Page 1

curriculum guide

th Form


6th Form Curriculum Guide

Contents

Introduction: Making a Choice

2

A Level Courses

- Art and Design: Fine Art - Biology - Business and Economics - Chemistry - Design and Technology - Drama and Theatre Studies - English Language and Literature - French - Geography - German - History - History of Art - Mathematics and Further Mathematics - Photography - Physical Education - Physics - Politics - Spanish

6 8 10 12 14 17 21 25 27 29 30 32 34 37 39 41 43 44

6th Form entry Year Courses

- GCSE English Language - GCSE Mathematics - GCSE Engineering - GCSE Psychology - IGCSE Global Citizenship - The International English Language Testing System (IELTS)

47 49 50 51 52 53

Other Sixth Form Courses

- EPQ - Extended Project Qualification - Music Opportunities

PSHE Sport Core Sport (Extra-Curricular)

55 56 56 57 57

Please read this document in conjunction with the 6th form Student Guide.

1


Introduction: Making a Choice You are about to embark upon the most exciting stage of your school career. As you approach the end of compulsory education, you will need to be thinking of the subjects you wish to study in Years 12+13.

The qualifications we offer lead to university entrance worldwide. The courses are all designed for specialists, and are therefore excellent preparation for the rigorous demands of top-class Universities. Our students gain admission to a large number of Universities, both in the United Kingdom and overseas. You may be aware of the A Level reform which has been conducted in the UK. At the British School of Paris, we are following these reforms. AS and A Level examinations will no longer be linked and students intending to study for an A Level qualification will not need the ‘stepping stone’ of AS in the Summer of Year 12. Some subjects can still offer AS in Year 12 if you are not progressing to the A Level. Please check the chart on Page 4 to see the possibilities. At the British School of Paris we are pleased to be able to offer a large variety of subjects to Advanced Level. We can also offer academic support and extension possibilities: General Certificate of Education subjects in Year 12, the possibility to extend beyond A level competence in French and Spanish and EPQ: the Extended Project Qualification created to provide additional stretch and challenge and better prepare students for university demands. Students progressing into the Sixth Form follow a rigorous schedule and helping you to reach your academic potential is one of our primary aims. Our examination results are excellent and we are very proud of the achievements of our students. There are many opportunities post GCSE for students at the British School of Paris, and we can support every pathway to the next stage in your educational career. The most common choice is the traditional highly academic linear A Level programme supported by excellent GCSE success. Alternatively, many of our students opt for more creative routes leading to Art, Photography or Performance courses in higher education. Additionally, every year a number of students select a non-university pathway, choosing vocational courses in further education which may be supported by fewer GCSE or A Level qualifications.

2

Early discussions about realistic possibilities are to be encouraged; the school runs a series of events throughout the year to support the process of subject choice. Students should be aware whilst making decisions for the Sixth Form that linear A Levels are very demanding. As such, A Level subjects should ideally be undertaken by students possessing high GCSE grades in related subjects. (High grades at GCSE typically include B – A* or levels 5 – 9). Prestigious Universities expect applicants to have a range (an absolute minimum of 5 is recommended) of good passes at GCSE as well as three strong passes in their A Level subjects. Therefore, we recommend and advise students only to enter our A Level programme with a proven track record from previous courses taken. If A Level study is not immediately suitable for you, consider our 6th form Entry Year courses. We offer a selection of repeat and ‘new’ GCSE subjects. This course can provide access to our A Level programme, or to further education courses in the UK or elsewhere. The need to remain realistic when choosing courses at the British School of Paris, and the great variety of options which exist in further and higher education can be overwhelming for both students and parents. Please do not hesitate to seek advice from subject specialists or our Careers Department if you should require support and advice. Please also see our ‘Route Map’ to help decision making.

What factors should you consider in your choice of Sixth Form programme? You should be genuinely interested in the subject you have chosen. Each course will represent a large part of your week. You must be able to enjoy what you are studying. If you have a passion for a particular subject combined with a real desire to extend your learning, success will be an enjoyable challenge. There are no easy options! You should know that courses at this level can be remarkedly different from GCSE courses which bear the same name. Read carefully the course descriptions, written by the various Heads of Departments. Consider not only the syllabus content but the various


6th Form Curriculum Guide

skills which you will have to develop. Take into account the amount of practical work. Think of the bias in the course towards the mathematical, the scientific or the literary. Some subjects demand a strong GCSE pass; some accept students without a GCSE. Discuss all this with the subject teachers at The British School of Paris.

extension. Please note the colour-coding to show the qualifications available in each subject. Option blocks will then be generated. We try to be as flexible as possible to allow everyone to be satisfied. We also know this is not always possible. Difficulties will be discussed at this stage.

Naturally you must consider choice of career. We hope that most of you will have at

May/June The timetable is completed. Subjects will be confirmed only if there are sufficient numbers of students.

least a general idea of the type of career you wish to pursue, although you may not yet have decided upon a particular profession. Consult widely: read the University Application and Careers section in the 6th Form Student Guide. Discuss your thoughts with your parents, the Careers Department, your subject teachers and your tutor.

The Options Procedure

August Receipt of GCSE results from Examination Boards. Year 12 The week before start of term In the light of GCSE results, some students may have to change courses or rethink their educational future. You should be available during this week to discuss issues with staff at school.

Year 10 Summer Term Futurewise testing conducted

September Sixth Form Induction.

Year 11 Autumn Term Futurewise information discussed

Year 12 courses start. Subject changes should be completed within 4 weeks and we advise that students wishing to drop a subject do so by the end of the first half term.

January/February For students at the British School of Paris, Year 11 mock examination results are analysed and discussed by your tutors, subject teachers and parents. March Option choices are made. The Sixth Form Curriculum Guide outlines courses and students are invited to an Options Evening. Most students will choose three subjects from List A. List B allows for support or

When you and your parents have read through this Curriculum Guide, you should discuss subject choices together and decide on the areas about which you would like further information. You may obtain clarification from a variety of sources: you can ask your subject teachers, your tutor or our Head of Careers. Also you should talk to students in Years 12 and 13 who are already following the courses in which you are interested. If you or your parents would like further information on any aspect of the courses or careers, we shall be happy to assist in any way we can. Dr J Batters, Head of Senior School

3


A Level This table shows the current subjects available. We constantly review the breadth of choice and may develop new courses where appropriate. List A – A Level

List B – 6th Form Entry/Extension/Support

A Level course

Possible AS Course

Art & Design

*Art & Design

Biology

*Biology

GCSE English Langauge

Extended Project Qualification (EPQ)

Business

Design & Technology

GCSE Mathematics

French Special Objectives (FSO)

Chemistry

Further Mathematics

GCSE Engineering

German Special Objectives (GSO)

Design & Technology

History of Art

GCSE Psychology

Spanish Special Objectives (SSO)

Drama & Theatre Studies

Mathematics

iGCSE Global Citizenship

Economics

*Photography

International English Language Testing System (IELTS)

Further Mathematics

*Physical Education

English Language & Literature

*Physics

English Literature

1 Year course

2 Year course

Music ABRSM, Rockschool

English as an Additonal Language It may also be possible to support Native Languages

French Further Mathematics

*Possible in exceptional cases

Geography German History History of Art Mathematics Photography Physical Education Physics Politics Spanish

AS qualifications will typically be selected by students as part of a ‘2 A Levels plus’ or ‘1 A Level plus’ package, as outlined in the Sixth Form Route Map document distributed to parents and students. AS qualifications can be studied over one or two years, dependent on the needs of the individual student and course availability.

4


6th Form Curriculum Guide Parent and student ‘Route Map’ for Sixth Form – September 2018 6th Form Entry Year Course Aims: • To gain 5 GCSEs. • To allow entry onto the A Level courses at the BSP/elsewhere. • To include a spread of relevant skills. • Can include academic and English support. • Additional qualifications such LAMDA and ABRSM are possible. • Extra-curricular activity participation is encouraged.

Our Recommended Student Profile for this course could include: • Students who are new to the English curriculum. • Students who need a complete academic ‘track record’ before moving onto higher courses • Students who speak English as an Additional Language.

Course Aims: • To provide a core of three AL grades. • To allow entry onto highly competitive university courses. • To provide stretch and challenge through additional qualifications. • Additional qualifications such as LAMDA and ABRSM are possible. • Extra-curricular activity participation is encouraged.

Our Recommended Student Profile for this course could include: • Students who are ‘Sixth Form Scholars’. • Students who speak English and French at a very high level. • Students who have high achieving track record, with grade 6 or above in relevant GCSEs. • Students who have very high ability across range of subject areas as recognised through school reports, assessment grades and external examination grades.

Course Aims: • To provide a core of three AL grades. • To allow entry onto a wide range of university courses. • Additional qualifications such as LAMDA and ABRSM are possible. • Extra-curricular activity participation is encouraged.

Our Recommended Student Profile for this course could include: • Students with more than 5 GCSEs of grade 5 or above. • Students who have grade 6 or above in relevant GCSEs. • Students who have a good level of ability across range of subject areas as recognised through school reports, assessment grades and external examination grades.

Course Content: • 5 GCSEs, including Maths and English • IELTS/Academic support can be offered alongside.

‘3 A Levels plus’ Course Content: • Our ‘Traditional’ 3 AL package. • French SO or Further Mathematics or EPQ can be added. • An own language AL can be added, if possible.

‘Traditional A Levels’ Course Content: • Our ‘Traditional’ 3 AL package. • An own language AL can be added, if possible.

‘2 A Levels plus’ Course Aims: • To provide a core of 2 AL grades and additional GCSEs if necessary. • To allow entry onto a narrower range of degree courses or Foundation Year Entry degree courses or vocational courses. • Additional qualifications such as LAMDA and ABRSM are possible. • Extra-curricular activity participation is encouraged.

Our Recommended Student Profile for this course could include: • Students who have equal to or fewer than 5 GCSEs at grade 5 or above. • Students who have grade 5 or above in relevant GCSEs. • Students who have demonstrated good ability in some subject areas as recognised through school reports, assessment grades and external examination grades.

Course Content: • 2 AL courses. • An own language AL can be added, if possible. • 1 AS subject taken over one or two years can be added, where possible. • GCSE courses can be added, where possible. • Academic support can be generally added, where possible.

1 A Level ‘+’ Course Aims: • To provide a core of 1 AL grade and additional GCSEs. • To allow entry onto Foundation Year Entry degree courses or Foundation Degree courses or vocational courses. • Additional qualifications such as LAMDA and ABRSM are possible. • Extra-curricular activity participation is encouraged.

Our Recommended Student Profile for this course could include: • Students who have fewer than 5 GCSEs at grade 5 or above. • Students who have demonstrated potential in some subject areas as recognised through school reports, assessment grades and external examination grades.

Course Content: • 1 AL course. • An own language AL can be added, if possible. • 1 AS subject taken over one or two years can be added, where possible. • GCSE courses can be added, where possible. • Academic support can be generally added, where possible. • Tailored specific support will be charged.

5


A Level Art and Design: Fine Art

Edexcel 9FA0

The Fine Art course allows you to consider and reflect on your place in the world. Students choosing Fine Art will learn how to develop visual language in order to communicate ideas, and build up skills using both traditional and new media. Students have the opportunity to inform their practice through day trips, residential trips and artist workshops.

The Morisot building houses the Art and History of Art departments. Those choosing to study Fine Art have the privilege of working in a dedicated Sixth Form Art studio, with beautiful views out across the Seine. Students will be able to make use of a full range of traditional resources and materials, including printmaking facilities and a kiln, as well as having access to a dedicated Art library containing Mac computers and digital photography equipment.

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking this course? The best foundation for success in A Level Art is a good grade at GCSE, preferably a C or above. A successful A Level Art student is one who is curious and passionate about the world around them, and who is self-motivated. You should have an understanding of the formal elements of art – colour, tone, form etc, and also some understanding of the place of art, craft and design in the world – its history and its purpose. Above all, you should have an interest in creating and understanding art and the determination to develop that interest.

What skills will I acquire if I choose to study Fine Art? You will build up a wide range of technical skills using both traditional and new media, including:

• Painting & Drawing • Sculpture & Ceramics • Printmaking • Lens-based image making You will also develop transferable skills, which will be essential to whatever higher education or career path you choose. These include: • Researching and writing a sustained personal study, with Harvard referencing and bibliography (A level only) • Solving practical problems and finding creative solutions; adaptability. • Critical thinking- analysing, synthesising and reasoning skills • Understanding of different cultural and historical contexts • Self-management and self-development

What equipment will I need? The Art department will provide you with all the materials you will need to work during lessons and after school. It will be necessary, however, to have a good set of each of the following, in order to be able to work at home: • Blendable coloured pencils • Drawing pencils (2H-6B) • Artist quality Acrylic paints • A range of brushes • Watercolour paints

What does the course involve? The A Level course is broken down into two components. Component 1: The Personal Investigation. This incorporates three major elements: supporting studies, practical work, and a personal study. It is worth 60% of the final grade, and is submitted in January of the second year of the course. • Supporting studies and practical work will comprise a portfolio of development work and outcomes based on themes and ideas developed from personal starting points. • The personal study will be evidenced through critical written communication showing contextual

6


6th Form Curriculum Guide

Art and Design (Continued)

research and understanding in a minimum 1000 words of continuous prose, which may contain integrated images. The personal study comprises 12% of the total qualification. Component 2: The Externally Set Assignment. This incorporates two major elements: preparatory studies and the 15–hour period of sustained focus. It is worth 40% of the final grade, and represents the culmination of the A Level course. Preparatory studies will comprise a portfolio of practical and written development work based on the Externally Set Assignment. • During the 15–hour period of sustained focus under examination conditions, students will produce final outcome(s) extending from their preparatory studies in response to the Externally Set Assignment. • The Externally Set Assignment is released on 1 February and contains a theme and suggested starting points. • Students have from 1 February until the commencement of the final 15–hour period of sustained focus to develop preparatory studies.

Can I work outside lesson times? The Sixth Form studio and Art library are dedicated spaces for students to come and work in their free periods and outside lesson times. You will be expected to spend sufficient time working independently on your coursework and exam projects if you wish to succeed in Art, and you are encouraged to attend the after-school sessions that take place in the Morisot building. When GCSE and A Level students use the studio facilities after school there is a great atmosphere in the department. These sessions allow students to share ideas, experiment with new techniques, as well as receiving feedback from teachers in a more informal environment.

an exhibition of your work, which will be advertised to students, parents and the local community. The external moderator will come to see the exhibition shortly before it opens to the public, to verify the marks, and will have the final decision on your overall grade.

What could I go on to do at the end of my course? There are many careers in art, craft and design. Most of these require further study at an art school, further education college or university. If you are unsure about whether to make a career of the subject, the best thing to do is to speak to your art teacher who will know about the courses on offer in your area or elsewhere. At present most students wishing to take art, craft or design will go on to do a one-year ‘Foundation’ course at an art college or college of further education before applying to degree courses in more specialist areas of art and design. You may wish to do an art A Level for its own sake, perhaps to form the basis of a future interest or as part of a range of other subjects. Or you might wish to go into a job where it is useful to have had experience of art, craft and design, or where you will need to use some of the skills developed during this course. These might include careers in such fields as advertising, marketing, design, architecture, publishing and the media. The study of Art can also help you develop transferable skills you can take into any career or job. Success in A Level Art requires determination and dedication. However, whichever future path you choose, it can be a very rewarding beginning.

What trips and visits will be on offer? It is essential to experience artworks first-hand in order to inform your project work and research. Day trips into Paris and artist workshops will be on offer to students taking this course. Joint trips to Florence and/ or Rome with History of Art and Photography students are also on offer. Student benefit enormously from the inspiring encounters with the rich array of art and architecture to inform their project work, as well as having a lot of fun! The trips to Italy are optional, as the cost is not included in the school fees.

How will my work be assessed? All work is internally marked by your teachers. You will receive regular written and verbal feedback on your progress against the assessment objectives. At the end of the course, you will organise and mount

7


A Level Biology

AQA 7401/7402

Teaching in this subject aims to combine content with context based approaches giving you the opportunity to develop skills in practical work, data and textual analysis and biological ethics. Our hope is to nurture your ability to reach informed, scientific conclusions in an ever evolving subject area.

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking this course? The A Level qualification builds upon the knowledge, understanding and practical skills that are taught at GCSE. For the best chance of success in this subject area we normally look for candidates who have achieved a Grade 6-6 or better in GCSE Combined Science Trilogy or GCSE Biology (or equivalent) and, due to the mathematical challenges of the course, a Grade 5 in GCSE Mathematics is also preferable.

What will I learn on this A Level course? In Biology you will develop practical skills through planning experiments, collecting and analysing data and hands-on experience of essential scientific techniques. You will also learn how scientific models are developed and how to evaluate the implications of scientific innovations on society.

Course layout: As an A Level biologist you will study content that includes biochemistry, cell biology, immunology, ecology and the physiology of various different organisms. Year 12 sees students gain the basics in cellular biology, transport systems in plants and animals and an understanding of how organisms and their environment are interdependent and interrelated. You will also study some basic aspects of inheritance and population ecology. In the second year the intensity of learning is increased and will include energy transfer in ecosystems, molecular understanding of photosynthesis and respiration, the control of gene expression, statistics in ecology and the finer points of the nervous, endocrine and musculoskeletal systems.

Assessment A Level Biology is offered as a two year course and will be assessed in the summer of the second year of study. Assessment takes the form of three, twohour examination papers. Paper 1 focusses on Year

8

12 learning, paper 2 on Year 13 learning and paper 3 examines content from both years. The practical content of the course is assessed within these written examinations. In addition, if students successfully demonstrate a range of required competences over the two years, they will attain a practical endorsement in addition to their Biology A Level results.


6th Form Curriculum Guide

Biology (Continued)

Clubs The Biology Department holds a discussion group once a week, during lunchtime, for A Level biologists. Students take turns to research, present and lead a debate on current ethical issues in Biology and Medicine. The audience is encouraged to give opinions supported by their reasons.

What could I go on to do at the end of my course? Biology is a valued subject in many third level courses. Here are some of the many university degree courses that require or highly recommend having an A Level qualification in Biology. Medicine, Midwifery, Veterinary Science, Genetics, Dentistry, Environmental Science, Biochemistry, Nursing, Pharmacy, Biomedical Science, Physiotherapy, Speech Therapy, Sports Science, Agricultural Science, Dietetics.

9


A Level Business Economics

Edexcel 9BS0 Edexcel 9EC0

The Economics and Business Department is excited..... This is because we are able to offer two A Level pathways for our students. We are offering A level Business and A level Economics. This will enable students to choose a curriculum that focuses their interests and their future university choice.

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking either course? It is not a requirement that you should have studied Business at GCSE level. Several topics in both courses are developments of work covered at GCSE, but most, especially in Economics, are new. It is however important that you have a strong interest in Enterprise, International Business and in Economics and want to learn how a business is organised, operates, plans and makes its decisions. Also, we encourage our A Level students to be up-to-date with current economical and business current affairs.

Business, Economics or both? Technically you can choose both courses as there is no clash in their code numbers. However, the British School of Paris career advice would be that if you are applying for a university place then you must have a wide range of subjects so it would not be advisable to choose both. Indeed, the Edexcel advice is: “Students or their advisers who have any doubts about their subject combinations should check with the institution to which they wish to progress before embarking on their programmes�.

10

Whether you choose Economics or Business at A Level is entirely your choice. If it is a business focussed course choose Business, if it is an economics focussed course then choose Economics. This literature contains further information that might answer your questions. Visit our Twitter page to get a feel for the lessons that we deliver in Economics and Business @BSP_SSCBus Econ


6th Form Curriculum Guide

Business What will I learn on this A Level course? • In Theme 1 you will learn about dynamic markets, social media and online retailing, innovation and entrepreneurship • Theme 2 introduces you to business finance, the impact of economic uncertainty on businesses and the competitive environment • In Theme 3 you will moving from functions to strategy, exploring business decision-making, small business survival, managing change and scenario planning • Theme 4 explores global business, investigating overseas markets, cultural and social differences and the impact of multinationals

What examinations will I have to take to get my qualification? For A Level you will study all four themes and will sit three exams at the end of your course: • Paper 1 has data response and essay questions, and focuses on Theme 1 and Theme 4 content. This paper is worth 35% of the overall qualification. • Paper 2 has data response and essay questions,

and focuses on Theme 2 and Theme 3 content. This paper is worth 35% of the overall qualification. • Paper 3 has a pre-released context so you will investigate an industry or market in which businesses operate before your exam. The data response and essay questions in the exam are linked to the context. This paper is worth 30% of the overall qualification.

What could I go on to do at the end of my course? Through studying business you will develop transferable skills that will prepare you for studying at university or moving into the world of work. You will become skilled in making decisions, solving problems, applying numerical skills (including understanding finance and working with data) and understanding the business environment. You will also develop commercial awareness. Suitable higher education courses include business management, accountancy and finance, marketing, tourism management and international business. Business students can also progress to a wide range of careers, such as banking, sales, product management and general management, to working in public sector organisations or charities.

Economics What will I learn on this A Level course? • In Theme 1 you will learn about how markets work and what happens when they don’t work so well • In Theme 2 you will learn about how the economy works in booms and recessions • In Theme 3 you will learn how businesses compete and set prices, how the jobs market works and how competition can be encouraged • In Theme 4 you will learn about globalisation and international trade, how economies develop, financial markets and the public finances

What examinations will I have to take to get my qualification? • Paper 1 has data response and essay questions, and focuses on how markets work and the behaviour of consumers and businesses. This paper is worth 35% of the overall qualification.

Edexcel 9BS0

Edexcel 9EC0

governments try to manage the economy. This paper is worth 35% of the overall qualification. • Paper 3 the data response and essay questions ask you to see how it all fits together. This paper is worth 30% of the overall qualification.

What could I go on to do at the end of my course? Studying Economics will help you develop transferable skills that will prepare you for studying at university or moving into the world of work. These include skills in data interpretation and essay writing. Suitable higher education courses include economics degrees or degrees in applied economics such as environmental economics, labour economics, public sector economics or monetary economics. You might choose to study business economics, econometrics or a business and management degree. Economics students can follow a wide range of careers in industry, commerce, finance and the civil service.

• Paper 2 has data response and essay questions, and focuses on how the economy works and how

11


A Level Chemistry

Edexcel 9CH0

With small class sizes, students benefit from individual attention and support. Practical skills are learned through frequent experiments, both in pair work and individually. Students are encouraged to develop a caring and responsible attitude towards handling and disposing of chemicals safely.

Background reading, discussion on chemical issues in the news, and researching Chemistry-related websites complement classroom experience. This course will try to give you the skills and understanding to make decisions about the way Chemistry affects your everyday life by applying concepts into contemporary areas of Chemistry including: • Climate change • Green chemistry • Pharmaceuticals • Chemistry research In addition, a GCE in Chemistry allows you to develop a range of generic skills requested by both employers and universities. For instance, a successful GCE level Chemist will be an effective problem-solver and be able to communicate efficiently both orally and with the written word. Handling data will be a key part of your work, allowing you to demonstrate information retrieval skills as well as use of numeracy and Computer Science. You will build up a range of practical skills that require creativity and accuracy as well as developing a firm understanding of health and safety issues. As Chemistry is a subject in which much learning stems from experimental work it is likely that you will need to work effectively as part of a group, developing team participation and leadership skills. As you become more skilled you will take responsibility for selecting appropriate qualitative and quantitative methods, recording your observations and findings accurately and precisely as well as critically analysing and evaluating the methodology, results and impact of your own and others’ experimental and investigative activities.

12

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking this course? This qualification builds on the knowledge, understanding and process skills inherent in GCSE. It is expected that you will have achieved a GCSE Grade 6 in Chemistry or Grades 6-6 Combined Science. The qualification integrates theory and relevant practical work, which are developed at different levels throughout the course. You will need to be able to communicate effectively, research and think critically about chemical problems.

What will I learn on the A Level course? Edexcel GCE Chemistry gives you the opportunity to study a core of key concepts in greater detail. Many of the ideas first covered at GCSE will be revisited but with a greater emphasis on explaining rather than simply describing the behaviour of substances. While studying GCE Chemistry you will develop practical skills that include making observations, collecting data, analysing experimental results and formulating conclusions. You will also gain an appreciation of how scientific models are developed and evolve, the applications and implications of science, the benefits and risks that science brings and the ways in which society uses science to make decisions. A Level Chemistry is suitable if you: • Have an interest in, and enjoy Chemistry • Want to find out about how things work in the real world • Enjoy applying your mind to solving problems • Want to use chemistry to progress onto further studies in Higher Education or support other qualifications or enter chemistry-based employment.


Chemistry (Continued)

6th Form Curriculum Guide

What examinations will I have to take to get my qualification? The Edexcel Advanced GCE in Chemistry consists of three externally examined papers and the Science Practical. This is a two-year course, so students starting the course in 2018 will sit the A Level examinations in 2020. Paper 1: Advanced Inorganic and Physical Chemistry (30% of the total qualification) This paper will examine the following topics: • Topic 1: Atomic structure and the Periodic Table • Topic 2: Bonding and Structure • Topic 3: Redox I • Topic 4: Inorganic Chemistry and the Periodic Table • Topic 5: Formulae, Equations and Amounts of Substance • Topic 8: Energetics I • Topic 10: Equilibrium I • Topic 11: Equilibrium II • Topic 12: Acid-base Equilibria • Topic 13: Energetics II • Topic 14: Redox II • Topic 15: Transition Metals Overview of assessment • Assessment is 1 hour 45 minutes • The paper consists of 90 marks • The paper may include multiple-choice, short open, open-response, calculations and extended writing questions. Paper 2: Advanced Organic and Physical Chemistry (30% of the total qualification) This paper will examine the following topics: • Topic 2: Bonding and Structure • Topic 3: Redox I • Topic 5: Formulae, Equations and Amounts of Substance • Topic 6: Organic Chemistry I • Topic 7: Modern Analytical Techniques I • Topic 9: Kinetics I • Topic 16: Kinetics II • Topic 17: Organic Chemistry II • Topic 18: Organic Chemistry III • Topic 19: Modern Analytical Techniques II Overview of assessment • Assessment is 1 hour 45 minutes • The paper consists of 90 marks • The paper may include multiple-choice, short open, open-response, calculations and extended writing questions. Paper 3: General and Practical Principles in Chemistry (40% of the total qualification) • Questions in this paper may draw on any of the - Questions in this paper may draw on any of the topics in this specification

• The paper will include synoptic questions that may draw on two or more different topics listed • The paper will include questions that assess conceptual and theoretical understanding of experimental methods (indirect practical skills) that will draw on students’ experiences of the core practicals Overview of assessment • Assessment is 2 hours 30 minutes • The paper consists of 120 marks • The paper may include multiple-choice, short open, open-response, calculations and extended writing questions • Some questions will assess conceptual and theoretical understanding of experimental methods. Science Practical This qualification will give students opportunities to use relevant apparatus and techniques to develop and demonstrate specific practical skills. These skills must be assessed through a minimum of 12 identified practical activities within each qualification - done during the course. The assessment outcomes will be reported separately on students’ certificates as either ‘pass’ or ‘fail’. To achieve a pass, students must demonstrate that they are competent in all of the practicals.

What could I go on to do at the end of my course? • A degree course in Chemistry, Environmental Science, Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmacology, Nursing. These are a small selection of courses with direct links. UCAS handbooks will give you further guidance • A Higher National programme in Applied Chemistry and related programmes, such as Sport Studies, Beauty Therapy, Applied Biology, Engineering, Agriculture, Animal Management, Countryside Management, Environmental Science, Equine Management or Horticulture • Employment in the area of Pharmacy or Biotechnology.

13


A Level Design and Technology: Product Design

What will I gain from taking this course? This is an exciting course emphasising two key considerations for designers. The first is to equip students with design skills for the future. You will be able to recognise design needs and develop an understanding of how current global issues, including integrating technology, impacts on today’s world. The second is to encourage creativity and innovation. You will develop the confidence to innovate and produce creative design solutions as you develop your own design brief with a client/end user. The Design and Technology work areas at The British School of Paris are well equipped and offer a stimulating environment for the delivery of a demanding and rewarding course. Students work both as individuals and as members of a team, mirroring the working practices of dynamic and creative companies. Our location here in Paris makes it possible to take advantage of the many design centres, galleries, and local places of interest to both support and enrich classroom activities.

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking this course? It is usual for students embarking on this course to have achieved at least a Grade C following the study of a Design and Technology subject at GCSE level. A successful student will not only have a passion for design in general, one that extends beyond a

14

Edexcel 9DT0


Design and Technology (Continued)

6th Form Curriculum Guide • Set of quality colouring pencils and drawing pencils • Black fine liner pens • Marker pens • Sketch book • Home computer with internet access • Scientific calculator • SketchUp • Fusion 360 • Photoshop • MS PowerPoint

superficial delight in beautiful things, but will be eager to grapple with the deeper questioning of why products are made as they are. An interest in learning about industrial and commercial processes and practices is critical. The ability to communicate visually using sketches is also of importance. Computer Science skills are essential as a significant amount of the work will be presented using Desktop Publishing software (CorelDraw) Adobe Photoshop, 3D modelling software (Fusion 360 and SketchUp), MS PowerPoint, as well as a range of iPad apps. Part of the new subject changes for September 2017 involves the introduction of more Mathematic and Scientific principles. These are core principles alike to GCSE Higher level Mathematics and are integrated to support students in becoming better designers. Students have access to a wide range of equipment and software both during and after school but would benefit from owning the following, especially for continuing work at home.

What will I learn on this full 2 year A Level course? Component 1: 50% of qualification from a 2.5 hour written examination Students will learn the theory elements of the course on an ongoing basis throughout Years 12 and 13. There will be a mock examination in the summer of Year 12 based on the elements they have covered up to that time. The 12 elements comprise: 1. Materials 2. Performance characteristics of materials 3. Processes and techniques 4. Digital technologies 5. Factors influencing the development of products 6. Effects of technological developments 7. Potential hazards and risk assessments 8. Features of manufacturing industries

15


A Level Design and Technology (Continued)

9. Designing for maintenance and the cleaner environment

that A Level students of Design and Technology have gone on to study at Degree Level have included:

10. Current legislation

• Animation

11. Information handling, modelling and forward planning

• Architecture

12. Further processes and techniques Component 2: 50% of qualification from an Independent Design and Make Project Students will spend Year 12 developing the skills they need for their final project by completing focused tasks and small design, make and evaluate projects. Towards the end of Year 12, and throughout Year 13, students will produce a substantial design, make and evaluate project which consists of a portfolio and a prototype. There are four parts to the assessment covering the identification of a design problem, developing the design, making the prototype and evaluating both the design and the final prototype.

What could I go on to do at the end of my course? Design and Technology at A Level could be either a complementary subject to Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, Business Studies, Art and Design; or a contrasting subject with English, History, Geography and Modern Languages. Dependent upon the combination, chosen subjects

16

• Art / Design • Automotive Design • Business Studies & Economics • Computer Aided Design • Engineering • Fashion Design • Furniture Design • Graphic Design • Industrial Design • Interior Architecture • Manufacturing Industries • Marketing • Product Design • Prosthetics & Orthotics • Set and Theatre Design • Special Effects • Sustainable Development


6th Form Curriculum Guide

Drama and Theatre Studies

Edexcel 9DR0

This is an exciting course for everyone who has a serious interest in acting, studying plays and practitioners and evaluating live performances. Drama and Theatre Studies would be suitable for most arts/humanities courses as well as giving useful ’breadth’ to a scientific path. Drama and Theatre Studies is a fully-fledged and academically rigorous A Level accepted by all universities including Oxbridge citing the breadth that the subject gives. Standards are very high and you will have to be motivated to meet the challenges ahead. What do I need to know, or be able to do, before taking this course?

What examinations will I have to take to get my qualification?

It is useful to have taken Drama at GCSE level but not essential. It is important that you are interested in gaining a greater understanding of how theatre and plays work, and that you are keen to be involved with performances.

The new GCEs are assessed through a combination of two approaches, these have been defined by Ofqual as:

What will I study on this A Level course?

Non-examined Assessment (NEA): through coursework assessment, either written or practical, which may be externally or internally assessed and must be externally moderated.

The course demands practical, creative and communication skills in almost equal measure. You will extend your ability to create drama and theatre, either in a performing or production role. You will also be required to write about drama and to develop your powers of analysis to become an informed critic. The course will involve taking part in drama productions, as well as studying plays and playwrights. You need to be curious about issues and ideas and have a creative instinct for communicating your views through drama. You may be keen on acting, writing or on the visual and technical side of theatre and wish to develop your skills in some or all of these areas. Equally you will be interested in going to the theatre to see plays performed by different theatre companies. The full A Level in Drama and Theatre Studies aims to extend the knowledge, skills and understanding by enabling students to apply what they have learned in their own creative work. In devising theatre, students alternate between the roles of playwright, performer, designer and director, and apply their knowledge of different theatre forms and structures to the creation of their own work.

Examined Assessment (EA): through written examination, which must be externally assessed;

All GCE specifications at A Level must enable students of Drama and Theatre to: • develop and apply an informed, analytical framework for making, performing, interpreting and understanding drama and theatre • understand the place of relevant theoretical research in informing the processes and practices involved in creating theatre and the place of practical exploration in informing theoretical knowledge of drama and theatre • develop an understanding and appreciation of how the social, cultural and historical contexts of performance texts have influenced the development of drama and theatre • investigate the practices used in twenty-first century theatre making • experience a range of opportunities to create theatre, both published text-based and devised work

In performing theatre, students are required to apply their knowledge, skills and understanding within the structure of a director’s interpretation of a play, and to operate at a highly intellectual level as well as at a highly skilled practical level. The aim of the full A Level is to enable students to operate more autonomously and with confidence within a drama and theatre context. In the role of director, students are individual thinkers determining their own interpretation of a play. As informed members of the audience, they are making independent judgments in their analysis of the way other directors, designers and performers have applied their craft to the production of a play.

17


A Level Drama and Theatre Studies (Continued)

• participate as a theatre maker and as an audience member in live theatre

- rehearsing

• understand and experience the collaborative relationship between various roles within theatre

- refining and amending work in progress

• develop and demonstrate a range of theatremaking skills • develop the creativity and independence to become effective theatre makers • adopt safe working practices as a theatre maker • analyse and evaluate their own work and the work of others

Students must develop a practical and theoretical knowledge and understanding of: • the theatrical processes and practices involved in interpreting and performing theatre • how conventions, forms and techniques are used in drama and live theatre to create meaning, including the: - use of performance space and spatial relationships on stage - relationships between performers and audience - design of set, costume, makeup, lighting, sound and props - performer’s vocal and physical interpretation of character

- their contribution to the final performance • realising artistic intention as a theatre maker, through: - interpretation of performance texts and the creation of devised work. - creativity and coherence when communicating meaning to an audience - refinement and amendment of work in progress • applying research to inform practical work to achieve clear dramatic and theatrical intentions • analysing and evaluating the process of creating their own live theatre and the effectiveness of the outcome • interpreting, analysing and evaluating live theatre performance by others.

At A Level, specifications must allow students to demonstrate greater depth of study and to apply an understanding of: • the connections between theory and practice in a range of periods, theatrical styles, social, historical and cultural contexts

• how creative and artistic choices influence how meaning is communicated to an audience

• how relevant research, independent thought and analysis of live theatre informs decision making in their own practical work

• how performance texts are constructed to be performed, conveying meaning through:

• the ways in which theatre makers collaborate to create theatre.

- structure - language - stage directions - character construction - the style of text • how performance texts are informed by their social, cultural and historical contexts, and are interpreted and performed for an audience.

All GCE specifications in Drama and Theatre must cover the following skills: Drawing on the knowledge and understanding GCE specifications in drama and theatre must require students to acquire, develop and apply skills in: • using the working methodologies of two influential practitioners (individuals or companies) in their own work • using theatrical techniques to create meaning in a live theatre context as theatre makers through: - research and development of ideas - interpretation of text - devising

18

- realisation

A level GCE Drama and Theatre specification overview The A level GCE Drama and Theatre specification comprises of two Non Examined Assessment (NEA) components worth 60 per cent of the qualification in


Drama and Theatre Studies (Continued) 6th Form Curriculum Guide total and one Examined Assessment (EA) component worth 40 per cent of the qualification. Component 1 Devising • Performance of a devised piece and a portfolio about the process • Internally assessed/externally moderated Component 2 Text in performance • Monologue/duologue performance • Group performance • Externally assessed Component 3 Theatre makers in practice • Written exam • Externally assessed

Content overview Component 1: Devising (40% of qualification) Content • Students use an extract from one text and a practitioner as a stimulus to create a devised performance, rehearsing and refining their performance/design realisations for an assessed performance. • They record and evaluate the exploration and rehearsal process of creating their devised performance, as well as the final performance. Assessment • Creation of and participation in group devised performance as performer or designer

• Individual portfolio. Component 2: Text in performance (20% of qualification) Content • Students prepare through exploration and rehearsal and participate in, as performer or designer, both a monologue/ duologue and a group performance. Assessment • Participation in monologue/duologue and group performance as performer or designer Component 3: Theatre makers in practice (40% of qualification) Content • Students are also audience members for a live performance. • They make and refine notes on the performance. • Students practically explore a chosen set text from List A. • Students practically explore a second set text (this one from List B) in the light of a practitioner. For this text, students create a director’s concept for a re-imagined production of the play. • They practice responding to questions for all three sections in examination conditions Assessment Written examination: • Section A: Live theatre evaluation • Section B: Page to Stage: Realising a Performance Text • Section C: Interpreting a Performance Text

LIST A

LIST B

Accidental Death Of An Anarchist, Dario Fo (adapted by Gavin Richards)

Antigone, Sophocles (adapted by Don Taylor)

Colder Than Here, Laura Wade

Hedda Gabler, Henrik Ibsen (adapted by Richard Eyre)

Equus, Peter Shaffer Fences, August Wilson Machinal, Sophie Treadwell That Face, Polly Stenham

Doctor Faustus, Christopher Marlowe* Lysistrata, Aristophanes (translated by Alan H. Sommerstein) The Maids, Jean Genet (translated by Bernard Frechtman) The School for Scandal, Richard Brinsley Sheridan The Tempest, William Shakespeare Waiting for Godot, Samuel Beckett Woyzeck, Georg Bűchner (translated by John Mackendrick )

19


A Level Drama and Theatre Studies (Continued)

Section C – A03 Interpreting a Performance Text (24 marks)

What could I go on to do at the end of my course?

Assessment overview Component 1 A01: Portfolio Create and develop ideas to communicate meaning for theatrical performance (40 marks) Assessed in two discrete areas of focus: • Communicate meaning as part of the theatremaking process (20 marks) • Making connections between dramatic theory and practice (20 marks) A02: Performance Apply theatrical skills to realise artistic intentions in live performance (20 marks) Assessed in discrete areas of focus: • Vocal and physical skills (10 marks) • Use of characterisation and communication to realise artistic intentions (10 marks). A04: Portfolio Analyse and evaluate their own work (20 marks) Component 2 AO2: The monologue or duologue Performance/design realisation (24 marks) A02: The group performance Performance/design realisation (36 marks) Assessed in three discrete areas of focus: • Vocal and physical skills (12 marks) • Characterisation and communication (12 marks) • Interpretation and realisation of artistic intentions (12 marks). Component 3 Section A – A04 Live theatre evaluation (20 marks) Section B – A03 Page to Stage: Realising a Performance Text (36 marks)

20

This A level can lead to further study in Drama, Theatre Studies and Performing Arts in Higher Education at degree or HND level. Drama is a subject that is becoming increasingly valued by businesses, who feel that our young people lack the confidence at interviews, or the ability to present. Within drama you will not only study the craft of acting and theatre, you will also learn extremely valuable transferrable skills for example – collaboration, empathy, analysis, evaluation, deconstruction of a given subject and construction of performance pieces. You are able to perform but also work on production skills such as lighting, costume, sound, set/props etc. It would fit well with most careers including medicine, law, public relations, journalism, diplomacy, politics, social work, hospitality, tourism and leisure and of course any form of acting or jobs in the theatre.

Extra Curricular It is important that you realise that Drama will take up more than just lesson time. You will be required to give up lunchtimes or stay after school for extra rehearsals if needed plus attend live theatre performances in the evening. Participation in the school production is not obligatory, but will clearly develop theatrical skills. There will also be a weekend trip to the UK at some point during the course. The cost of this trip is not included in the school fees.


6th Form Curriculum Guide

English Language & Literature What do I need to know or be able to do before taking this course? In order to study this subject it is important to have a GCSE qualification, of at least ‘C’ grade, in English Language or English Literature, but preferably both. Several areas covered in the course are developments of work at GCSE, but others are new. You will need to be prepared to study prose, poetry and drama texts, to make comparisons between texts and study ‘unprepared’ texts, including non-fiction or media texts. You will have the opportunity to study both modern texts and texts from previous centuries, and even to create your own texts! You will need an ability to analyse what you have read and to communicate your ideas effectively in writing.

What will I learn on this course? You will: • develop and apply knowledge of literary analysis and evaluation • develop and apply understanding of the concepts and methods appropriate for the analysis and study of language • use linguistic and literary approaches in reading and interpretation of texts, showing how the two disciplines can relate to each other • engage creatively and critically with a wide range of texts • explore the ways in which texts relate to each other and the contexts in which they are produced and received • develop skills as producers and interpreters of language • undertake independent and sustained studies to develop their skills as producers and interpreters of language • study three units, or components. First sitting of these units will take place in summer 2017

Edexcel 9EL0

Details of the components follow.

Component 1: Voices in Speech and Writing, 40% of the total qualification, 9EL0/01 • Externally assessed • Availability: May/June • First Assessment: 2017 Overview of content Students will study: • Voices in Speech and Writing: An Anthology • One drama text from a prescribed list Overview of assessment • Written examination, lasting 2 hours 30 minutes • Open book – a clean copy of the prescribed drama text can be taken into the examination • Two sections – students answer the question in Section A and one question on their chosen drama text in Section B • Total of 50 marks available – 25 marks for Section A and 25 marks for Section B • Section A – Voices in 20th- and 21st century Texts: one comparative essay question on one unseen extract selected from 20th- or 21st-century sources and one text from the anthology (AO1, AO2, AO3, AO4 assessed) • Section B – Drama Texts: one extract-based essay question on the chosen drama text (AO1, AO2, AO3 assessed)

Component 2: Varieties in Language and Literature, 40% of the total qualification, 9EL0/02 • Externally assessed • Availability: May/June • First Assessment: 2017

• the qualification requires students to study six texts – at least three from the genres of prose fiction, poetry and/or drama and another three, one of which must be one non-literary Please note that pupils cannot sit English Language and Literature as well as English Literature: pupils may choose one or the other Please contact us if any further questions remain.

21


A Level English Language & Literature (Continued)

Overview of content Students will study: • a wide range of non-fiction texts on their chosen theme, in preparation for responding to an unseen text • two literary texts from a chosen theme; one compulsory prose fiction text (anchor text) from a choice of two and one other literary text. Themes: Society and the Individual or Love and Loss or Encounters or Crossing Boundaries Overview of assessment • Written examination, lasting 2 hours 30 minutes • Open book – clean copies of the prescribed texts can be taken into the examination • Two sections – students answer one question from a choice of four in Section A and one question from a choice of four in Section B • Total of 50 marks available – 20 marks for Section A and 30 marks for Section B • Section A – Unseen Prose Non-fiction Texts: one essay question on an unseen prose non-fiction extract. The unseen extract is linked to the studied theme (AO1, AO2, AO3 assessed) • Section B – Prose Fiction and Other Genres: one comparative essay question on one prose fiction anchor text and one other text from a theme (AO1, AO2, AO3, AO4 assessed)

Coursework: Investigating and Creating Texts, 20% of the total qualification, 9EL0-01 • Internally assessed, externally moderated • Availability: May/June • First moderation: 2017 Overview of content Students will study: • a chosen topic (free choice)

22

• two texts relating to their chosen topic; one fiction and one non-fiction text Overview of assessment Students will produce two assignments: • Assignment 1 – two pieces of original writing: one piece of fiction writing and one piece of creative non-fiction writing (AO5 assessed) • Assignment 2 – one analytical commentary reflecting on their studied texts and the pieces of writing they have produced (AO1, AO2, AO3, AO4 assessed) • The advisory total word count is 2500–3250: 1500–2000 words for the original writing pieces and 1000–1250 for the commentary • Total of 60 marks available – 36 marks for the original writing and 24 marks for the commentaries

What could I go on to do at the end of my course? Students with A Level English Language and Literature have a wide choice of possible Higher Education and career possibilities. You will learn and use a wide variety of skills during the course. These include writing for a variety of purposes, informed discussion, the expression of independent opinions, intelligent reading, and advanced knowledge of the English language and an awareness of literary tradition. These skills are valuable in their own right and required by universities and colleges. English Language and Literature can be studied as a single pair of subjects in Higher Education or can be combined with other subjects. It forms a strong basis for study in any Arts based subject in preparation for History, Modern Languages, Media Studies, Philosophy, Law or Politics. Students of English will usually go on to do a Higher Degree in Humanities and often find themselves working in Journalism, Teaching, the Media or the Law.


6th Form Curriculum Guide

English Literature

Edexcel 9ET0

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking this course?

Students must complete all assessment in May/June in one examination sitting at the end of Year 13.

In order to study this subject it is important to have a GCSE qualification, of at least ‘C’ grade, in English Literature. Several areas covered in the course are developments of work at GCSE, but others are new. You will need to be prepared to study prose, poetry and drama texts, to make comparisons between texts and study ‘unprepared’ texts. You will have the opportunity to study both modern texts and texts from previous centuries.

Please contact us if any further questions remain.

You will need an ability to analyse what you have read and to communicate your ideas effectively in writing.

What will I learn on this course? The course will enable you to: • Develop your interest and enjoyment in literature by reading widely • Gain an understanding of the traditions of English Literature • Communicate your response to a wide variety of texts and respond to texts of different types and periods • Make informed opinions and judgements on literary texts • Gain an understanding of cultural, historical and other influences on texts

What examinations will I have to take to get my qualification? The A Level in English Literature consists of three externally examined papers and one coursework component. The qualification requires the study of eight literary texts plus unseen poetry.

Pupils cannot sit English Language and Literature as well as English Literature: pupils may choose one or the other.

Component 1: Drama, 30% of the total qualification, 9ET1/01 • Externally assessed • Availability: May/June • First Assessment: 2017 Overview of content Students will study: • one Shakespeare play and one other drama from either tragedy or comedy – both texts may be selected from one or both of these categories • critical essays related to their selected Shakespeare play. Students’ preparation is supported by Shakespeare: A Critical Anthology – Tragedy or Shakespeare: A Critical Anthology – Comedy Overview of assessment • Written examination, lasting 2 hours and 15 minutes • Open book – clean copies of the drama texts can be taken into the examination. The Critical Anthology must not be taken into the examination • Total of 60 marks available – 35 marks for Section A and 25 marks for Section B • Two sections: students answer one question from a choice of two on their studied text for both Section A and Section B

23


A Level English Literature (Continued)

• Section A – Shakespeare: one essay question, incorporating ideas from wider critical reading (AO1, AO2, AO3, AO5 assessed) • Section B – Other Drama: one essay question (AO1, AO2, AO3 assessed)

Component 2: Prose, 20% of the total examination, 9ET0/02 • Externally assessed • Availability: May/June • First Assessment: 2017 Overview of content Students will study: • two prose texts from a chosen theme. At least one of the prose texts must be pre-1900 Overview of assessment • Written examination, lasting 1 hour • Open book – clean copies of the prose texts can be taken into the examination • Total of 40 marks available • Students answer one comparative essay question from a choice of two on their studied theme (AO1, AO2, AO3, AO4 assessed)

Component 3: Poetry, 30% of the total examination, 9ET0/03 • Externally assessed • Availability: May/June • First Assessment: 2017 Overview of content Students will study: • poetic form, meaning and language • a selection of post-2000 specified poetry and a specified range of poetry from either - a literacy period (either pre- or post- 1900) - a named poet from within a literary period Overview of assessment • Written examination, lasting 2 hours and 15 minutes • Open book – clean copies of the poetry texts can be taken into the examination • Total of 60 marks available – 30 marks for Section A and 30 marks for Section B • Two sections: students answer one question from a choice of two, comparing an unseen poem with a named poem from their studied contemporary text and one question from a choice of two on their studied movement/poet

24

• Section A – Post-2000 Specified Poetry: one

comparative essay question on an unseen modern poem written post 2000 and one named poem from the studied contemporary text (AO1, AO2, AO4 assessed) • Section B – Specified Poetry Pre- or Post-1900: one essay question (AO1, AO2, AO3 assessed)

Coursework, 20% of the total examination, 9ET0/04 • Internally assessed • Availability: May/June • First Assessment: 2017 Overview of content Students have a free choice of two texts to study. Chosen texts: • must be different from those studied in Components 1, 2 and 3 • must be complete texts and may be linked by theme, movement, author or period • may be selected from poetry, drama, prose or literary non-fiction Overview of assessment Students produce one assignment: • one extended comparative essay referring to two texts (AO1, AO2, AO3, AO4, AO5 assessed) • Advisory total word count is 2500–3000 words • Total of 60 marks available

What could I go on to do at the end of my course? Students with A Level English Literature have a wide choice of possible Higher Education and career possibilities. You will learn and use a wide variety of skills during the course. These include writing for a variety of purposes, informed discussion, the expression of independent opinions, intelligent reading, and advanced knowledge of the English language and an awareness of literary tradition. These skills are valuable in their own right and required by universities and colleges. English Literature can be studied as a single subject in Higher Education or combined with a wide variety of subjects. It forms a necessary basis for study in any Arts based subject in preparation for History, Modern Languages, Media Studies, Philosophy, Law or Politics. Students of English Literature will usually go on to do a Higher Degree in Humanities and often find themselves working in Journalism, Teaching, the Media or the Law.


6th Form Curriculum Guide

French

Edexcel 9FR01

The Pearson Edexcel Level 3 Advanced GCE in French consists of two externally-examined papers assessing listening, reading and writing and a non-examined speaking assessment. The speaking assessment is externally set and conducted by a teacher/examiner*. All assessments are marked by Pearson.

Students must complete their speaking assessment in April/May and all other assessments in May/June in any single year. * It is usual for teachers to conduct the speaking assessment with their students during a timetabled assessment window in April/May. Paper 1: Listening, reading and translation (*Paper code: 9FR0/01) Written examination: 2 hours 40% of the qualification 80 marks Content overview This paper draws on vocabulary and structures across all four themes. Themes are based on the society and culture of the language being studied. Assessment overview Students are not permitted access to a dictionary during the examination. The examination is made up of: Section A: Listening (30 marks) A listening assessment based on a recording, featuring male and female French speakers. Students will respond to comprehension questions based on a variety of contexts and sources. Section B: Reading (30 marks) A reading assessment based on a variety of text types and genres where students will have to respond to comprehension questions. Section C: Translation into English (20 marks) An unseen passage to be translated from French to English.

25


A Level French (Continued) Paper 2: Written response to works and translation (*Paper code: 9FR0/02) Written examination: 2 hours and 40 minutes 30% of the qualification 120 marks Content overview This paper draws on the study of two discrete French works: either two literary texts, or one literary text and one film. The works must be taken from the list provided in Appendix 2: Prescribed literary texts and films. The literary texts listed include a range of novels, plays and a series of short stories. All of the films are feature length. Assessment overview This paper includes a translation exercise and two essays on either two literary texts, or one literary text and one film (students must not answer questions on two films). Students are not permitted access to a dictionary or any documentation relating to the works during the examination. Section A: Translation (20 marks) Students translate an unseen passage from English into French. Section B: Written response to works (literary texts) (50 marks) Students must write an extended response on either one or two of the literary texts listed in Appendix 2: Prescribed literary texts and films. Students select one question from a choice of two for each of their chosen literary text(s). If a student answers questions on two literary texts then they do not complete Section C. Section C: Written response to works (films) (50 marks) Students who answer only one question from a literary text in Section B must now write an extended response on one of the films listed in Appendix 2: Prescribed literary texts and films. Students select one question from a choice of two for their chosen film.

Paper 3: Speaking (*Paper code: 9FR0/03) Internally conducted and externally assessed Total assessment time: between 21 and 23 minutes, which includes a single period of 5 minutes’ formal preparation time 30% of the qualification 72 marks Content overview Task 1 draws on vocabulary and structures across all four themes (listed on pages 8–9). Task 2 is based on independent research selected and carried out by the student. The research may be based on one of the themes or on the student’s own subject of interest related to the society and culture of the language studied. Students will be assessed on their ability to use a range of language accurately, communicate and interact effectively, summarise and analyse findings from written sources relating to their research subject, and show knowledge and understanding about the culture and society where the language is spoken. Assessment overview Students complete two tasks. Task 1 is worth 30 marks and Task 2 is worth 42 marks. Task 1 (discussion on a Theme) Students discuss one Theme from the specification based on a stimulus containing two different statements. Task 2, Part 1 (independent research presentation) Students present a summary of at least two of the written sources they have used for their research and give a personal response to what they have read. Task 2, Part 2 (discussion on independent research) Students answer questions on their presentation and then have a wider discussion on their research.

26


6th Form Curriculum Guide

Geography

Edexcel (Level 3) 9GE0

Geography A Level is known for developing wide-ranging transferable and employable skills. It gives you the opportunity to make use of the skills you learn in Maths, Science and ICT by interpreting political opinions and economic decisions. You understand patterns by creating reports using maps, graphs, statistics, satellite images, photos and Geographical Information Systems (GIS). At The British School of Paris we have two large dedicated classrooms with full access to the laboratories and ICT rooms. There is a specialist library within the Department to supplement the School Library. SPECIFICATION

What will I study at A Level?

You will gain an appreciation of current events and global challenges such as the effects of natural hazards and the plight of refugees. You will know how to plan, collect data for, and write your own fieldwork report. You will understand primary and secondary evidence before being able to analyse it to evaluate connections across a wide variety of topics.

Paper 1: (30%) Compulsory:

Paper 2: (30%) Compulsory:

1. Tectonic Processes and Hazards

1. Globalisation

2. The Water Cycle and Water Insecurity

2. Regenerating Places

3. The Carbon Cycle and Energy Security.

3. Superpowers

4. Landscape Systems, Processes and Change:

4. Global Development and Connections:

a. Coastal Landscapes and Change (optional),

a. Health, Human Rights & Intervention (optional),

or

or

b. Glaciated Landscapes and Change (optional).

b. Migration, Identity and Sovereignty (optional).

Paper 3: (20%) Synoptic Investigation

based on a geographical issue within a placebased context that links to the three synoptic themes (players, attitudes and actions, futures and uncertainties) and is rooted in two or more of the compulsory content areas.

SAMPLE ASSESSMENT

Paper 4: (20%): Coursework (3000–4000

words)

1. Define a question relating to Units 1 or 2. 2. Incorporate your primary/secondary fieldwork data (collected by you/your team). 3. Independently analyse and evaluate, present and report your quantitative and qualitative data.

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking this course? It is a requirement that you should have studied Geography at GCSE in order to take the A Level course. In addition you should have a grade B or above at Geography GCSE. A level students should have a lively and enquiring mind, an interest in the environment and current affairs, a willingness to explore new ideas and an ability to communicate your ideas effectively. Those students who have studied GCSE Geography will find that the material and the skills they have learned will prove a valuable foundation for further studies at this level. 

27


Geography (Continued) Is Geography the right subject for me at A Level? Which subjects am I good at? Which subjects really interests me? In order to answer these difficult questions, think about what you really enjoy about studying. Think also about what your privileges and responsibilities are as a globally-minded citizen. Put a tick √ or a cross X next to these statements: □ Do I want a job in which I work as a team with colleagues around the world to inspire and inform others to live sustainably? □ Do I prefer to learn through investigating and doing things for myself, not just listening and reading? □ Do I want to do some of my studies remotely from mountain ranges, river valleys and seaside resorts around France and abroad? □ Do I want to make practical use of my Maths, Science, and ICT skills? You will learn to create, analyse and scrutinise maps using ‘Big Data’ and my own field data using the latest in GIS (Geographical Information Systems) software. If you ticked √ all these boxes, then you should seriously consider A Level Geography and read on. “Geography is a subject which holds the key to our future.”

Fieldtrips

Michael Palin

Fieldwork is mandatory and encourages independent learning and critical thinking. Group work and debates are part of the programme as well as decision making and developing analytical skills. As a compulsory part of the Geography course, we have carried out fieldtrip studies in many diverse locations throughout the world: • Urban fieldwork has been carried out by our pupils in Shanghai, Barcelona, Paris and Marrakech. • Rural fieldwork analysing downstream changes in rivers in Morocco, Iceland, Spain, France, Scotland and England. • Rural deprivation studies have been carried out during fieldwork in France, England, Iceland, Scotland, Spain, Guilin (Southern China) and Morocco. The costs of these trips are not included in the school fees. Students must be able to attend compulsory fieldwork for 4 days.

Where will A Level Geography take me? You will examine the Earth’s natural resources and the increasing battles between the man-made and natural world. Geography opens up opportunities to apply your Maths, Science and ICT skills to your studies and career. These may include environmental management, economic growth and government policy analysis, or evaluation of social activism supporting integration of refugees in European host countries. Your skills and knowledge, paired with your essential curiosity and teamwork, will give you the sought-after transferable skills for success in further education, workplace and other adventures. If you have any questions, please see your British School of Paris Geography teachers.

28


6th Form Curriculum Guide

German

Edexcel 9GN0

Top tip: “Choosing an A Level language is a really smart move if you want a fascinating subject that offers you a range of career possibilities at the end and are a lot of fun along the way.” A Level language courses are interesting and varied subjects to study and give you a broad range of knowledge and skills. The skills and qualifications that you gain from studying a language at A Level are incredibly important tools to have under your belt. What is the A Level course like? A Level languages build upon your existing knowledge gained at GCSE, giving you a sound understanding of using your language in a variety of contexts and situations: • At home • Abroad • With friends • In the workplace The emphasise of the A Level languages course focuses on improving communication in your foreign language through different means as well as being able to use it in a variety of situations, developing your key skills areas and most importantly to encourage you to fall in love with learning languages. The A Level modern foreign language course is structured so that you will study four themes over 2 years, plus a book and a film. With around 5 hours of class time a week dedicated to learning German, this provides a fast pace environment with noticeable improvements. The topics that you will cover are varied so you not only greatly improve your language speaking ability, use of grammar, different tenses and to know to use more vocabulary but you will also learn about:

(and there are lots of them). Plus, a language is also a pre-requisite for lots of university courses so it is something to consider if you are thinking in the future. Languages are key to the exciting multinational world we live in. You will study the 4 themes below, plus a book and film: • Theme 1: Evolving society in Germany • Theme 2: Political and Artistic Culture in German speaking countries • Theme 3: Immigration in Germany • Theme 4: Reunification of Germany You will also present a topic of your choice in the oral examination related to a German speaking country. It can be about anything you are passionate about, for example: Sport, Fashion, Food, Art etc…

What examinations will I take? You will take 3 externally assessed exams at the end of Year 13 Paper 1

Listening, Reading and translation

40%

Paper 2

Written response to works and 30% translation

Paper 3

Speaking

30%

• Culture • History • Literature • Society • Environment lifestyle • Film The aim of the A Level course is to help you to develop an interest in speaking a foreign language, to gain awareness of the need to speak foreign languages, to appreciate the nature and diversity of different cultures and people and to acquire knowledge, skills and understanding for practical use, further study and employment.

What can I do afterwards? Languages are an invaluable skill to have. Having a language can increase your salary from 8% to 20% and gives you a head start on other potential employees as by speaking another language you are vital to any company who does International business

29


A Level History

Edexcel 9H10

The History Department at The British School of Paris combines a dynamic teaching approach with the reinforcement of traditional skills of research and essay-writing. A Level History classes are small and students are offered the opportunity for in depth research using the excellent resources available.

Students are encouraged to read widely around the subject and to use weekends to visit the many places of historical interest in and around Paris. Students following the history course will seek to • develop interest and enthusiasm for history and an understanding of its intrinsic value and significance • acquire an understanding of different identities within society and an appreciation of aspects such as social, cultural, religious and ethnic diversity as appropriate • build on their understanding of the past through experiencing a broad and balanced course of study • Improve as effective and independent learners, and as critical and reflective thinkers with curious and enquiring minds • develop the ability to ask relevant and significant questions about the past and to research them

30

• acquire the understanding of the nature of historical study, for example that history is concerned with judgements based on available evidence and historical judgements are provisional • develop their use and understanding of historical terms, concepts and skills • make links and draw comparisons within and/ or across different periods and aspects of the past; and • organise and communicate their historical knowledge and understanding in different ways, arguing a case and reaching a substantiated judgement. The course will be demanding, rigorous, inclusive and empowering. Students will follow ROUTE E and will study Russia 1917-78, Mao’s China 1949-91 and 1 option from Paper 3. Students will also undertake a personal study coursework unit focusing on controversy in history.


History (Continued)

6th Form Curriculum Guide

Route E: Communist states in the twentieth century Paper 1 Option

Paper 2 Option

Paper 3 option

Coursework option

1E: Russia,

2E.1: Mao’s China, 1949–76

30: Lancastrians, Yorkists and Henry VII, 1399–1509

Or

31: Rebellion and disorder under the Tudors, 1485–1603

The purpose of this coursework is to enable students to develop skills in the analysis and evaluation of interpretations of history in a chosen question, problem or issue as part of an independently researched assignment.

1917–91: from Lenin to Yeltsin

2E.2: The German Democratic Republic, 1949–90

34.1: Industrialisation and social change in Britain, 1759–1928: forging a new society 34.2: Poverty, public health and the state in Britain, c1780–1939 35.1: Britain: losing and gaining an empire, 1763–1914 35.2: The British experience of warfare, c1790–1918 36.1: Protest, agitation and parliamentary reform in Britain, c1780–1928 36.2: Ireland and the Union

The focus is on understanding the nature and purpose of the work of the historian. Students will be required to form a critical view based on relevant reading on the question, problem or issue. They will also be specifically required to analyse, explain and evaluate the interpretations of three historians. The coursework will be assessed using a centre-set assignment. An assignment framework is provided to support the development of individual assignments.

Examination Overview Paper 1 Breadth study with interpretations

Externally assessed in 2 hour 15 minute examination worth 30% of total A Level

Paper 2 Depth Study

Externally assessed in 2 hour 15 minute examination worth 30% of total A Level

Paper 3 Themes in Breadth and Depth

Externally assessed in 2 hour and 15 minutes examination and worth 30% of total A Level

Coursework

Internally assessed and externally moderated worth 20% of total A Level

What could I go on to do at the end of my course? Students who study A Level History have access to a wide range of career and Higher Education opportunities. By the end of your course you will have learned how to evaluate and analyse information, how to weigh up evidence and how to communicate complex ideas effectively. These skills are recognised and valued by employers, Universities and Colleges. History combines well with Maths and Science subjects to create an attractive portfolio of qualifications, enabling a student to move on to a University Sciencebased course. Combined with English and a Modern Foreign Language it would provide a good basis for an Arts or Languages-based Degree. History provides an excellent foundation for a number of popular careers including Journalism, Law and Business.

31


A Level History of Art

Edexcel

“Art history is the study of power, politics, identity and humanity” Jeremy Deller (Turner Prize winner)

story of Art is a long established A Level. It has been a public examination since the 1950s and taught at our school for nearly 30 years. Eminent figures in the creative industries have welcomed the recent announcement that the new History of Art A Level will be taught from September 2018.

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking this course? History of Art A Level ensures that you can analyse, interpret and develop opinions about contemporary and historical visual culture. The course aims to foster intellectual critical skills which will help you enter our visual world armed and prepared. Students need to be enthusiastic and open-minded. Practical art skills are not required but observation, visual curiosity and analytical abilities, together with well-developed literary skills, are essential. The course combines well with languages and humanities as well as art and design. Moreover, if you are a science specialist it offers an alternative discipline and a pathway for enrichment. The British School of Paris offers an excellent opportunity to study History of Art in the unique surroundings of Paris. First-hand experience of art is vital and you need to be prepared to independently visit galleries and exhibitions. There is an annual study trip overseas; recent destinations have included Rome and Florence.

Why study History of Art? The study of History of Art teaches you the skills and critical vocabulary needed in order to analyse and interpret works of art. However, the course goes beyond providing a mere overview of artistic trends, giving you a broad cultural and historical understanding of art from the Classical world to the present day. Students are taught to consider works of art within their historical and cultural contexts. Therefore, this makes History of Art an ideal complement to other

32

humanities subjects (including English Literature, English Language, History or Modern Languages) but it is also a very meaningful A Level for students of Fine Art and Photography as well as Design and Technology as it helps students to make links between their own work and that of previous artistic traditions. By the end of the course, you should be able to look at any painting, drawing, sculpture or building and analyse it critically in terms of its formal qualities and historical context.

How will I be assessed? The course allows for a deep exploration of the arts of painting, sculpture and architecture which past students have found highly enjoyable and rewarding. History of Art is assessed by formal essays so you have to be prepared to be exact and careful in your writing. To prepare for written examinations, students develop their analytical skills, construct written arguments and enhance their visual awareness. In class you develop your communication skills, discussing ideas around works of art and architecture. Units of Study Art History - 1 PAPER 1: 3 Hour Examination 50% of the A Level Section A • Visual Analysis – 3 unseen images


6th Form Curriculum Guide

History of Art (Continued)

• Questions on images provided in the paper assess knowledge and understanding of formal aspects of art and architecture and how they contribute to meaning. Section B Thematic Study - two short answer questions & two concise essays Two topics studied from a choice of the following four topics: • Nature in art and architecture • Identities in art and architecture • War in art and architecture Art History - 2 PAPER 2: 3 Hour Examination 50% of the A Level Two short answer questions, one concise essay and one long essay

The commercial world of the 21st Century is highly visual. The marketing and advertising world is constantly seeking the visually aware. One important aim of History of Art is to produce visual literacy; the ability to assess images of all kinds critically and perceptively and discover proof. This unique combination of visual sensitivity and intellectual rigour has proven valuable in areas such as journalism, advertising, publishing, law and film and television work. More directly related careers include those in teaching and research, conservation and restoration, museum and gallery administration, commercial galleries and auction houses. It must be remembered too that many students study the subject at school but go on to further study in a wide range of other subjects some of which relate to History of Art such as art therapy, archaeology, anthropology and architecture.

Two teacher-selected art historical periods from a choice of the following five optional topics. • Invention and Illusion (The Renaissance in Italy 14201520) • Power & Persuasion (The Baroque in Catholic Europe 1597-1685) • Rebellion & Revival (The Avant-Garde in Britain & France (1848-1899) • Brave New World (Modernism in Europe 1900-1939) • Pop Life (Contemporary Art & Architecture in Britain & the USA 1960-2015)

What could I go on to do at the end of my course? History of Art provides a sound basis for progression to higher education and employment. Over the last few years several British School of Paris students have gone on to study History of Art at university. The History of Art A Level will provide you with excellent preparation for further specialisation in a range of areas at degree level. History of Art can be studied as a single subject at university or can be combined with many other subjects ranging from the humanities to design and media studies. Graduates in this subject can follow an academic career or find work in museums and galleries. They may become teachers or work in public or private institutions dealing with heritage, exhibitions, environment or tourism. Increasingly there is work to be found in the commercial art world. The arts and culture industry, in all its forms, is a major contributor to the prosperity of both France and Great Britain. History of Art is a practical choice at A Level - besides the pleasure of personal learning - it encourages clarity of thought, exactness of expression and skills in informed communication.

33


A Level Mathematics and Further Mathematics

AQA 7357 AQA 7376

Mathematics is an important and useful discipline; its special power lies in its capacity not just to describe and explain but also to solve and predict. The subject itself is an endless source of wonder and delight. To encourage all pupils to be robust when faced with challenging situations, the AS/A Level Mathematics students enter the UKMT Senior Challenge with the intention of inspiring the talented Mathematics pupils. The British School of Paris also sends teams to represent the school at the annual International Schools Mathematics Competition. We offer Further Mathematics for our most gifted mathematic students. What do I need to know or be able to do before taking this course? Due to the testing nature of A Level Mathematics, it is essential students have a strong understanding of Algebra. They must have a good knowledge of Trigonometry, of forming and solving Quadratic Equations and of Coordinate Geometry. A grade 7, 8 or 9 in the new GCSE or an A* or A at IGCSE Mathematics is recommended as a prerequisite for the course. Students who have achieved less than this at GCSE must meet with the Head of Faculty in order to discuss their suitability.

Students would normally be expected to complete the full A Level course through to Year 13 but there would be the possibility to sit the AS exam at the end of Year 12 or Year 13. Further Mathematics builds on and extends the work of A Level Mathematics. The techniques studied are more challenging and are an excellent preparation for students considering Mathematics, Computer Science, Engineering or Economics courses at Oxbridge or other top Universities. Only students with an 8 or 9 in the new GCSE or A* at IGCSE would be considered for this course.

What will I learn on the course?: A Level Mathematics: The core content of the A Level course covers the following topics:

34

• OT1: Mathematical argument, language and proof

• I: Numerical Methods

• OT2: Mathematical problem solving

• J: Vectors

• OT3: Mathematical modelling

• K: Statistical sampling

• A: Proof

• L: Data presentation and interpretation

• B: Algebra and functions

• M: Probability

• C: Coordinate geometry in the (x,y) plane

• N: Statistical distributions

• D: Sequences and series

• O: Statistical hypothesis testing

• E: Trigonometry

• P: Quantities and units in mechanics

• F: Exponentials and logarithus

• Q: Kinematics

• G: Differentiation

• R: Forces and Newton’s laws

• H: Integration

• S: Moments


Mathematics and Further Mathematics (Continued)

6th Form Curriculum Guide

The qualification is linear which means the students will be assessed at the end of the course. The assessment involves three written papers:

Paper 1

Paper 2

Paper 3

What’s assessed?

What’s assessed?

What’s assessed?

Any content from:

Any content from Paper 1 and content from:

Any content from Paper 1 and content from:

• J: Vectors

• K: Statistical sampling

• P: Quantities and units in mechanics

• L: Data presentation and Interpretation

• Q: Kinematics

• M: Probability

• R: Forces and Newton’s laws

• N: Statistical distributions

• S: Moments

• O: Statistical hypothesis testing

How it’s assessed?

How it’s assessed?

How it’s assessed?

• Written exam: 2 hours

• Written exam: 2 hours

• Written exam: 2 hours

• 100 marks

• 100 marks

• 100 marks

• 33¹⁄₃ % of A-level

• 33¹⁄₃ % of A-level

• 33¹⁄₃ % of A-level

Questions

Questions

Questions

A mix of question styles, from short, single-mark questions to multi-step problems.

A mix of question styles, from short, single-mark questions to multi-step problems.

A mix of question styles, from short, single-mark questions to multi-step problems.

• A: Proof • B: Algebra and functions • C: Coordinate geometry • D: Sequences and series • E: Trigonometry • F: Exponentials and logarithms • G: Differentiation • H: Integration • I: Numerical methods

35


A Level Mathematics and Further Mathematics (Continued) A Level Further Mathematics: The core content of the course covers the following topics which all students must study.

Students then must study two of the following options. • Optional application 1 – mechanics

• OT1: Mathematical argument, language and proof

• Optional application 2 – statistics

• OT2: Mathematical problem solving

• Optional application 3 – discrete

• OT3: Mathematical modelling

A Level Further Mathematics students at the British School of Paris study the Optional application 1 (Mechanics) and the Optional application 2 (Statistics).

• Compulsory content

The qualification is linear which means the students will be assessed at the end of the course. The assessment involves three written papers:

Paper 1

Paper 2

Paper 3

What’s assessed?

What’s assessed?

What’s assessed?

May assess content from the following sections: • A: Proof • B: Complex numbers • C: Matrices • D: Further Algebra and Functions • E: Further Calculus • F: Further Vectors • G: Polar coordinates • H: Hyperbolic functions • I: Differential equations • J: Trigonometry • L: Coordinate geometry

May assess content from the following sections: • A: Proof • B: Complex numbers • C: Matrices • D: Further Algebra and Functions • E: Further Calculus • F: Further Vectors • G: Polar coordinates • H: Hyperbolic functions • I: Differential equations • J: Trigonometry • L: Coordinate geometry

One question paper answer booklet on each of their option subjects.

How it’s assessed

How it’s assessed

How it’s assessed

• Written exam: 2 hours • 100 marks • 33¹⁄₃ % of A-level

• Written exam: 2 hours • 100 marks • 33¹⁄₃ % of A-level

• Written exam: 2 hours • 100 marks • 33¹⁄₃ % of A-level

Questions

Questions

Questions

A mix of question styles, from short, single-mark questions to multi-step problems.

A mix of question styles, from short, single-mark questions to multi-step problems.

A mix of question styles, from short, single-mark questions to multi-step problems.

What could I go on to do at the end of my course? An AS in Mathematics is very valuable as a supporting subject to many courses at A Level and degree level, especially in Science, Geography, Psychology, Sociology and Medical courses.

36

A Level Mathematics is a much sought after qualification for entry to a wide variety of full-time courses in Higher Education. There are also many areas of employment that see a Mathematics A Level as an important qualification and it is often a requirement for the vocational qualifications related to these areas. Higher Education courses or careers that either require A Level Mathematics or that are strongly related include: • Economics • Medicine

• Architecture • Engineering • Accountancy • Teaching • Psychology • Environmental Studies • Computing • Information and Communication Technology. AS and A Level Further Mathematics are prestigious qualifications and expected of students applying for Maths related courses at top universities. If you wanted to continue your study of Mathematics after A Level you could follow a course in Mathematics at degree level or even continue further as a postgraduate and become involved in mathematical research.


6th Form Curriculum Guide

Art & Design: Photography

9PY01

Students choosing this course will learn to use photography as a vehicle for artistic expression, communicating personal ideas about the world around them. You will learn a wide range of analogue and digital processes, and digital editing techniques, to reflect on, refine and apply the observations you make with a camera, and determine which tools or techniques are most appropriate in your exploration of ideas. Students will have the opportunity to inform their practice through day trips, residential trips and artist workshops. The Morisot building houses the Art and History of Art departments. Those choosing to study Photography have access to a dedicated Art library containing Mac computers and digital photography equipment. There are also computer suites at students’ disposal for lessons with Adobe Bridge and Photoshop CC 2015 software.

What equipment will I need to provide?

Students have access to high quality digital SLR cameras and tripods for use in lessons, Lomo cameras, negative scanners, and cyanotype chemicals for analogue photography, as well as Bamboo drawing tablets and photo-quality inkjet printer.

• A digital SLR or Bridge camera (capable of use with manual settings and the ability to shoot in RAW)

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking this course? Students who have previously studied Art or Photography will have an advantage, but this is not a requirement. A successful Photography student is one who is motivated and curious to learn, and who is passionate about taking photographs.

The Art department will provide you will all the materials you will need to work during lessons and after school. It will be necessary, however, to have the following in order to be able to carry out photo shoots and edit images:

• Photoshop CC 2015 or later- this is not obligatory, but it is advantageous for students to have access to this editing software at home

What does the course involve? The A Level course is broken down into two components.

What skills will I acquire if I choose to study Photography? You will build up a wide range of technical skills, including: • Learning the operations and principles of creating a photographic image, including the use of available and controlled light, lenses, cameras and lightsensitive materials, including digital and non-digital. • Learning to use professional editing software, such as Adobe Photoshop CC 2015 and Bamboo drawing tablets You will also develop transferable skills, which will be essential to whatever higher education or career path you choose. These include: • Researching and writing a sustained personal study, with Harvard referencing and bibliography • Solving practical problems and finding creative solutions; Adaptability. • Critical thinking- analysing, synthesising and reasoning skills • Understanding of different cultural and historical contexts • Self-management and self-development

37


A Level Photography (Continued) Component 1: The Personal Investigation.

Can I work outside lesson times?

This incorporates three major elements: supporting studies, practical work, and a personal study. It is worth 60% of the final grade, and is submitted in January of the second year of the course.

The Art library is a dedicated space for students to come and work in their free periods and outside lesson times. You will be expected to spend sufficient time working independently on your coursework and exam projects if you wish to succeed in Photography, and you are encouraged to attend the after-school sessions that take place in the Morisot building.

• Supporting studies and practical work will comprise a portfolio of development work and outcomes based on themes and ideas developed from personal starting points. • The personal study will be evidenced through critical written communication showing contextual research and understanding in a minimum 1000 words of continuous prose, which may contain integrated images. The personal study comprises 12% of the total qualification. Component 2: The Externally Set Assignment This incorporates two major elements: preparatory studies and the 15–hour period of sustained focus. It is worth 40% of the final grade, and represents the culmination of the A Level course. Preparatory studies will comprise a portfolio of practical and written development work based on the Externally Set Assignment. • During the 15–hour period of sustained focus under examination conditions, students will produce final outcome(s) extending from their preparatory studies in response to the Externally Set Assignment. • The Externally Set Assignment is released on 1 February and contains a theme and suggested starting points. • Students have from 1 February until the commencement of the final 15–hour period of sustained focus to develop preparatory studies.

What trips and visits will be on offer? It is essential to experience artworks first-hand in order to inform your project work and research. Day trips into Paris will be on offer to students taking this course. Joint trips to Florence and Rome with History of Art and Fine Art students are also on offer. Students benefit enormously from the extend photo-shoot opportunities, as well as the rich array of art and architecture to inform their project work. The trips to Italy are optional, as the cost is not included in the school fees.

How will my work be assessed? All work is internally marked by your teachers. You will receive regular written and verbal feedback on your progress against the assessment objectives. At the end of the course, you will organise and mount an exhibition of your work, which will be advertised to students, parents and the local community. The external moderator will come to see the exhibition shortly before it opens to the public, to verify the marks, and will have the final decision on your overall grade.

What could I go on to do at the end of my course? Because of its appeal to many different people, careers in photography are highly competitive, this course would give you the basis to go on to study photography, or another arts-related course at a higher level. Journalism, Architecture, Commercial/Industrial photography, Professional Photographer are just a few of the careers that you could choose. Learning to develop visual language, photographic and related computer skills will also prove extremely useful to a broad range of careers not directly linked to the industry itself, as well as having a utility in everyday life.

38


6th Form Curriculum Guide

Physical Education

AQA 7582

Physical activity is a fundamental necessity to enhance a healthy lifestyle and at The British School of Paris we seek to promote this through recreational sport and examination courses. As sport and leisure continues to play an increasingly bigger part in many people’s lives, the new look A Level specification reflects the increased interest in this subject area and covers a wide range of topics that are relevant to both the recreation and elite level performer. A Level PE gives students opportunities to discover the science behind sport and sporting performance, gives an insight into the psychological factors that can affect an athlete and looks at the various social and cultural aspects that have a bearing on how sport is perceived.

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking this course? It is not a requirement that you should have studied Physical Education at GCSE in order to take the A Level course in this subject. Several topics covered in the course are developments of work covered at GCSE, but others are new. What is more important is that you should have a lively and enquiring mind, an interest in Physical Education, a willingness to explore new ideas and an ability to communicate your ideas effectively. It is, however, a requirement that any pupil deciding to take A Level PE must be actively and heavily involved in a recognised competitive sport throughout the course, either at School or in a local club. Most sports are accepted but you may wish to consult the AQA website in order to find out more. Whilst A Level PE is a very interesting and enjoyable course, it is important to emphasise that the majority of the work undertaken is theoretical and that students will spend the majority of their time in the classroom. It is a challenging course that must not be taken lightly.

What will I learn on this A Level course? You will: • Study applied exercise physiology and discover the effects that exercise and training have upon the systems of the body • Examine the relationships between training and performance • Study the various psychological aspects that help optimise performance

About the course The content of the first paper will be covered in the first year of the course, the content of the second paper in the second year. It is possible for students to sit the first paper after their first year in order to gain an AS level qualification. Students who decide to sit the AS examination after one year can then opt to leave the course with an AS grade or continue onto the full A Level in their second year. If a student opts to continue onto the A2 content, the students AS result does not count towards the overall A Level and students will be tested on all the content covered over the two years when the sit the A-Level paper at the end of their second year of study. The students will be assessed in one competitive sporting activity of their choice that will include an oral or written analysis of their performance. This will be completed at the end of the two year A Level course. Those students opting to take the AS exam after one year will also have to complete this practical element. Subject content 1. Applied anatomy and physiology 2. Skill acquisition 3. Sport and society 4. Exercise physiology 5. Biomechanical movement 6. Sport psychology 7. Sport and society and the role of technology in physical activity and sport

Assessments

• Learn to evaluate the effects of contemporary influences on elite sporting performance

Paper 1: Factors affecting participation in physical activity and sport:

• Learn how biomechanical analysis can aid performance

• This constitutes the first year of the course and a stand-alone AS examination may be sat at the end of the year.

• Gain an understanding of the various social and cultural issues that can have an effect on sports participation • Have the opportunity to enhance your role as a performer, leader or official.

What is assessed? Section A: Applied anatomy and physiology Section B: Skill acquisition Section C: Sport and society

39


A Level Physical Education (Continued)

How it’s assessed Written examination: 2 hours 105 marks 35% of A Level

Questions Section A: multiple choice, short answer and extended writing (35 marks) Section B: multiple choice, short answer and extended writing (35 marks) Section C: multiple choice, short answer and extended writing (35 marks)

Paper 2: Factors affecting optimal performance in physical activity and sport: • The second year of the course

What is assessed? Section A: Exercise physiology and biomechanics Section B: Sport psychology Section C: Sport and society and technology in sport

How it is assessed Written examination: 2 hours 105 marks 35% of A Level

Questions Section A: multiple choice, short answer and extended writing (35 marks) Section B: multiple choice, short answer and extended writing (35 marks) Section C: multiple choice, short answer and extended writing (35 marks)

Non-examination assessment: Practical performance in physical activity and sport What is assessed? Students are assessed as a performer or coach in the full sided version of one activity Plus: written/verbal analysis of performance

How is it assessed? Internal assessment, external moderation 90 marks 30% of A Level

40

What could I go on to do at the end of my course? Students with AS or A Level Physical Education have access to a wide range of possible career and Higher Education opportunities. You learn and use a variety of transferable skills throughout the course. These include collecting, analysing and interpreting data, communicating your findings in different ways, and identifying and developing the links between different parts of the subject. These skills are in great demand and are recognised by employers, Universities and Colleges as being of great value. Physical Education combines with a range of AS and A Level subjects. Taken with sciences like Biology it supports applications for a wide range of university courses like Sports Science, Physiotherapy, Recreation, Leisure Studies and Sports Coaching. Many students choose to use their qualification to go straight into employment, rather than go on to Higher Education. Because AS and A Level Physical Education develop the transferable skills and the key skills that employers are looking for, they can lead to a very wide range of employment opportunities. This can include further training in such areas as Recreational Management, Leisure Activities, Armed Forces and the Civil Services.


6th Form Curriculum Guide

Physics

AQA 7408

Research in Physics continues to inspire awe and wonder as the mysteries of the universe are unravelled by scientists across the world. The detection of the gravitational waves created by the collision of two black holes and subsequently neutron stars was hailed as a ground breaking discovery which confirmed Einstein’s theories. At the other end of the scale, particle accelerators such as the Large Hadron Collider at CERN in Geneva attempt to answer questions about the very stuff that the universe is made of. Physics lies at the heart of the technologies that are essential to modern life: energy generation, medical diagnoses, smartphones and the Internet to name but a few.

What will I gain from studying A Level Physics? An A level in Physics is a rigorous and well-respected qualification which is highly valued by universities. It not only gives you an understanding of how our world works at a fundamental level but stimulates the intellect, encourages an enquiring mind, teaches you to become an effective independent learner and draw connections between different concepts. It enhances your analytical, quantitative and problem solving skills, all of which are essential to a successful career in both scientific and non-scientific disciplines. The theoretical content of the A Level course is undoubtedly challenging and has scope to stretch the most able students. There is also regular practical work, designed not only to develop and perfect experimental skills but also to enhance understanding of the various theories and relationships. The Physics laboratories are very well-equipped and good use is made of modern data logging technology. The teaching is designed not only to instil a thorough understanding of Physics principles, but also to make the material interesting, fun and relevant to everyday experiences. We encourage a wide range of reading and promote an appreciation of the history and development of Physics. Students are encouraged to participate in the British Physics Olympiad.

An optional trip to CERN, home of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), is available to students in the Sixth Form who will by then be familiar with the world of sub-atomic particles and will have met some of the principles involved in accelerating protons in the LHC. The trip represents a fantastic, not-to-be-missed opportunity to visit the very centre of modern physics research. The cost of the trip is not included in the school fees.

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking this course? In Physics, we follow the course offered by AQA. The qualification builds on the knowledge, understanding and process skills that were taught in GCSE Science. You will need at the very minimum a GCSE grade 6 in Physics or 6-6 in Combined Science (or equivalent) although grades 7 and above are preferred. You should also be a very keen and competent mathematician with at least a grade 6 or above in GCSE Mathematics (or equivalent). Due to the mathematical nature of the course, you will be required to study Mathematics to at least AS level.

A Level Physics is the right choice if you: • have an interest in, and enjoy, Physics • have a sense of wonder about how things work in the physical world

41


A Level

Physics (Continued) • enjoy applying your mind to solving problems

papers:

• want to study a relevant, worthwhile qualification of recognised value

• Paper 1, worth 34% of the A Level assesses the units from the first year plus further mechanics from the second year

• enjoy carrying out practical investigations by the application of imaginative, logical thinking • are interested in further study or a career in a scientific or technical discipline.

What will I learn and how will I be assessed on this A Level course? In the first year, you will get a grounding in the basics of measurements and errors. In parallel, you will explore key principles of modern physics including the nature of fundamental forces and elementary particle physics. You will be introduced to quantum physics and gain an understanding of how the idea of wave particle duality developed. Other topics you will study during the course of the year include waves and wave phenomena, mechanics, properties of materials and electricity. By the second year, you will be skilled at solving a variety of problems mathematically. You will study more advanced concepts in mechanics such as circular and simple harmonic motion. By applying the classical laws of motion to particles, you will be able to link macroscopic properties such as pressure and temperature to the microscopic behaviour of molecules. The concept of fields which is just touched upon at GCSE will be developed fully in the context of gravity and electromagnetism. Nuclear physics will build upon the particles physics studied in the first year and explore why some nuclei are unstable and therefore radioactive. Modern physics will crop up again in the optional topic “Turning Points in Physics” in which you will study, from a historical viewpoint, the significance of some of the major conceptual shifts in the physics which occurred in the early part of the twentieth century. You will look not only at theoretical developments such as special relativity and quantum mechanics but also the experimental basis for these and practical applications such as electron microscopes. Depending on students’ interests and aspirations, alternative topics such as Engineering Physics or Astrophysics may be offered instead of Turning Points. While studying all these units you will develop a range of practical skills: planning experiments, collecting data, analysing experimental results and forming valid conclusions. These will be assessed by your teachers based on direct observation of your competency during a series of twelve mandatory experiments. You will also gain an appreciation of: how scientific models are developed as new evidence comes to light, the benefits and risks that science brings, and the ways in which society uses science to make informed decisions.

How will I be assessed? 42

The A Level course is assessed in three 2-hour written

• Paper 2, worth 34% of the A Level assesses the units from the second year • Paper 3, worth 32% of the A Level assesses the optional topic plus practical skills and data analysis. There is no practical examination

What could I go on to do at the end of my course? A good grade in A Level Physics can open the door to a wide range of courses and careers. The numerous transferable skills you will develop are valued highly by employers and universities alike. Physics is recognised as an entry qualification for a wide range of Higher Education courses and employment opportunities such as: • a degree course such as Physics, Natural Sciences, Mathematics, Medicine, Metrology, Meteorology, Sports Science, Computer Science, Engineering (including Chemical Engineering) and related programmes. A good A Level grade in Physics is an essential requirement for nearly all university engineering courses • employment in a wide range of areas, including radiography, biotechnology or seismology


6th Form Curriculum Guide

Politics

Edexcel 9PL0

Politics is an exciting course for the Sixth Form at The British School of Paris. It will allow you to develop a critical awareness of the nature of politics and the relationship between political ideas, institutions and processes. It will also help you to acquire knowledge of Politics and of the rights and responsibilities of individuals.

What do I need to know or be able to do before taking this course? This subject does not require you to have any previous study experience in Politics or other Social Sciences. It is more important that you have a lively and enquiring mind, an interest in politics and current affairs, a desire to explore new ideas and an ability to communicate your ideas effectively. Politics continues to be a very popular subject at University Level and is regarded highly by University Admissions. We hope to organise educational visits to the UK, to places and conferences relating to Political Science. The costs of these trips are in addition to the school fees.

Content overview 1. UK Government, students will study: • the constitution, parliament, Prime Minister and executive, relationships between the branches 2. Optional Political Ideas, students will study: • one idea from the following: anarchism, ecologism, feminism, multiculturalism, nationalism Component 3: Comparative Politics (*Component code: 9PL0/3A ) Written examination: 2 hours 33¹⁄₃ % of the qualification

What will I learn on this A Level course?

84 marks

The course will enable students to develop a critical awareness of the nature of politics and the relationship between political ideas, institutions and processes. You will learn and use a variety of transferable skills throughout the course. These include collecting and analysing information and evaluating different political ideas and systems. Your written communication skills will develop greatly, as will your ability to question information given to you. These skills are in great demand and are recognised by employers, universities and colleges as being of great value.

Students study USA (9PL0/3A)

What examinations will I have to take to get my qualification? Component 1: UK Politics (*Component code: 9PL0/01) Written examination: 2 hours

Content overview For USA (3A), students will study: • the US Constitution and federalism, US congress, US presidency, US Supreme Court and civil rights, democracy and participation, comparative theories

What could I go on to do at the end of my course? Students with A Level Politics have access to a wide range of possible careers and Higher Education opportunities. Politics combines well with a range of Science, Social Science and Humanities subjects to lead to university courses in such areas as Business, Economics, Law, Media, Philosophy and, of course, Politics.

33¹⁄₃ % of the qualification 84 marks

Content overview 1. Political Participation, students will study: • democracy and participation, political parties, electoral systems, voting behaviour and the media 2. Core Political Ideas, students will study: • conservatism, liberalism, socialism Component 2: UK Government (*Component code: 9PL0/02) Written examination: 2 hours 33¹⁄₃ % of the qualification 84 marks

43


A Level Spanish

Edexcel 9SP0

Our new A Level in Spanish has been developed to inspire all students to appreciate the language, literature, film and culture of the Spanish-speaking world.

Spanish A Level has a straightforward structure with four Themes: - La evolución de la sociedad española - La cultura política y artística en el mundo hispanohablante - La inmigración y la sociedad multicultural española - La dictadura franquista y la transición a la democracia The four Themes are studied alongside a literary text and a film.

Aims and objectives: The aims and objectives of the new Spanish specifications are to enable students to: • Enhance their linguistic skills and promote and develop their capacity of critical thinking on the basis of their knowledge and understanding of the language, culture and society of the country/ countries where the language is spoken • Develop control of the language system to convey meaning, using spoken and written skills • Develop their ability to interact effectively with users of the language in speech and in writing, including through online media • Develop language skills and strategies including communication strategies to sustain communication, build fluency and confidence • Engage critically with intellectually stimulating texts, films and other materials in the original language, developing an appreciation of them in their cultural and social contexts • Develop knowledge about matters central to the society and culture (past and present) • Mediate between cultures and between speakers of the language and speakers of English through a translation component • Foster ability to learn other languages • Equip students with transferable skills such as autonomy, resourcefulness, creativity and critical thinking, linguistic, cultural and cognitive flexibility • Develop capacity for critical and analytical thinking through the language of study • Develop as independent researchers through the language of study

44

What examinations will I take? Spanish A Level consists entirely of three externallyexamined examinations assessing listening, reading, writing and speaking:

Paper 1 Paper 2 Paper 3

Listening, reading and translation Written response to works and translation Speaking

40% 30% 30%

The qualification is linear and will be taken at the end of a 2 year period (5 hours per week).


Spanish (Continued)

6th Form Curriculum Guide

What do I need in order to be successful? You should: • Be a competent linguist with a secure command of Spanish grammar and vocabulary and be prepared to continue developing your language skills (minimum recommend GCSE grade: 7) • Have a genuine interest in the language and culture you wish to study and be prepared to work independently • Demonstrate an ability to read critically and to analyse material would also be very useful: you will, for instance, be required to study some literature, to analyse characters or themes in films, to keep abreast of current affairs and to form your own opinions about sociological issues • Have (or be prepared to develop) strong debating/ discursive skills as you will be expected to engage in debates on potentially controversial issues linked to worldwide events • Display intellectual curiosity, initiative and perseverance

What could I go on to do at the end of my course? There will be a range of opportunities open to you, where you can continue to use and further develop your language skills and knowledge of contemporary society. Some students choose to do degree courses in languages; others choose to pursue a Higher Education course in another subject, but choose a language option alongside it. Studying a language at A Level will certainly improve your employability, particularly with companies which have international branches. Whether you are interested in continuing your studies or working at home or abroad, a language course at A Level is an excellent step towards achieving your goals.

45


The 6th Form Entry Year We offer a 6th Form Entry Year. This Entry Year aims to allow students access to our A Level course having completed the five required GCSEs including English and Maths. Learning Support is available if required.

Below are the five GCSEs on offer at The British School of Paris. In addition we now offer the IELTS (International English Language Testing System) recognised worldwide by universities. For students: • who are new to the English curriculum • who need a complete academic ‘track record’ before moving onto higher courses • who speak English as an Additional Language

6th Form Entry Year Courses Your stepping stones to success!

46


GCSE Courses 6th Form Curriculum Guide

iGCSE English Language

GCSE students of English Language will follow the new Pearson Edexcel International GCSE in English Language, Specification A (4EA1), which enables pupils to: • develop their understanding of the spoken word and the capacity to participate effectively in a variety of speaking and listening activities • develop the ability to read, understand and respond to material from a variety of sources, and to recognise and appreciate themes and attitudes and the ways in which writers achieve their effects • develop the ability to construct and convey meaning in written language, matching style to audience and purpose. The Edexcel International GCSE in English Language (Specification A) (4EA1) has the option of two assessment routes: pupils sit Paper 1, and either Paper 2 or Paper 3. We shall sit Paper 1 and Paper 3. Details of Papers 1 and 3: Paper 1: Non-fiction Texts and Transactional Writing 60% of the total International GCSE Content summary: • The contemporary non-fiction texts from Part 1 of the Pearson Edexcel International GCSE English Anthology include:

Edexcel 4EA1

Aims: • Develop skills to analyse how writers use linguistic and structural devices to achieve their effects. • Explore links and connections between writers’ ideas and perspectives. • Develop transactional writing skills for a variety of purposes and audiences. • Use spelling, punctuation and grammar accurately. Assessment: • Section A: Reading – a mixture of short- and longanswer questions related to a nonfiction text from Part 1 of the Pearson Edexcel International GCSE English Anthology (see list of possibilities above) and one previously unseen extract. Total of 45 marks. • Section B: Transactional Writing – one 45-mark writing task, from a choice of two involving a given audience, form or purpose. • The total number of marks available is 90. • The assessment duration is 2 hours 15 minutes. • Pupils will be provided with the anthology text in the examination. Paper 3: Poetry and Prose Texts and Imaginative Writing 40% of the total International GCSE

o From ‘The Danger of a Single Story’ by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie o From ‘A Passage to Africa’ by George Alagiah o From ‘The Explorer’s Daughter’ by Kari Herbert o ‘Explorers, or boys messing about?’ by Steven Morris o From ‘127 Hours: Between a Rock and a Hard Place’ by Aron Ralston o ‘Young and Dyslexic’ by Benjamin Zephaniah o From ‘A Game of Polo with a Headless Goat’ by Emma Levine o From ‘Beyond the Sky and Earth’ by Jamie Zeppa o From ‘H is for Hawk’ by Helen Macdonald o From ‘Chinese Cinderella’ by Adeline Yen Mah

47


GCSE English Language (Continued)

Content summary:

Assessment

• The poetry and prose texts from Part 2 of the Pearson Edexcel International GCSE English Anthology.

• Assignment A: Poetry and prose texts – one 30mark essay question based on any two poetry or prose texts from Part 2 of the Pearson Edexcel International GCSE English Anthology (see above), including a 6-mark commentary on why these texts were selected.

• These include: o ‘Disabled’ by Wilfred Owen o ‘Out, Out–‘ by Robert Frost o ‘An Unknown Girl’ by Moniza Alvi o ‘The Bright Lights of Sarajevo’ by Tony Harrison o ‘Still I Rise’ by Maya Angelou o ‘The Story of an Hour’ by Kate Chopin o ‘The Necklace’ by Guy de Maupassant o ‘Significant Cigarettes’ (from ‘The Road Home’) by Rose Tremain o ‘Whistle and I’ll Come to You’ (from ‘The Woman in Black’) by Susan Hill o ‘Night’ by Alice Munro • Develop skills to analyse how writers use linguistic and structural devices to achieve their effects. • Develop imaginative writing skills to engage the reader. • Use spelling, punctuation and grammar accurately.

48

• Assignment B: Imaginative writing – one 30-mark imaginative writing task. Pupils may also be entered for the optional spoken language endorsement (worth 0% of the IGCSE) which is endorsed separately and does not count towards the overall qualification. Summary: The spoken language presentation may take a variety of forms, including: a) a speech or talk by a pupil, followed by questions from the audience. b) a formal debate or dialogue, such as an interview where the pupil is able to prepare extended responses to questions or prompts, which have been shared in advance, followed by questions from the audience. In all cases, the presentation should be prepared and last no longer than 10 minutes.


GCSE Courses 6th Form Curriculum Guide

GCSE Mathematics AQA 8300/Edexcel iGCSE 4MA0 Mathematics provides the oral, written and practical skills needed to solve everyday problems and to acquire knowledge in other subjects particularly Science and Technology. Mathematics is an important discipline; its power lies not only in the capacity to explain and describe but also to predict and solve.

A GCSE qualification in Maths is highly recommended for those wishing to pursue a university career in the UK. Year 12 students joining the British School of Paris who have not yet achieved at least a C grade in iGCSE or a grade 4 in GCSE Maths will have the opportunity to study towards this qualification. If, when joining, they have already sat a GCSE examination in Mathematics the previous summer they will be entitled to sit the November AQA GCSE Mathematics (8300) examination. If not, the first opportunity will be the January sitting of the Edexcel International GCSE Mathematics A examination. The final opportunity in Year 12 will be the AQA GCSE Mathematics (8300) at the end of the summer term.

The Mathematics teachers are keen to help students enjoy Mathematics and to be successful in the examinations. However, to benefit fully from lessons you must bring to each maths class: • a simple scientific calculator • a simple sturdy compass with pencil • a 20cm flat, clear plastic ruler • a small clear plastic protractor • an eraser, a sharpener with a box, an HB pencil • 3 or 4 colouring pencils.

Willing students will find Mathematics challenging but accessible, useful and enjoyable. Students are entered for written papers appropriate to their ability.

49


GCSE Courses GCSE Engineering

AQA 8852

The sky’s the limit. Engineering is an increasingly innovative and exciting area to work in. It affects every aspect of modern life – from skyscrapers to smart phones, cars to carrier bags.

The subject content is split into six sections and pupils will be taught holistically. The sections studied comprise: • Engineering materials and their properties. o Metals, polymers, composites, timbers, ceramics. o Material cost and supply. o Factors influencing design solutions. • Engineering manufacturing processes. o Additive, wastage, shaping, casting, assembly, heat treatment, surface treatment. • Systems. o Mechanical, electrical, electronic, structural, pneumatic. • Testing and investigation. o Modelling and calculating, testing, aerodynamics. • The impact of modern technologies. o New and emerging technologies, engineering industries. • Practical engineering skills. o Technical drawing, wide range of practical skills using a variety of material types. The GCSE Engineering qualification allows pupils to develop mathematical, scientific, and design skills and understanding which will be of use generally and as part of a progressive career path, which could lead to further academic study or employment. The specific aims and learning outcomes for pupils are: • Engage in a range of intellectual and practical processes in order to solve problems through the production of engineered outcomes. • Develop knowledge and understanding of materials, components and resources relating to engineering. • Develop knowledge and understanding of engineering processes and be able to apply these where appropriate in order to produce a manufactured outcome. • Draw on knowledge, skills and understanding of materials, processes and techniques in order to engineer products which provide a functioning solution in response to a given brief.

50

• Develop an understanding of how emerging

technologies (in areas such as materials science, information technology (IT) and communications, energy, medicine and robotics) have changed and will continue to change the way in which engineered products are made and used. • Develop an understanding of health and safety procedures and be able to carry out practical activities in a safe way. • Develop an awareness and understanding of the impact of engineering on the environment and sustainable development. • Develop skills, knowledge and understanding as a foundation for future learning and progression, in relation to engineering and other related disciplines. • Apply their knowledge and understanding of mathematical concepts in an engineering related context. The qualification is linear meaning that students will sit all their examinations and submit all their non-exam assessment at the end of the course. The examination is worth 60% of the final GCSE grade with the other 40% coming from the non-exam assessment that pupils complete during lessons.


GCSE Courses GCSE Psychology

Edexcel 1PS0

The Psychology course is a full GCSE qualification run as a one year course. It is therefore taught for four hours a week. The course has been designed to focus on five topic areas:

• Topic A: How do we see our world? • Topic B: Is dreaming meaningful? • Topic C: Do TV and Video Games affect young people’s behaviour? • Topic D: Why do we have phobias? • Topic E: Are criminals born or made? All the topics ask students to explore and investigate questions and consider why psychology matters in everyday life. There is also a deliberate attempt to extend learning around the topics by attaching topics to current areas of interest and events in focus. Interpretation, evaluation and analysis of psychology are therefore embedded throughout the topics and the course helps students to explain, theorise and model in psychology. The five topics are all key contemporary debates in society today and include relevant and contemporary scientific research. The topics provide a platform to explore current debates such as nature-nurture, ethical issues and comparisons to see how psychology has developed over time and differ between various cultures. There is a deliberate focus on what Psychologists do and this focus enables students to consider the implications of psychology for society.

51


iGCSE Global Citizenship

Edexcel 4GL1/01

Citizenship is the exercise of rights, responsibilities and values in a democratic society. A democratic society needs its communities to consist of active, informed and responsible citizens who are willing and able to contribute effectively to society and its politics.

Being a ‘global citizen’ means recognising that the world consists of a number of interdependencies, nurturing respect for others and thinking about what is equitable and how to minimise harm to the planet. It is therefore expected that students will understand that there are contested definitions of ‘global citizenship’ and this is in part affected by differing cultural and political traditions (democratic and nondemocratic) in which citizens act together to improve society. The content and assessment approach for this qualification has been designed to meet students’ needs in the following ways: A global outlook • Students will develop an understanding of key changes affecting societies across the world, enabling them to have a global outlook and understand diverse points of view. For students who are internationally mobile, or wish to study and work in fields that require a global outlook, this qualification will support them to become global citizens, and understand how they can affect positive change. Practical project • Students will be required to undertake a practical community action project to enable them to apply citizenship knowledge, understanding and skills in real life. They will have the opportunity to be active citizens through tasks such as research, problem solving, advocacy and evaluation. Transferable skills • The content is organised around the following key themes: Politics and Governance, Economic Development and the Environment, Culture and Community, and Technology. Students will have an opportunity through this qualification to explore topics that span the humanities, giving them a stronger base of knowledge and skills with which to make decisions about future specialisms Clear and straightforward question papers • Papers are clear and accessible for all students of all ability ranges and learning styles

52

Broad and deep development of students’ skills

• The design of the revised International GCSE aims to extend students’ knowledge and understanding by broadening and deepening skills, for example students will: • Develop skills of enquiry, analysis and evaluation of different perspectives in relation to global themes and change • Participate in local community actions and understand their impact on a range of scales linked to global change and on societal impacts • Make interdisciplinary linkages to equip students to successfully engage in a global society Progression to A Level: International GCSEs enable successful progression to A Level and beyond. Our ‘Global Citizenship’ students typically progress to subjects such as Law, Economics, History, Politics, Geography and other humanities.

Assessment The Paper 1 examination lasts 2 hours and 30 minutes and is worth 100% of the qualification. It consists of 100 marks. The paper consists of three sections: • Section A – citizenship community action project worth 20 marks • Sections B and C – key questions on four main themes (Politics and Governance, Economic Development and the Environment, Culture and Community, Technology). (The assessment will feature questions on a number of sources.) 2 sections of 30 marks • Section D – synoptic essay worth 20 marks.


6th Form Curriculum Guide

The International English Language Testing System (IELTS) IELTS classes are offered by the English as an Additional Language (EAL) Department to any student whose first language is not English or who has not previously been educated extensively or primarily in English. What are the aims of the course?

IELTS is designed to assess the language ability of people who want to study where English is the language of communication. Many English-speaking universities require proof of a new student’s English level. IELTS provides this proof and is recognised by over 10,000 organisations worldwide.

What will I study? Students will prepare for the “Academic IELTS” examination. They will follow a course book in class and will be expected to complete independent study to improve their grammar skills as well as to widen their vocabulary. This examination will be taken at an examination centre out of school.

53


Other Sixth Form Courses

The value of individual extension work within the overall Sixth form package has long been recognised and with your personal statements being an important part of the UCAS application procedure such extension work has real value.

EPQ – Extended Project Qualification The Level 3 (A Level equivalent) Extended Project aims to support students with the transition to Higher Education or into the world of work. It provides opportunities for the development of critical, reflective, problem-solving and independent learning skills through the planning, research and evaluation of a self-selected project. In Year 12 you will attend lessons to introduce you to a variety of planning, research and evaluation tools as well as a multitude of academic questions. During the course you will have the chance to broaden your skills, widen your perspectives and deepen your understanding of a wide range of issues. Throughout your in-depth study, you will develop and apply skills creatively, resulting in one of the four following project outcomes: • A dissertation • An investigation • A performance • An artefact

Edexcel

In Year 13 you will work with a mentor to demonstrate that you can: • select a topic/area of interest for an in-depth study that provides opportunities to develop skills, knowledge and understanding • negotiate with your mentor the scope of that project • identify and draft an objective(s) for your project (eg in the form of a question, hypothesis, problem, challenge, outline of proposed performance, issue to be investigated) and provide a rationale for your choice • produce a plan for how you will deliver your intended outcome • conduct research as required by the project brief, using appropriate techniques • develop the intended outcome using selected tools and techniques safely demonstrating the ability to pursue an extended project through to completion • share the outcome of the project, including an evaluation of the outcome and your own learning and performance with another or others, using appropriate communication methods The Extended Project outcome is graded A* to E. Level 3 Projects are worth half a GCE for UCAS points.

54


Other Sixth Form Courses 6th Form Curriculum Guide

Music Opportunities The lively Music department provides the following: Choir, Flute, Guitar Club, Orchestra and Peripatetic lessons for you to pursue your individual musical speciality. In addition the ABRSM and Rock School exams are available. These exams, from Grade 6 upwards, carry UCAS points which may be used towards university entrance.

The Music department offers extension and enhancement opportunities throughout the school in the form of Practical and Theory music examinations outside normal curriculum time, but next year in the 6th form we are very excited to be able to offer the following activities as extension and enhancement activities within curriculum time: • Solo performance in pop, rock or classical styles • Ensemble / group performance • Theory of music for both commercial and classical musicians It is envisaged that students will select from the various components on offer to build a programme individual to their needs in Year 12 and onwards into Year 13 if so desired. Courses could be tailor made and might lead to qualifications with the ABRSM or Rockschool exam boards; options include practical and theory examinations and may even lead to an ABRSM Performance Diploma for some candidates (some prerequisites may be required).

• Would be overseen by one of the peripatetic instrumental teachers in a weekly specialist lesson on a 1:1 basis, you would have time built into your week to rehearse and practice with a pianist/ accompaniment in preparation for the examination • The aural training component of the examination would be taught during class time • The sight reading elements would be covered • Any technical requirements, scales/improvisations would also be taught • Viva requirements would also be covered if necessary • Leads to a qualification from grade 1 to Diploma level and UCAS points can be claimed for Grades 6 8 Popular Music Theory (Rockschool) • Covers commercial notation, tabs/chord symbols • Learn about instruments other than your own

All these activities will be certified and accredited either by ABRSM or Rockschool and the following information gives a brief outline of the various possibilities which may be on offer:

• Learn how to arrange for brass/wind groups

Theory of Music (ABRSM)

Solo and Group performance (Rockschool)

• Grade 5 is a pre-requisite exam before going onto grades 6 - 8 practical examination

• Group performance depending upon the instrumental strengths of the students opting into the scheme; solo performance available from beginner / debut level up to grade 8

• Grades 6, 7 and 8 cover material at a standard equivalent to A Level

• Claim UCAS points for Grades 6 – 8 • Taught in class time

• Grades 6, 7, 8 exams attract UCAS points

• Music Practitioners Qualifications are offered by Rockschool for dedicated and enthusiastic musicians

• Examination in March or June

Possibility to prepare for School Show

• Taught in class time

• This will be dependent on the number of students taking music as an option in the 6th form, the type of show chosen and the skills required for the accompanying band in the show.

Ensemble performances (ABRSM) • Offered by ABRSM at three levels, Primary for grades 4-5, Intermediate for grades 6-7 and Advanced for grade 8 • Ensembles can be any number and combination of instruments • Examination in June

Useful Websites For classical musicians - www.abrsm.org/en/our-exams For commercial/rock or pop musicians - http://www. rslawards.com/music

Solo performance (ABRSM)

55


Personal, Social and Health Education (PSHE) The PSHE scheme of work follows the UK National Curriculum non-statutory guidelines for Personal, Social, Health and Economic Education. Lessons are often discussion based, making use of factsheets, newspaper articles, video, role-play, debate and student presentations. In addition, we make use of PSHE Association quality assured packages of interactive lessons and materials. Resources are updated regularly to reflect our rapidly changing world. Students are encouraged to develop:

The aim is to enable our young adults to become:

• A healthy and safe lifestyle

• Independent enquirers and reflective learners

• Good relationships while respecting the differences between people

• Creative thinkers and effective participators

• Skills of enquiry and communication

• Self managers and good team workers

• Methodical and successful work habits

The following specialist inputs are integrated into the PSHE programme:

• Skills for living in the wider world

• Careers

In sixth form classes there is an increased emphasis on the pupils making wider progress through development of personal, learning and thinking skills.

• Study and library skills • Sex education and life skills presented by the School Nurse

Our programme for Years 12 and 13 remains flexible and responsive and includes the following areas: Year

Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

12

Class ethos / Presentations Study skills and target setting Debates – topical issues Cancer talks Sexually transmitted infections Law, sex and the internet Love in a Box

Introduction to Higher Education: understanding your options Performance Review Study skills and target setting Online safety

Careers Work experience: making the most of it Study skills and target setting Sex and relationships education

13

Class ethos UCAS preparation and applications Topical issues: class debate Study skills Interview skills

Online safety Post-mock review Sexual health

Living away from home: DIY, Cooking, Budgeting; First Aid; Mindfulness Transition issues Study skills and Target setting Coping with stress and relaxation techniques

In recent years the tutors have been exploring new topics of relevance and interest, in response to the needs of the year group, and these include the following headings: Year 12

56

Year 13

Gender differences

Confidence/Self esteem

Positive Thinking

Binge Drinking

Can drugs be recreational?

Media manipulation

Personal Fitness

Personal safety

Informed decision making

Pros and Pitfalls of University Life

Personal Finances

Responsible Budgeting

Establishing personal limits

Pressure

Discussion & Debating Skills

Discussion & Debating Skills

Healthy Lifestyle Choices

Gap Year possibilities

As with all areas of the curriculum, parents are welcome to contact us to discuss any of the topics we cover.


Sport Core

6th Form Curriculum Guide

Each student in the Sixth Form has the opportunity to take part in a range of recreational sporting activities on a Friday afternoon. These sessions are designed to engender enjoyment, social interaction and learning, as well as to hopefully to set a trend for an active life in the future. The sports afternoon has a compulsory element, and all students are expected to take part in at least one activity each week. Popular choices include football, netball, fitness and weight training, climbing, volleyball, basketball, hockey, badminton and zumba. Whilst the students will receive help from staff to further improve their skills and techniques, the main focus of the lesson lies in competition and enjoyment.

Sport (Extra-curricular) The school fields representative teams in the following sports; Girls and Boys Football, Rugby, Netball, Cross Country, Climbing and Athletics. If a student is selected for a school team he/she is expected to attend all training sessions and fixtures. The school has an international fixture list for all of its teams with regular fixtures in France, Belgium, Holland, and the UK.

Additionally, our school is a member of the International Schools Sports Tournament Organisation. Our senior teams compete against all the other major International and American Schools in prestigious tournaments throughout Europe. For a more comprehensive insight into the Sports programme at the School please consult the Parents Handbook.

57


The British School of Paris 38 quai de l’Ecluse 78290 Croissy sur Seine Tel: +33 (0)1 34 80 45 94 Fax: +33 (0)1 39 76 32 21 Website www.britishschool.fr Email ssc@britishschool.fr February 2018

6th Form Curriculum Guide  

The British School of Paris 6th Form Curriculum Guide

6th Form Curriculum Guide  

The British School of Paris 6th Form Curriculum Guide