extension on the occupancy and the Bishop Estate gave him per the landlord tenant code as well as lease contract that he had ample time to vacate the property whether he chose to hire a moving company or felon in need of support is no responsibility of the Bishop Estate and so it’s his responsibility to vacate the property according to the date on the contract. I don’t think situation has anything to do with ethnicity, culture, age, religion, or handicap status – it’s a contract and ample time- there is no leeway for Saturdays or Sundays. This Bishop Estate gave him a date and more than likely had a management agent ready and available to review his completely vacating the property on the 31 and received improper corporation and therefore the terms of the contract and valid and if I were the Bishop Estate I would state this..We will be happy to work out a payment program with you that are due and payable.

36/40 (to be added to FINAL score)

Chaminade University Fall 2010, Dept of Humanities

ralphkeahi.renaud@adjunct.chaminade.edu

(808) 927-1619 (personal) (848) NATIVES {628-4837}

Comment [P1]: You were the first person to submit an ESSAY… (= motivated)..Strong Wor k. You exercised the Hawaiian Axiom of… MAI KALI A PAU KA NIHO Comment [P2]: Well, embarrassing? Sad? It is definitely standard business… blac k & white, cold, and legal. We wish they may have been more receptive to leniency, but that becomes a slippery slope of legal wrangling in the end. It’s a business. Comment [P3]: Is this appropriate and acceptable anywhere it is employed? What would be the consequences legally? Socially? Culturally? Comment [P4]: We can agree that Hawaii is unique and embodies more than the Western codifications of common law and the Uniform Commercial Code. In fact, we constitutionally protect traditional and customary Hawaiian practices.

Comment [P5]: Wow, future attorney. In defense of this tenant, he simply presumed that the lease would be renewed.. but it wasn’t… OOPS. Comment [P6]: This is a lot of information… but I want you to recognize that this fairly sizable paragraph is ONLY one SINGLE SENTENCE. Comment [P7]: The FOCUS of this experience which makes it unusual is the “Hawaiian Time” defense. I was hoping somewhere amongst this very skilled legal brief and dissertation, you would have engendered the validity and standing of such a legal supposition. Comment [P8]: You are “empowered.” You should become a District Attorney or maybe even a State’s Attorneys General. Had I known you had this “fire”.. I would have introduced more debate into class. LOL


Chaminade University, Honolulu Adjunct Professor, Department of Humanitiies Hawaiian Language, Leadership, Religion, and Oral History

FINAL EXAM ESSAY The Rite Time for Hawaiian Time ? Response My initial reaction to this email was one of shock. I think the sender is trying to take advantage of both you and the good nature of other Hawaiian people. Just because the Hawaiian culture is more accepting and understanding, does not mean that people should take advantage of this. If this exact scenario occurred on the mainland would this man have the same complaint?? Although the fee does seem quite large, the man signed a contract and knew the consequences of over staying the lease. I feel as though the man is trying to manipulate the system in a way to benefit himself. I also do not see how this is a cultural issue. Just because it happened in Hawaii doesn‟t mean that it is less of a legal issue than if it occurred on the mainland.

Comment [P1]: I was looking for comments on cultural exploitation through interpretational bastardization. That a desperate well-intended educated man was grasping at excuses and loopholes and found only a loosely understood idea of “Hawaiian Time.” This really was a case of “Mai kali a pau ka niho.” And he‟s finding himself toothless. Comment [P2]: Many cultures fit this bid. Comment [P3]: A professor , no less Comment [P4]: This is the basis of his error Comment [P5]: At the cost of degrading culture Comment [P6]: It is cultural, culturally wrong

Even if the fee is “ exorbitant” it has nothing to do with Hawaiian culture. The law is the law and everyone is responsible to follow it, regardless of how long you have lived on the Islands and you know a couple of Hawaiian works like „aina.

33/40 (to be added to FINAL score)

Comment [P7]: “Where is your main „aina”? Mine is here, yours is where you were born… why are we calling the US continent the “MAIN” land if it means that your land and my land is “MINOR”? If our mana circle is “real”.. then our „aina is real. And if the US continent is the “main land”.. it does not bode well for the sands of our birth, does it? Comment [P8]: Not sure what this means

Chaminade University Fall 2010, Dept of Humanities

ralphkeahi.renaud@adjunct.chaminade.edu

(808) 927-1619 (personal) (848) NATIVES {628-4837}


Chaminade University, Honolulu Adjunct Professor, Department of Humanitiies Hawaiian Language, Leadership, Religion, and Oral History

The Rite Time to be the Wrong Hawaiian ? After thoroughly reading through this letter sent in by Professor XX, I realized that he was in a s ituation that seemed hard to get out of. His request for your assistance seemed a little to eager, however, the use of “Hawaiian time” in this letter wasn’t the proper thing to say. Even though he lived in Hawaii for over 20 years , I feel that the term “Hawaiian time” shouldn’t be abused. For example, I will ALWAYS remember the story you told us in class about “Hawaiian time”. It was an experience you shared with Uncle John Lake and the bless ing of the new Planet Hollywood in Waikiki. People tend to misuse the term giving the stereotype that it’s okay for those of Hawaii to be late because of “Hawaiian time”. But Uncle John Lake made it clear that it’s NOT cons idered to “Hawaiian time” if the Hawaiians are present. I strongly feel for this professor but I feel that he was given a deadline by Bishop Es tates for a reason and I feel that he took advantage of it. He was aware of the consequences when the contract expired. Another thing that I don’t quite understand is the trust the professor gave an ex-convict to help him vacate the property. He probably was following the “second chance” term that some companies believe in when it comes to the criminal justice system but I don’t think it was good judgment on the professor’s part because it left him in a bad situation. So all in all, I feel that Bishop Estate gave the professor a deadline due to contract expiration and I feel that if the professor didn’t want to end up paying fees in the end, he should have been more respons ible and not use “Hawaiian time” as an excuse.

36/40 (to be added to FINAL score)

Chaminade University Fall 2010, Dept of Humanities

ralphkeahi.renaud@adjunct.chaminade.edu

(808) 927-1619 (personal) (848) NATIVES {628-4837}

Comment [P1]: Excellent putting the thrust of your argument up front this way. Comment [P2]: How would you define a “non abuse” use of the term “Hawaian Time”?

Comment [P3]: Great recollection. But it wasn’t that he felt if the Hawaiians are here, it isn’t Hawaiian Time… it seemed the point was that WHY do you blame Hawaiians.. if the Hawaiian are here? Do you recognize the subtle difference? That subtlety is critical in understanding where Hawaiian Time is appropriate and when it is not.

Comment [P4]: You and I both recognize the honorable intent of the Professor. But as we always say amongst “high risk” choices… you “TRUST” but “VERI FY.” It would seem that the ProfXX did not follow-up with the follow-through. Comment [P5]: It would evidently appear that he was seeking a loophole from his FINE.


Chaminade University, Honolulu Adjunct Professor, Department of Humanitiies Hawaiian Language, Leadership, Religion, and Oral History

FINAL ESSAY: RXN LTR TO DR. XX ? 14 December 2010 The Rite Time to be a Wrong Hawaiian Although I understand your belief in the concept of “Hawaiian Time”, it is still a responsibility to abide by the rules signed by your contract when you gained ownership of your building. You understood the date in which you were to be vacated by, and although you were away, I am sure there was someone reliable that could have helped you in your time of need. I am sorry for your unreliable helper that abandoned you in your time of despair, but that is another problem unto itself. Although it seems unfair for the fee due to your delay in vacating the premises due to unforeseeable problems, it would be uneconomical for you to avoid your fee due to events simply because you believe in “Hawaiian Time”.

Comment [P1]: What is your understanding of his belief? Is this a cultural concept? Social concept? Is this a traditional practice or esoteric concept? Comment [P2]: In this case, could you contemplate any acceptable extenuating circumstances which would allow for a “set aside” of such a fine or for invoking the supposed “Hawaiian Time”? Comment [P3]: What precisely is “unfair”… the levy itself or the amount of the levy? Comment [P4]: What is the concept of Hawaiian Time which allows him to raise it here as a means to avoid the fine?

33/40 (to be added to FINAL score)

What is the cultural implication in using this term? What is the long term implication of its use… - Culturally? - Contractually?

Chaminade Unive rsity Fall 2010, Dept of Humanities

ralphkeahi.renaud@adjunct.chaminade.edu

(808) 927-1619 (personal) (848) NATIVES {628-4837}


Chaminade University, Honolulu Adjunct Professor, Department of Humanitiies Hawaiian Language, Leadership, Religion, and Oral History

The Wrong Reason for the Right Hawaiian Time ? In my honest opinion, I think that what has happened, is somewhat unfair to only a certain degree, but it also is understandable because it is a bus iness runned operation, and in that manner, it should be conducted as so. If they had given you a specific amount of time and you have mentioned, that you did return in late December and mentioned about the holiday season previous to the New Year (it can be assumed that the return was before Chris tmas ) then other attempts could have been made. So within that time, I believe that necessary arrangements could have been made even if acquiring rental trucks and storage places were impossible.

Comment [P1]: Who is this “YOU” ??

You go on to mention the Aloha Spirit, if that same Aloha Spirit you believe and expect it to be shared with you, then you could have received the Aloha Spirit by requesting or seeking help from other friends to help you move and store your things. Many other options could have been sought, even due to whatever illness you may have experienced, some other things could have been done. I’m not sure if you took immediate action, as soon as you received that notice, such as call them and explain your s ituation, that you were not on the is land to take care of bus iness, and ask for an extension from your return, which could have been another option.

Comment [P2]: Are you addressing the professor who wrote the letter? Or are you speaking to me?

Also you go to mention, “Hawaiian Time” as you mentioned in class, how your mentor, Kumu Lake took offense to that term and you didn’t understand until he replied “the Hawaiians are already here.” In my opinion, Hawaiians aren’t always late, and that should have not been used as an excuse for your failure in keeping time allotted to move everything out.

Comment [P3]: It would appear here that you are referring to me. Which in a very big way, means you didn’t understand that letter, who wrote it, and who it was written to. However.. your arguments are strong.

Yes , whatever purpose you were serving out from that office, may have been very important and helpful to everyone, including the Hawaiian community, but just by mentioning that, and possibly thinking that whatever your service was should have had much more precedence over what the Bishop Estate had planned for that office should not of have been accounted for. As mentioned earlier, you have conducted a bus iness contract with them, and with that, a bus iness relationship should have been kept, not just because you say my business that I’m serving out of my office is for Hawaiian purpose, and that Bishop Estate is built on a foundation for supporting Hawaiians (as how I see it) that should not have been the perceived factor that they would have given you leniency especially if the holidays were involved. Sunday, as a non-business day is understandable, but Saturday, although was the day of the New Year, many businesses are still open and seen as a bus iness day, so something else could have been done on that day. 35/40 (to be added to FINAL score)

Chaminade University Fall 2010, Dept of Humanities

ralphkeahi.renaud@adjunct.chaminade.edu

(808) 927-1619 (personal) (848) NATIVES {628-4837}

Comment [P4]: I did understand what Kumu La ke had said that day. I actually do not believe that Kumu Lake understood what a profound effect it had on me. So much so that I believe he enjoyed hearing me retell that story often. Nobody else who was present probably took this story to heart as I had.

Comment [P5]: Indeed, this Prof had clearly stipulated terms and fees. And as an educated person, we can likely hold his comprehension to an elevated standard. Comment [P6]: There were many factors involved: contractual, personal, logistical, social.. however, the longer lasting legacy of invoking HAWAIIAN TIME as an excuse for dereliction of his contractual responsibilities is unprofessional and culturally abusive at the least.


Chaminade University, Honolulu Adjunct Professor, Department of Humanitiies Hawaiian Language, Leadership, Religion, and Oral History

The Rite Time to be the Wrong Hawaiian ? I think that some things in life just happen so you have to do what you have to do. I think that he should have got someone that he really trusted to move all of his things out of there. Like he said he lived in Hawai'i for 20 years, he should have some trusted friends that were willing to help him out. I think that it is not right of him to try and say that it is "Hawaiian time". It was his fault for trusting some guy that didn't even do the job right. I think that we do live in Hawai'i and that we do still carry the Aloha spirit, and I dont think that he should pay that much of a fine, but how is he going to learn from his mis takes? I bas ically think that it is his fault and if he had the chance to do it over again then he should think about it and do it right.

ralphkeahi.renaud@adjunct.chaminade.edu

Comment [P2]: LOL… what do you mean? Comment [P3]: He was trying to help out someone.. and if he was an ex-convict.. it was probably trying to help out a Hawaiian. However, we must remember when operating under “risky” conditions… you can TRUST, but must VERI FY. Comment [P4]: What is wrong with the use of Hawaiian Time? That is the explanation I was hoping to have elucidated. He made a mistake trusting, but even if he hadn’t made that mistake, could he then use the term “Hawaiian Time”? It seemed he didn’t MAI KALI A PAU KA NIHO!! Comment [P5]: Mista kes are only learned from when they first recognize a mistake was made. This person is not acknowledge he made a mistake. Everything and everyone else made mistakes.. the convict, the estate, the calendar, the weather, and lastly… the Hawaiians made a mistake by always being late. Therefore, he should allowed to be late.

34/40 (to be added to FINAL score)

Chaminade University Fall 2010, Dept of Humanities

Comment [P1]: A little over-used, me thinks.

(808) 927-1619 (personal) (848) NATIVES {628-4837}


Chaminade University, Honolulu Adjunct Professor, Department of Humanitiies Hawaiian Language, Leadership, Religion, and Oral History

FINAL EXAM ESSAY The Rite Time for the Wrong Reason of Hawaiian Time ?

Total Points is out of 40 pts Personally, I was entirely taken aback by this request. His use of the term “Hawaiian Time” was malicious in that it presumed a defense based upon being in Hawaii. This supposedly educated man submits that since the Hawaii State Constitution provides for the protection of traditional and customary practices, he should be provided some sort of margin of latitude for completion. However, we should refrain from making the comparison between whether this seemed appropriate outside of the islands because cultural morality and ethics usually transcends geographic borders. The “misstep” given by his action is NOT that he is requesting a set aside of the penalty. It is just that this Professor is trying to bolster his reasons based upon a condescending stereotype of what people are calling “Hawaiian Time.” He is (which is false) stating that since Hawaiians were always late, he should be allowed to be late. To support this argument would make defensible the argument that if he were in Germany during WWII, he should be allowed to kill Jews because the Germans did (and this was actually true). This is prima facia disrespect and insensitive desperation. We all need to make sure that we are accountable to our own doings… our own hana. The use of such methods to justify unacceptable behavior amongst non-Hawaiians is sad. But the sorrow is only superseded by Hawaiians using it to justify their own misbehavior… shucks. After having received this letter, I conferred with Kumu Lake and he felt that by simply not responding, the silence alone would send the most clear and appropriate message to such a culturally-inept and misguided person. POINTS I WANTED PONDERED: Why or why not is Hawaiian Time appropriate here? When? Which social, financial, contractual, or cultural elements are culpable? If reasonable to invoke, why, how, when, and where can it be used/challenged? What are the short/long-term consequences of invoking such a “Hawaiian Time” exception? What are the implications when there are Non-Hawaiians invoking Hawaiian Time exceptions? What are the implications when the Hawaiians themselves invoke the Hawaiian Time excuse?

Chaminade University Fall 2010, Dept of Humanities

ralphkeahi.renaud@adjunct.chaminade.edu

(808) 927-1619 (personal) (848) NATIVES {628-4837}


Hawaiian Time is the Pono Time