Page 1

Journal SUMMER 2015

20508_Journal.indd 1

7/17/15 2:02 PM


Upper School Protest Banners: Students

in Tina Piccolo’s foundational art class thought critically to develop concepts for protest banners, a social justice tradition and an art form. Speaking out against racial profiling, police violence, and the deaths of young men of color were subjects they felt compelled to address. The students spoke truth to power and communicated their ideas by distilling word and image into a powerfully unified message. The student artists, from left to right and top to bottom are Emmitt Sklar, Zelda Cherner, Caila French, Fiona Beswick, Andrew Cha, Halima Matthews, Molly Rosenbloom, and Miles Nabritt.

Cover: Graduate Daisy Feddoes ’15 with Dr. Larry Weiss

20508_Journal.indd 2

7/17/15 2:02 PM


Message from Head of School Dr. Larry Weiss Diversity, Equity, Justice and Civic Engagement at Brooklyn Friends School AS A Quaker, urban, progressive,

and neighborhood school, BFS has been recognized over the past five decades as a distinctively diverse school. In recent years, we have maintained enrollments of 35-40% students of color, and we have increased our faculty of color census that stood at 25% in 2009 to 40% this year. We have also continued to address socioeconomic diversity by increasing needbased financial aid commitments from 13% of our operating budget in 2009 to 17% over the past four years. Such accomplishments have been consistent with the mandates and expectations of the Strategic Plan for Diversity approved by the BFS Board of Trustees in 2009. From the beginnings of the plan’s development by an All-School Diversity Committee, the faculty took a leading role in its conceptualization, design and implementation. In my address to the PAT Diversity Committee’s April 11, 2015 event entitled “The State of our Union: Nurturing Community, Equity, and Justice Through Diversity and Service Learning,” I paid tribute to the faculty’s foundational work on diversity issues, particularly to Jeffrey Cox. Jeffrey’s initial leadership work with the Undoing Racism program opened the door for many faculty and administrators to broaden their understanding of how to develop alliances across racial boundaries to address injustice and bias in many institutional settings. Such work shaped the development of the All-School Diversity Committee and the Strategic Plan for Diversity. I also recognized the faculty members whose ongoing work on equity and justice began in the early days of the All-School Diversity Committee: Valarie Alston, Bruce Arnold, Karine Blemur-Chapman, Sidney Bridges, Sharon Carter, Jackie

Condie, Jeffrey Cox, Maura Eden, Kate Engle, Sarah Gordon, Laurice Hwang, Yuval Ortiz-Quiroga, Jesse Phillips-Fein, Orinthia Swindell and Whitney Thompson. In addition, well-deserved credit for the Strategic Plan for Diversity was given to my predecessor, Dr. Michael Nill, who chaired the All-School Diversity Committee. Toukie A. Smith was central to the work of the PAT Diversity Committee, and Darrick Hamilton ’89, a Trustee from 2007-2013, represented the Board on the All-School Committee. With Board approval, the All-School Diversity Committee implemented one of the Strategic Plan’s recommendations by initiating a search for a Director of Diversity. Following a national search, the Committee approved Dr. Eddie Moore, Jr. as Director, and he began work at BFS in July, 2011. For the next three years, significant progress was made in many areas delineated in the Strategic Plan: n “Creating support groups, mentoring systems, and leadership training to overcome invisibility and disadvantages experienced by groups that have traditionally been underrepresented in independent schools.” n “Providing faculty and staff with professional development opportunities which will help them be more effective multicultural classroom teachers and be better able to fulfill their roles with sensitivity to diversity issues in their language and interactions.” n “Developing and publicizing a process for communicating and addressing diversity concerns among the school constituencies.” Since the beginning of the 2014-15 school year, Orinthia Swindell — first as Acting Director of Diversity and now as Director of Diversity and Institutional Equity — has continued and expanded work in these areas.

Summer 2015 BROOKLYN FRIENDS SCHOOL JOURNAL

20508_Journal.indd 3

1

7/17/15 2:02 PM


Larry Weiss welcomes a group of kindergarten children and their teacher, Amanda Welch ’03, into his office for a visit. In the spring of every year, all kindergarten students make a pilgrimage to school offices, the cafeteria, the mail room, and the boiler room, to ask questions and make observations about the jobs of community members.

At the same time, working with Director of Service Learning Natania Kremer and the newly-appointed Russell Marsh as Associate Director of Diversity, Orinthia has engaged in collaborative discussions with me to address an area of great importance regarding diversity that required continued attention—curriculum and its relationship with diversity concerns. The starting point for our discussions was the idea that, in addition to the continued operation of the Office of Diversity and Institutional Equity, and the Office of Service Learning, members of these offices could also form a new academic department: the Department of Equity, Justice, and Civic Engagement. While the Strategic Plan of 2009’s only reference to curriculum was a call to “conduct an audit of the curriculum and educational program to ensure that their effectiveness and consistency in regard to multiculturalism and diversity, across grades, divisions and disciplines as appropriate,” the subsequent job description for the Director of Diversity, had the following expectation: “Collaborate with teachers, Department Heads, and Division Heads in ongoing efforts to embed diversity and issues of equity and justice in the school’s curriculum, pedagogy, and student life.” The new department’s name adds the

2

words Civic Engagement in recognizing the critical importance of experiential learning in the process of developing for our students a working knowledge of justice, injustice, equity, and bias, as they exist in the real world beyond Brooklyn Friends. Using a service learning approach to civic engagement enables students to develop in-depth and critical understanding of different strategies and tactics that are used by individuals and organizations to address injustice, bias and inequity and to enable students to be part of the actual work involved with such struggles. The ultimate goal of our next stage of diversity work at BFS is to nurture in our students, as they progress through our school, an age-appropriate, informed, realistic, and confident sense of how they, as individuals and in groups, can decide to answer the central questions regarding injustice, bias, justice and equity in our communities, nation, and world: What can I do? What should I do? What will I do? In friendship,

BROOKLYN FRIENDS SCHOOL JOURNAL Summer 2015

20508_Journal.indd 4

7/17/15 2:02 PM


Commencement

READY FOR FLIGHT –

THE CLASS OF 2015

20508_Journal.indd 5

7/17/15 2:02 PM


Commencement

A STRONG SENSE of purpose, the importance of staying true to oneself, and the value of asking the right questions characterized commencement exercises for the Class of 2015, held on June 9 at the New York Society for Ethical Culture. The Three student commencement speakers – Louisa Grenham ’15, Giovanna Molina ’15, and Bisa McDuffie-Thurmond ’15 – spoke with a wisdom that seemed to be far beyond their age – a wisdom earned through their experiences as Brooklyn Friends School students. They each recounted their class’s journey at BFS and their amazing growth, individually and collectively. Jacob Swindell-Sakoor ’15 conducted the Chamber Orchestra in Bach’s “Sleepers Wake,” reinforcing the depth of talent and creative expression in the student body. The usually reserved Upper School Head Bob Bowman brought chuckles and smiles when he let the seniors in on a secret. “There’s an amazing benefit to teaching,” he confessed. “We learn from our students all the time.” He then elaborated on three key lessons the Class of 2015 taught him. “First, I learned about the power of resilience, the power to recover from difficulty. Second, you taught me what it means to have empathy, the ability to understand the predicaments of others. It was truly remarkable to witness your love for each other. . . on our sports teams, on our stage, in our hallways and in our classrooms I saw you sticking together and supporting each other. Finally, you taught me the lesson of the necessity of joy. I saw laughter, cajoling, and silliness everywhere. There is no school if there is no joy, and you folks brought the joy. It is powerful and it is necessary.” At the students’ behest, this year’s commencement nonetheless had a more muted tone than in recent years. The celebrating, hugs, laughter and tears were abundant but they were tempered with repeated acknowledgements that all is not right with the world, and with continued calls for action. Head of School Dr. Larry Weiss struck a somber note when he placed the class in a global context, and spoke of our shared duties to continue pursuing peace, justice and progress around the world. The seniors selected straight-talking 4

Photos l to r from top to bottom: Calli Thomas-Siegel, Brad Mulder, Lara Holliday, D. Crystal Byndloss; Zenzile Keith; Ariel Goldner, Beatrix McCarthy; D. Crystal Byndloss; Noa Buchwalter, Jesse Slade-D’Addona, Molly Smith; Fiona Sharp, Airenakhue Omoragbon, Owen Edwards, Daisy Feddoes, Kariesha Martinez, Jonathan Bach; Bob Bowman.

BROOKLYN FRIENDS SCHOOL JOURNAL

20508_Journal.indd 6

7/17/15 2:03 PM


Photos l to r from top to bottom on both pages: Calli Thomas-Segal, Brad Mulder, Lara Holliday, D. Crystal Byndloss; Zenzile Keith; Ariel Goldner, Beatrix McCarthy; D. Crystal Byndloss; Noa Buchwalter, Jesse Slade-D’Addona, Molly Smith; Fiona Sharp, Airenakhue Omoragbon, Owen Edwards, Daisy Feddoes, Kariesha Martinez, Jonathan Bach; Juan Alonso receiving his diploma; Otis Hatfield; Jevon Cooper, Jumoke McDuffie-Thurmond; Niamh Henchy, Eloise Seda, Samantha Liebeskind; Jacob Swindell Sakoor conducting the string ensemble. Photos l to r from top to bottom: Juan Alonso receiving his diploma; Otis Hatfield; Jevon Cooper, Jumoke McDuffie-Thurmond; Niamh Henchy, Eloise Seda, Samantha Liebeskind; Jacob Swindell Sakoor conducting the string ensemble.

Upper School Math Teacher Zenzile Keith to be their faculty speaker. She ardently discussed the challenges the graduating class faced this year, both within the school, in New York City, and across the nation. Commending the seniors for persevering through such troubling times, she urged them to continue remaining impassioned about speaking truth to power throughout the rest of their lives. She also spoke about the importance of always striving to achieve ethical and moral ideals. “BFS aspires to the high goals in its mission statement, but sometimes we all fall short. I caution you not to let the events of this year cloud your entire experience,” she said. “I charge you with finding your voice, and with finding empathy with your fellow beings...I charge you with being great.” The George Fox Distinguished Alumna Award was presented to Commencement Speaker Dr. D. Crystal Byndloss, Ph.D., from the class of 1987. “In many ways I credit BFS with setting the foundation for my future education and my life,” she told the graduating class. A graduate of Sarah Lawrence College, she then went on to Harvard where she earned her doctorate in sociology. Since that time her career has focused on ways to help high performing, low income students gain access to high quality education, in some ways following in her own footsteps. “Many academically qualified students are unaware of their opportunities. So many students lack the information, social networks, the encouragement at home and at school and sometimes the confidence to apply to the colleges that you apply to,” she pointedly told the seniors. “I know firsthand that encouraging students to reach high and guiding them through the process can change lives. Brooklyn Friends did that for me.” Crystal urged the students to keep up the Quaker practice of silent reflection as they move forward into their adult lives. She stressed that such reflection is especially important during times of change, like graduating high school. “Don’t let fear of change paralyze you. Change is necessary, and the up side of it is, change can open the door to new, great things. Have faith that your wings are ready for flight, and go for it.”

BROOKLYN FRIENDS SCHOOL JOURNAL

20508_Journal.indd 7

5

7/17/15 2:03 PM


Commencement

The Class of

2015

Marcus Adolf Juan Alonso Jonathan Bach * Julien Bouguennec Julia Breen Eve Bromberg Noa Buchalter Thomas Chamberlain * Jevon Cooper Bronwyn Edwards Griffin Edwards * Owen Edwards Theo Esvandjia Daisy Feddoes Sarah Fuerst Asha Gaskin Eric Gayle Ariel Goldner Louisa Grenham * Olivia Hart-Kobel Otis Hatfield Hannah Hemmerly * Aoife Henchy * Jacob Iarussi Maya Kaul * Ian Kupchik Greta Lagerberg Michelle Li Samantha Liebeskind Abigail Lloyd Kariesha Martinez Beatrix McCarthy Bisa McDuffie-Thurmond * Jumoke McDuffie-Thurmond * Malcolm McKeever Sage Meade Lucas Miller Giovanna Molina * Airenakhue Omoragbon Bianca Rhea Julia Sacks-Cohen Eloise Seda Fiona Sharp Jesse Slade-D’Addona * Molly Smith Maret Smith-Miller Patricia Stortz Jacob Swindell-Sakoor Calli Thomas-Siegel Christeline Velazquez Malik Walfall Adam Wells * Kayla Zervos

ONE OF THE PROBLEMS with going to a school which

educates you on the issues of the world and the systems in place is that you fully realize how terrible the world truly is. I’m extremely grateful that I know about these issues, but sometimes you can feel cynical, and angry and helpless to the multitudes of injustices around the world. And you can so easily lose hope. But when I look at the Class of 2015, I see an abundance of hope. And it’s not hope out of ignorance of the world, or assumptions that everything will fix itself. It’s the hope that comes with knowing there’s always more that can be done. That there’s more than what’s in front of you. Knowing that things can be better and that change is gradual but possible. This hope is very rare, and the responsibility that comes with it is huge. It’s the individual responsibility of always asking for more, and for better, no matter where you are. This group of people is not afraid to do that. Louisa Grenham

LIKE ALL OTHER YOUNG ADULTS, all other

people, we have been faced with the temptation to be filled with resentment, exasperation, and a desire to give up. Sometimes, difficulty is only met with quitting. Stewards are not allowed this luxury. Here in this community we met difficulty and adversity of any kind with an effort to understand, compassion, and love. For individuals such as these, who have been distinguished by their intellectualism and intelligence, there is the grave temptation to follow a painless and familiar path. This path is laden with guarantees of individual achievement and financial success, so lavishly spread before people like us, who have enjoyed the privilege of a great education. This path however, is not the road that the Class of 2015 has defined for itself. Like it or not, we inhabit a community, a country, a world, that needs stewards. Bisa McDuffie-Thurmond

IT’S A STRANGE FEELING to stand before you,

because I don’t feel that it’s really my place to be giving advice. The future is just as uncertain for me as it is for everyone else in this room. The one thing I’ll say, that’s taken me a long time to understand, is that advancement in life does not depend on knowing all the answers. It depends on embracing what occurs. If you know me, I like to make plans and organize things to ensure that they go the “right” way, or rather my way. I will forever be an avid list maker and email writer. I always try to improve things, whether it be my life, the school, or even corporations. While I will always love crafting strongly worded emails, I’ve realized that some of the best things that have happened to me have been unplanned. Now just because great things can happen when they’re not planned, that doesn’t mean one should just sit around waiting for them to happen. Giovanna Molina

* Signifies students who entered BFS in 1st grade or earlier

6

BROOKLYN FRIENDS SCHOOL JOURNAL Summer 2015

20508_Journal.indd 8

7/17/15 2:03 PM


A Closer Look: Technology at BFS

IT’s Everywhere Innovative thinking from the school’s Information Technology (IT) staff, along with a recent push from a philanthropic parent, continue to move BFS forward in bold, new directions.

b

Over the past several years, technological experimentation and innovation have become the norm in many schools across the country. The changes are evident at BFS, too, where tech continues to be a daily part of school life for students, faculty, staff, and families. Most notably, Brooklyn Friends has a 1:1 computing program in which all middle and upper school students receive a school-issued Chromebook. Lower school students are part of the tech revolution too, with more than 160 iPads on six carts making their way around every kindergarten through 4th grade class. The iPads and Chromebooks are only one piece of the ubiquitous technology throughout the school. “Our biggest initiative was getting everything cloud-based,” said Greg George, Director of Technology and a faculty member since 1989. “We’ve achieved it. This means students and faculty can access their work anywhere, anytime, including offsite.” Under Greg’s direction the school also has in place a disaster recovery plan for minimizing disruptions to the networks, quickly restoring the normalcy of operations, and ensuring continuity in learning and all-school operations. With a cloud-based system and Google’s unlimited storage capacity, BFS has become paperless – a happy circumstance for our green initiatives that has also resulted in substantial savings in postage costs. “Every academic program and every department in the school is cloud-based,” said Greg, “starting with enrollment and ending with graduation.” The application process, enrollment contracts, report cards, transcripts, afterschool/summer program registration, and other IT functions are administered through the Senior Systems/My BackPack system. Another cloud-based product,

Magnus Health, contains all students’ medical data so that teachers can retrieve data easily from anywhere at school and offsite, such as athletic events and field trips. Tuition and homework assignments are managed through the cloud-based TADS and Haiku systems, respectively. As though hearing the school’s technological call to action, Lower School parent Nichol Alexander made a generous $25,000 gift to BFS through his family foundation this academic year to support curricular innovation through technology. With the iPad roll-out in the lower school and the middle and upper school students’ fierce attachments to their Chromebooks, it couldn’t have come at a more fortuitous time. With input from Greg and his staff, which includes Academic Technology Chair Liz Harnage and the technology Integrators, one of the first things the school did was to purchase two cutting edge MakerBot 3-D printers. Liz was a key decision maker in the discussions on how best to use Nichol’s gift to the school. “Nichol expressed a keen interest in developing the exposure our students get to innovative, hands-on technologies and the programming that governs them,” she said. “We decided to focus on various STEM or STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Math) pursuits.” Liz noted that aside from the two 3-D printers and related hardware accessories and design software, the funds were used to purchase LEGO Education WeDo software, as well as robotics kits, circuit kits and electronics kits.  “Nichol’s gift helped expedite our students’ access to some of these advanced technologies for which we are truly grateful,” she said. “The future of technology at BFS is very bright.”

Middle School students observing the new MakerBot 3-D printer in action

Summer 2015 BROOKLYN FRIENDS SCHOOL JOURNAL

20508_Journal.indd 9

7

7/17/15 2:03 PM


A Closer Look: Technology at BFS

Practicing alphabet letter writing on the iPad Mini in kindergarten class

Taking It to the Top in Tech Technological experiments and innovations have become the norm in many schools across the country. Nowhere is this more evident at BFS than in the Lower School.

b

It’s a brave new world of immersion into technology across kindergarten through grade 4 classrooms and library. The arrival of 160 iPads for student use in the fall of 2014 brought technology closer to the points of learning, but innovative tech integration into academics has been taking place for many years in the lower school. Thanks to the mind-boggling boom in educational software, teachers have an array of choices with which to experiment. Beginning Sounds Sort, Smart Notebook, RAZ Kids and Sight Words Ninja are but a few of the apps popular with students. Kindergarten and first

8

graders are using Bitsboard, a program that helps them practice sight words. RAZ Kids, for example, is an app that allows teachers to assign books at the ‘just right’ reading level of each student, with the student interacting with the book via his/her own iPad. Tracy Chow, the division’s technology integrator elaborated: “The students hear a short book being read to them so they can model the fluency, get the chance to read and record the same book into the iPads so they hear their own fluency, and answer a set of reading comprehension questions.”  Teachers are involved with the student in this learning exercise every step of the way. Lest you think the end result is a classroom full of silent children staring into isolated, glowing screens all day, Tracy points out that the technology is meant as a curricular enhancement, not a panacea. In another project, first graders used an iPad app called “Art Set” to design backdrops for a skit they created based on two books they read. “They took a look at the book they were performing, figured out the settings based on the context cues in the text, and drew their settings,” she said. “They uploaded their pictures to the first grade Google Drive and their teacher was able to project the settings on the Eno Board while the students performed their skits.” For National Poetry Month, second graders studying Japanese collaborative poems called rengas wrote their own poetry inspired by the four seasons and painted watercolors illustrating their work. Next, explained Tracy, “They used Adobe Voice to narrate their poems while an image of their watercolors was shown onscreen. The app stitches all of their narrations together, puts in music and creates a movie.” Along with the children’s artwork and poems, Tracy created a QR code that parents could scan on the bulletin board to link to the finished movies. Tracy teaches coding in her weekly third and fourth grade technology classes using an app called Code Studio. “It helps students focus on concepts like sequencing, loops, and functions without being bogged down by syntax.” More artistically inclined students use coding to draw and create computer graphics. Some of our students were also introduced to the Lego WeDo robotics kit. Using the Macbooks from the middle school, students explored the different parts in the WeDo kit (e.g., motors and sensors) and tested out their coding skills in the Lego WeDo programming environment.

BROOKLYN FRIENDS SCHOOL JOURNAL Summer 2015

20508_Journal.indd 10

7/17/15 2:03 PM


Fourth grade teachers used Greek and Latin Root Words, an app that helps students increase their English vocabularies by teaching etymologies of words. “It gives examples of words that use a particular root and how they are related,” said Tracy. “What the teachers really like about this app is that it’s computer adaptive. If students respond incorrectly to a question the same root will be reinforced with other examples until the student responds correctly. The level of the game also adapts to the student’s level of understanding.” In Spanish Teacher Miriam Juarbe’s class, fourth graders are using Google Classroom, a suite of software tools designed especially for classroom collaboration, to write letters to their Spanish pen pals. The students use Skype to meet each other face to face, and they also had a Skype meeting with the son of Roberto Clemente, one of the people featured in their biography studies. Tracy holds an MA from Columbia Teacher’s College and started at BFS as a 1st grade teacher “Before becoming a teacher I was in experimental psychology research,” she explained.  “My focus was in cognitive psychology. I was interested in how people processed information and how they reasoned with the information taken in, kind of like a computer.  I was especially interested in the interaction between conceptual understanding and language processing and then later on, how language processing affected people’s visualization of events.” The arrival of the 3-D printers added a whole new dimension to the school’s tech adventures and explorations. Tracy dived right in with an Introduction to 3-D Printing unit for the third grade and a course called Introduction to Design Thinking and 3-D Printing for fourth grade. An added bonus is the fact that these courses mesh well with the geometry study units in the third and fourth grade math classes. In seeking out 3-D projects for young children, Academic Technology Chair Liz Harnage and Tracy had learned about a cookie cutter project at another school and gave it a try. “We decided that third graders could work with their kindergarten buddies to create the cookie cutter design on paper,” Tracy said. “Then they used an iPad app called Ink Pad that allows them to free draw their designs using vector graphics. The students then uploaded their images to the Google drive and imported them into Tinker CAD, a 3-D design program, on the Chromebooks.”

An image showing the creation of an original 2-D shape and design before it gets to be printed on a 3-D printer

From there, the students gave height to their 2-D shapes, bringing them into the third dimension. Designs were then printed on the MakerBot. The final products were used to cut and bake cookies in class during buddy time. There were many benefits to the project. Not only did it incorporate technology, engineering, art and math, it was a collaborative venture bringing younger students into the process. It also brought a sense of wonder, possibility, and joy to the children.

Authentic, Engaging, Inspirational The Middle School continues integrating technology into the curriculum in ingenious new ways, among them taking part in the global “Hour of Code” movement.

b

In addition to directing academic technology for Kindergarten through Grade 12, Liz Harnage has been the Middle School’s Academic Technology Integrator for the past six years. Liz teaches fifth through eighth grade technology classes with a focus on innovative technologies, introductory computer programming, 3D design and printing, augmented reality, underrepresented groups in technology, computer history, digital citizenship,

Summer 2015 BROOKLYN FRIENDS SCHOOL JOURNAL

20508_Journal.indd 11

9

7/17/15 2:03 PM


A Closer Look: Technology at BFS

digital storytelling – and much more. In fifth grade, each student is issued a Chromebook that must be kept at school, a BFS email account, and they begin using Google Docs to complete homework assignments. They’re also introduced to the array of other Google Classroom apps such as Google Slides presentation software. For their units on ancient history, teachers

Photo at right, students show their pencil and paper designs as part of the 3-D printing process; photo below, tradition and tech go hand-inhand as a fifth grader uses a reference book, a Chromebook, and the “Easybib” app to take notes for class.

10

Kathleen Clinchy and Michael Roth use Google Maps to create individualized maps of ancient areas that they use to enhance their lecture content. Moreover, the students used “Easy Bib” to generate digital notecards for their studies. Fifth graders also start using Haiku, a cloud-based learning management system that they’ll continue using through senior year. The web-based learning environment includes a homework board and supplemental course content such as videos, presentations and web links provided by their teachers. As computer and web use for schoolwork becomes more intensive in sixth grade, Liz kicks off her technology classes by talking about the digital footprints that we leave behind online. “We did interactive assignments and learned the ways companies can track us online,” she said. “This led to stimulating discussions about the meaning of privacy and how we can stay as safe as possible.” Sixth graders also saw a 3-D printer in action and began their own experiments in creating 3-D designs using the Tinker CAD and 3DT in websites. They then used cutting edge Prezi.com’s software to make interactive presentations on what they learned about 3-D printing. As a prelude to seventh grade, they studied computer programming, computational thinking, and set up accounts on Code.org. Seventh graders explored 3-D design and printing for the first time this year. They created augmented reality scavenger hunts with the iPad app Aurasma. Augmented reality is a live view of the real world that is being simultaneously manipulated in some way onscreen, such as adding an animated character to a video feed that students can interact with in real time. The eighth grade classes learned basic HTML and CSS web design code and have created their own Tumblr blogs using those coding languages. They also designed their own figurines using 3DTin and the 3-D printers. Throughout the middle school grades and even in the afterschool program, students have been using LittleBits DIY Electronics kits and “Makey Makey” kits to connect the physical world to the digital world and solve real-life problems. With all these programs in place, middle schoolers are more than ready to advance into our technological world.

BROOKLYN FRIENDS SCHOOL JOURNAL Summer 2015

20508_Journal.indd 12

7/17/15 2:03 PM


Physics Leads the Way In the Upper School, Physics Teacher Travis Merritt has joined explorations in 3-D printing with infectious enthusiasm.

b

Travis Merritt’s gadget-filled science lab now boasts a MakerBot 3-D printer. “It’s in an early stage. Right now it’s just one more tool available to students.” Travis teaches IB Physics to juniors and seniors and Conceptual Physics to ninth graders, and both classes work on experimental design projects. “I let students use their own ideas rather than assigning each of them a repetitive project,” he says. One group used the MakerBot to design a working model of a wind turbine, which was tested in a simple wind tunnel they made in class. Various shapes and styles for the turbines were explored to test their efficiency. “They used the printer to learn how to iterate multiple variations of the length of an object and measure its wind resistance,” Travis explained. Another group used the printer to create a water chute, which was part of a mockup of an off-the-grid house utilizing wind, solar, and water energy.  “I’d like to see the 3-D printer used in ways that enhance the curriculum but also as an avenue for students to explore more about programming and design,” said Travis. “Having that exposure is helpful – it gives purpose to their learning.”

The physics lab provides endless opportunities for experimentation and the integration of science and technology.

Indeed, some of Travis’ projects don’t fit neatly into the set curriculum, but he is known for thinking outside the box. “Rigor to me means coming up with creative solutions to problems, not going home and answering 20 physics problems every night. Yes, that’s hard but I’d rather have them apply what they know to a real problem.”  One section of his classroom wall is demarcated as the Question Board. “Unlock the doors of science!” screams the sign atop it.  All questions have a place in this class. Find a place for your keys.  “The questions are keys that unlock a door,” he explained. The board is chock full of index cards on which students have anonymously written questions they might be embarrassed to ask in class for fear of seeming unintelligent in front of their classmates. Periodically Travis will devote a few minutes of class to answering one of the questions. At other times he categorizes them and waits until they’re germane to a particular lecture.  “Students are only going to invest in science if you encourage them to ask questions, to guess, to be wrong.” In keeping with that broad philosophy, further explorations continue throughout the school. There’s no end in sight but why should there be? Travis is intense when he speaks: “Why can’t we be one of the schools that’s an early adapter?  Can you imagine in the 1980’s saying to someone that computers will be in every classroom?”

Summer 2015 BROOKLYN FRIENDS SCHOOL JOURNAL

20508_Journal.indd 13

11

7/17/15 2:03 PM


A Closer Look: Technology at BFS

Still Your Grandparents’ Library (with an accent on high tech)

b

Librarian Christina Karvounis leads a group of second graders in activities during their “Maker Month.”

12

Despite fast and furious 21st century changes, the school library remains a repository of knowledge, a retreat for those seeking solitude, and a gathering place for young collaborators. Library Department Chair Kathy Hartzler, now in her 23rd year at the school, has long pushed for enhanced technologies in the school’s hubs of learning.  “Print and digital resources including video programs, countless databases, and apps for all grades are here,” she boasted, “along with iPads, Chromebooks, Macbooks and Kindles.” Just this year, the Library purchased an additional 24 Chromebooks to enhance and facilitate learning. Such innovations are the norm for educational technology spending in the school’s classrooms, but the libraries have had to keep pace, too.  “The great thing about infusing educational technology into the library is that it allows us to support the curriculum, promote literacy and foster a love of reading and learning,” said Middle School Librarian Angela Ungaro. Still, it’s not gadgets that make libraries effective learning centers. “Technologies are always

improving and that’s great, but it’s not so much what tools we use as the research skills we’re teaching students that matter most, for now and when they get to college.” Most recently, Kathy and her colleagues have been experimenting with makerspaces, a way to encourage creativity and critical thinking both individually and in groups. For the month of May, all Lower School students got to interact with a variety of materials and digital resources during their Library class.  “Our themes were The Art of Words, Book Arts, Makerspace Roundup and Build it, Fold it, Tinker,” explained PreschoolLower School Librarian Christina Karvounis. “Embedded within each of these themes were curated opportunities for students to run with ideas, share ideas, bring ideas to life and learn something new.” “What has not changed is our mission,” Kathy said.  “The Preschool-Lower School, Middle School, and soon-to-be new Upper School library have always been here for students, faculty, staff and families.”

BROOKLYN FRIENDS SCHOOL JOURNAL Summer 2015

20508_Journal.indd 14

7/17/15 2:03 PM


Profile in Giving

Nichol Alexander

b

Technological experiments and innovations have become the norm in many schools across the country. Nowhere is this more evident at BFS than in the Lower School. Even before their daughter Madeline started in the preschool threes, Nichol and Sarah Alexander had an instant connection to Brooklyn Friends School. “We immediately fell in love with the school, largely because it seemed to offer an oasis of thoughtfulness and community within the city that we had not seen anywhere else,” Nichol recalled. Now a Lower School parent of both Madeline and Charles, Nichol appreciated the school so much, in fact, that he recently made a generous $25,000 gift through his family foundation to support technological innovation.  “It’s been really exciting to see the kids come up through the different levels,” he said, “and one thing that we’ve been consistently amazed by is the thought and consideration that goes into every stage and step, both in terms of curriculum and personal development and community.” Such experiences made giving to the school a no-brainer for them.  “The commitment to learning makes it easy as a parent to support the school,” he said, “and to have confidence that the support is going to be well-directed and applied in a meaningful, thoughtful way.”  Nichol grew up in New York City and attended the Dalton School. At New York University he started out as a computer science major but quickly switched to dramatic literature.  “I was unable to imagine how computers and web technologies would connect people,” he said.  “At the time, computer science was very dull and directed at supporting IT departments in banks, which is

not where I saw myself.” He earned an MFA in playwriting, and now runs a tech startup. A good deal of his time is also spent volunteering at the school, initially as a class parent, then as a member of a digital communications task force, and more recently as a PAT Vice President. Not surprisingly, Nichol requested that the gift have a significant impact on the technology program. “He wanted more depth,” explained Kathryn Collins, Director of Annual Giving. “He didn’t want it be used for teacher equipment or simply for more computers.” Said Nichol, “It’s my hope that a fully integrated and supported technology curriculum will give students the opportunity to experience first hand how different disciplines can feed off of each other and magnify their impacts.”  He elaborated further.  “I have absolutely loved being able to participate in some part of the technological development around me and New York is one of the most interesting places to have a foundational understanding of STEM,” [an acronym for science, technology, engineering and math in school curricula.]  “We wanted to be able to encourage that within the school.” Nichol stressed that he and his wife Sarah hope their gift has a long-term impact on the BFS community. “Sarah and I love the school, the teachers, the parents, the kids, and hope that our children will graduate and look back on it as a formative place that not only helped to make them who they are but also gave them tools they use and cherish in their own pursuits. BFS is sort of like an extension of our family and it’s important for us to help out where we can.” Voluntary giving to support a specific school program is often the icing on the cake for the school’s fundraisers, who have an almost million dollar goal to support all areas of the school’s operations. “It’s very gratifying when a donor’s personal passion aligns so perfectly with the school’s long-term curricular objectives,” observed Director of Annual Giving Kathryn Collins. “Nichol and Sarah’s gift for technology has kickstarted new ways of teaching and learning at BFS while their continued support of the Brooklyn Friends Fund supports ongoing professional development for teachers in this and other quickly evolving areas.”

“It’s very gratifying when a donor’s personal passion aligns so perfectly with the school’s long-term curricular  objectives.” Kathryn Collins Director of Annual Giving

Summer 2015 BROOKLYN FRIENDS SCHOOL JOURNAL

20508_Journal.indd 15

13

7/17/15 2:03 PM


A Closer Look: Technology at BFS

It’s a Small World:

Team Tech

It takes a village to run the information and academic technology functions at BFS. Among those who are front and center, as well as behind the scenes, are (seated l to r), Director of Technology Greg George, Sam Caravaglia, Jean Kim, Ginny Terry, James Logue, Dakota Benedek; (standing l to r), Andy Cohen, Chair of Academic Technology Liz Harnage, Tracy Chow, Valarie Alston, and Tanya Pinto.

Coming Soon . . .

BFS, MakerBot, and Bre Pettis

b

When Nichol Alexander stipulated that his donation be used for technological innovations in the classroom, one of the first decisions the school made was acquiring two MakerBot Replicator 3-D printers. Coincidentally, Preschool parent Bre Pettis is a co-founder of MakerBot Industries. “The printers are easy enough to use by anyone with passion and my favorite is when teachers get them,” Bre explained. In addition to 3-D design software tools available on the web, our students have access to the MakerBot Nook book, a handy training and idea guide created by Bre. Upper School physics teacher Travis Merritt invited Bre to his IB class as a guest speaker to discuss the potential uses of 3-D printers in scientific experimentation. Don’t such high-tech devices clash

Brooklyn Friends School launches a new website this summer at www.brooklynfriends.org With the opening of the new Upper School at 116 Lawrence Street in MetroTech this coming September, BFS begins a new era in our history. To celebrate our success and keep pace with technological advances, the school is proud to introduce a totally new, responsive website. Created as a marketing website, brooklynfriends. org has been adapted for ease of use with smartphones, tablets, and desktops; it also features a multimedia “Meet the School” section with video profiles created by BFS alumnus Andrew Guidone ‘94.

14

with Quaker ideals of simplicity? Bre doesn’t think so, and he speaks from a position of experience.  “I was trained to be a teacher at Pacific Oaks, which is a Quaker teacher training school,” he said. “I was also part of a program called Courage to Teach, which taught me how to participate in a clearness committee. I really value the Quaker focus on friendship and non-judgment,” he said. Given his deep connection to MakerBot, one might imagine Bre settling in the Silicon Valley instead of Brooklyn, but he was blessed with a unique trajectory. “I was a puppeteer, a school teacher, a videographer. But my superpower is gathering talented people together to do wonderful things,” he said. “As a maker, it was a holy grail to make something that makes things, and so I’ve spent the last six years dedicated to creating tools of manifestation for creative explorers.” Blue Room Parents Bre Pettis and Kio Stark visited the class to demonstrate a family tradition entitled “The things we make for the people we love.” Using a MakerBot, Bre made nuts, bolts and medals ahead of time for each of the students. He showed the class the material and the mobile MakerBot that he used to create the items.

BROOKLYN FRIENDS SCHOOL JOURNAL Summer 2015

20508_Journal.indd 16

7/17/15 2:03 PM


Celebrations

Preschool Grandparents and Special Friends Day

was a joyous celebration for our community. We were thrilled to welcome over 200 guests to the second floor for a beautiful morning of art, music, and exciting classroom time together.Â

Many thanks to the Preschool Faculty who hosted our VIP guests on May 20th: Head of Preschool Maura Eden, Administrative Assistant Ginny Terry, Teachers Suzanne Stevens, Maricarmen Ramirez, Sharon Carter, Laura Obuobi, Niamh Dolan, Emily Martin, Camille Fobbs, Bianca Sanchez, Lisa Ventry, Dani Clarke, Kate Engle, Linda Villamarin, Robin Stewart, Claudia Lewis, Jazelyn Montanez, and Jackie Ortiz.

Summer 2015 BROOKLYN FRIENDS SCHOOL JOURNAL

20508_Journal.indd 17

15

7/17/15 2:03 PM


Celebrations

Oh, What a Night! THE SPRING GALA at Brooklyn Friends

School is constantly evolving, thanks to the creativity, commitment, and volunteerism of members of the PAT, our Parents and Teachers association. This year, the end of a dreary and snow-filled winter enticed more than 350 guests to take part in a delightful evening of silent and live auctions, great music, delicious food, bowling, and fun with friends. Best of all, $105,000 was raised to support the school’s financial aid program. At the 2015 Spring Bowl, held on Tuesday, May 5th, the BFS community traveled to Williamsburg’s Brooklyn Bowl to take advantage of all that the legendary concert and bowling venue has to offer. The evening kicked off with bidding on nearly 200 silent auction items. The hard work of the Spring Bowl Auction Committee paid off with an item for every interest and budget. With the addition of online bidding opening before the party, the action was already well underway and members of the BFS community across the country were able to take part in the fun. The focus then turned to the main stage and middle school teacher and auctioneer Jeremy Hawkins. Captivating the crowd with a musical performance, Jeremy led the auctioning of the beautiful collaborative artwork of our Preschool and Lower School students. To celebrate the tremendous success of the evening, Big Beat featuring BFS parents Josh Margolis and Jon Walker took to the stage as the crowd hit the dance floor and the bowling lanes. As a PAT event, the success of the Spring Bowl is thanks to the hard work of parent volunteers. The School thanks Spring Bowl Co-Chairs Monica Jonas and Lauryn Small as well as the creative and dedicated Spring Bowl Committee. The School also thanks DJ Lumumba Bandele and the band Big Beat for providing the evening’s soundtrack. And last, but certainly not least, thanks to our students and teachers for the incredible artwork that they created for the auction. —Emily Cowles

16

BROOKLYN FRIENDS SCHOOL JOURNAL Summer 2015

20508_Journal.indd 18

7/17/15 2:03 PM


Lighting the Way MORE THAN 250

community members gathered at the site of the new Upper School at 116 Lawrence Street on May 30th for a celebration and insider tours of the new facility. (The building officially opens in September.) On this lovely spring morning, Head of School Larry Weiss and Board Co-chairs Lara Holliday and Brad Mulder ’83 announced the launch of an $8 million capital campaign, known as “Light the Way,” for the new building and the school’s endowment

fund. All members of the BFS community – trustees, alumni, parents, parents of alumni, faculty alums, faculty and staff, Quakers, and many other friends of the school – will be asked to participate in this three-year effort, which culminates in the school’s 150th anniversary in 2017. The “Light the Way” campaign signifies the promise of a bright future and the support required to achieve that promise. Additional details and photos are on the school website, brooklynfriends.org.

The hundreds of people who toured the facility were thrilled to see the care and attention given to creating an architecturally outstanding new Upper School. On a platform outside the building, the Board, the Head of School, and others talked about their hopes and dreams for the school. Top photo, l to r, Lara Holliday, Brad Mulder, and 2015-16 Upper School Head Sidney Bridges.

Summer 2015 BROOKLYN FRIENDS SCHOOL JOURNAL

20508_Journal.indd 19

17

7/17/15 2:03 PM


Alumni

#backtoBFS ALUMNI DAY on May 30, 2015 was a well-attended event that left our alumni prouder than ever to be part of the BFS community. The event actually started on Friday night with a 1995-2000 soccer team reunion and game played at Brooklyn Bridge Park. Several former athletes and coaches gathered to play soccer and reminisce about BFS. This reunion was planned as a surprise for coach Rich Van Buren, who led BFS to the state championship in 1997. Upper School teacher Vladimir Malukoff, Athletic Director David Gardella and Head of School Dr. Larry Weiss were also in attendance to show their support of our athletic alums. Although the second half of the game exhausted several of the soccer players, their competitive spirit and appreciation for the team were still intact.

1

2

3

4

5

7

18

6

BROOKLYN FRIENDS SCHOOL JOURNAL Summer 2015

20508_Journal.indd 20

7/17/15 2:03 PM


8

9

10

12

11

Early on Saturday morning, alums joined faculty, parents and friends to tour the new Upper School building (116 Lawrence Street) as the $8 million “Light the Way” capital campaign kicked off. The crisp morning was capped off by stirring remarks from Dr. Larry Weiss, incoming Head of Upper School Sidney Bridges, and Board of Trustees co-chairs, Brad Mulder ’83 and Lara Holliday. Alumni attendance at the celebration spanned many decades, including a significant presence from our Class of 1965, celebrating their 50th reunion. Afternoon events included a spirited alumni basketball game, tours of Pearl Street and Lawrence Street, and Quaker Meeting. This year, Elissa Bluth ’65 ended the silence of the Meeting with a beautiful piano selection that was reminiscent of the times she played in high school. A cocktail party that brought together all the alumni in the festive spirit of “Eat, Drink and Be Merry” followed. Approximately 150 alums attended and participated in the activities, with a strong representation of the reunion years, particularly the classes of 1965, 1975, and 1995. The theme of the day was “Celebrating our Upper School,” but there was also a prominent plea for strong alumni support of the Brooklyn Friends Fund as well as the Capital Campaign. Contributions enable BFS to continue to serve our community and provide our students, staff and alumni with quality experiences and events. In the spirit of giving, a generous alum has created the Light The Way Alumni Challenge, which promises to match alum gifts to the Capital Campaign up to $50,000. With the success of Alumni Day, we hope to continue the momentum and garner even more alumni support and dedication for many years to come. — Lekeia Varlack Judge ’99

1. Faculty alum John Cusato with Athletic Director David Gardella; 2. From the Class of 1995: Natalie Fernandez, Javita Moreira, Rikiya Brown, Meredith Cole Erickson; 3. Chineke Njideka ’11, Jazelyn Montanez ’97, Ashley Felix ’11, Miriam Gentile ’11; 4. Sara Soll, Becky Soll ’99, Asha Paul ’10; 5. Angelina McCormick Soll, Jesse Soll ’95, Anya Hoerburger ’95; 6. Leneil Roderique ’13 and Brad Mulder ’83; 7. From the Class of 1975: Lisa Rubin Kornblau, Karl Kass, Latin teacher Martin Moore, Susan Rettig Raifman, Mitchell Zeller, Mitchell Markson; 8. From the Classes of 2010-14: Avery Martinez, Adam Ginsberg, William Figueroa, Nathan Josaphat, Sebastian Jean, Amara Granderson, Janna Joissainte; 9. From the Class of 1965: Jonathan Zorach, Betty Gullen, Hartley Spatt, Maury Sherman, Paul Johnson, Carla Heaton, Ed Akins, Elissa Bluth, Jonathan Unger, and Moses Silverman; 10-11 Alum basketball; 12. Larry Weiss, Vlad Malukoff, Ari Raisa, a guest player, Chris Price, Jason Garry, Coach Rich Van Buren, Zak Van Buren, Sam Benedict, Jesse Soll, Noah Zuss, Allan Maragh, Zev Sohne. Front row, Charles McVey, Javier Gaston Greenberg, Gardiner Comfort.

Summer 2015 BROOKLYN FRIENDS SCHOOL JOURNAL

20508_Journal.indd 21

19

7/17/15 2:03 PM


The season premiere focused on the magic of the theaters of NYC, including Brooklyn’s recently restored Loews Kings Theater. Great job – we’ll be watching Andrew!

BFS alums Amanda Welch ’03 and Darnell Paul ’03 are engaged to be married.

WRITER GERRY VALEN-

TINE ’81 is excited about his new editorial column in the local Boulder paper, The Daily Camera. He writes a monthly column that discusses the intersection of business innovation and social responsibility. Thank you for always keeping us updated, Gerry. Keep up the great work! After discovering an appreciation for finance, ELIZABETH BURNS PUNZI ’82 now works in Wealth Management at Morgan Stanley in Red Bank, NJ. She, along with her team, employs a planning based practice to address all aspects of wealth

management, not just investments. Although she misses Brooklyn, Beth is definitely enjoying the Jersey Shore! Good luck to CAMILLE CRUSE ’86, who recently launched a Kickstarter campaign for MyGameBook®. Her business is designed to help your sports parent, sports guardian, or coach develop talented youth athletes. For more information about MyGameBook® check out www.mygamebookusa.com. Emmy-award winning filmmaker ANDREW GUIDONE ’94 has been producing a history series for Channel 25’s NYC Life: Blueprint|NYC.

Next time you listen to Drake’s album Take Care, you’ll be hearing the Grammy winning works of alum ANDREW WRIGHT ’94! This mixing and recording engineer has worked with some acclaimed artists such as Kendrick Lamar and Wyclef Jean. Congrats on your success, Andrew! JULIO PABON ’98 and his wife Mariela welcomed their first baby, a boy named Luca Tomas Pabon! Blessings to you and your family, Julio! Congratulations are in order for JONATHAN RICHARDS ’99 – he was married in April in a small ceremony in Brooklyn! We wish him and his wife Natalie all the best. Described as “improvisatory, glancing and gorgeous,” and “a slow-burn beauty” by New York magazine, GARRETT BRADLEY’S ’03 film

Class Notes

Do you have some great news you want to share? Have you been promoted at work? Getting married? Or maybe you just want to let your classmates know how you are doing... BFS would love to help you spread the word! To contribute to Class Notes, contact the Alumni Office at lvarlack@brooklynfriends.org and be featured in our next journal! 22 20

BROOKLYN FRIENDS SCHOOL JOURNAL Winter Summer2014 2015

20508_Journal.indd 22

Below Dreams was released in select theaters in April. Garrett’s film made its world premiere at the Tribeca Film Festival and has since been screened at various national and international festivals. Congratulations Garrett, we support you!

Garrett Bradley ’03

What a beautiful love story! High school sweethearts AMANDA WELCH ’03 and DARNELL PAUL ’03 got engaged to be married in Paris! Best of luck to the couple! Congrats to MATT GENTILE ’07, who is finishing up a Master’s program with the American Film Institute in Los Angeles and is the writer and director of the film Frontman. Best of luck with your career, Matt! by Lekeia Varlack Judge ’99

IN MEMORIAM JONATHAN PINCUS ’52 PAUL WALDMAN ’48 SHEILA BELL FRIEDLI ’47 FRANCES SALANT ’37

BROOKLYNFRIENDS.ORG

7/17/15 2:03 PM


United We Stand by Lekeia Varlack Judge ’99

From left, UNITE Mentors Kamal DeCosta’ 95, Lekeia Varlack Judge ’99, Jazelyn Montanez ’98 and Edmund Francis ’03

FOR THE AVERAGE PERSON,

visiting one’s high school is not something you want to do regularly. For the average person, the urge to hang out with high schoolers ended, well, when they left high school. But Brooklyn Friends School does not produce average people or average alums. Every month, I gather in the library with a group of dedicated alumni who plan ways to meaningfully engage and support our Upper School students through an initiative known as UNITE. Earlier in the school year, fellow faculty/alums Jesse Phillips-Fein ’97, Claudia Lewis ’88 and Jazelyn Montanez ’98, along with alumna Asha Boston ’08, approached me with a proposal to create a mentorship program designed to unite alums of color with students of color in the Upper School. They asked me to help spread the word to the alumni community to gather interest and a few prospective mentors. As someone who participated in a mentorship development certificate program with Big Brother Big Sister of New York, I know about the challenges of creating an unproven program, especially when trying to recruit mentors. There are the monthly planning meetings to be held after work hours, the high expectations of accountability and time commitments, and the task of asking people to join an organization in its developmental stages. The list of reasons for not joining seemed pretty significant. So, I sent out the information and waited for the excuses to pour in. To my surprise, the applications began rolling

in and the interest and support from the alumni community spread. Edmund Francis ’03 explained his motivation for volunteering to become a mentor. He decided to join UNITE because at one time in his life, he attended a school where the goal was to survive the day and escape without any incidents. “It wasn’t until I went to BFS that I learned that school was about learning and exploring who you were,” Edmund said. “This was a big adjustment for me – I was in an unfamiliar place, with people from different backgrounds, interests and lifestyles. I needed help navigating through this system. At the end of the day, being at BFS gave me a stronger sense of identity and made me appreciate who I am and where I came from, because these were the things that were valued and appreciated.” Alums Kamal DeCosta ’95 and Jazelyn Montanez ’98 were motivated to become mentors because of the challenges that they experienced while attending BFS. “High school is hard,” says Jazelyn. “I

wish I had someone to guide me through it. I want to help today’s students so their experience could be a little easier than mine was.” Edmund, Kamal and Jazelyn represent just a few of the alums who plan to pave the way for our students to have a better transition into the Upper School and beyond. UNITE is still in its formative stage, but I believe we are off to an amazing start. In the beginning, our meetings were part planning, part brainstorm, part therapy session and part trip down memory lane. Now that our mentors have been paired with their mentees, the journey to form meaningful relationships with the each student has begun. In addition to the mentorship component, our mentors are also committed to be visible figures in the BFS community, as a way to lend the support to our students and to Brooklyn Friends School. If you are an alum of color interested in becoming a mentor, please email unite@ brooklynfriends.org.

Author and cultural anthropologist Margaret Mead once said, “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.”

20508_Journal.indd 23

7/17/15 2:04 PM


Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage PAID S. Hackensack, NJ Permit # 79

Brooklyn Friends School 375 Pearl Street Brooklyn, NY 11201

Address Service Requested

Brooklyn Friends School Journal is published quarterly by the Advancement Office of Brooklyn Friends School for students, alumni/ae, parents, grandparents, and friends. 375 Pearl Street, Brooklyn, NY 11201 Tel: 718.852.1029 brooklynfriends.org Joan Martin, Editor Jeffrey Stanley, Staff Writer Gregg Martin, Staff Photographer

Congratulations to the following colleges and universities.

You have the good fortune to be welcoming a 2015 Brooklyn Friends School graduate into your Class of 2019. Allegheny College

Johns Hopkins University

Stanford University

Bard College

Kenyon College

Barnard College

Knox College

SUNY College at Brockport

Bennington College

Lewis & Clark College

Swarthmore College

Binghamton University

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Tufts University University of Miami

McDaniel College

University of North Carolina School of the Arts

Brandeis University Bucknell University Carleton College Colorado College DePaul University Dickinson College Eckerd College Emerson College Eugene Lang College, The New School for the Arts Ithaca College

20508_Journal.indd 24

Middlebury College Muhlenberg College Northeastern University Parsons, The New School for Design Pitzer College

University of Vermont University of Wisconsin, Madison Ursinus College Wesleyan University

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Skidmore College

Yale University

Smith College

Bold indicates more than one student will be attending.

7/17/15 2:04 PM

BFS Journal Summer 2015  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you