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BROOKS BULLETIN • SUMMER 2018


BOA RD O F T RU STEES President Steven R. Gorham ’85, P’17, P’21 Andover, Mass. Vice Presidents John R. Barker ’87, P’21 Wellesley, Mass. Whitney Romoser Savignano ’87 Manchester, Mass. Secretary Craig J. Ziady ’85, P’18, P’20, P’22 Winchester, Mass. Treasurer Valentine Hollingsworth III ’72, P’17 Dover, Mass.

TRUSTEES Pamela W. Albright P’10, P’16 Topsfield, Mass. Cristina E. Antelo ’95 Washington, D.C. Peter J. Caldwell Morristown, N.J. W. J. Patrick Curley III ’69 New York, N.Y. Peter V. K. Doyle ’69 Sherborn, Mass. Anthony H. Everets ’93 New York, N.Y. Nancy Ferry P’21 West Newton, Mass. Jonathan F. Gibbons ’92 Needham, Mass. Shawn Gorman ’84 Falmouth, Maine Paul L. Hallingby ’65 New York, N.Y.

A group of Brooksians enjoys a game of spikeball in May. Spikeball, a game described as a combination of volleyball and foursquare, is a popular warmweather pastime at Brooks.

Robert W. Hughes P’16, P’19 Andover, Mass. Booth D. Kyle ’89 Seattle, Wash. Zachary S. Martin P’15, P’17 Wellesley, Mass. Brian McCabe P’18 Meredith, N.H. Timothy H. McCoy ’81, P’14, P’15, P’18 Boston, Mass. John R. Packard Jr. P’18, P’21 Head of School North Andover, Mass. Daniel J. Riccio P’17, P’20 Los Gatos, Calif. Belisario A. Rosas P’15, P’21 Andover, Mass. Juliane Gardner Spencer ’93 New York, N.Y.

Ramakrishna R. Sudireddy P’15 Andover, Mass.

James G. Hellmuth P’78 Lawrence, N.Y.

Isabella Speakman Timon ’92 Chadds Ford, Pa.

H. Anthony Ittleson ’56, P’84, P’86 Green Pond, S.C.

Alessandro F. Uzielli ’85 Beverly Hills, Calif.

Michael B. Keating ’58, P’97 Boston, Mass.

Meredith M. Verdone ’81, P’19 Newton Center, Mass.

Frank A. Kissel ’69, P’96, P’99 Far Hills, N.J.

ALUM N I TRUSTE E S Ronald P. Dixon ’06 Newmarket, N.H.

Peter A. Nadosy ’64 New York, N.Y.

Caroline E. Trustey ’13 Wenham, Mass. TRUSTE E S E M E RITI William N. Booth ’67, P’05 Chestnut Hill, Mass. Henry M. Buhl ’48 New York, N.Y. Steve Forbes ’66, P’91 Bedminster, N.J.

Peter W. Nash ’51, P’81, P’89 Nantucket, Mass. Cera B. Robbins P’85, P’90 New York, N.Y. Eleanor R. Seaman P’86, P’88, P’91, GP’18 Hobe Sound, Fla. David R. Williams III ’67 Beverly Farms, Mass.


B CO N T E N TS

BU L L E T I N • SU M M E R 2 0 1 8

Head of School John R. Packard Jr. P’18, P’21

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Director of Institutional Advancement Gage S. Dobbins P’22 Associate Director of Alumni and Parent Programs Nicole Mallen Jackson ’95 Associate Director of Alumni Relations Carly Churchill ’10

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Director of Admission and Financial Aid Bini W. Egertson P’12, P’15

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Director of Communications and Marketing Dan Callahan P’19, P’20 Director of Publications Rebecca A. Binder Design Aldeia www.aldeia.design Alumni Communications Manager Emily Williams Assistant Director of Communications Jennifer O’Neill

Unsolicited manuscripts are welcome. Opinions expressed in the Bulletin are those of the authors and not necessarily of Brooks School. Correspondence concerning the Bulletin should be sent to Editor Rebecca A. Binder:

F E AT U R ES

D E PA RT M E N TS

16 A Hearty Celebration

02 M  essage from the Head of School

Lawn Ceremony and Prize Day gave the Brooks community a chance to celebrate and send off the class of 2018. The two-day event honored achievement across the school and closed out the academic year.

03 News + Notes 36 Reunion Notes

26 On Familiar Ground

Alumni Weekend invited Brooksians to campus to reunite with classmates, reconnect with the campus and meet today’s Brooksians. The weekend featured formal awards, a Saturday night affair and multiple opportunities to enjoy a weekend on Great Pond Road.

mail Editor, Brooks Bulletin 1160 Great Pond Road North Andover, MA 01845 email rbinder@brooksschool.org phone (978) 725-6326 © 2018 Brooks School

ON THE COVER: A graduating sixth-former receives a Brooks shield for his blazer on the morning of Prize Day in May.


A M E SSAGE F ROM JO H N R. PAC KA R D J R. H E A D O F SC H O O L

New Possibilities Abound Each year, as we turn our attention from

“ T he challenge ahead is making good on the infrastructure we have in place and enabling the strength and imagination of a faculty determined to reach our students in increasingly meaningful and lasting ways.”

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the previous school year to the one looming ever larger on the horizon, I am always struck by the incredible opportunities we have as new students and colleagues join returning students and colleagues in unbridled optimism and boundless hope for the year ahead. The school’s collective memory spans the years in important ways, but the truth is that every school year is unique. The collection of students, teachers, administrators and staff that will begin the 2018–2019 year in the fall is distinct. We get one year together to leverage the optimism and hope that we all feel as summer fades and the school year begins. In so doing, we find our way to both scripted and unscripted experiences that matter deeply to us. This has much to do with why I return to Brooks every fall — new possibilities abound. This 2018–2019 school year will be a bit more distinct than most, as we will move into a new 44,000-square-foot Center for the Arts in the fall. A year ago at this time, we had just broken ground on this extraordinary and expansive capital building project. Now, we find ourselves on the verge of being in the space and enjoying all the possibilities that come with it. Construction of this state-of-the-art facility marks the first time in the school’s history that we have designed and built space for our visual art, music and theater programs from the ground up. On the one hand, scores of Brooks students through our first 91 years of life drew tremendously from gifted and passionate teachers in the arts. On the other hand, all of the good work in the arts happened in repurposed space, a converted barn, and other nooks and crannies that were limiting in a number of ways. Thus, our excitement about exploring new possibilities in visual

art, music and theater, in space that feels limitless to us, is thrilling. We cannot wait to get underway! At an earlier point in The Campaign for Brooks, I was speaking to our board of trustees and drew a distinction between the school’s academic program and arts program. A trustee inquired as to why I drew that distinction. Why, he wondered, did I think of the arts as separate and distinct from the academic program? The arts are part of the academic program, he asserted. He was right. I would venture to say that curricular and scheduling work we have done to ensure the arts have an equal seat at the academic table marked an initial step in the direction of undoing the notion I carried. The completion of the Center for the Arts is the final step in asserting as a school that our arts program deserves and will have every bit as much as any program at Brooks. The challenge ahead is making good on the infrastructure we have in place and enabling the strength and imagination of a faculty determined to reach our students in increasingly meaningful and lasting ways. In short order, the Center for the Arts will be a hub of activity and the first example we cite when commenting on how we have improved the school with our mission leading the way. On its own, this is reason enough to have me excited about 2018–2019. In closing, please know how grateful we are to all who played any number of important roles in moving The Campaign for Brooks forward. The school improves when we pull in the same direction in support of initiatives aimed at furthering our students in ways we hope will matter to them for the rest of their lives. To that end, we step into 2018–2019 eager to see what our 92nd year might yield.

B RO O KS BU L L E T I N


N EWS + N OT ES Fourth-formers Myles Foster (left) and Charlie Paras enjoy the campus and conversation on a spring day. Read on to learn more about the spring term, which featured student-led initiatives, academic excellence and outstanding athletic performances.

NEWS + NOTES IN THIS SECTION 04 News from Campus 10 Campus Scene 12 Athlete Spotlight 14 Athletics News


N EWS + N OT ES

N EWS F RO M CA M PUS

A N O P PO RT U N I TY TO L E A R N The Cummings Foundation, which has awarded more than $220 million in grants to nonprofits in the Greater Boston area, awarded Brooks a $100,000 grant in June. The grant will provide funding for thorough professional development in competency-based education for each of the school’s teaching faculty. “This is terrific news for our faculty and for our students, as it will make a positive and lasting immediate impact on the quality and depth of the teaching and learning happening in our classrooms,” Dean of Faculty John McVeigh says. Competency-based education focuses on a skills-based approach to learning and the assessment of student work. The skills and habits that are highlighted within competency-based education are those that students need to be successful in college, in their careers, and throughout their lives. The school hopes that applying competency-based education will help increase students’ ability to communicate, to solve problems and to lead.

P H OTO : H A N N A H L AT H A M ’ 1 7

“Using a skills-based approach to

Brooks faculty members Stacy Turner (left) and Ali Mattison on their wedding day.

assessment means that students need to apply the knowledge they are learning in novel situations,” Dean of Teaching and Learning Mary Jo Carabatsos says. “This is what learning should be.” The Cummings Foundation grant will allow every Brooks faculty member to receive training in competency-based education through workshops, programs and coursework.

A Summer Wedding The school is happy and proud to announce the wedding of two members of its faculty. Ali Mattison and Stacy Turner were married on June 23 on Great Island, Mass. Several Brooks faculty and community members attended, and the ceremony was officiated over by Director of Technology Ryan Dobbins P’22. Congratulations and best wishes to the happy couple!

“There’s no such thing as perfection in teaching,” McVeigh says. “Even the most experienced and gifted educators know that you can always improve and add things to your toolbox. I’m so grateful to be surrounded by faculty members who care about kids, love the craft of teaching, and who will make the most of this wonderful opportunity that the Cummings Foundation has provided for us.”

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B RO O KS BU L L E T I N


N EWS + N OT ES

C A M PA I G N U P DAT E

T H A N K YOU! THE CAMPAIGN FOR

A scene from the Center for the Arts construction in July. This photo was taken from the front of Wilder Dining Hall. It shows the new facility (right), Danforth Gymnasium (left) and the beginnings of a new courtyard (foreground) that will utilize the area’s outdoor space.

Finishing Touches Progress continues on the Center for the Arts as the school eyes a fall opening. It’s been a year since the first construction vehicles rolled onto Main Street to begin building the school’s longanticipated Center for the Arts. The 45,000 gross-squarefoot building, which is the centerpiece of The Campaign for Brooks, promises to place the visual, musical and performing arts together in the center of campus. The fall 2018 opening date is rapidly approaching, and the Center for the Arts is rising — literally — to meet the deadline. The 80 workers on site daily have kept up a rapid pace, and the building’s construction has been ahead of schedule since spring. As of early July, the roof was complete, 80 percent of the siding was in place, and crews had turned their focus to the courtyard between the Center for the Arts, Danforth Gymnasium and Wilder Dining Hall. Stone walls, walkways and stairs have been placed on the site. The inside of the facility is also nearing completion. As of early July, in the theater, hanging wood ceilings were

B RO O KS concluded on June 30. This five-year, $60 million campaign PROMISED to chart the future course for the school in every area of its MISSION to provide the

most meaningful

educational experience our students will have

in their lives. We are proud to say that we have

ACHIEVED ALL THE GOALS we set five years ago. We are

GRATEFUL to all of our generous donors for their SUPPORT of the campaign and of the SCHOOL.

being installed in the audience seating area. On the lower level, concrete floors were being polished and shelving was being installed. On the upper level, classrooms had drywall installed and painting had begun. Head of School John Packard is enthusiastic at the imminent completion of the massive project. “It is incredibly exciting to see the Center for the Arts and the surrounding area progressing in tangible ways almost every day,” he

We look forward to sharing details on the campaign’s SUCCESS and the ways in which that success will impact Brooks in a future issue of the Bulletin.

says. “We can’t wait to run into the space when it opens in the fall!”

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THANK YOU

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A scene from “Heathers: The Musical,” this year’s spring play.

N EWS + N OT ES

N EWS F RO M CA M PUS

S P R I N G P L AY

The Other Side of the Stage

A sixth-former uses her directorial debut to stage a show that resonates with teenagers.

Kate Packard ’18 has spent a lot of time on stage at Brooks. She’s appeared in numerous theatrical productions over the course of her time at school, often in a lead role. This year, though, Packard got to focus on another aspect of theater: She took on independent coursework with Chair of the Arts Department Rob Lazar and used the course to direct and present the show “Heathers: The Musical” for a two-night showing in May. “Heathers” is based on the 1988 film of the same name. The show is a comedy that explores darker themes of bullying, teen suicide and violence in schools. The plot follows Veronica, a rebellious high school student, and J.D., her boyfriend, as they go to great lengths to bring down a clique of popular girls and upset the entrenched social heirarchy of their high school. “I knew I wanted to do something with real depth to it, but also, I wanted to try to do comedy as well,” Packard says. “That’s one of the things that made this

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show so appealing to me. It’s a dark comedy. Also, I think it sends a huge message about mental health and teenagers and what they go through in high school.” The show has been a year’s worth of work for Packard. She worked with Lazar in the fall to select “Heathers,” and to discuss her reasons for selecting that show and her plans for addressing the themes in the show. The second semester brought auditions, casting and rehearsals. “It’s been a long process,” Packard says, “but it’s been awesome and such a cool experience, and I wouldn’t have gotten to do it if I wasn’t at Brooks.” Packard enjoyed the chance to direct and to see a production from a new perspective. “It’s really interesting to see it from the other side,” she says. “This is my artistic vision. I think that having acted first is helpful: I know what it’s like to be in an actor’s shoes, and that helps me know how to act with them and how to talk about something. I’ve really enjoyed it, and it’s definitely something that I might want to do again.”

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I N ST I T U T I O N A L M E M O R I E S

Archiving History, With Your Help As the Brooks school archives become more institutionalized, more standardized and more organized, we’re beginning to see previously unrealized holes in our institutional memory. We need your help to fill in our records. In this new recurring column, we’ll ask you for your memories, photographs and other documents related to a particular moment in Brooks history. If you have information, please contact Director of the Archives Deanna Stuart at (978) 725-6300 ext. 3292 or dstuart@brooksschool.org. Currently, we are looking for information on which students were awarded the following athletic team prizes: Field Hockey Prize: 2010; David Hadad Award (Boys Ice Hockey): 1993, 1994, 2010; William S. Barr Trophy (Boys Ice Hockey): 1972–1988; Wellington Cup, or Brooks Hockey Cup (Boys Ice Hockey): 1993, 1994, 2014; Francis Gardner Jackson Bowl (Baseball): 1978–1987, 1989, 1992, 1993, 2000– 2002, 2009–2011; Baird Haney Award (Boys Squash and Boys Tennis): Squash, 1994–1996; Tennis, 1994, 1998–2002, 2008, 2010–2014. With your help, we can continue to expand our school archives in breadth and depth, and we can continue to honor and recognize your memories of Brooks. Thank you.

A M O M E N T TO G E T H E R

Members of the sixth form gathered in the Remembrance Garden for this May 22 portrait. Each student wore a shirt or sweatshirt representing the next destination on their educational journey. In total, the class of 2018 will attend more than 50 colleges, universities and further educational opportunities. A complete list is on page 24.

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SENIORS, IN HIGH SCHOOL

Brooks opened its doors to its grandparents and special friends in mid-April. Guests had a chance to sit in on classes with their students, take family portraits, and attend a presentation from Head of School John Packard on the forthcoming Center for the Arts. Guests also enjoyed a luncheon, student musical performances and afternoon athletic contests. Pictured above is Spencer Pierce’19 (right) with his guests.

HEARD ON CAMPUS

“I approach most things like the athlete and teammate I was several years ago … I still believe that, to be truly great at something, you need to put 100 percent into it.” AMY BROADHEAD ’94 addressed the Brooks community in Ashburn Chapel on Kippy Liddle Day in April. Brooks observes Kippy Liddle Day each spring, when the school pauses to recognize the outstanding achievements, accomplishments and character of its woman athletes. Broadhead was a three-sport 1st team athlete at Brooks. She was an All-America and All-ISL lacrosse player who picked up Boston Globe All-Scholastic and Eagle-Tribune Athlete of the Year awards before going on to Brown University, where she captained the soccer team and also played basketball. She was inducted into the Brooks Athletics Hall of Fame in 2002, and is the eponym of the school’s Amy E. Broadhead Award, which is given annually to a member of the girls 1st soccer team who “demonstrates a love for the game, a commitment to excellence and enthusiasm for success.”

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N EWS F RO M CA M PUS

An Elite Group Brooks inducted nine sixth-formers into the Cum Laude Society. April 18 was a day to celebrate at Brooks. The school inducted nine members of the sixth form into the Cum Laude Society. Founded in 1906, the Cum Laude Society is dedicated to honoring scholastic achievement in secondary schools. The founders of the society modeled Cum Laude after Phi Beta Kappa. In the years

Where Dwell the Brave at Heart A twist on seated dinner conjured visions of familiar literature.

The seven books of the “Harry Potter” series, written by J. K. Rowling, were published between 1999 and 2007. Today’s Brooks students grew up with the series, and for many, the houses of Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry that Harry, Ron, Hermione and their schoolmates inhabit feel as familiar as the dorms at Brooks. In a nod to the importance of the series to Brooks students’ literary upbringings, Brooks held a Hogwarts-themed seated dinner in May. Diners were able to fill out an Internet questionnaire in the days before seated dinner to choose the house they wished to represent: Thirty percent of the diners represented Gryffindor; 28 percent represented Hufflepuff; 27 percent represented Slytherin; and 15 percent represented Ravenclaw. “I’ve been wanting to do this for a few years now,” says Head of Wilder Dining Hall Claudia Keller. “Student government members came up with the idea.” On the night of seated dinner, students and faculty dressed in their house colors, sat at tables with their Hogwarts housemates and enjoyed Harry Potter-themed food, including root beer floats that doubled as butterbeer. Head of School John Packard’s table sat on a riser, imitating the layout of the Hogwarts dining room, and Mr. Packard — along with some faculty, school prefects and other students — wore black choir gowns to imitate the academic robes worn at Hogwarts. Keller says that, now that she has this first Hogwarts-themed dinner under her belt, she’d like to organize a similar dinner in the future. She has ideas for improvement, including supplying each diner with a wand — a large pretzel stick dipped in chocolate — and more closely reproducing meals described in the series.

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since its founding, Cum Laude has grown to 382 chapters across the United States and internationally. Some 4,000 new student members are inducted annually. The induction ceremony took place in Ashburn Chapel. The nine inductees were sixth-formers Stephen Chung, Madison Dunn, Sally Jong, Max Kemper, Luke Muther, Callie Scala, Nate Smith, Logen Witz and Victor Wong. Science faculty Justine Rooney delivered the Cum Laude address. Then, Head of School John Packard and Academic Dean Susanna Waters awarded the inductees with Cum Laude certificates. “These students’ dedication to their studies has not gone unnoticed,” Waters told the assembly. “As you pursue your education, it is our hope that you will accept the honor of membership in this society as a responsibility to make a contribution to the ongoing search for greater understanding of humanity and society.”

CO M M U N I TY S E RV I C E DAY

As in past years, the sixth form split up for a day in May to volunteer time and elbow grease to various planting, landscaping and spring cleanup tasks at seven local organizations. Some of the class stayed on campus to work at Bobbin Farm; the rest of the class traveled to Windrush Farm and The Stevens-Coolidge Place in North Andover, Camp Tasker in Newton, N.H., and Project Home Again, Greater Lawrence Community Boating and the Boys & Girls Club of Lawrence in Lawrence, Mass.

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Strong Leaders Brooks welcomes three new members to the board of trustees and three new members to the alumni board. N E W SC H O O L T RU ST E E S PETER J. CALDWELL (top) joins the board of trustees as the headmaster of Morristown-Beard School, located in Morristown, New Jersey. Under Caldwell’s leadership, Morristown-Beard has witnessed extraordinary growth. During the past year alone, the school opened a new math and science facility, introduced a new daily schedule, and unveiled plans for a new center for innovation and design. Caldwell is a lifelong educator. He has enjoyed a laudable and broad career in independent schools at Vermont Academy, Riverdale Country School in New York City and St. Andrew’s School in Middletown, Delaware. Caldwell has three children, two of whom are on the faculty at Phillips Exeter Academy. NANCY FERRY P’21 (middle) brings a critical eye and a fresh perspective to the Brooks board of trustees. In addition to her career in design, marketing and product development, Ferry has focused on raising her four children, managing her daughter’s chronic medical condition and supporting her husband’s start-up business. Ferry is a current Brooks parent: Her son, Riker, is a rising fourth-former. Ferry is a graduate of Concord Academy (class of 1981), and she looks forward to engaging with Brooks’s close-knit community and the ways in which it creates balance for its students. Ferry previously spent 14 years on the board of directors at Soldiers Field Park Children’s

S U M M E R 2 0 1 8

Center in Allston, Mass., including three years as the board president. MEREDITH MAREN VERDONE ’81, P’19 (bottom) is Bank of America’s chief marketing officer. She is responsible for all brand strategy and consumer, affluent and high net-worth marketing across the corporation. She also oversees all marketing efforts for Bank of America’s 47 million client relationships, 20,000 retail financial centers and ATMs, and 14,000 client advisors. Verdone is a member of the bank’s Global Diversity and Inclusion Council, and is an executive sponsor of the Boston chapter of Bank of America’s Leadership, Education, Advocacy and Development (LEAD) network, which promotes the attraction, retention and development of successful professional women throughout Bank of America. Verdone was a member of Brooks’s first coed graduating class. She was awarded the school’s Athletic Prize and was inducted into the Cum Laude Society. Other Brooksians in her family include her brother Jonathan ’77 and her daughter Lucy ’19. N E W A L U M N I BOA R D M E M B E RS CATHERINE CANNON FRANCIS ’96 is a wealth advisor associate at Morgan Stanley and a champion for personal growth through education and international travel. She is an avid traveler who also studied abroad in Hungary (through Brooks’s Exchange Program) and Italy.

For more than a decade, she instilled a love of learning in students in the Andover Public School and Los Gatos Union School districts. She currently resides in Silicon Valley, where she is an active member of the CLUB women’s leadership incubator program. JASON FRASER ’90 has worked at the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) since 2001. During his tenure, he has developed a portfolio focused on agriculture, food security, economic growth, trade, education and health efforts. Fraser is currently the mission director for USAID’s mission in Rwanda, and has previously worked on USAID missions in Angola and Ethiopia. Fraser practiced law in Boston and New York before joining USAID. He lives in Fairfax, Virginia. JESS KAPADIA ’04 is a graduate of the Annenberg School for Journalism at the University of Southern California, where she hosted two seasons of the cooking show “Dorm Gourmet” on Trojan Vision Network. After interning at culinary magazines “Edible Los Angeles” and “Saveur,” she co-founded food, drink and travel website “Food Republic” alongside Harlem chef and TV host Marcus Samuelsson, and served as senior editor for seven years. Jess focuses her writing on culinary education, waste reduction, policy reform and sustainability, traveling around the world to meet with chefs making a difference. She lives in New York City with her husband, Alex, and their cats, Frasier and Niles.

N OT I C E The school is sad to announce the death of former headmaster Peter H. Aitken H’49, H’86. Mr. Aitken died on August 1 following a long battle with brain cancer. He succeeded Frank D. Ashburn as headmaster in 1973 and served Brooks ably until 1986. The fall issue of the Bulletin will include a longer obituary and appreciation of Mr. Aitken’s tenure at Brooks. If you would like to submit a memory for inclusion in this upcoming piece, please contact Bulletin editor Rebecca A. Binder at rbinder@brooksschool.org or (978) 725-6326.

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N EWS + N OT ES

CA M PUS SC E N E


Brooksians hit the dance floor at the prom. This year’s prom was held in late April at the Danversport Yacht Club in Danvers, Mass.


N EWS + N OT ES

AT H L E T E S POT L I G H T

The Three With Twelve Departing sixth-formers Millie Brady, Teagan Canning and Emma English have each earned 12 1st-team letters at Brooks. Their individual accomplishments are notable, and the trio has also provided stability, leadership and experience to Brooks programs that are on the rise. Consider the cumulative athletic experience of outgoing sixth-formers Millie Brady, Teagan Canning and Emma English. The back-of-the-envelope estimates are impressive: Thirty-six 1st-team letters. Thirty-six 1st-team seasons. More than 1,500 practices. More than 500 games. Hundreds of bus rides to away games. Dozens of uniforms. Uncountable trips to the training room, to the equipment room, to the weight room, to the locker room. This investment of time, energy, strength and focus was, in many ways, intentional. Each of the Brooksians intended to play three sports in high school. At the same time, though, each of the Brooksians leaves Brooks focusing on a different sport than they expected to. Brady, who entered Brooks expecting to focus on ice hockey and lacrosse, will play field hockey at Babson College next year. Canning, who used to daydream of being the captain of the United States women’s national ice hockey team, will play lacrosse at State University of New York at Albany next spring. And English, who entered Brooks with an eye towards playing ice hockey, will row crew at Boston University this fall. At Brooks, each athlete found something unique about the school that allowed them to pursue their adopted sports. English says that she came to Brooks, in part, because she wanted to try rowing. She did not expect, she continues, for rowing to become as important to her as it has. “It’s much different,” she says. “Rowing is still something new to me, and I’m excited.” “I don’t think I would have had half the experience I’ve had at Brooks without sports,” English continues. “Right off the bat at preseason, you’re meeting people and forming close friendships that you’ll have the rest of your life. Besides winning games and championships, these are the relationships that you’re going to remember for the rest of your life.” Brady, meanwhile, fell into field hockey after experiencing the team’s atmosphere. “Field hockey was not one of the sports I had thought about playing at the

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collegiate level. It was always lacrosse or ice hockey,” she says. “But I came here and really just loved the field hockey team. I started to really enjoy going to practice and being with them all fall.” Brady calls her experience playing sports at Brooks “really special. I think about this all the time,” she says. “Brooks makes an extra effort to put afternoon activities and sports in a prominent place. Whether first team or second team, every team here has a unique bond and connection, and you hold that bond and connection throughout your years at Brooks. And, our coaches are also our teachers. That makes the environment an even closer one.” Canning saw an opportunity at Brooks to play more than one sport at a high level. “I realized that I love lacrosse, and when I started to think about college, I knew that I’d be able to do this year round,” she says. “And, I think that playing three sports here taught me how to deal with adversity. I was the field hockey goalie, for example, and I think that position alone teaches you how to deal with adversity. That’s carried over into hockey and lacrosse.” Despite their different expectations and experiences of playing sports at Brooks, the thread that ties Brady, Canning and English together best is the time spent together on the girls 1st ice hockey team. They’ve each played hockey for four years; Brady and Canning have played together every season for the field hockey, ice hockey and lacrosse teams; and English discovered field hockey as a fourth-former. “Our first hockey season, I think there were four third-formers on the team, and we were three of them,” English remembers. “So, we bonded a ton during hockey season when we were third-formers, and we’ve all stayed close from there.” Canning agrees, and says that the trio has learned how to work off of each other. “What’s cool about us is that we don’t have certain roles,” she says. “It’s not like this one’s the vocal one and that one’s the hard worker. I think that we’re all well-rounded, and that’s

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Left to right: Sixth-formers Emma English, Teagan Canning and Millie Brady each received plaques recognizing their 12 1st-team letters at Lawn Ceremony in May.

how we’ve been so successful. It’s been fun to work with them.” Lori Charpentier, the head girls 1st ice hockey coach, reflects on how the trio has grown together as individuals and as a unit over four ice hockey seasons. “They all played important roles on our team,” she says. “While they were all very different kids, what they have in common is that they all push themselves to be better on and off the ice each year. They respected each other, used the lessons they learned during their journey, and leveraged their strengths to lead the team to a successful season — in wins and losses, but more importantly, in bringing together their teammates. Individually, they are three impressive female student-athletes and leaders. Together, they’re special, and they’ve influenced underclassmen on the team in ways that will stay with them.” The three athletes are ready to part ways, but they’ll still continue to heighten each other’s play. “I’ve spent all three seasons with [Teagan],” Brady says. “She’s a person I can go to regardless of the circumstances, because we’ve literally spent every afternoon together. Meanwhile, Emma was the first person I met at orientation, and we connected right away and we’ve kept

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“Whether first team or second team, every team here has a unique bond and connection, and you hold that bond and connection throughout your years at Brooks.” MILLIE BRADY ’18

that connection. That’s what sports has done for us: They’re not just friends — I go out onto the field and do battle with them. That’s an amazing thing.” English, meanwhile, says Canning and Brady have inspired her drive. “Since we’re all focused on a different sport, I’ve seen through lacrosse and field hockey how passionate Teagan and Millie are,” English says. “I think playing with them makes me more passionate about any sport that I play. We’re all pretty competitive. Whichever sport we’re all playing, we all just want to win.”

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N EWS + N OT ES

N EWS F RO M PUS AT HLET I CSMNCA EWS

The Brooks 1st baseball team takes on Belmont Hill School.

Spring to New Heights Brooks athletes made their mark this spring in a season that was successful on and off the field. CLEARING THE BASES

Connor Breen ’18 (above, uniform number 2) led the 1st baseball team to an 11—7 record this year from behind the plate. Breen, who transitioned from shortstop to catcher for his sixth-form year, “was certainly a huge part of this group,” says head coach Andy Campbell. “He set a great tone with them culturally, and his work ethic is contagious. Our other sixth-formers — Nick Lam, Gavin Cann, Chris Capo, Adam Ziady, Ryan Neal and Nathan Costantino — have played in this league for a while. They knew how to approach the game at this level, and there wasn’t a lot of coaching that needed to be done with them. They wanted a winning experience and knew that if they collectively believed in what they were doing, it would come.” The class of 2018 brought the program above a .500 record and will return a strong core. Campbell, meanwhile, pulled in ISL Coach of the Year honors.

W MORE ONLINE: Please visit the Brooks athletics website at www.brooksschool.org/ athletics for more information on your favorite Brooks team, including schedules, game recaps and up-to-date news.

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CREW TURNS HEADS

For the second consecutive year, all eight Brooks 1st crew fours earned invites to the NEIRA Championships, with individual boat seedings ranging from the sixth-seeded girls fourth boat to the 18th-seeded boys first boat. Each Brooks boat performed at or above its seeded position. Director of Rowing Tote Smith says that, despite only one boat being slated to make the grand finals, five of the eight boats rowed their way into the grand finals. In fact, he continues, only two schools had more boats in the grand finals. He highlights the girls first boat’s qualifying heat, which saw Brooks finish behind The Winsor School and with a comfortable margin over Groton School, which

B RO O KS BU L L E T I N


N EWS + N OT ES

had beaten Brooks two weeks earlier on Lake Cochichewick. The grand finals saw more impressive results. The girls third boat — coxed by Kate Packard ’18, stroked by Caitlin Peirce ’19, with novices Brooke Cordes ’20 and Annie Edwards ’21 in the engine room, and with veteran Kat Saunders ’18 in the bow — came in third. In other grand finals, Brooks took two fifth-place finishes and two sixth-place finishes. “Brooks graduated 24 members of the team two days later, so we officially enter a rebuilding mode,” Smith says. “The remarkable class of 2018 has left a lasting legacy of commitment to boat and team. But, with the performances of these lower boats dominated by young rowers, we are enthusiastic about our prospects for the coming years.”

GIRLS LACROSSE ROARS

The girls 1st lacrosse team had a highlight reel of a season. In addition to a bevy of individual national honors (see box), Brooks made its presence known as a team. The squad fought for an 11—4 record. Of the team’s four losses, three were by one goal and one was by two. This drive and tenacity, head coach Stacy Turner reports, was obvious from the beginning of the season. “The girls had an amazing season from start to finish,” Turner says. “I was consistently impressed by their complete and total dedication, day in and day out.”

NATIONAL ACCOLADES

Turner credits the team’s sixthformers with instilling a strong team culture. “Each of our six sixth-formers, including our four team captains, brought incredible leadership and strength daily,” she reports. “They built trust with their teammates, which allowed the girls to take risks, try new things, and grow on and off the field. While the team was large, with 24 players, they were all so close.” The ISL took notice of the Brooks surge. It awarded All-ISL honors to sixth-formers Jordyn Arakelian, Teagan Canning and Kathryn Delaney. The league also awarded All-ISL Honorable Mention nods to sixth-former Avery Asherman, fifth-former Amanda Monahan and fourth-former Madeline Delaney. Although Turner cautions that the program loses a strong sixth-form class, she has high hopes for the future. “These six ladies were instrumental in the growth of the program from their third-form year until now,” she says, referring to the departing sixthformers, “but they have grown it in such a way that the culture they’ve built will continue on. The underclassmen are ready to step up and keep this program moving forward. And, while turnover is never easy, I believe in how they’ve taught and trained the underclassmen, and I know the next class won’t miss a beat!”

In early June, four sixth-form Brooks lacrosse players received national awards. Kathryn Delaney, a midfielder who helped power the girls 1st lacrosse team through a strong season, was one of 29 recipients of the prestigious US Lacrosse Jackie Pitts Award. Delaney represented the Massachusetts - Eastern Independent region. The award honors one graduating player from each region who truly honors the game of lacrosse, is invested in the development of the game in her community, is an exceptional player who continually strives to improve her game and is an exemplary member of her team. US Lacrosse also named girls 1st team standout Teagan Canning to its Girls’ High School All America team. Girls 1st team midfielder Jordyn Arakelian nabbed a spot on the US Lacrosse Girls’ High School All-Academic team, and the ISL reported that Jason Gold, an attackman for the boys 1st lacrosse team and the school’s outgoing senior prefect, was named to the US Lacrosse Boys’ High School All-Academic team.

S U M M E R 2 0 1 8

COLLEGE COMMITS The following members of the class of 2018 plan to continue their athletic careers in college. An updated list of Brooksians involved in collegiate athletics is located on the Athletics page of the school website. Baseball Gavin Cann Bowdoin College Chris Capo Bates College Nick Lam Bowdoin College Men’s Basketball Justin Connolly Merrimack College Keigan Kerby University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Cam Ray Endicott College Brian Wright-Kinsey Bentley University Men’s Crew Madison Dunn College of the Holy Cross (coxswain) Jameson Lehrer Boston College Women’s Crew Riley Baker Santa Clara University Emma English Boston University Clare Naughton Yale University Bella O’Shea Boston University Field Hockey Millie Brady Babson College Football Pat Freiermuth The Pennsylvania State University Seamus Lambert Trinity College Women’s Lacrosse Jordyn Arakelian College of the Holy Cross Avery Asherman Denison University Teagan Canning SUNY Albany Kathryn Delaney Tufts University Men’s Soccer Christian Garner Boston College Marcelo Lage The George Washington University Luke Muther Kenyon College Matt Sciascia Hamilton College Andrew Stevens Columbia University Men’s Squash Aly Abou Eleinen University of Pennsylvania Ishaan George Bowdoin College

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Annabelle Leeson ’18 (left) and Bella O’Shea ’18 celebrate as they walk down the Prize Day aisle.

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2018

A Hearty

Celebratıon The class of 2018 celebrated its graduation from Brooks over Memorial Day weekend. The class spent time together, bid farewell to treasured teachers, and applauded its accomplishments on Lawn Ceremony and Prize Day.

The end of the class of 2018’s journey through Brooks was a two-day affair of celebration, reminiscence and heartfelt best wishes, as sixth-formers spent their last days at Brooks immersed in the school’s Lawn Ceremony and Prize Day schedule. Lawn Ceremony, which was held on the afternoon of Sunday, May 27, was an all-school celebration to award prizes in the arts, athletics and academics. Prize Day, which was held the following morning, was a graduation ceremony for the 105 members of the class of 2018. Lawn Ceremony began with a speech by Head of School John Packard, who showed his pride at the accomplishments Brooks students achieved this year, both as individual students and as a community. “The hard work, exceptional leadership and superb citizenship so many students have shared and provided leaves us proud of the year we have had together,” Mr. Packard said. “We look forward to sharing that pride and good feeling with you this afternoon.” The first segment of Lawn Ceremony, led by Chair of the Arts Department Rob Lazar, recognized student achievement in the arts. Then, student speaker Sehee Jong ’18 shared her journey at Brooks, which included discovering musical genres to which she had not been previously exposed. “When I first arrived at Brooks, I knew only a small range of music,” she shared. “Listening to and creating music was how I found the person that is uniquely me and expressed that to the world,” she concluded.

S U M M E R 2 0 1 8

The second segment of Lawn Ceremony saw Director of Athletics Bobbie Crump-Burbank award prizes to students who succeeded on the field and led by example. Brian Flanagan ’18 took to the podium to share how his hard work, determination and fortitude throughout his years at Brooks brought him onto the 1st team rosters he reached for. The third segment of Lawn Ceremony celebrated a wide range of academic achievement. Associate Head for Academic Affairs Lance Latham presented a multitude of prizes before ceding the floor to Callie Scala ’18, who revealed that Brooks faculty taught her how to learn for the sake of learning without focusing on her grades. “That was the first time a teacher really told me not to care about the number associated with the knowledge,” she said. “Or, maybe it was the first time I really listened and understood what learning was.” Mr. Packard concluded Lawn Ceremony by awarding Brooks’s school prizes, and then the crowd dispersed to Boo-Hoo Chapel, a final Chapel service for the student and faculty body. As is tradition, the service ended with the faculty and third, fourth and fifth forms processing out of Ashburn Chapel past a waiting line of emotional sixth-formers who bid their colleagues goodbye. Prize Day dawned with a focus on the sixth form and an air of tradition, as graduates donned a special dress code and took the same steps as generations of Brooks graduates before them. Mr. Packard opened

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G R A D UAT I O N S NA PS H OTS

the graduation ceremony with a speech in which he reflected on his own feelings on the day of his daughter Kate’s graduation. “Here’s what I want you to know,” Mr. Packard told the parents in the audience. “You have done really, really well. You have a lot to be proud of. Take it from someone who, in one way or another, has spent his entire adult life around your kids and so many like them. They are talented and passionate and hard-working and driven and empathic and engaged and creative and kind, and, yes, occasionally frustrating, but if I were you, and I suppose I am today, I would be so proud of this group. I know that I am.” As the ceremony went on, Sixth-Form Speaker Jack Garrard advised students to use the support system and encouragement Brooks provides to try new things and to risk failure. “It is not your mistakes that define you,” he said, “but it is what you do in response to them that shows the content of your character. Brooks instills in people that courage to put themselves out there, make mistakes and learn from them.” Mr. Packard distributed diplomas to the class, assisted by President of the Board of Trustees Steve Gorham ’85, before the Prize Day ceremonies came to an end with a benediction.

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“Nothing is ever going to be given to you. If you want something badly enough, you have to put in the hard work to attain your goals.” B R I A N F L A N AGA N ’ 1 8 O N L ESSO N S H E L E A R N E D F RO M P L AY I N G S PO RTS AT B RO O KS, S P E A K I N G D U R I N G L AW N CEREMONY

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[ 1 ] Brian Flanagan ’18 speaks at Lawn Ceremony on his athletics experience at Brooks. [ 2 ] Jacob Iwowo ’18 with a well-wisher on Prize Day. [ 3 ] From left to right: Graduates Jason Gold, Ishaan George and Jack Garrard. Gold served as this year’s senior prefect.

[ 4 ] The scene on Chapel Walk following Boo-Hoo Chapel. [ 5 ] Olivia Jarvis ’18 (left) and Jackie Desautels ’18 with their diplomas. [ 6 ] Madison Dunn ’18 receives her rosette at the Head of School’s House on the morning of Prize Day.

[ 7 ] Fifth-form students bid goodbye to sixth-form students at the conclusion of Boo-Hoo Chapel. [ 8 ] A bagpiper accompanies the procession of students and faculty into Boo-Hoo Chapel.

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4 [ 1 ] Members of the boys 1st basketball team, including alumni, took a moment to themselves following the Prize Day ceremony. [ 2 ] Head of School John Packard addresses the Lawn Ceremony crowd. [ 3 ] Pat Freiermuth ’18 (right), a Penn State-bound football standout, receives the Athletics award from Director of Athletics Bobbie Crump-Burbank. [ 4 ] A group of Brooks boys poses on the steps of the Head of School’s House on the morning of Prize Day.

[5 ] Cole Payton ’18 (center) with guests on Prize Day. [ 6 ] Jadie DeLeon ’19 (left) and Connor Silva ’19 will serve as senior prefects for the 2018—2019 school year. [ 7 ] Talha Kamran ’18 (left) greets English faculty Mel Graham at Boo-Hoo Chapel. [ 8 ] Kat Saunders ’18 (right) with her mother, Registrar and Director of Administrative Computing Lisa Saunders.

[ 9 ] From left to right: Graduates Emily Roush, Blakely Dimeo, Emma English, Leah Rosenbaum, Addy Clements, Callie Scala, Emma Flaherty, Katherine Matthews and Millie Brady. [ 10 ] Hannah Maver ’18 following Boo-Hoo Chapel. [ 11 ] Sean Hoerl ’18 (left) and Alex Kluchnik ’18. [ 12 ] A group of Brooksians shares a laugh at the Head of School’s House on Prize Day.

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“I work with people who have taken permanent root in the hearts and minds of today’s graduates. I believe the class of 2018 will be inspired by my colleagues for the rest of their lives.” H E A D O F SC H O O L JO H N PAC K A R D O N P R I Z E DAY, S P E A K I N G A BO U T T H E B RO O KS FACU LTY 3 5

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Recognizing Achievement

AWA R D S

Brooks awarded more than four dozen prizes at Lawn Ceremony and Prize Day, recognizing The Reverend George F. Vought Prize: awarded by the Head of School to honor a member of the faculty in his or her first few years of teaching who has made special contributions to the School and has exhibited notable professional growth: justine

noel rooney, science

The Kerri Ann Kattar Prize: awarded annually by the faculty to that member of the graduating class who, by her warmth and generosity of spirit to others, by her outstanding contribution to Brooks athletics, by her presence alone, has added that precious quality of kindness for which we remember Kerri Ann Kattar:

kathryn grace delaney ’18 The Trustees Prize: awarded by the faculty to any member of the school community who has served beyond the call of duty: jade monique tate ’18 The Faculty Prize: given by George C. Haas and awarded annually to a student who has made outstanding contributions to the life of the School: da in diane lee ’18 The Headmaster’s Prize: given in memory of George B. Case Jr.: jason lawrence

gold ’18

A RT AWA R DS The George A. Tirone Prize: awarded by Mrs. Rudolph Muto, in memory of her father, to a Middle School student who shows unusual promise in the Visual Arts: amelia jay

kovacs ’20

The Buhl Photography Prize:

nalia medina ’18

The Russell Morse Prize: awarded to an Upper School student who has made distinguished contributions to the visual arts at Brooks:

katherine coulson saunders ’18

The Knowlton Drama Prize: given in memory of Warren Knowlton, of the Class of 1967, and awarded to a member of the Brooks community who has shown those qualities of loyalty and devotion to drama and versatility and enthusiasm in work before and behind the scenes that was typified by Warren Knowlton (two recipients in 2018): hannah victoria maver ’18 and

katherine o’neill packard ’18

The Music Prize: awarded in recognition of dedicated, longterm study of an instrument or voice that has resulted in the highest level of musical performance in the graduating class (two recipients in 2018):

riley albert baker ’18

(instrumental) and emma rose dawson ’18 (vocal) AT H L E T I C AWA R DS The ISL Award of Excellence: boys: aly hassan abou

eleinen ’18 girls: millicent mckay brady ’18

The Frank D. Ashburn Athletic Award: given by the Cogswell family to honor an outstanding individual or team performance in which intangible, extra qualities have added a special flavor for the school: the boys

The John J. Cabral Prize: given to the Brooks student who has shown a high degree of interest in physics and for the depth of involvement in the subject:

AC A D E M I C AWA R DS

lee ’18

The Edmund Samuel Carr Prize in Beginning Latin:

diane lee ’18

1st soccer team

nicole li ’21

The Edmund Samuel Carr Prize in Latin: da in diane

lee ’18

The Spanish Prize:

jacqueline lorraine desautels ’18 The Rene Champollion French Prize: jordyn paige

arakelian ’18

The Charles C. Cottingham Class of 2008 Chinese Prize: to be awarded annually to a student who has exhibited an enthusiasm and appreciation for the Chinese language and culture: maxwell cyr

kemper ’18

The John B. Melvin Computer Prize: given to the student who demonstrates an admirable ability and inquisitive nature in the field of computer science:

max benjamin charlamb ’18

The Athletic Prize: An annual award to two sixth-formers who, in the opinion of coaches, have distinguished themselves in sportsmanship, athletic ability, and whose achievements have demonstrated an outstanding record in the athletic life at Brooks: boys: patrick john

The A. G. Davis Philip Prize: given by the Science Department to an individual who has demonstrated an interest in and who shows considerable promise in Science: madeline stone

girls: emma loretta

edward choi ’19

freiermuth ’18

english ’18

hesse ’20

The Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Medal: for excellence in Mathematics and Science:

lutong tim zhao ’18

The Nicholas J. Evangelos Science Prize: da in diane The Mathematics Prize: da in

The Howell Van Gerbig, Jr., Prize: given for the best essay on the development of political institutions, for her essay titled “The ‘Scopes’ Trial: Cause and Effect”: yinlan

lami zhang '19

The Richard K. Irons Prize: for the best essay on a pressing problem in American history or international relations, for her essay titled “Women’s Fight for the Ballot in 20th-Century Europe”: jordyn paige

arakelian '18

The Michael W. McCahill Prize In History: awarded to a Sixth-Form student who has demonstrated a love for the discipline by taking a wide and rigorous program in History, a mastery of analytical thinking and writing, an enthusiasm for the craft of historical research, a delight in the exploration and exchange of ideas, and an empathy for the human condition: jason lawrence

gold ’18

The E. Graham Ward English Prize: awarded to a student who has demonstrated a love of literature in all of its forms. This student is a talented reader and writer gifted with the ability to respond to literature both analytically and creatively: emma rose

dawson ’18


the school’s academic, artistic, athletics and community leaders. The Denison University Book Award: awarded to an outstanding fifth-former with a proven record of academic achievement and an interest in pursuing the study of English literature, creative writing, or poetry at the college level:

yinlan lami zhang ’19

The Wilder Speaking Prize: (given by John G. and H. Todd Cobey Jr.):

The Oscar Root Prize: given by Morgan H. Harris Jr., to a member of the Brooks community who has exemplified certain characteristics with which Oscar M. Root for many years enriched the life at Brooks. These characteristics include excellence in the sciences, devotion to nature study, and a sense of humor which provided a rare overview of life: jameson

nathaniel palmer smith ’18

hamilton lehrer ’18

The Columbia University Club of New England Prize: awarded to a Fifth-Former who has demonstrated an ability to combine academic achievement, personal character, extra-curricular contribution to the school, and accomplishment in and dedication to a field of interest meriting personal recognition: caroline

The Jolene And Stephen C. Eyre Prize for Scholarly Achievement: this prize is awarded each year to the ranking scholar in the Sixth Form: da in diane lee ’18

elisabeth cutter ’19

The Harvard Club of Andover Prize: awarded by the Harvard Club of Andover to a Fifth-Former nominated by the Faculty for high academic achievement, leadership, and active participation in school affairs: connor matthew

silva ’19

The St. Lawrence Prize: awarded to a Fifth-Former who has displayed a significant commitment to community service: caitlin

rose peirce ’19

The Phillips Brooks Prize: donated by the Phillips Brooks Society and awarded by the School Minister in memory of the Reverend George Frederick Vought to a Sixth-Former who, during his or her time at the School, has followed in the path of Phillips Brooks by offering constant love, exemplary service and good humor to the community and by setting a high standard for others:

terrell gardea brown ’18



SC H O O L P R I Z E S The Malcolm G. Chace III Prize: awarded to a third-, fourth- and fifth-former who, in the judgment of the Headmaster, has made the most personal progress during the year: third form:

gardner hamilton brown '21 fourth form:

catherine davenport scher '20 fifth form:

nicholas li '19

The Leonard S. Perkins Prize: awarded by the Faculty to that member of the Fifth Form who makes an outstanding contribution to the life of the school: tianshu

wang ’19

The George B. Blake Prize: awarded in recognition of extended voluntary and generous service to others: nalia medina ’18 The Kilborn Bowl: given by Mr. and Mrs. John W. Kilborn for the greatest all-around improvement: millicent mckay bady ’18 and

keigan rhys kerby ’18

The William R. Ferris, Jr. Prize: given by Howell van Gerbig in honor of William R. Ferris ’60, and awarded to a sixth-form student who stands out among his peers on account of the depth and range of his intellectual curiosity, energy and creativity: da in diane lee ’18 The Harvey P. Hood Prize: awarded in recognition of special interests such as working with young children, making things with one’s hands, and in memory of a lively, gentle view of life: emma rose

dawson ’18

The Headmaster Emeritus Prize: given by the faculty for any reason it considers appropriate: hannah victoria maver ’18 and

isabella lillian o’shea ’18

The Dunnell Prize: given by the faculty in honor of Jacob Dunnell and William W. Dunnell III to a sixthformer who has worked without fanfare to better the school:

andrew phalen stevens ’18

The Allen Ashburn Prize: given by the late James D. Regan and awarded each year by the Headmaster for any purpose which he deems suitable: max benjamin

“I continued to grow and do better every single time I walked into that classroom. Failure, for me, became my greatest success.”

charlamb ’18

The Thomas Perkins Brooks Jr. Prize: given in memory of Ensign Brooks who was lost in the Battle of Leyte Gulf and awarded annually by the Headmaster to a member of the sixth form who, during his or her career at Brooks, has met certain requirements of development, leadership and responsibility:

katherine o’neill packard ’18

The Russell Prize: given by the late Richard S. Russell for an outstanding single contribution to the life of the community during the year: nalia medina ’18

CA L L I E SCA L A ’ 1 8 , S P E A K I N G AT L AW N CEREMONY ON HER ACA D E M I C E X P E R I E N C E AT B RO O KS


CO L L E G E S

Looking Ahead Brooks prepared the class of 2018 well to take on its next academic challenges. Brooksians will attend colleges and universities across the country and the world, and they are poised to think critically, write well, communicate clearly and work confidently as they pursue their dreams. Babson College (2)

Miami University, Oxford

Bates College (2)

Northeastern University (6)

Bentley University (3)

Pennsylvania State University

Boston College (5)

Providence College (2)

Boston University (9)

Santa Clara University (2)

Bowdoin College (3)

Southern Methodist University

Bucknell University

State University of New York at Albany

Colby College Colgate University College of Charleston College of the Holy Cross (3) Columbia University Cornell University Dartmouth College Denison University (2) Drew University Endicott College Georgetown University Georgia College Georgia Institute of Technology Hamilton College

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[ 1 ] Sehee Jong ’18 delivers her Lawn Ceremony remarks on the arts at Brooks.

Syracuse University (2)

[ 2 ] Max Kemper ’18 (right) processes down the Prize Day aisle. As they walked across the stage to receive their diploma, each graduate handed Head of School John Packard a paintbrush to mark the construction of the new Center for the Arts.

The George Washington University (5) The University of Tampa Trinity College (3) Tufts University (3)

[ 3 ] Students process into Boo-Hoo Chapel.

Tulane University University of Chicago (2) University of Colorado at Boulder (2) University of Connecticut

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University of Pennsylvania University of St. Andrews

Johns Hopkins University (2)

University of Tennessee, Chattanooga

Kenyon College

University of Vermont

Lafayette College

University of Virginia (2)

Lake Forest College

University of Washington

Lehigh University (4)

University of Wisconsin, Madison

Loyola University Maryland

Vassar College

Macalester College (2)

Wesleyan University

Merrimack College

Yale University

B RO O KS BU L L E T I N


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“Brooks is an institution designed to offer students artistic, academic and athletic options. So, stuff your plates now while these opportunities are low-risk and convenient. You might discover your new favorites and come back for more!” S E H E E JO N G ’ 1 8 A D D R ESS I N G T H E C ROW D AT L AW N C E R E M O N Y

S U M M E R 2 0 1 8

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2018

On Famıliar

Ground Alumni Weekend saw more than 200 Brooksians and guests return to campus in mid-May. The group spent the weekend remembering the old, reconnecting with the present and meeting the future.

Spring arrived in North Andover in May, and with it, so did scores of Brooks alumni, along with their guests and families. Alumni Weekend welcomed alumni from all class years, and especially those from class years ending in 3 or 8, to enjoy two days on campus. Alumni Weekend at Brooks takes place while students are still in residence and classes are in session. Graduates use the opportunity to sit in on classes, watch games and meet students. They get a feel for the current atmosphere, energy and day-to-day operation of the school. The class of 1968 kicked off the programming on Friday morning with a panel discussion in Ashburn Chapel. The class includes the first AfricanAmerican student enrolled at Brooks, and classmates used the event as an opportunity to discuss diversity at Brooks, historically and at present, as well as the ways in which broader culture and society changed in the late 1960s. The panel was moderated by Dean of Faculty John McVeigh and was attended by a large number of alumni and current Brooks students. The panel culminated in a vigorous question-and-answer session in which both students and alumni participated. Next, members of the FDA Society and alumni celebrating their 50th reunion and beyond enjoyed the annual Ashburn Luncheon, hosted by Head of School John Packard. The day also saw alumni sit in on classes, tour the campus and visit the Brooks Archives. As the day drew to a close, attendees congregated in the Science Center Atrium for a cocktail reception hosted by the alumni board. Then, each class gathered for its

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Saturday’s rainy and cold weather didn’t keep Peter Cross ’63, P’07 away from the Brooks crew regatta. >>

class dinner at locations on and off campus. The schedule began again in earnest early Saturday morning, when a group of hearty alumni participated in the 7 a.m. Alumni Row. Current and former Brooks rowers and coxswains set off together across Lake Cochichewick. Following breakfast and another opportunity to visit classes, visitors assembled for the weekend’s most formal proceeding. Ashburn Chapel was the venue for the annual Memorial Chapel, the State of the School address, a faculty and student panel, and Alumni Convocation. Together, the events stretched over two and a half hours, and they left the guests with a sense of nostalgia, a better understanding of today’s Brooks and an appreciation for the accomplishments of fellow alumni. The Memorial Chapel service gave alumni a chance to remember Brooksians who had passed away over the past year. The emotional service gave way to Mr. Packard’s heartening State of the School address. Mr. Packard affirmed that the school is doing “great, deep, lasting and meaningful work with kids,” and said that all of the progress the school seeks to make is “aimed at the student experience, and attracting more students to our school and finding ways to do better and better work with them.” Mr. Packard preceded a panel of current Brooks students and faculty. The Brooksians addressed questions pertaining to daily life at Brooks. Then, Alumni Convocation took hold: Mr. Packard presided over a ceremony to award the Alumni Bowl award and the Alumni

B RO O KS BU L L E T I N


Shield award. Former faculty Cliff Irons ’63 received the Alumni Bowl award for his steadfast and decades-long relationship with and support for Brooks. Jeff Volk ’93 was awarded the Alumni Shield award for his leadership work in business development and marketing. Following the Ashburn Chapel proceedings and lunch, Alumni Weekend guests and current Brooks students and faculty were invited to attend a career panel in science and medicine. The panel was moderated by Peter Dunn ’82, P’11, P’13, P’15, P’18 and was composed of graduates working in a variety of scientific and medical fields. The day concluded with two home games — a girls 1st lacrosse game against Thayer Academy and a crew regatta — before Alumni Weekend celebrants congregated under a tent to dance, dine and witness the presentation of the Distinguished Brooksian award to Eric Genden ’83. On Sunday morning — Mother’s Day — many attendees, as well as other members of the Brooks community, gathered outside of the Science Center to dedicate a newly planted tree in honor of recently deceased faculty emerita Maureen Perkins H’81, W’56, P’81, P’83, GP’14, GP’18. PLEASE NOTE that this year’s inductees to the Brooks Athletics Hall of Fame will be announced in the fall. The fall issue of the Bulletin will recognize these worthy Brooksians. S U M M E R 2 0 1 8

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[ 1 ] Former faculty Rob Walker ’53, H’66, P’94, GP’18 (center) and former faculty Cliff Irons ’63 (center right).

“We have a lot of work to do, but you’re descending, parachuting, into a thriving school, and that feels really good.”

[ 2 ] Alumni leave Ashburn Chapel on Friday morning. [ 3 ] From left to right: Ashley Wightman Scott ’84, P’11, P’14, Sarah Edwards Feeney ’83 and Melissa Ryan Kaiser ’84 watch the Brooks crews in action.

HEAD OF SCHOOL JOHN PACKARD DURING HIS ANNUAL STATE OF THE SCHOOL ADDRESS IN ASHBURN CHAPEL

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[ 4 ] Sean Nagle ’99 at the alumni board cocktail reception. [ 5 ] Sally MIlliken ’88 (center). [ 6 ] Alumni Weekend attendees greet former faculty Cliff Irons ’63 (right).

[ 8 ] Jim Moxham ’68 (right) and Ellen Moxham. [ 9 ] Head of School John Packard presents the Distinguished Brooksian award on Saturday night. [ 10 ] A group of alumni and student tour guides pauses outside Chace House.

[ 7 ] Gail and David Worthen P’09, P’11 hosted members of the class of 1978 on Friday night. Former faculty Mark Shovan H’99, P’99 (back row, seventh from left) was in attendance.

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[ 1 ] Alumni mingled at the alumni board’s cocktail reception in the Science Center on Friday night. [ 2 ] An Alumni Weekend tour group walks past the new Center for the Arts, which is scheduled to open this fall. [ 3 ] Spectators watch the Brooks crew from the boathouse. [ 4 ] Alumni relived their glory days on Lake Cochichewick at Saturday’s Alumni Row.

[ 5 ] Alumni tour the interior of the Center for the Arts, which is currently under construction. The tour was led by Consigli Construction’s Joe Napolitano ’09 (right). [ 6 ] Associate Director of Admission Alex Skinner ’08 (left) reunites with Emmanuel DikeUdensi ’08. [ 7 ] Juli Gardner Spencer ’93 (left) and classmate Allison Jackson met up in a relaxed setting on Friday night.

[ 8 ] Ross Hatch ’58 (left) and Aaron Shinberg ’58 under the tent on Saturday night. [ 9 ] Members of the class of 1968 in a lighthearted moment. Back row, left to right: Tom Powell, Jay Stack, Matt Spence, Canby Robinson, Frank Record, Bob Hall, Gene Clapp. Middle row, left to right: Reg Foster, Stu Arthur, Ando Hixon. Front row, left to right: Art Strawbridge, Bill Archibald, Allen Schirmer, Larry Buthman, Gary Cummins.

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A LU M N I AWA R D S

Alumni Awards Brooks proudly awards three distinctions over the course of Alumni Weekend: The Alumni Bowl award and the Alumni Shield award were awarded by Head of School John Packard in Ashburn Chapel on Saturday morning. Mr. Packard then conferred the Distinguished Brooksian award in front of a celebratory crowd at Saturday night’s reception.

Distinguished Brooksian Award

This award honors a member of the Brooks community whose life and contributions to society exemplify the nobility of character and usefulness to humanity embodied in the spirit of the school. “Our newest Distinguished Brooksian is the personification of our mission and values,” Mr. Packard said about eric genden ’83, a renowned physician. “His life’s work has been caring for others and inspiring more to do the same,” Mr. Packard continued. “The meaning of that work to his patients and students knows no bounds, and he embodies empathy, integrity and passion in everything that he does. It is not hyperbole to say that he has saved and changed lives time and time again throughout his exemplary career.” Genden left Brooks for Columbia University, where he studied economics and literature before

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finding his passion in anatomy and his path to a career in medicine. He earned his M.D. at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in 1992, and later added a Master of Health Care Administration degree from Harvard University’s School of Public Health. He is a fellow in the American College of Surgeons. In 1998, Genden joined Mount Sinai Medical Center and quickly took on leadership roles. He became chairman of the department of otolaryngology in 2005, and has focused on ear, nose, throat, head and neck ailments and diseases. The department has expanded under Genden’s watch: It is now the largest in the country and currently operates more than 20 clinical trials for patients in need. Genden had the honor of being the first surgeon to perform a jaw transplant in the United States. His distinctions in his field are numerous, but Genden also ensures that the future of his medical specialty is in good hands: He has authored and

edited six textbooks on the subjects of head and neck cancer, microvascular reconstruction, and robotic head and neck surgery, and he supervises basic science laboratory research in the area of transplant immune-biology and head and neck cancer biology. Mr. Packard noted Genden’s “extraordinary and historic contributions to medicine, colleagues, students and patients” when he awarded Genden the Distinguished Brooksian. “This year’s recipient fits the citation beautifully, as his ‘nobility of character and usefulness to humanity’ are absolute,” he said.

Alumni Shield Award

This award recognizes an alumna or alumnus who graduated from Brooks fewer than 25 years ago and has made significant contributions in the field of his or her endeavor.

jeffrey andrew volk ’93 has built a dynamic career in digital

B RO O KS BU L L E T I N


Left to right: Eric Genden ’83 Jeffrey Andrew Volk ’93 and Head of School John Packard Clifford G. Irons ’63

media, marketing, sports and entreprenueurship. He has also developed programs, created businesses and established communities within and beyond existing organizations. “Jeff has drawn from his capacity to bring communities together, a skill he honed at Brooks,” Mr. Packard said. To date, Volk has helped wellknown names in sports build brand recognition and develop media strategies. He co-founded New York Venture Community Sports (NYVC Sports) and San Francisco Venture Community Sports (SFVC Sports), and just this year was appointed to a leadership role at deltatre, whose clients include the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA), the Federation International Football Association (FIFA), the English Premier League, the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP), the British Broadcasting Company (BBC), BT Sport and Fox. Beyond his professional accomplishments, Mr. Packard continued, Volk’s personal commitment to

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helping others has never wavered despite his busy schedule. He has fundraised through the New York City Triathlon, the PanMass Challenge and the Northeast AIDS Ride.

Alumni Bowl Award

This award, given by the Brooks School Alumni Board, recognizes dedicated and thoughtful service to this school. Former faculty clifford g. irons ’63, Mr. Packard noted, is a member of a select group of Brooks alumni who also served on the faculty for many years. “Yet,” Mr. Packard continued, “his volunteerism beyond his years here as a student and a member of the faculty makes him a singular figure in the school’s history. Few have given to the school in so many different ways throughout their lives.” Irons was hired by founding headmaster Frank D. Ashburn to work

in the Brooks admission office. He spent the next 21 years meeting and interviewing thousands of prospective Brooks families. He also coached hockey and tennis, and served as a dorm parent in Blake House for many years. Irons has served the class of 1963 as a reunion chair, reunion committee member and host committee member, bringing the group together for social events. He has been a steadfast class correspondent. “He bleeds green, cares deeply about the school and has been an incredible ambassador on its behalf,” Mr. Packard said. “How fortunate the school has been to have him here as a student, faculty member, volunteer and champion of Brooks School for the vast majority of his life. It would be hard to give more to a school than Cliff has to Brooks.”

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A LU M N I S NA PS H OTS

[ 1 ] Adriana Rizzo Wheeler ’98 (left) and Allan Wheeler.

Flanagan ’13, Sarah Bresette ’13, Gavin Ugone ’13.

[ 2 ] The Perkins family next to the tree dedicated to faculty emerita Maureen Perkins H’81, W’56, P’81, P’83, GP’14, GP’18. The tree is planted in front of the Science Center.

[ 5 ] Will Collier ’11 at the alumni board cocktail reception in the Science Center Atrium.

[ 3 ] Jock Cowperthwaite ’58 (left) and Rosita Shinberg.

[ 7 ] Saturday night attendees dance the night away.

[ 6 ] JeeSu Baek ’08 (left) and Kamilah Welch ’08.

[ 4 ] From left to right: Andrew Bruno ’13, Kim Neyman ’13, Meaghan

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“Technology is being used at Brooks to make learning mathematics a student-centered, active experience.” CHAIR OF THE MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT DAVE PRICE, DURING AN ALUMNI WEEKEND PRESENTATION ON HOW HE AND OTHER BROOKS FACULTY USE TECHNOLOGY IN THE CLASSROOM

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PARTING SHOT

The Brooks campus is always on full display in spring, and this year was no exception. The Friday of Alumni Weekend hummed with spectacular weather that showcased the school’s well-planned flora.

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B RO O KS BU L L E T I N


THANK YOU

to our Essential Stewards for their commitment to Brooks and their generous philanthropic support of our students, faculty, programs and campus. The Essential Stewards supported the Brooks Fund during fiscal year 2018 with gifts of $10,000 or more. Anonymous / Richard C. Albright Jr. and Pamela Albright P’10, P’16 / Hope Aldrich P’80 / Kevin M. Barry and Susan L. Barry P’13, P’16, P’18 / Christina Bascom and Charles E. Bascom ’60 / Anne Berni and Carl L. Berni ’75 / Atul L. Bhat and Ajita A. Bhat P’19 / Adam C. Bird and Kristen J. Bird P’18 / Mary D. Booth and William N. Booth ’67, P’05 / Andrew M. Chaban and Christine M. Chaban P’17, P’19 / Elizabeth Z. Chace W’52, P’88, GP’09, GP’11 / Meredith Clapp and Eugene H. Clapp III ’68, P’02 / Kevin P. Clark and Jeanine P. Clark P’18 / Buckner W. Clay IV ’02 / Earl M. Collier and Maren D. Anderson P’11 / Lammot Copeland Jr. ’50 / Jane Curley and W. J. Patrick Curley III ’69 / Bradford S. Dimeo and Kimberly M. Dimeo P’18 / Charles P. Eaton ’60 / Steven A. Fern and Alexandra Fern P’18 / Joseph C. Flaherty Jr. and Eva Flaherty P’18 / William M. Flanagan and Elizabeth S. Flanagan P’13, P’16, P’18 / Howard M. Gardner and Naomi A. Gardner P’93, GP’16, GP’18 / Aileen Geddes and E. Maxwell Geddes Jr. ’53, P’90 / Scott Ginsberg and Stephanie G. Ginsberg P’16 / Dorothy Gorham and Steven R. Gorham ’85, P’17, P’21 / Cariann Gorman and Shawn Gorman ’84 / Thomas P. Grainger and Elizabeth Grainger P’05, P’07 / Julia Hallingby and Paul L. Hallingby ’65 / James P. Hoffmann and Grace R. Hoffmann P’18 / Robert W. Hughes and Susan M. Hughes P’16, P’19 / To Li and Jun Jun Liu P’19 / Ann M. Livermore and Thomas H. Livermore ’66 / Richard W. Lyman III and Amy E. Lyman P’20 / Case H. Lynch ’74 / Minglu Ma P’19 / Zachary S. Martin and Laurel G. Martin P’15, P’17 / Timothy P. McAdam ’86 / Brian McCabe and Loren McCabe P’18 / Timothy H. McCoy ’81, P’14, P’15, P’18 / George A. Miller and Buffington Miller P’02 / Richard T. Miller and LeeAnn Miller P’19 / Patricia Nadosy and Peter Nadosy ’64 / Richard W. O’Neill and Robin L. O’Neill P’19, P’20 / John R. Packard Jr. H’87 and Kimberly O’Neill Packard ’87, P’18, P’21 / Joseph J. Plumeri and Susan Plumeri P’20 / Vorasit Pokachaiyapat and Suddhiman Pokachaiyapat P’19 / Stuart H. Pyle ’85 / Dan Riccio and Diane Riccio P’17, P’20 / Diana R. Riccio P’17, P’20 / Belisario A. Rosas and Leslie BROOKS FUND M. Rosas P’15, P’21 / John A. Roush and Julie W. Roush P’18 / Jennifer Runnells and John S. Runnells III ’82, P’17 / Andrew B. Ruprecht ’09 / Nicola C. G. Savignano ’87 and Whitney Romoser Savignano ’87 / Lynne A. Sawyer ’83 / Robert G. Scott and Ashley Wightman Scott ’84, P’11, P’14 / Gregory A. Serrao and Sheila C. Serrao P’15, P’20 / John T. Sheehan and Kristin B. Sheehan P’15, P’17, P’20 / David H. Spencer ’80 / Scott Spencer and Juliane Gardner Spencer ’93 / Charles A. Sterling III ’62 / Ramakrishna R. Sudireddy and Santha Sudireddy P’15 / Li Sun and Xiao Yuan Shen P’20 / Philip C. Timon and Isabella Speakman Timon ’92 / Kristine M. Trustey P’13, P’16, P’19 / William D. Werner ’73 / Maximillian B. Whitney ’01 / Letitia Wightman and Orrin S. Wightman III ’58, P’84, GP’11, GP’14 / Alexander G. B. Zaldastani ’87

BROOKS S CHOOL

TO INQUIRE ABOUT JOINING THE ESSENTIAL STEWARDS, please contact Director of Institutional Advancement Gage S. Dobbins at (978) 725-6288 or gdobbins@brooksschool.org. TO MAKE YOUR GIFT ONLINE, please visit www.brooksschool.org/giving.


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Fall 2018 Schedule of Events: September 5 Classes Begin

October 29 School Holiday

September 29 Homecoming

November 17–26 Thanksgiving Break

October 8 School Holiday October 26–27 Family Weekend

December 14– January 2, 2019 Winter Break

Assistant Brooks crew coach Sasha, who claims Director of Rowing Tote Smith as her human, takes to the launch before practice in May. Turn to page 14 to read more about the program’s strong showing this year.

Profile for Brooks School

Summer 2018 Brooks Bulletin  

The magazine of Brooks School, a college preparatory school located in North Andover, Massachusetts.

Summer 2018 Brooks Bulletin  

The magazine of Brooks School, a college preparatory school located in North Andover, Massachusetts.