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BROOKS BULLETIN

Brooks Bulletin Brooks School 1160 Great Pond Road North Andover, MA 01845-1298

B

BROOKS BULLETIN • SUMMER 2017

This August 2017 photo shows the extent of the construction that has already been completed on the future Center for the Arts. The new structure, which will house the visual, musical and performing arts together in one state-ofthe-art building in the center of campus, will be ready to welcome students in the fall of 2018. For more information on the construction, as well as an update on the final year of The Campaign for Brooks, please turn to page 4.

S P EC I A L E D I T I O N L AW N C E R E M O N Y, P R I Z E DAY & A LU M N I W E E K E N D

“A place that reminds you of who you are at your very best.” H E A D O F SC H O O L JO H N R . PAC K A R D O N P R I Z E DAY ( PG . 1 7 ) .

SUMMER 2017


BOA R D O F T RU ST E E S President Steven R. Gorham ’85, P’17, P’21 Andover, Mass. Vice Presidents John R. Barker ’87, P’21 Wellesley, Mass. Whitney Romoser Savignano ’87 Manchester, Mass. Secretary Craig J. Ziady ’85, P’18, P’20 Winchester, Mass. Treasurer Valentine Hollingsworth III ’72, P’17 Dover, Mass. T RU ST E E S Pamela W. Albright P’10, P’16 Topsfield, Mass. Cristina E. Antelo ’95 Washington, D.C. W. J. Patrick Curley III ’69 New York, N.Y.

Paul L. Hallingby ’65 New York, N.Y. Robert W. Hughes P’16, P’19 Andover, Mass. Booth D. Kyle ’89 Seattle, Wash. Zachary S. Martin P’15, P’17 Wellesley, Mass. Brian McCabe P’18 Meredith, N.H. Timothy H. McCoy ’81, P’14, P’15, P’18 Wellesley, Mass. John R. Packard Jr. P ’18, P’21 Head of School North Andover, Mass. Daniel J. Riccio P’17, P’20 Los Gatos, Calif. Belisario A. Rosas P’15, P’21 Andover, Mass.

Peter V. K. Doyle ’69 Sherborn, Mass.

Ashley Wightman Scott ’84, P’11, P’14 Manchester, Mass.

Anthony H. Everets ’93 New York, N.Y.

Juliane Gardner Spencer ’93 New York, N.Y.

Jonathan F. Gibbons ’92 Needham, Mass.

Ramakrishna R. Sudireddy P’15 Andover, Mass.

Shawn Gorman ’84 Falmouth, Maine

Isabella Speakman Timon ’92 Chadds Ford, Pa. Alessandro F. Uzielli ’85 Beverly Hills, Calif.

A L U M N I T RU ST E E S Ronald P. Dixon ’06 Newmarket, N.H. Caroline E. Trustey ’13 Wenham, Mass. T RU ST E E S E M E R I T I William N. Booth ’67, P’05 Chestnut Hill, Mass. Henry M. Buhl ’48, P’82 New York, N.Y. Steve Forbes ’66, P’91 Bedminster, N.J. James G. Hellmuth P’78 Lawrence, N.Y. H. Anthony Ittleson ’56, P’84, P’86 Green Pond, S.C. Michael B. Keating ’58, P’97 Boston, Mass. Frank A. Kissel ’69, P’96, P’99 Far Hills, N.J. Peter A. Nadosy ’64 New York, N.Y. Peter W. Nash ’51, P’81, P’89 Nantucket, Mass. Cera B. Robbins P’85, P’90 New York, N.Y. Eleanor R. Seaman P’86, P’88, P’91, GP’18 Hobe Sound, Fla. David R. Williams III ’67 Beverly Farms, Mass.

The weather over Alumni Weekend didn’t cooperate, but Brooksians were undaunted. Here, members and guests of the class of 1967 tour campus.

Teamwork. Perseverance. Purpose. At Brooks, our students learn to stretch for each other, to rely on each other, to support each other. We teach these lessons on the soccer field, in Chapel and in the classroom. Now, in the final year of The Campaign for Brooks, we’re relying on you, and we’re asking you to help us succeed. The Brooks Fund, which provides nearly 10 percent of the school’s annual operating budget, is one of the pillars of The Campaign for Brooks, and the one that has the most immediate impact on the day-to-day lives of our students and faculty. Please consider a gift to the campaign for our future and a gift to the Brooks Fund for our present. We need your support to achieve our goals.

B RO O KS SCHOOL BROOKS FUND

Three easy ways to give: Credit Card — Check — Stock. Visit www.brooksschool.org to make your gift.


B CO N T E N TS

BU L L E T I N • SU M M E R 2 0 1 7

Head of School John R. Packard Jr. P’18, P’21

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Associate Head for External Affairs Jim Hamilton Director of Development Gage S. Dobbins Director of Alumni and Parent Events Erica Callahan P’19, P’20 Assistant Director of Alumni Programs Carly Churchill ’10

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Director of Admission and Financial Aid Bini W. Egertson P’12, P’15

Director of Communications and Marketing Dan Callahan P’19, P’20 Director of Publications Rebecca A. Binder

F E AT U R ES

D E PA RT M E N TS

Design Aldeia www.aldeia.design

16 Graduating with Honors

02 M  essage from the Head of School

Alumni Communications Manager Emily Williams Assistant Director of Communications Jennifer O’Neill

Unsolicited manuscripts are welcome. Opinions expressed in the Bulletin are those of the authors and not necessarily of Brooks School.

The class of 2017 finished its career at Brooks with a two-day celebration over Lawn Ceremony and Prize Day. Students, family and the Brooks community gathered to celebrate the form’s journey and its readiness for life beyond Brooks.

03 News + Notes 36 Reunion Notes

26 Coming Home (Again)

In mid-May, Brooks alumni returned to campus to reconnect with each other, with campus and with the Brooksians of today. They also had a chance to walk down memory lane, honor individual accomplishments and party under the stars.

Correspondence concerning the Bulletin should be sent to Editor Rebecca A. Binder: mail Editor, Brooks Bulletin 1160 Great Pond Road North Andover, MA 01845 email rbinder@brooksschool.org phone (978) 725-6326 © 2017 Brooks School

ON THE COVER: These Brooksians were eager to show school spirit as they returned to campus for their 10th reunion in May. Clockwise, from top left: Annie Michalek ’07, Christy Bradley ’07, Jamie Callahan ’07 and Caroline Tamposi ’07.


A M E SSAGE F ROM JO H N R. PAC KA R D J R. H E A D O F SC H O O L

“The Stretch Ahead” It would make perfect sense to think that

“ Stretching at school to deliver an exemplary student experience, and in what we ask our broader constituency to do on the school’s behalf, will be deeply embedded in all that we do in the coming year.”

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the summer at Brooks is quiet and tranquil on our 270-acre campus. After all, our students and faculty are finding time for a well-deserved break between the school years, and we have far more flexibility in our lives than we do in the fall, winter and spring. Yet, even a passing visit to Brooks during this particular summer would reveal that our campus is busy and bustling in ways that have us incredibly excited. The work we are engaged in during this July, August and beyond leaves me as confident as ever about where our school is headed. Within one week of conferring diplomas to the class of 2017, construction fences were up and work on what will eventually be our new Center for the Arts was under way. The past few months have been dominated by extensive demolition and excavation of 28,000 square feet of existing arts facilities in order to make way for the 44,000-square-foot facility that will be ready by the fall of 2018. This construction phase spanning 15 to 18 months will require all of us to stretch and share as we watch this exciting project rise from the ground in the middle of campus. In many ways, the notion of stretching, in general, is in the front of our minds as the 2017-2018 year takes hold. As we move the Center for the Arts forward, we have stretched to be ready to deliver a great year in music, theater and visual art, without spaces that we have been accustomed to having. As we seek to complete The Campaign for Brooks, we know well that we will not reach our $60 million goal if we do not succeed in asking the school’s many supporters to stretch in order to equip the school with what it needs to thrive for generations to come. Indeed, stretching at school to deliver an exemplary student

experience, and in what we ask our broader constituency to do on the school’s behalf, will be deeply embedded in all that we do in the coming year. I am equally proud of the progress we have made in areas that are perhaps less tangible and harder to see than construction projects. Our academic program continues to seek ways to deepen student learning via pedagogical approaches that are more intentional about skill and competency development. We have more than doubled our financial aid budget over the past eight years and will open this fall with more students attending our school with need-based financial aid than has ever been the case. We have added to and improved the school’s physical plant in dramatic fashion over the past five years with a new dormitory, turf field and totally renovated Ashburn Chapel constituting just the highlights. We have stretched to get here and are proud of this work. My good feeling is rooted in the people who make our school work a bit better year after year. Our students inspire one another every day. Our parents are great partners in deepening the experience their children have here. Our staff enriches the school’s life with incredible selflessness. Our faculty’s commitment ensures that our students are challenged and supported in mission-driven ways. Our administration includes some of the finest and most forward-thinking educators in independent schools. Our board of trustees is devoted to the wellbeing and certainty of the school’s present and future. In the midst of a busy summer, we are poised to continue stretching, and are intent on earning more of your time, attention and care as we go. Have a great start to your autumn.

B RO O KS BU L L E T I N


NEWS + N OT ES

NEWS + NOTES IN THIS SECTION 04 News from Campus 10 Campus Scene 12 Athlete Spotlight 14 Athletics News

The Danforth Memorial Room in May 2017. The Danforth Room played host to a cocktail reception with the Brooks alumni board during Alumni Weekend. This space was given to Brooks as a center for extracurricular activities in 1948 by former trustee Mrs. Murray Danforth P’39. The gift also included the nearby gymnasium, which today is the Danforth Squash & Rowing Center. The Crossing, a space for student meetings and socializing in the forthcoming Center for the Arts, will stand in the same location as the Danforth Room. The new space will also honor the Danforths and their contributions to Brooks.


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N EWS F RO M CA M PUS

The Heart of Brooks At the beginning of its final year, The Campaign for Brooks seeks to complete construction projects while turning toward creating a community that reaches new heights. The Campaign for Brooks, the $60 million effort that is moving

Brooks toward a promising future, has already funded stunning renovations and the building of new community spaces at Brooks. Now, even as construction of the Center for the Arts begins, the campaign turns its focus to the intangible priorities that form the heart of the school: financial aid to ensure that qualified students can access a Brooks education; and faculty support to ensure that Brooks retains dedicated, passionate teachers who will deliver on the school’s promise.

A ST RO N G F RA M E WO R K

The Campaign for Brooks has solidified the aspects of Brooks that make the school special: It has funded renovations of our most iconic community space; it has enabled Brooksians to walk down a serene, car-free Main Street; and it has provided a topnotch, lit turf field where games are played and school spirit is strengthened. Now, the campaign is closing in on completing funding for the Center for the Arts, which will allow our visual, musical and performing arts to reach their full potential and serve students well.

T H E PA R E N T SU M M I T Join us this fall on Parents Weekend for the Parent Summit, a program of informational sessions designed to update current Brooks parents on the progress of the campaign and other initiatives at Brooks. Please watch your mail for a formal invitation. In the interim, please contact Director of Development Gage Dobbins via email at gdobbins@brooksschool.org or telephone at (978) 725-6288 for more information.

Projects completed and open to additional unrestricted funds: •R  ENOVATION OF ASHBURN CHAPEL

$5 million

•C  ENTER OF CAMPUS

$2 million

•A  NNA K. TRUSTEY MEMORIAL FIELD

$2 million

Ongoing Priorities: • CENTER FOR THE ARTS

97+3 44+56 $28 million

$729,896 needed

$27,270,104 raised

• FINANCIAL AID

$10 million

$5,597,076 needed

$4,402,924 raised

NEEDED

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RA I S E D

B RO O KS BU L L E T I N


NEWS + N OT ES

BU I L D I N G T H E C E N T E R FO R T H E A RTS • FACULTY SUPPORT

12+88 79+21 $2 million

$242,031 raised

$1,757,969 needed

• BROOKS FUND

$11 million

$2,359,702 needed

$8,640,298 raised

Construction on the Center for the Arts began in early June and is projected to wrap up by October 2018. Todd McCabe ’89, P’15, the project executive for Consigli Construction, provided a timeline for the project: JUNE 2017

•D  emolition of the Auditorium • Sitework Dirt from the site will be used to level the grade of the boys 3rd soccer field, which until now has sported a unique “home-field advantage.” AUGUST 2017

• Concrete Foundation

SEPTEMBER–NOVEMBER 2017

• Steel Framework

DECEMBER 2017–JANUARY 2018

• Envelope The building will be weathertight by the end of 2017. DECEMBER 2017–AUGUST 2018

• I nterior Work

MAY 2018–SEPTEMBER 2018

•L  andscape and Sitework

T H E B EST A N D B R I G H T EST

This year, The Campaign for Brooks will turn its focus to opening a Brooks education to the most deserving students, and delivering a faculty that has resources available to fully live a life of academia. Endowment for Financial Aid: Our goal is to attract talented and engaged students who represent a broad range of interests and backgrounds. An endowment for financial aid will ensure the long-term health of the school through more stable enrollments, and will strengthen our ability to create a school that reflects the diversity of the world that awaits its graduates. Endowment for Faculty Support: Great teachers are the soul of Brooks. An increased endowment to support Brooks faculty will provide for enhanced compensation for top faculty candidates, grants to reward faculty excellence, and funding for faculty development and curricular innovation.

G I V I N G BAC K TO T H E CO M M U N I TY This spring, the Brooks arts department vacated the Auditorium, the music center and the visual arts studios. Brooks donated the following theater supplies to several local organizations, including two of North Andover’s public schools, the Salem, Mass., YMCA and Lazarus House: • seating • props • set pieces • building materials • costumes • lighting units, equipment and cable • dimming equipment • clothing • furniture • household goods • building supplies

Campaign totals are as of June 30, 2017.

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N EWS F RO M CA M PUS

All-School Read

Never Let Me Go This year’s All-School Read is “Never Let Me Go,” the 2005 novel by Kazuo Ishiguro. The plot focuses on a group of students and alumni of a fictional elite boarding school in the British countryside, and explores themes of loss, the passage of time, the power of memory and the dignity of human life. The All-School Read program asks every Brooks student and faculty member to read the same book over the summer. The English department selected this year’s book. When school opens, English faculty and other faculty will integrate the book into lessons. The department also plans a speaker series on topics connected to the novel, along with other campus and community activities. Staff, alumni, parents and friends are encouraged to read along. The English department chose “Never Let Me Go,” chair Dean Charpentier says, because it challenges the Brooks community to think deeply about the world while also being an entertaining work. “The benefit of an all-school experience like this is not necessarily in dissecting the piece itself, though there is value in that,” he says. “What kind of conversations does this novel generate? How does it make us think about our lives, both individually and collectively? The book is about memory and telling our stories, and about being human. Discussing those things both formally and informally can only make us a better and stronger community.”

CU M L AU D E CEREMONY On April 19, the Brooks chapter of the Cum Laude Society welcomed 22 new members in an Ashburn Chapel ceremony. The Cum Laude Society, founded in 1906, is dedicated to honoring scholastic achievement in secondary schools. The founders of the society modeled Cum Laude after Phi Beta Kappa. In the years since its founding, Cum Laude has grown to 382 chapters across the United States and internationally. Some 4,000 new student members are inducted annually. Elected as Sixth-Formers: Els Caulo; Eunice Chung; Bridget Cifuni; Duncan Davies; Elsa Grant; Jennifer Jin; Ritika Kommareddi; Austin Morris; Nicole Rivera; and Priyanka Thakuria. Elected as Fifth-Formers: Jordyn Arakelian; Max Charlamb; Brian Choi; Jackie Desautels; Jason Gold; Henry Goodman; Olivia Jarvis; Lucy Lannan; Diane Lee; Bella O’Shea; Kate Packard; and Tim Zhao. The group of new inductees joined the following sixth-formers, who were inducted as fifth-formers in 2016: Nikko Dominaitis; Lee

A New Direction for Gardner

Goodman; Allie Iamonaco; Joon Lee; Grace Lindsey; Tess Martin; Kelly Raymond; Coco Sun; Johnny Trotto; Sam Wakelin; and Jack Yang.

When third-form boarding girls arrive on campus this fall, they’ll have a new opportunity to connect with each other. Gardner Dormitory, which previously housed female boarding students from all forms, has been repurposed into a dormitory exclusively for third-form girls. Associate Head for Student Affairs Andrea Heinze hopes that the change will provide a “transformative experience” for Brooks’s new students. She cites the opportunity to build class cohesion, and the opportunity to develop residential skills, social skills and emotional skills that are essential to success in high school. She also notes that the model provides leadership development and mentorship for older students: Seven rising sixth-form girls eagerly accepted the opportunity

N E W W E BS I T E Brooks debuted a new school website in May. You can view it at www.brooksschool.org. The new site — which is mobile-friendly — showcases the Brooks campus and community with stunning video and photography, and includes updated content that focuses on Brooks’s mission, values and unique programs. We hope you enjoy it!

to live in Gardner and be prefects in the dorm.

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The fifth annual all-day event gave Brooks students, faculty and staff time to learn about gender awareness. This year’s Unity Day, which was held in late March, asked the Brooks community to pause for a day of programming with a single focus: gender awareness. Faculty and student organizers facilitated 35 different hour-long sessions on topics that explored the ways in which gender expectations shape society, the Brooks community and individuals. The day also included a keynote address by noted speaker and writer Alex Myers, a transgender alumnus of Phillips Exeter Academy and Harvard University. The hour-long sessions traversed a broad array of topics, including the meaning of masculinity in the 21st century, gender norms in athletics, and the ways in which male and female students may learn differently in the classroom. Director of Diversity Initiatives Shaunielle McDonald ’94 calls Unity Day “an opportunity to do intentional programming,” and adds that “work that promotes positive school culture can’t always come from a place of reflex.” She hopes that Unity Day also identified ways in which community members can learn from each other. The day concluded in Ashburn Chapel, when members of the community were invited to express their thoughts on the day. Olivia Jarvis ’18, who led a session exploring the feminist movement, shared that “this coming together of different people to grapple with a problem society is facing is, to me, what Unity Day is about.”

HEARD ON CA M PUS

“Our family ran an organic farm…the average day consisted of getting up before the sun, helping milk the goats, collecting chicken eggs — you know, normal stuff.” ROWAN BEAUDOIN-FRIEDE ’17 during his senior speech in February 2017. Beaudoin-Friede spoke with classmate and close friend Ritika Kommareddi. The pair described their upbringings and experiences before Brooks, and discussed how those different perspectives contributed to their sharing common activities and a friendship at Brooks.

PHOT O: HANN AH LATH AM ’ 17

Unity Day

A Renovated Space Along with other campus construction, the Student Center, located beneath Wilder Dining Hall, will undergo a summer renovation that will redefine the space to best suit the student body’s needs. The footprint of the current student center will not change, but the space will be reorganized: Interior walls will be brought down to encourage a well-lit, open space; the snack bar will gain an additional sales window; and new furniture and appliances will be installed, providing an improved central space on campus for students to congregate, socialize and study.

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PAINT DANCE

Close to 100 Brooksians partied under the stars at the annual Paint Dance in May. Paint Dance, sponsored by the Brooks Gender & Sexuality Alliance, is a campus-wide celebration that raises awareness and visibility while also giving students — here, fifth-formers Em English, Addy Clements and Leah Rosenbaum — a chance to let loose before spring finals begin.

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Guidance and Energy Brooks welcomes new members of the board of trustees and alumni board. S I N C E R E T H A N K S TO D E PA RT I N G M E M B E RS : Cristina Antelo ’95 Marianne Augot Fleischman ’87, P’19, P’21 Andrew Garcia ’94 Will Kinzel ’92 John Petzold ’03 Kathryn Stone ’98 Amanda Dubois ’95 College. Longnecker has served on a Brooks alumni career panel and as a member of the Boston Reception Host Committee. He is a cousin of faculty emeritus Ox Kingsbury.

The alumni board in May 2017. Back row, from left to right: Emma Parkinson ’07, Joe Malarney ’06, Jon Gibbons ’92, Will Collier ’01, Morgan Manoff ’04, Jack McKallagat ’66, P’96, P’00, Sally Milliken ’88; front row, left to right: Marianne Augot Fleischman ’87, P’19, P’21, Phillip Field ’05, Lexi Caffrey ’02, Cristina Antelo ’95, Sean Nagle ’99, Karl Arakelian ’81, P’18, P’20, Peter Dunn ’82, P’11, P’13, P’15, P’18.

A L U M N I BOA R D LOWELL ABBOTT ’10 is a research analyst at Spencer Stuart, an executive search and leadership consulting firm in Boston. She attended Connecticut College. Abbott is a third-generation Brooks graduate: She follows her grandfather, former faculty Gordon Abbott Jr. ’45, and her father, former alumni board president and former school trustee Chris Abbott ’75. In addition, Abbott’s aunt Alexandra ’85 and brother Gordon ’14 attended the school. Abbott, who spoke at the 2017 sixth-form induction dinner into the alumni association, feels that Brooks has always been a fixture in her life. She remembers fondly her graduation, when her father presented her with her diploma.

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PETER DUNN ’82 lives in North Andover with his family. He is the vice president of perioperative services administration and healthcare system engineering at Massachusetts General Hospital. Following his time at Brooks, Dunn attended George Washington University and George Washington University School of Medicine. He is married to Brooks classmate Deirdre ’82; they are the proud parents of Matthew ’11, Chandler ’13, Morgan ’15 and Madison ’18. Dunn has served on his reunion committee and the admissions host committee. He previously received the Alumni Shield award and is also integral to the success of the Students on the Forefront of Science program. PHILLIP FIELD ’05 resides in Boston. He is an associate at the international law firm Mintz Levin

Cohn Ferris Glovsky and Popeo PC, where he specializes in commercial real estate transactions, including the acquisition, disposition and financing of office, industrial, retail and multifamily properties. Field completed his undergraduate work at Vanderbilt University and attended law school at Southern Methodist University, where he was both staff editor and articles editor of the school’s law review. Field’s two brothers, Peter ’07 and John ’08, also attended Brooks. He serves as the class correspondent for the class of 2005. JEFFREY LONGNECKER ’93 resides in Charlestown, Mass., with his family. Longnecker is a senior director at DivcoWest, a commercial real estate investment firm, where he is responsible for asset management with a focus on East Coast properties. He attended Dartmouth

MORGAN MANOFF ’04 is a senior manager of corporate and real estate finance at Time, Inc. in New York. He attended Colby College and is currently pursing his MBA at Columbia University. Morgan has served as a member of the New York Reception Host Committee. ALBERT NASCIMENTO ’10 lives in Marion, Mass., where he is on the English faculty at Tabor Academy. After Brooks, Nascimento attended Middlebury College, where he played basketball and was named to the NESCAC Winter All-Academic team three times. Nascimento has been extremely involved in the Brooks alumni community: He has served as a guest Chapel speaker, a class agent and most recently an alumni trustee. PETER RATHBONE ’64 splits his time between homes in West Yarmouth, Mass., and Santa Barbara, Calif. He is an art consultant and advisor who has spent the entirety of his successful 45-year career in the auction business at Sotheby’s, where he specializes in American paintings and sculpture. Rathbone served a three-year stint in the United States Army before attending Boston University. He has served as his class chair, his

B RO O KS BU L L E T I N


NEWS + N OT ES

class correspondent, his class agent and as a member of the New York Reception Host Committee. He is the proud parent of Vanessa ’04 and Dylan ’15. ERIC ZIADY ’83 lives in East Greenwich, R.I. with his wife, Lauren, and his children, Matthew, Lindsey and Courtney. He is the chief financial officer of the American Athletic Conference. Prior to joining the conference, he served as the director of athletics at the University of Delaware and as the senior associate athletic director at Boston College. Ziady attended Providence College. He then received both a master’s degree in sports management and an MBA from Northeastern University. The Ziady family has a long history with Brooks: Eric’s brother Craig ’85, P’18, P’20, who was formerly president of the alumni board, rejoined the school’s board of trustees last year; and, brother Mark ’90, nephew Adam ’18 and niece Claire ’20 have all taken up residence on Great Pond Road.

EMERITUS MEMBER JOHN MCKALLAGAT ’66, the first emeritus member of the alumni board, resides in West Newbury, Mass. He is an executive director at Oppenheimer and Co., Inc., a leading investment bank and full-service investment firm with offices in New York, London, Tel Aviv and Hong Kong. McKallagat attended Rollins College and is the father of Bailey ’96 and Jesse ’00. McKallagat was a member of the alumni board for over 30 years, which included an 18-year stint as its treasurer, a three-year term as chairman of the annual fund and a two-year run as chairman of the senior parent gift committee. He is also a former school trustee, a previous recipient of the Alumni Bowl award, a member of his class reunion committee and a former class chair. We thank him for his indefatigable service to Brooks.

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BOA R D O F T RU ST E E S CRISTINA ANTELO ’95 is a principal at the Podesta Group in Washington, D.C., where she manages government relations campaigns for multinational and Fortune 500 companies, while maintaining deep ties to Democratic leadership and providing an expertise on Texas and U.S. border issues. Antelo graduated from Georgetown University and The George Washington University Law School. She worked as a legal fellow for the Senate Democratic Steering Committee and with the government affairs practice of a leading Washington law firm before joining the Podesta Group. A native Spanish speaker, she is a founding member and president of the Hispanic Lobbyists Association and a board member of the Hispanic Bar Association of D.C. Foundation. She is also a member of the board of trustees for the Washington, D.C., chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society and the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute. PETER VAN KIRK DOYLE ’69 spent his entire professional career in development and public affairs, specializing in complicated charitable gifts and the investment of gift assets. He managed the gift planning program at Wellesley College for 20 years, before and after similar stints at

music. He was a four-year member and captain of the Dartmouth men’s basketball team, where he earned MVP honors as a junior. He was also a drummer for the Dartmouth College Gospel Choir and the Barbary Coast Jazz Ensemble. Prior to beginning at Groton, Dixon had a brief stint playing professional basketball in the American Basketball Association and the Independent Basketball Association for two seasons. He was also the organist for his hometown church in Danville, Ill. In his free time he loves traveling, meeting new people and creating music.

Harvard Medical School and Harvard Business School. Doyle received a degree in English Literature from Boston University and currently resides in Sherborn, Mass.

A L U M N I T RU ST E E S RONALD DIXON ’06 is the regional director of major gifts at Phillips Exeter Academy. He previously worked at Groton School as the director of diversity outreach and assistant director of admission. He graduated from Dartmouth College with a B.A. in economics and

CAROLINE TRUSTEY ’13 graduated from The University of Notre Dame in May 2017, where she completed a major in neuroscience and a minor in theology. She will begin graduate study at Marquette University this fall, en route to a master’s degree in mental health counseling with a concentration in addiction recovery. At Brooks, Trustey ran cross-country, managed the boys 1st basketball team, played lacrosse and rowed crew. She was also a school prefect and co-president of the Phillips Brooks Society.

INTERESTED IN THE ALUMNI BOARD? The Brooks School Alumni Board bolsters the ongoing relationship between the school and its alumni. The board’s subcommittees spearhead networking events, community volunteer days and the annual Giving Day, among other initiatives. For more information and to get involved, please visit the Alumni tab on the school website or email alumni@brooksschool.org.

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NEWS + N OT ES Shovels and hard hats stand ready at the formal groundbreaking for Brooks’s new Center for the Arts. The ceremony took place over Alumni Weekend, and it marked the beginning of the most ambitious construction project in school history.

N EWS F RO MECA CA M PUS SC N E M PUS


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AT H L E T E S POT L I G H T

Jason Gold ’18 The incoming senior prefect excels on the field, on the mat and in the classroom through hard work and discipline. Jason Gold ’18 has a presence on campus that is much larger than his diminutive frame. In fact, Gold’s role at Brooks is oversized: The incoming senior prefect is not only his form’s ranking scholar, but he’s also part of student government, involved in Brooks Brothers and Sisters, and a co-head of the school’s revitalized investment club. And, to boot, he’s a member of the reigning ISL-champion boys 1st soccer team, an All-ISL and All-New England wrestler and a captain of the boys 1st lacrosse team. When asked about any of his accomplishments — about his top academic record; about his ability to maneuver through a field of lacrosse players that often have a head, shoulders and 60 pounds on him; about his place as a leader for the student body — Gold settles on a variation of the same mantra: “I just work my hardest,” he says. “Who knows what could happen?” Gold, who hails from New Canaan, Conn., knew that the smaller classes and accessible faculty of a boarding school would complement his learning style. He toured a series of boarding high schools as a prospective student, but Brooks was his last stop. “When my visit here was over, my parents and I sort of just looked at each other,” Gold says. “We all just knew that this was the place.” The feeling of community on campus drew him in, he says, along with the structure of the Brooks classroom: He thought that the small, discussion-based classes would allow him to contribute, and being able to work closely with teachers and

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collaborate with classmates would help him learn. Gold was right: Now, he has the highest GPA in his form, and he says that academics are his “highest priority after my family, of course, and being a good person.” He particularly enjoys math, Spanish and history: math, because he likes numbers and arriving at “a definite answer to a problem”; Spanish, because he enjoys learning about different cultures, and feels that the ability to speak more than one language will open doors in what he calls “this globalizing world”; and history, because he enjoys “seeing how trends change over time — to compare, say, an ancient Chinese dynasty to U.S. democracy, and see how one of those things relates to the other.” Gold maintains that the structure athletics places on his days helps his classroom performance. “I think it’s different for everyone,” he says, “but for me, I like to plan things out and organize, so being busy and having a busy schedule help me prioritize my time. I go to practice right after class, then I lift, then I start my homework. Sports definitely help me get my work done and focus.” Gold’s experiences with each of the three programs he plays for differ. He played on the boys 2nd soccer team in the fall of his third-form year. He considered it “just a fun thing to do,” but, encouraged by friends on the 1st team and true to form, he “just kept working hard” and made the 1st team as a fourth-former. He’s a reserve player, and he says that role has shown him “what sports really mean. Every team

needs leaders; every team needs role players. Everyone makes a difference, and that’s what creates a team.” Gold worked hard on the lacrosse field, also. This helped him stand out to boys 1st head coach Dean Charpentier when Gold was a third-former; Gold has started every game save one since his third-form year. “It’s not necessarily Jason’s size or strength that contribute to the player he is,” Charpentier says. “He’s highly skilled, and I imagine that’s a result of him taking a similar approach to athletics that he does to academics. He’s a hard worker, he knows what he needs to work on and he knows how to work on it.” Gold says that lacrosse is his favorite sport to play. In fact, he even got the opportunity to practice with a lacrosse team based in Seville, Spain while he was a student on the Exchange Program over spring break in March. “I think lacrosse is the perfect combination of soccer, hockey and football,” he says, “and I love the fast-paced nature of it. I play attack, and as a small player I take pride in being quick and agile. I play against some big defensemen. I think it’s fun to play against them, and I just try to run around them.” Moreover, Gold decided to throw his hat in with the wrestling team as a third-former after former captain Chris Cervizzi ’15 and other wrestlers approached him. “Everyone says you should try new things here, so I decided to try wrestling,” Gold says. “That was one of the best decisions I’ve made in my life. Wrestling has

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changed me, not only athletically but also personally, academically and in how I see the world.” Gold explains that wrestling is, he says, “a very grueling sport” — it requires cutting weight, enduring long matches, blood, sweat — but also, it illuminates the balance between the individual who competes in matches and the team score, which every match result contributes to. Gold hopes to play lacrosse in college: He says he wants to “continue to contribute to a sport and a team and a school.” Until then, though, he looks forward to finishing out his well-rounded Brooks career in style. In Gold’s opinion, Brooks has “the perfect balance between academics, athletics and social life. You see kids contributing in the arts, for example, contributing in the classroom, on the field; it’s a testament to the balance that this school has.” He says he’s grateful to Brooks for giving him and other students so much opportunity. “If you don’t play sports, you can contribute artistically, go on exchange, belong to student clubs,” he says. “Brooks is a place where you can contribute in different ways, which we’re lucky to have.”

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N EWS F RO M PUS AT HLET I CSMNCA EWS

Standing Strong SOFTBALL SHAKES UP SCHEDULE

The Brooks 1st softball team showed up to play this spring. The squad stormed to an 11–5 record this year on the heels of an 8–7 campaign in 2016. The 2017 stretch featured a combination of close wins — including a 6–5, nine-inning win over Noble and Greenough School in late April and a 2–0 win over Phillips Andover Academy to close out the year — and a stretch of offensive blowouts, including a five-game win streak during which Brooks outscored opponents 58–11. The program’s ascendance over the past few years is largely due to the success of its sixth-form tri-captain triumvirate: Molly Carabatsos and Bridget Cifuni, pitchers who picked up All-ISL and All-ISL Honorable Mention nods, respectively; and catcher Gabi Hillner, who was also named to the All-ISL team. Together, Carabatsos, Cifuni and Hillner formed a battery that provided a firm foundation for the growth of the team around them. Cifuni and Carabatsos combined to start 14 of the team’s 16 games; Carabatsos posted a 1.183 ERA on the year, and Cifuni led the staff with 51 strikeouts. Hillner, meanwhile, powered the team on offense: She led the team in almost every offensive category, including hits, home runs, batting average and extra-base hits.

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Bridget Cifuni ’17 was a mainstay for the Brooks softball program for four years, including this year’s 11–5 season.

“Coach [Andrea] Heinze and I truly enjoyed this season,” head coach Brian Martin says. “The athletes stepped up, believed in themselves and performed. It doesn’t get much better than that. The old reliables were awesome, and the talented newcomers got better each game. This season will be hard to duplicate with regards to losing the sixth-formers, but the returning players have never backed down from a challenge. If I know them, they will welcome it!” Although Brooks loses a defining presence with the class of 2017, the program looks forward to its next steps. Shortstop Carolyn Kukas ’19, who also got an All-ISL nod this year, will ground the program next year. Kukas, Carly Stefanini ’20 and Jen

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Mills ’20 should lead the Brooks offense. Mills should also lead from the mound: Over 15.2 innings this spring, Mills allowed 15 hits, 10 walks and seven earned runs while striking out 19.

LACROSSE TEAMS BATTLE

Both the boys 1st and girls 1st lacrosse teams showed mettle this spring, improving on their previous records and turning heads around the conference. The boys moved their league record to 7–7 — a strong improvement over last year’s 5–11 ISL campaign — which included wins over Groton School, Lawrence Academy and a thrilling, 9–8 overtime win against Thayer Academy on Alumni Weekend. “With some injured players back from the previous season, we made great strides this year,” says head coach Dean Charpentier. “The sixth form was the backbone of that success. Not only were they accomplished players, they were excellent leaders. While we will miss our sixth-form class, I’m really excited to see the younger players who have been so instrumental take over the personality of this team. They’re friends, they’re good teammates, they put the team first.” Four Brooksians picked up postseason honors: Michael Hughes ’19 and Paul Miller ’17 were named All-ISL, and Kyle Helfrich ’17 and Will Gibeley ’17 got All-ISL Honorable Mention recognition. The girls team, meanwhile, doubled its win total from last year. Head coach Wendy Brennan says that at the beginning of the season, she laid out a goal for the team: “All the games we had lost by one or two goals the year before, I wanted to win those,” she says. “And we did.”

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The team loses two sixthformers to graduation: tricaptain Els Caulo and Alexia Ames. Brennan sings Caulo’s and Ames’s praises as athletes and leaders. She notes that “[Caulo] was a big contributor on offense, and [Ames] was a very stable force on defense.” But, Brennan says, she’s confident in the team’s future. “We have seven thirdformers who have already made a huge contribution, and who will continue to. That’s exciting as we move the program forward.” The team will look to its upperclass leadership: captains Teagan Canning ’18 and Kathryn Delaney ’18, who also captained the team this year, and who each picked up an All-ISL slot; and Jordyn Arakelian ’18 and Caroline Yonce ’19, who were each named to the All-ISL Honorable Mention squad.

MOVING UP

The class of 2017 boasts more than two dozen members who will continue their athletic careers in college, including the following athletes: Men’s Basketball
 Fru’Nwi Che Amherst College Tamenang Choh Brown University Ethan Gabert-Doyon Emerson College Isaiah Godwin Catholic University Adonis Williams American International College Men’s Crew
 Arnaud Harmange Boston University Henry Hollingsworth Brown University Women’s Cross-Country
 Caroline O’Shea University of Vermont Field Hockey Els Caulo Bates College Kelly Raymond Brown University Football Owen Rosenberger Colgate University Women’s Hockey Mairi Anthony Connecticut College Gabi Hillner Salve Regina University

A SOLID SHOWING

The girls 1st four left its mark on the 2017 New England Interscholastic Rowing Association Regatta, held in May. The crew — which loses no sixth-formers to graduation — finished in fourth place in the final, behind only Deerfield Academy, The Winsor School and Noble and Greenough School.

Men’s Lacrosse Will Gibeley Dartmouth College Kyle Helfrich College of the Holy Cross Gavin McNamara College of the Holy Cross Paul Miller College of the Holy Cross (fall 2018) Softball
 Bridget Cifuni Brandeis University Men’s Soccer
 Alex Chaban Bowdoin College Dylan Steele Amherst College

W MORE ONLINE: Please visit the Brooks athletics website at www.brooksschool. org/athletics for more information on your favorite Brooks team, including schedules, game recaps and up-to-date news.

Women’s Soccer
 Kate Donovan Syracuse University Mia Karras Boston College Shannon Ryan Fairfield University Women’s Squash Molly Carabatsos Connecticut College Wrestling
 Nick Konovalchik Washington and Lee University

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2017

During Memorial Day weekend, the class of 2017 graduated from Brooks. The 103 members of the form took time to celebrate, reflect and look back over their time on campus before setting their sights on their next accomplishments.

GRADUATING 

WITH HONORS

THE MEMORIAL DAY weather may have been chilly and unsettled, but clouds and coats didn’t put a damper on Brooks’s celebration of the academic year and the class of 2017. Lawn Ceremony, which was held on Sunday, May 28, highlighted student accomplishment in the arts, athletics and academics. Prize Day, which took place the following morning, allowed the school community to recognize the enduring achievements of the class of 2017. Head of School John Packard began Lawn Ceremony by commenting on the heights Brooks students reached over the 2016–2017 academic year. “The hard work, exceptional leadership and superb citizenship so many students have shared and provided leaves us proud of the year we have had together,” he said. Lawn Ceremony was broken up into three areas of focus. First, Chair of the Arts Department Rob Lazar presented prizes in the arts. Gio Vargas ’17, who spoke on the arts at Brooks, said that the ability to create and appreciate art is a universal prerequisite to being a human being. Second, Director of Athletics Bobbie Crump-Burbank awarded prizes in athletics. Gabi Hillner ’17 — who, along with classmates Alexia Ames and Bridget Cifuni, was recognized for having played on 1st teams for each of her 12 seasons at Brooks — spoke on the value of teammates. Third, Associate Head for Academic Affairs Lance Latham awarded academic prizes that ranged from recognition of outstanding

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A group of soon-to-be graduates after Boo Hoo Chapel.

papers in the humanities to recognition of notable work in physics and Latin. Kyle Helfrich ’17 then relayed his thoughts on his academic journey at Brooks. Boo Hoo Chapel followed Lawn Ceremony. As always, the service ended with the faculty and younger forms processing out of Ashburn Chapel, past a waiting line of sixth-formers who received and gave hugs and well-wishes. The next morning brought Prize Day, and with it, the sixth form’s receipt of its diplomas. Mr. Packard spoke on the form’s time at Brooks, and said that he hoped its members would view Brooks as “a port of sorts throughout your life, and a place that reminds you of who you are at your very best.” He stressed that “it is important that this class of 2017 knows that this school, more theirs today than anyone else’s, will always be there for them.” Mr. Packard conducted a moment of silence — on, he noted, Memorial Day — for Alexi Whitney ’96, who was killed in December 2016 while on a mission for our country in Afghanistan. As the ceremony continued, Sixth-Form Speaker Jack Yang contemplated the way in which, over four years on campus, Brooks brought the individuals of the class of 2017 together through shared experiences and memories. Mr. Packard then awarded the form its diplomas, assisted by President of the Board of Trustees Steve Gorham ’85, P’17, P’21, before School Minister the Rev. Julie A. Mavity Maddalena concluded the ceremony with a benediction.

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“You — we — are all great artists … you can’t be human without being an artist.” G I O VA RGAS ’ 1 7, S P E A K I N G O N T H E A RTS AT B RO O KS D U R I N G L AW N C E R E M O N Y 6 5

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[ 1 ] From left to right: Andrew Konovalchik ’14, Admission Office Administrative Assistant Sheila Konovalchik P’14, P’17, Nick Konovalchik ’17 and history faculty Alex Konovalchik P’14, P’17 after the conclusion of Prize Day.

[ 4 ] Ollie Gorham ’17 receives a Brooks patch on the morning of Prize Day.

[ 2 ] Molly Carabatsos ’17 (left) and classmate Shannon Ryan on Prize Day.

[ 6 ] Tradition holds that a bagpiper plays as students enter Boo Hoo Chapel, which takes place after Lawn Ceremony. The bagpiper plays again as the students exit Ashburn Chapel at the conclusion of the event.

[ 3 ] Gio Vargas ’17 delivers his speech on his experiences with the arts at Brooks at Lawn Ceremony.

[ 5 ] Kenza Bouanane ’17 during the traditional faculty procession that follows Boo Hoo Chapel.

[ 7 ] Kim O’Neill Packard ’87 (left) gives Els Caulo ’17 a rosette, which is traditionally worn by Brooks graduates on Prize Day. [ 8 ] Jackson Quinn ’17 celebrates after Prize Day. [ 9 ] Members of the class of 2017 chat on the morning of Prize Day. From left to right: Johnny Trotto, Andrew Tallas, Pete Ahonen, Paul Miller and Gavin McNamara.

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G R A D UAT I O N S NA PS H OTS

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[ 1 ] Ritika Kommareddi ’17 embraces classical languages faculty Deb Davies following Boo Hoo Chapel. [ 2 ] Gabi Hillner ’17 reflects on her Brooks athletics career at Lawn Ceremony. [ 3 ] Adonis Williams ’17 at the rosette ceremony on the morning of Prize Day. [ 4 ] Grace Lindsey ’17 (left) and Owen Rosenberger ’17 enter Prize Day in style. [ 5 ] A group of 2017 graduates gathers before Prize Day begins. From left to right: Kate Donovan, Molly Carabatsos, Ellie Cordes, Alexia Ames, Alex Comiskey, Mairi Anthony, Mia Karras. [ 6 ] From left to right: Class of 2017 graduates Sam Wakelin, Alex Chaban,

Liam Scott, Lee Goodman

provides space for students

and Jackson Quinn getting ready to proceed into the Prize Day tent.

to gather or reflect, is located in the courtyard between the Science Center and the Classroom Building.

[ 7 ] A student poses for a selfie with Head of School John Packard — and with the class of 2017 in the background — on the Prize Day stage. [ 8 ] Alex Hajdukiewicz ’17 (center) escorts his mother, science faculty Laura Hajdukiewicz, into Ashburn Chapel for the Prize Day Chapel Service. [ 9 ] The formal dedication of the Remembrance Garden on the morning of Lawn Ceremony. The garden was funded through gifts to the Anna Trustey Memorial Fund. Trustey, a 2016 graduate, was lost along with her father, Joe P’13, P’16, P’19, in July 2015. The garden, which

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[ 10 ] Nick Thorndike ’17 (right) during the Prize Day ceremony. [ 11 ] Graduating students cluster around a delivery of toy cars on the morning of Prize Day. Students gave the cars to Head of School John Packard as they crossed the stage to receive their diplomas, in a nod to this year’s revised student driving policies. [ 12 ] From left to right: Elaine Perez ’17, Melany Blanco ’18 and Sarah Palmer ’17 share a laugh at the Head of School’s House on the morning of Prize Day.

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“I have been truly blessed. Twelve seasons, 12 teams, 12 families. But, there has always been just one name written across my chest: Brooks.” GA B I H I L L N E R ’ 1 7 R E F L ECT I N G O N T H E AT H L E T I CS P RO G RA M D U R I N G L AW N C E R E M O N Y

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Recognition & Praise

AWA R D S

Brooks awarded more than four dozen prizes at Lawn Ceremony and Prize Day, recognizing The Reverend George F. Vought Prize: awarded by the Head of School to honor a member of the faculty in his or her first few years of teaching who has made special contributions to the School and has exhibited notable professional growth:

stephanie carolyn holmes, english

The Kerri Ann Kattar Prize: awarded annually by the faculty to that member of the graduating class who, by her warmth and generosity of spirit to others, by her outstanding contribution to Brooks athletics, by her presence alone, has added that precious quality of kindness for which we remember Kerri Ann Kattar:

caroline elizabeth o’shea ’17

The Trustees Prize: awarded by the faculty to any member of the school community who has served beyond the call of duty: hannah elisabeth

latham ’17

The Faculty Prize: given by George C. Haas and awarded annually to a student who has made outstanding contributions to the life of the School: yutong coco sun ’17 The Headmaster’s Prize: given in memory of George B. Case Jr.: julia scott moore ’17

ART AWARDS

ATHLETIC AWARDS

The George A. Tirone Prize: awarded by Mrs. Rudolph Muto, in memory of her father, to a Middle School student who shows unusual promise in the Visual Arts: madeline marie

The ISL Award of Excellence: boys: alexander maxwell

shea ’19

The Buhl Photography Prize:

ariana marie riccio ’17

The Russell Morse Prize: awarded to an Upper School student who has made distinguished contributions to the visual arts at Brooks:

hannah elisabeth latham ’17

The Parkman Prize in Drama: given in memory of Terry Parkman to a student who has worked long and hard backstage with no thought of any reward: duncan andrew

davies ’17

The Knowlton Drama Prize: given in memory of Warren Knowlton, of the Class of 1967, and awarded to a member of the Brooks community who has shown those qualities of loyalty and devotion to drama and versatility and enthusiasm in work before and behind the scenes that was typified by Warren Knowlton: maxwell

crosby currie ’17

The Music Prize: awarded in recognition of dedicated, longterm study of an instrument or voice that has resulted in the highest level of musical performance in the graduating class (two recipients in 2017):

rowan jack beaudoinfriede ’17 (vocals) and henry mccormick hollingsworth ’17 (instrumental)

chaban ’17

choe ’19

ames ’17

The Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Medal: for excellence in Mathematics and Science:

girls: alexia madeline

The Athletic Prize: An annual award to two sixthformers who, in the opinion of coaches, have distinguished themselves in sportsmanship and athletic ability, and whose achievements have demonstrated an outstanding record in the athletic life at Brooks: boys: owen flaherty

rosenberger ’17 girls: gabrielle marcelline hillner ’17

The Frank D. Ashburn Athletic Award: given by the Cogswell family to honor an outstanding individual or team performance in which intangible, extra qualities have added a special flavor for the school: the

girls 1st basketball team

ACADEMIC AWARDS The Edmund Samuel Carr Prize in Beginning Latin: kelsey jill

moody ’20

The Edmund Samuel Carr Prize in Latin: duncan

andrew davies ’17, ritika kommareddi ’17

The Spanish Prize: nicole

karina rivera ’17

The Rene Champollion French Prize: allison maureen

sheehan ’17

The Charles C. Cottingham Class of 2008 Chinese Prize: to be awarded annually to a student who has exhibited an enthusiasm and appreciation for the Chinese language and culture: joon hyung lee ’17 The A. G. Davis Philip Prize: given by the Science Department to an individual

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LUC I E JA D OW ’ 1 7

who has demonstrated an interest in and who shows considerable promise in Science: hye in emily

da in diane lee ’18

The John J. Cabral Prize: given to the Brooks student who has shown a high degree of interest in physics and for the depth of involvement in the subject: zi

qi jack yang ’17

The Nicholas J. Evangelos Science Prize: yutong coco

sun ’17

The Mathematics Prize:

yutong coco sun ’17

The Howell Van Gerbig Jr. Prize: given for the best essay on the development of political institutions, for her paper titled “The American Woman: How Her Role Progressed from 1848 to 1920”: hannah victoria

maver ’18

The Richard K. Irons Prize: for the best essay on a pressing problem in American history or international relations, for her paper titled “Dissecting the Multifarious Entity of ISIS: Propaganda and Psychology”:

kenza bouanane ’17

The Michael W. McCahill Prize In History: awarded to a Sixth-Form student who has demonstrated a love for the discipline by taking a wide and rigorous program in History, a mastery of analytical thinking and writing, an enthusiasm for the craft of historical research, a delight in the exploration and exchange of ideas, and an empathy for the human condition: samuel hobart

wakelin ’17

The E. Graham Ward English Prize: awarded to a student who has demonstrated a love of literature in all of its forms. This student is a

B RO O KS BU L L E T I N


the school’s academic, artistic, athletics and community leaders. talented reader and writer gifted with the ability to respond to literature both analytically and creatively: alexandra elizabeth

iamonaco ’17

The Denison University Book Award: awarded to an outstanding fifth-former with a proven record of academic achievement and an interest in pursuing the study of English literature, creative writing, or poetry at the college level:

emma rose dawson ’18

The Publications Prize: awarded to a student whose diligence, devotion and skill have contributed significantly to the successful production of a Brooks publication: rowan jack

beaudoin-friede ’17

The Wilder Speaking Prize (given by John G. and H. Todd Cobey Jr.):

yinlan lami zhang ’19

The Columbia University Club of New England Prize: awarded to a Fifth-Former who has demonstrated an ability to combine academic achievement, personal character, extra-curricular contribution to the school, and accomplishment in and dedication to a field of interest meriting personal recognition: da in diane

lee ’18

The Harvard Club of Andover Prize: awarded by the Harvard Club of Andover to a Fifth-Former nominated by the Faculty for high academic achievement, leadership, and active participation in school affairs: jason lawrence

gold ’18

The Phillips Brooks Prize: donated by the Phillips Brooks Society and awarded by the School Minister in memory of the Reverend George Frederick Vought to a Sixth-Former who, during his or her time at the School, has followed in the path of Phillips Brooks by offering constant love, exemplary service and good humor to the community and by setting a high standard for others:

samuel hobart wakelin ’17

SUMMER 2017

The Oscar Root Prize: given by Morgan H. Harris Jr. to a member of the Brooks community who has exemplified certain characteristics with which Oscar M. Root for many years enriched the life at Brooks. These characteristics include excellence in the sciences, devotion to nature study, and a sense of humor which provided a rare overview of life: alexandra

elizabeth iamonaco ’17

The Jolene and Stephen C. Eyre Prize for Scholarly Achievement: this prize is awarded each year to the ranking scholar in the Sixth Form: yutong coco sun ’17

GENERAL PRIZES The Malcolm G. Chace III Prize: awarded to a third-, fourth- and fifth-former who, in the judgment of the Headmaster, has made the most personal progress during the year: third form: danielle rose

riccio ’20

fourth form: pawin

pokachaiyapat ’19 fifth form: jaylen aubrey cromwell ’18 The Leonard S. Perkins Prize: awarded by the Faculty to that member of the Fifth Form who makes an outstanding contribution to the life of the school: nalia

medina ’18

The George B. Blake Prize: awarded in recognition of extended voluntary and generous service to others: leland maxwell

goodman ’17, john louis trotto ’17, zi qi jack yang ’17

The Kilborn Bowl: given by Mr. and Mrs. John W. Kilborn for the greatest all-around improvement:

connor cadbury goff ’17

The William R. Ferris Jr. Prize: given by Howell van Gerbig in honor of William R. Ferris ’60, and awarded to a sixth-form student who stands out among his peers on account of the depth and range of his intellectual curiosity, energy and creativity: yutong coco sun ’17 The Harvey P. Hood Prize: awarded in recognition of special interests such as working with young children, making things with one’s hands, and in memory of a lively, gentle view of life: ritika

kommareddi ’17

The Headmaster Emeritus Prize: given by the faculty for any reason it considers appropriate: rowan

jack beaudoin-friede ’17, sarah ellen palmer ’17

The Dunnell Prize: given by the faculty in honor of Jacob Dunnell and William W. Dunnell III to a sixthformer who has worked without fanfare to better the school:

nicholas alexander konovalchik ’17

The Allen Ashburn Prize: given by the late James D. Regan and awarded each year by the Headmaster for any purpose which he deems suitable: ji hyeong

james kim ’17

The Thomas Perkins Brooks Jr. Prize: given in memory of Ensign Brooks, who was lost in the Battle of Leyte Gulf, and awarded annually by the Headmaster to a member of the sixth form who, during his or her career at Brooks, has met certain requirements of development, leadership and responsibility: tamenang achu

choh ’17

The Russell Prize: given by the late Richard S. Russell for an outstanding single contribution to the life of the community during the year: kyle mulligan

helfrich ’17

“Brooks has transformed us in ways beyond our imagination. I know that I can speak to that myself.” S I XT H - FO R M S P E A K E R JAC K YA N G O N P R I Z E DAY


CO L L E G E S

The Next Challenge The class of 2017 is well-prepared to attend a long list of some of the country’s — and the world’s — most highly regarded colleges and universities. From small liberal arts colleges to Ivy League stalwarts to large state universities, the class will bring a sense of academic inquiry, a dedication to community, and a desire to engage with classmates and faculty to college. American International College

Rhode Island College

Amherst College (2)

Rhode Island School of Design

Bates College

Salve Regina University (2)

Boston College

Southern Methodist University (3)

Boston University (2) Bowdoin College Brandeis University Brown University (3) Bucknell University (3) Chapman University Colby College (2) Colgate University College of the Holy Cross (2) Colorado College Columbia University Connecticut College (2) Dartmouth College (2) Elon University (3) Emerson College (3) Fairfield University (2) Georgetown University Hamilton College (N.Y.) Hamline University Indiana University at Bloomington

Stanford University Syracuse University (6) Texas Christian University The Catholic University of America

The University of Iowa The University of Tampa Trinity College (2) University of California, Santa Cruz University of Chicago University of Denver University of Edinburgh University of Massachusetts Amherst (3) University of Minnesota Twin Cities University of Southern California University of Virginia (3)

Lehigh University (2)

University of Wisconsin – Madison (2)

Northeastern University (5) Pepperdine University

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Tulane University

University of Vermont

North Carolina State University

KY L E H E L F R I C H ’ 1 7, D U R I N G H I S L AW N C E R E M O N Y S P E EC H O N T H E B RO O KS ACA D E M I C E X P E R I E N C E .

The University of Georgia

Johns Hopkins University

New York University (6)

“I could not be more grateful for my time here, and I’d do it all over again if I could.”

The University of Alabama

James Madison University

Miami University, Oxford

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Virginia Tech Wake Forest University Washington and Lee University Wesleyan University

Providence College

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3 [ 1 ] Hunter Runnells ’17 (left) and Kelly Zhang ’17 celebrate as they proceed into the Prize Day tent. [ 2 ] Charlie Curtis ’17 jubiliantly crosses the stage and receives his diploma on Prize Day. [ 3 ] Katherine von Stade ’17 enjoys the Prize Day proceedings.

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2017 COM I NG HOME In mid-May, almost 300 Brooks alumni and their guests returned to Great Pond Road for Alumni Weekend. The unseasonably cool weather didn’t chill the Brooksians’ spirits, as they celebrated, reminisced and reconnected over the two-day event. BROOKS welcomed its alumni back to campus with open arms in May. Scores of alumni from class years ending in 2 or 7, along with other graduates and guests, enjoyed a two-day stay on Great Pond Road. For the past four years, Alumni Weekend has been held when spring classes are still in session, allowing graduates to attend classes and experience the academic atmosphere of today’s Brooks. In addition, landscape paintings by artist Tjasa Owen ’89 were on exhibit in the Robert Lehman Art Center. Friday included: a campus tour for the 50th reunion class of 1967; the Ashburn Luncheon for alumni celebrating their 50th reunion or greater or who have made a provision for Brooks in their estate; and exhibits and events that included an alumni golf outing at the North Andover Country Club and evening cocktails in the Danforth Room with the alumni board. Alumni then attended dinners around campus and in Boston, where they had time to reconnect and catch up with old friends. Saturday’s festivities included an early-morning Alumni Row at the Brooks boathouse. The annual Memorial Chapel commenced at 9 a.m. in Frank D. Ashburn Chapel. The service was followed by Head of School John Packard’s yearly State of the School address. He shared an overarching theme: “What we are in pursuit of as a school, really, is trying to find our way to be a better version of who we are,” Mr. Packard

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said. “What we hope you feel when you revisit the school is that it’s changed so much, and that it is intent on continuing to change in ways that it needs to … but that it also gives you a sense of where you are.” Continuing in Ashburn Chapel, Mr. Packard ceded the floor to a panel of current faculty and students, who each addressed the crowd on a different aspect of the Brooks experience, from teaching style to the ability of students to reach outside of their comfort zones at the school. Then, Mr. Packard took the lectern again to chair the awarding of the Alumni Bowl award, the Alumni Shield award and the induction of two new members of the Athletic Hall of Fame. Jonathan Gibbons ’92 received the Alumni Bowl; William MacVittie ’02 received the Alumni Shield; and Tim Bickford ’67 and the 1991–1992 boys 1st cross-country team were inducted into the Athletic Hall of Fame. The crowd filed out of Ashburn Chapel to attend the long-awaited groundbreaking of the Center for the Arts, the complex currently under construction that will house the visual, musical and performing arts together in a state-of-the-art building at the center of campus. After lunch in Wilder Dining Hall, alumni spent the afternoon informally milling around campus, attending athletic contests — including a thrilling boys 1st lacrosse overtime win against Thayer Academy — and touring the school. Roz Mays ’02 screened a documentary about her career as a plus-size pole dancer to an appreciative audience in Room X. “Dangerous Curves” explores Mays’s navigation of the media, image and various types of public exposure. Saturday night’s All-Alumni Reception and Dinner brought the celebration into the night. The highlight of the event was Mr. Packard’s bestowing of the Distinguished Brooksian award, given to former board president Nick Booth ’67, P’05.

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The class of 1967 enjoyed a tour of campus on Friday, May 12. Here, the group leaves Ashburn Chapel.

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“I’ve been extremely fortunate in my time to have taught beside some legendary teachers … Today I teach alongside arguably an equally talented and committed group of colleagues — maybe not as quirky, but they care as deeply about educating their students.” 2

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MATHEMATICS FACULTY DOUG BURBANK, SPEAKING IN ASHBURN CHAPEL ON SATURDAY MORNING. BURBANK HAS TAUGHT AT BROOKS SINCE 1986.

[ 1 ] Members of the class of 2002 meet up in the Science Center. From left to right: Kimberly O’Kane, John O’Kane ’02, Dean of Students Willie Waters ’02, Ashley Banker Enthoven ’02, Roz Mays ’02, Allison Caffrey ’02, Peter Gett ’02, Ariana Gett, D. K. Kim ’02.

[ 4 ] Bob Chappell ’67 (right) shares memories with an old friend.

[ 8 ] Bill Ray ’72 (left) and Denis Wettlaufer ’72 outside Ashburn Chapel.

[ 5 ] Many archival items were placed on display over Alumni Weekend, including, shown here, Prize Day rosettes, postcards and other Brooks paraphernalia.

[ 9 ] Mathematics faculty Kihak Nam ’99 greets a returning graduate while waiting to enter the Saturday night reception.

[ 2 ] Many alumni took part in Brooks’s Oral History Project over Alumni Weekend. They were videotaped recounting stories about their time at Brooks at a station set up in Frick Dining Hall.

[ 6 ] Marianne Augot Fleischman ’87, P’19, P’21 (left) and Robert Fleischman P’19, P’21 take in the boys 1st lacrosse game on Saturday.

[ 3 ] Sylvia Kimball Perry ’87 (right) shares memories with another Brooksian.

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[ 7 ] Linda Kaufhold (left) and Toby Goodyear ’67, P’08, P’09 catch up with an old friend.

[ 10 ] John Runnells ’82, P’17 rings the bell in Ashburn Chapel to open the Saturday morning schedule of events. [ 11 ] Head of School John Packard (standing) addresses the crowd at the Ashburn Luncheon. [ 12 ] Director of the Archives Deanna Stuart (left) reviews archival photographs in the school archives.

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[ 1 ] Annie McClelland ’12 (left) and Jackie Kelleher ’12 enjoy their time back on the Brooks campus.

[ 4 ] Sue Clark (left) and Corky Clark ’67 enjoy themselves at the All-Alumni Reception and Dinner.

[ 7 ] Head of School John Packard gives his annual State of the School address in Ashburn Chapel.

[ 2 ] From left to right: Margi Drinker Dillon ’87, former faculty Mary Drinker Gooch P’87 and Associate Head for Student Affairs and mathematics faculty Andrea Heinze, deep in discussion.

[ 5 ] Greta Lundberg ’97 (left) and Jake Lamarine ’97 before Saturday’s All-Alumni Reception and Dinner.

[ 8 ] Orville Mills ’97.

[ 6 ] From left to right: Head of School John Packard, President of the Board of Trustees Steve Gorham ’85, P’17, P’21, former board president and Distinguished Brooksian recipient Nick Booth ’67, P’05 and board vice president Whitney Romoser Savignano ’87 break ground for the school’s new Center for the Arts, which is scheduled to be completed in fall 2018.

[ 10 ] Kat Wheeler ’02 (center), flanked by Peter Richardson (left) and Wick Hill ’01.

[ 3 ] From left to right: Robert Fleischman P’19, P’21, President of the Board of Trustees Steve Gorham ’85, P’17, P’21 and Trustee John Barker ’87, P’21 enjoy the Saturday night festivities.

[ 9 ] Faculty emeritus Michael McCahill H’07, P’91, P’97.

[ 11 ] From left to right: James Medeiros ’92, Christine Byrnes ’92 and Kris Landreth Dean ’92.

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A LU M N I AWA R D S

Alumni Awards Brooks awarded the annual Alumni Shield and Alumni Bowl awards in Ashburn Chapel on Saturday, and bestowed its Distinguished Brooksian award in front of a capacity crowd at Saturday night’s All-Alumni Reception and Dinner.

Distinguished Brooksian Award

The Distinguished Brooksian award honors a member of the Brooks community whose life and contributions to society exemplify the nobility of character and usefulness to humanity embodied in the spirit of the school.

william n. booth ’67, p’05

“This year’s Distinguished Brooksian has been a mentor, friend and confidant in ways that will matter to my wife, Kim, and me for the rest of our lives. Thus, I feel especially privileged to have this opportunity tonight,” Mr. Packard said, as he began his speech honoring Nick Booth as Distinguished Brooksian. He continued, recounting Booth’s expansive time at Brooks as a student — as an athlete, an artist and a student leader — and as a 12-year member and 10-year president of the school’s board of trustees. With an accomplished career in finance behind him, Mr. Packard explained,

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Booth “continues to put his expertise to work by serving on a number of boards and is an integral member of the school’s investment committee.” As president of the board of trustees, Booth “led and stewarded the school with great vision and care,” Mr. Packard said. Booth’s time on the board transformed the school: During his tenure, Mr. Packard was named head of school; the Science Center was built; and The Campaign for Brooks launched. Booth, Mr. Packard said, shepherded the school through these changes, and saw the school through the adversity of the 2008 financial crisis. “His leadership and steady hand were indispensable during those years when we turned our attention inward, found our way to the school’s current mission and earned support that allowed us to build the first new dormitory at Brooks in 30 years,” Mr. Packard continued. “The Campaign for Brooks that we are now pushing to complete by the end of next year was driven

in large part by his belief that our school deserves the highest levels of support and by voting with his feet — a $5 million gift to the effort.” Mr. Packard ended on a personal note. “His care for others comes through without fail,” he said. “He can and wants to work with anyone who wants to move something forward, and the fact that Brooks School has drawn his attention and energy for the past 12 years has deepened our ability to achieve our mission, reach our students and be a school all of us should be deeply proud of.”

Alumni Bowl Award

The Alumni Bowl award, given by the Brooks School Alumni Board, recognizes dedicated and thoughtful service to this school.

jonathan f. gibbons ’92

The volunteer service of Jon Gibbons began when he was still a student at Brooks, a three-sport athlete who also served as president of the

B RO O KS BU L L E T I N


Left to right: William N. Booth ’67, P’05 Jonathan F. Gibbons ’92 Major William S. MacVittie ’02 Tim Bickford ’67 Karim Ghachem ’92

Phillips Brooks Society, a dorm prefect and a chapel prefect. Since 2001, Gibbons has served on the alumni board as the head of the giving committee and a class agent, and most recently as the board’s president. Under his watch, the alumni board has been reinvigorated: Gibbons led a restructuring of the alumni board’s committees, which has provided the board with a refocused purpose and direction. Now a school trustee, Gibbons’s work as a volunteer has been largely behind the scenes. He’s planned class reunions, volunteered for phone-a-thons several times, and has supported Brooks for more than 20 years in a row.

Alumni Shield Award

The Alumni Shield award recognizes an alumna or alumnus who graduated from Brooks less than 25 years ago and has made significant contributions in the field of his or her endeavor.

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major william s. macvittie ’02

The attacks of September 11, 2001, occurred in the fall of Mac MacVittie’s sixth-form year at Brooks. He sent an application in to the United States Air Force Academy on September 12, 2001. He knew he would enter the military in wartime; his courage inspires and resonates with Brooksians of all ages. Over the past 15 years, MacVittie has been deployed to the Middle East three times, where he has flown more than 120 combat missions in support of American and coalition troops. He has piloted: medical evacuations; humanitarian missions to deliver food, clothing and water to civilians in Afghanistan, Iraq and Pakistan; and missions of “dignified transfer” to bring home soldiers who have lost their lives. In the summer of 2017, MacVittie returned to the Air Force Academy, where he will be responsible for training a squadron of 100 new cadets.

Athletics Hall of Fame Inductees

Honoring those individuals who have made exceptional contributions to the quality and tradition of athletics here at Brooks.

tim bickford ’67 played football

and ice hockey and was a member of the crew team at Brooks. He helped the football team to 15 straight undefeated games. He was a captain of the hockey team, and even played a game with a broken ankle. His hockey career continued at the University of Vermont. After Brooks, Bickford taught and coached at Belmont Hill School and Moses Brown School.

the 1991–1992 boys 1st cross-country team went 10-0

in the 1991 fall season, and won both the ISL Championship and the New England Championship. karim ghachem ’92 accepted the induction on behalf of his team.

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3 [ 1 ] Self in Community and science faculty Kenya Jones (left) with Bert Nascimento ’10. [ 2 ] Trish Anderson Sherman ’87, P’16 (left) and Kim O’Neill Packard ’87, P’18, P’21 on Main Street. [ 3 ] A group of alumni and their guests tour the visual arts studios, which will be replaced by the Center for the Arts. [ 4 ] From left to right: David Freeman ’67, Peter Van Ness ’67 and Chas Belknap ’67 reminisce at the alumni board cocktail reception.

[ 5 ] From left to right: English faculty Mel Graham, Academic Dean and history faculty Susanna Waters, George Demoulas ’12 and Elijah Soko ’12. [ 6 ] Ashley Banker Enthoven ’02 (left) and Josh Isaacs ’02. [ 7 ] Jeff Sherer ’67 (left) and former faculty Cliff Irons ’63, deep in discussion. [ 8 ] Eddie Lewis ’67 (left) and Mary Feidt at the AllAlumni Reception and Dinner on Saturday night. [ 9 ] Alumni enjoy a trip down memory lane.

“We do not ignore each other on Main Street, or use our phones as a social crutch, and you will get to know the people you share a campus with.” EMMA MARTIN ’17, SPEAKING ABOUT THE ADVANTAGES OF THE SMALL BROOKS COMMUNITY AND THE WAYS IN WHICH IT FOSTERS CLOSE RELATIONSHIPS.

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R EU N I O N N OT ES Alumni stroll the Brooks campus during Alumni Weekend.

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R EU N I O N N OT ES

O B I T UA R I ES

Bernard Carter Fisk ’57 Bernard Carter Fisk, 77, formerly of Greenville, Del., passed away peacefully on Friday, February 3, 2017, at Avow Hospice in Naples, Fla., following a brief illness and months of declining health. He is survived by his wife of 51 years, Alice Collins Fisk; his daughter, Ridgely Fisk Green, son-in-law, Eric Green, grandson, Emerson Green, and granddaughter, Vivian Green; and his son, B. Carter Fisk Jr., and daughter-in-law, Chauntelle Tibbals. Bunny, as he was better known, was born and raised in Greens Farms, Conn., the son of Arthur Lyman Fisk Jr. and Janet Hager Fisk, and later adopted by his stepmother, Emily Burchell Fisk. After losing his mother Janet at a young age, Bunny attended boarding school at Eaglebrook School and Brooks before enrolling at Yale University, where he earned a master’s degree in electrical engineering in 1961. Bunny and Alice met in Bermuda and married a year later, in 1965. Soon after that, Bunny started working at Xerox, and his job there took the couple (then a family) to Rochester, N.Y., and Dallas. The family then moved to Greenville, where they lived for more than 30 years. In 2013, Bunny and Alice moved to Naples to enjoy their golden years in the sunshine state, where Bunny enjoyed wearing shorts every day. Bunny loved food (both cooking it and eating it), gadgets, the New York Giants, the Yale Bulldogs, telling stories (the best ones multiple times), Jim Croce’s music, and nonfiction books on the history of war. But most of all, he loved his family. From supporting Alice’s passions — most recently her alma mater, Doane Academy — to taking Ridgely to horse shows nearly every weekend, to coaching Carter’s soccer teams, Bunny’s life revolved around his family. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations be made in Bunny’s name to Eaglebrook, Brooks, Yale or Avow Hospice.

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R EU N I O N N OT ES

F O R M E R FAC U LT Y

Paul Keaney

Ralph Richards Culbertson ’59 Ralph Richards Culbertson, May 18, 1941, to January 5, 2017, was the son of John D. Culbertson III and Mary Richards Culbertson. He leaves behind his devoted wife, Martha Culbertson; his brother, John D. Culbertson ’62; sister, Tingle C. Barnes; five nieces and nephews; and eight grandnieces and nephews. Born in Sewickley, Penn., outside of Pittsburgh, he attended Sewickley Academy, Brooks, Culver Academy and Pennsylvania State University. Dick, as he was better known, spent most of his career as a manufacturer’s representative, first in New Jersey and then in Southern California. Retiring to South Carolina in 2002 with his wife, Marty, the couple lived in Chocowinity and then Washington, North Carolina. Dick was at Brooks for his third- and fourth-form years. He was an avid golfer, Pittsburgh Steelers fan and trap shooter. Dick loved life, lived large, and will be much missed by his family and many friends.

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Paul John Keaney, son of Jack and Frances Keaney, died May 25, 2017, in Dover, N.H., after a long illness. The oldest of four children, he is predeceased by his sister Harriet and his brother James. He is survived by his sister Mary Ellen; his loving wife of 46 years, Judith; his daughters Anna and Emily; his grandson Gibson; and several nieces and nephews. Keaney was a graduate of Phillips Academy Andover, Harvard University and Wesleyan University’s MALS graduate program. He served in the U.S. Navy on an admiral’s staff aboard the aircraft carrier USS Independence; he saw duty during the Bay of Pigs incident and the Cuban missile crisis. Keaney always considered himself an educator. Beginning in 1964 at Brooks, he taught history and political science to generations of students from diverse backgrounds, cultures and circumstances. He pursued his ideals of education from Brooks to Pomfret School to the fledgling Community School of Naples in Naples, Fla. (where he was the first dean of the upper school and one of its visionary founders), and eventually to Lee Academy in Lee, Maine, where his “official” teaching career ended in 1987. Beyond academics, Keaney was dedicated to educating on the football field. His passion and specialty was youth football, from high- and middle-school programs in New England — including Brooks — to the Police Athletic League in Naples. He also coached the Tri-City Charge semi-professional football team and served as an analyst when he could no longer take the field. He encouraged a sense of inquiry, reason and discipline that inspired his students both in the classroom and on the field. Paul’s interests were always remarkable for their diversity. His music collection ranged from old jazz to new country. His bookshelf contained heavy tomes on war and political science, and collections of Henny Youngman one-liners. He learned phrases in Klingon, recipes for vegetable soup and tunes on the marimba. He adored finding bargains on the Internet and lavishing his wife with unique “treasures.” He leaves behind a story for every person he ever knew. Those who wish to honor his memory may make a donation in his name to either the Cocheco Valley Humane Society in Dover, N.H., or the NHSPCA in Stratham, N.H.

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PA RT I N G S H OT

Ashburn Chapel, the enduring center of community life at Brooks, hosted a full roster of events over Alumni Weekend, Lawn Ceremony and Prize Day, including the annual Alumni Convocation and the memorable Boo Hoo Chapel service.

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BOA R D O F T RU ST E E S President Steven R. Gorham ’85, P’17, P’21 Andover, Mass. Vice Presidents John R. Barker ’87, P’21 Wellesley, Mass. Whitney Romoser Savignano ’87 Manchester, Mass. Secretary Craig J. Ziady ’85, P’18, P’20 Winchester, Mass. Treasurer Valentine Hollingsworth III ’72, P’17 Dover, Mass. T RU ST E E S Pamela W. Albright P’10, P’16 Topsfield, Mass. Cristina E. Antelo ’95 Washington, D.C. W. J. Patrick Curley III ’69 New York, N.Y.

Paul L. Hallingby ’65 New York, N.Y. Robert W. Hughes P’16, P’19 Andover, Mass. Booth D. Kyle ’89 Seattle, Wash. Zachary S. Martin P’15, P’17 Wellesley, Mass. Brian McCabe P’18 Meredith, N.H. Timothy H. McCoy ’81, P’14, P’15, P’18 Wellesley, Mass. John R. Packard Jr. P ’18, P’21 Head of School North Andover, Mass. Daniel J. Riccio P’17, P’20 Los Gatos, Calif. Belisario A. Rosas P’15, P’21 Andover, Mass.

Peter V. K. Doyle ’69 Sherborn, Mass.

Ashley Wightman Scott ’84, P’11, P’14 Manchester, Mass.

Anthony H. Everets ’93 New York, N.Y.

Juliane Gardner Spencer ’93 New York, N.Y.

Jonathan F. Gibbons ’92 Needham, Mass.

Ramakrishna R. Sudireddy P’15 Andover, Mass.

Shawn Gorman ’84 Falmouth, Maine

Isabella Speakman Timon ’92 Chadds Ford, Pa. Alessandro F. Uzielli ’85 Beverly Hills, Calif.

A L U M N I T RU ST E E S Ronald P. Dixon ’06 Newmarket, N.H. Caroline E. Trustey ’13 Wenham, Mass. T RU ST E E S E M E R I T I William N. Booth ’67, P’05 Chestnut Hill, Mass. Henry M. Buhl ’48, P’82 New York, N.Y. Steve Forbes ’66, P’91 Bedminster, N.J. James G. Hellmuth P’78 Lawrence, N.Y. H. Anthony Ittleson ’56, P’84, P’86 Green Pond, S.C. Michael B. Keating ’58, P’97 Boston, Mass. Frank A. Kissel ’69, P’96, P’99 Far Hills, N.J. Peter A. Nadosy ’64 New York, N.Y. Peter W. Nash ’51, P’81, P’89 Nantucket, Mass. Cera B. Robbins P’85, P’90 New York, N.Y. Eleanor R. Seaman P’86, P’88, P’91, GP’18 Hobe Sound, Fla. David R. Williams III ’67 Beverly Farms, Mass.

The weather over Alumni Weekend didn’t cooperate, but Brooksians were undaunted. Here, members and guests of the class of 1967 tour campus.

Teamwork. Perseverance. Purpose. At Brooks, our students learn to stretch for each other, to rely on each other, to support each other. We teach these lessons on the soccer field, in Chapel and in the classroom. Now, in the final year of The Campaign for Brooks, we’re relying on you, and we’re asking you to help us succeed. The Brooks Fund, which provides nearly 10 percent of the school’s annual operating budget, is one of the pillars of The Campaign for Brooks, and the one that has the most immediate impact on the day-to-day lives of our students and faculty. Please consider a gift to the campaign for our future and a gift to the Brooks Fund for our present. We need your support to achieve our goals.

B RO O KS SCHOOL BROOKS FUND

Three easy ways to give: Credit Card — Check — Stock. Visit www.brooksschool.org to make your gift.


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B R O O KS B U LLET I N

Brooks Bulletin Brooks School 1160 Great Pond Road North Andover, MA 01845-1298

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BROOKS BULLETIN • SUMMER 2017

This August 2017 photo shows the extent of the construction that has already been completed on the future Center for the Arts. The new structure, which will house the visual, musical and performing arts together in one state-ofthe-art building in the center of campus, will be ready to welcome students in the fall of 2018. For more information on the construction, as well as an update on the final year of The Campaign for Brooks, please turn to page 4.

SPECIAL E DITION LAW N C EREM ON Y, PR IZE DAY & ALUM N I WE E KE N D

“A place that reminds you of who you are at your very best.” HE A D O F SC H O O L JO H N R. PACKARD O N P RIZ E DAY ( PG. 1 7) .

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Summer 2017 Brooks Bulletin  

The magazine of Brooks School, a college preparatory school located in North Andover, Massachusetts.

Summer 2017 Brooks Bulletin  

The magazine of Brooks School, a college preparatory school located in North Andover, Massachusetts.