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CONFERENCE PROGRAMME /BritishCouncilMexico

@mxbritish

Free BBELT 2017 app available

www.britishcouncil.org.mx


The brand new 6-level course for ADULT LEARNERS by Jane Revell, Jeremy Harmer, Mary Tomalin, Amanda Maris, Deborah Friedland

JEREMY HARMER

JANE REV

Helbling English Mexico & Central America Phone: +52 (55) 6587 0764 mexico@helblinglanguages.com www.facebook.com/HelblingLanguagesMexico

communication made easy

www.helbling.com/english

E LL


Come to the HMH presentation:

Empowering Teachers and Students for Integral 21st Century Success

hmhco.com/international

Mexico and Central America Country Manager Miguel Calderón miguel.calderon@hmhco.com 55 36 53 85 49

Central Mexico Educational Sales Consultant Mónica Fuhrken monica.fuhrken@hmhco.com 55 54 38 72 72

Bajío and Central Mexico Educational Sales Consultant Isaías de la Cerda isaias.cerda@hmhco.com 55 36 44 98 06

Northern Mexico Educational Sales Consultant Luis Martínez luis.martinezllamas@hmhco.com 81 15 44 68 41


Welcome We are delighted to once again welcome you to the Best of British English Language Teaching Conference, BBELT, an event that is already a feature of Mexico’s ELT calendar, and a symbol of the British Council’s commitment to improving the quality of English language teaching in the country. This year we are celebrating the 5th anniversary of BBELT in its present format. BBELT ran from 1991 to 2007 as a biennial event. These nine conferences were known for their academic quality as well as for being highly enjoyable and quickly became teachers’ favourite! In 2013, we re-launched BBELT as an annual conference, building on the very best of our conference’s essence as well as bringing it up to date to meet the challenges of 21st century education. We are proud to have provided -for five years in a row - a space for thousands of ELT professionals to learn, share and network and even prouder to still be teachers’ favourite! This year’s theme, The Truth about Teaching, will explore the many and varied beliefs, facts, myths and realities of our profession. We are sure the programme will offer you enough inspiration to (re)discover and (re)interpret your own professional truths. BBELT 2017 offers two exciting and action-packed days of talks and workshops delivered by experts flying in from Argentina, Canada, Mexico, Poland and the United Kingdom. Thanks to all the speakers in advance for generously sharing their knowledge and experience. Some special features this year are that: » There will be a series of talks (all highlighted in the programme) introducing our new approach to teacher development, Teaching for Success. If you are interested in teacher education, training and development, you will want to see them all! » We are delighted to be hosts to a wonderful theatre play, ¡Silencio, Romeo!, presented by Seña y Verbo: Teatro de Sordos. The play is equally enjoyable for the deaf and hearing impaired, and those that can hear too! This is a wonderful example of our inter-institutional collaboration, as part of our Arts and Disability programme. » There is a free conference app that you can download, which will give you information about the venue, allow you to follow the programme as well as share you conference highlights and pictures on social media and much more! Just go to your app store and search for BBELT 2017, it’s as simple as that! We would like to thank our sponsors for their support and commitment to our shared goals. An event of this scale would not be possible without them. Many thanks to all the state governments and education authorities that have made it possible for teachers to attend BBELT 2017, in particular Secretaría de Educación del Estado de México, Secretaría de Educación de Jalisco, Secretaría de Educación de Coahuila, Secretaría de Educación de Guanajuato, Universidad de Guadalajara and Universidad Tecnológica del Valle del Mezquital. Special thanks to Secretaría de Educación Pública for their interest and support of BBELT. As always, all our thanks to you, the teachers, for making BBELT the BEST event for teachers. We hope you find the conference a nourishing and enjoyable experience on both a professional and personal level. With best wishes,

Kevin Mackenzie Country Director

Pilar Aramayo Prudencio Director of English


British Council Mexico Kevin Mackenzie

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Director Mexico

English in Education Systems (EES) Pilar Aramayo Prudencio

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Director, EES

Iveth Pompa Ruiz

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Head of Programmes, EES

Patricia E. Millán Arroyo

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Head of Higher Education Distance Programmes, EES

Adriana L. Sánchez León

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Project Manager, EES

Denise Valenzuela López

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Project Manager, EES

Jennifer Cosgrave

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Project Manager, EES

Irma Piña Silva

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Higher Education Distance Programmes Officer, EES

Karina Villarreal Soriano

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Projects Assistant, EES

Diana Cumpean

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Projects Assistant, EES

Gabriela García

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Projects Assistant, EES

David Connolly

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English Online Product Development Manager, EES

Julieta Jiménez

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Project Coordinator, EES

Erika Lizárraga Robles

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Project Coordinator, EES

Dante Segura

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Project Coordinator, EES

Jaime Rodriguez Olmos

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Project Coordinator, EES

Ana Rosa Gutiérrez Orozco

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Project Coordinator, EES

Susana Ramírez Félix

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Project Coordinator, EES

Teaching Centre Keri Craig

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Teaching Centre Manager

Kim Beadle

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Head of Training & Development

Emily Hardy

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Head of Early Years & Young Learners

Izaak Jones

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Head of Adults

Lucian Alexandrin

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Academic Manager Ibero University

Jake Russell

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Adult Courses Coordinator

Lea Hunnings

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Young Learners Coordinator

Exams

2

Liliana Sánchez

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Country Exams Manager

Will Howorth

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Exams Operations Manager

Miguel A. Galván

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Exams Finance Manager

Silvia Soria

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Exams Finance Assistant

Cristina Llamas

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IELTS Administrator and Exams Coordinator

Bernardo Rosas

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IELTS Exams Assistant

Jazmin Martínez

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IELTS Exams Assistant

Gloria Hernández

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Cambridge English Exams Coordinator

Miriam Rodríguez

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Cambridge English Exams Assistant

Estefania Madrid

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Cambridge English Exams Assistant

Juan Carlos Vergara

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Aptis Exams Assistant

Denise Dominguez

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CENNI Exams Assistant

Dulce Bernal

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Customer Service Exams Assistant

Erandy Martínez

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Customer Service Exams Assistant

Paola Lucas

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Customer Service Exams Assistant


Contents Welcome.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 British Council Mexico.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Programme overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Venue map. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Conference app. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Academic programme: Friday, 17 February 2017.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Academic programme: Saturday, 18 February 2017. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Exhibitors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Presenter index. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Acknowledgements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Questionnaire and Raffle ticket. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71


Thursday 16 February 16:00 - 20:00

Registrations (Lobby / Foyer, second floor)

Friday 17 February 07:30 – 09:00

Registrations (Lobby / Foyer, second floor)

09:00 – 09:20

Opening ceremony (Don Alberto 1)

09:20 – 10:20

Plenary session A (Don Alberto 1) NESTs and LETs: ensuring successful collaborative practices, Fiona Copland

10:35 – 11:35

Concurrent sessions

We Don’t Live in Igloos: Identity and Intercultural Communication

…And they all lived happily ever after!

Comparing communicative behaviour in L1 Spanish and L2 English

Fire Up Your Generation Y Classroom

Heutagogy, edupunk, knowmads, invisible learning; what’s all this

KL Sagert Don Diego 1

S Fash Don Diego 2

J Briggs-Fish Don Diego 3

C Roca Don Diego 4

A Romero Don Diego 5

Tackling stereotypes in ELT

The truth about English teachers

Teaching for Success: Teaching for Success: ESOL - Principles Knowing the Subject Integrating ICT for academic digital (Teaching Unplugged) presentations

A B Bawtinheimer Don Américo

AJ Starling Don Genaro

11:35 – 12:20

Exhibition and coffee break (Don Diego)

12:20 – 13:20

Plenary session B (Don Alberto 1) Whose truth is it anyway?, Thom Jones

13:35 – 14:35

Concurrent sessions

B

14:35 – 16:00 16:00 – 17:00

17:15 – 18:15

Concurrent sessions

C

Helping groups accept classmates with special needs through awareness activities

J Van der Werff Don Diego 1

Find out all about the British Council’s Online Courses

D Connolly J Partain Don Diego 2

P Sabugo K Villegas Don Diego 6 Core skills for teacher development: a perspective from online postgraduate study C Moore P Grounds T Castineira Doña Sol

M Harpalani Doña Socorro

J Russell Doña Adelita

Creating a Culture of Acceptance: Inclusion through Collaborative Learning

Empowering Teachers Teaching for Success: Flash: Saviour of Using Multi-lingual Complicated Classes and Students for Integral 21st Century approaches (CLIL) Success

EM Krause H Albrechtsen R Thummler Don Diego 3

M Fuhrken Don Diego 4

A Recke Don Julián

K Baker Don Diego 5

T Sinclair Don Diego 6

Accent, culture, The digital future is communication: What our digital present are the targets for global learners?

Teaching for Success: Exploiting video Truth, opinion or Assessing Learners outside the classroom hoax? How can we for language learning know? purposes

Teaching For Success: Managing Resources

L Lansford Don Américo

K Beadle Doña Socorro

R Valero Don Genaro

P Haines Doña Adelita

JA Miller Don Julián

L Hunnings Doña Sol

The 4 Ps of Assessment: A wonderful idea!!!

LEP Language and Methodology: Opening a window of opportunities

Making the Right Noise (Primary Edition)

Lunch Plenary session C (Don Alberto 1) The play’s the thing, Nick Bilbrough The Social SAC: Platforms + Wattpad = Clear Writing - Clear attracting and Writing Communicaction motivation unbelievers J Holmes M Ávila Don Diego 1 The shocking truth about online learning

D Humm Don Américo

FR Chávez Don Diego 2

U Schrader Don Diego 3

Reacting in Writing

Teaching for Success: Native or non-native? Planning Lessons and Bringing the debate Courses into our classes

P Varela J Mundo Don Diego 5 Achieving better results: Cambridge Learning Solutions

R Hill Don Genaro

E Hardy Doña Socorro

O Palmas Don Julián

B Ceballos Don Diego 4

M Kiczkowiak Doña Adelita

18:15 – 19:00

Exhibition and coffee break (Don Diego)

19:00 – 21:00

Theatre time at BBELT (Don Alberto 1) ¡Silencio, Romeo! (Silence, Romeo!), Seña y Verbo: Teatro de Sordos

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Let’s Play to Write

S Lever Don Diego 6 Teaching for Success: Using Inclusive Practices A Beider Doña Sol


Saturday 18 February 08:00 – 08:45

Exhibition and coffee break (Don Diego)

08:45 – 09:00

Announcements (Don Alberto 1)

09:00 – 10:00

Plenary session D (Don Alberto 1) Native speakers are better teachers: debunking the myth, Marek Kiczkowiak

10:15 – 11:15

Concurrent sessions

D

11:15 – 12:00 12:00 – 13:00

Developing expertise: A framework for teachers and coordinators

World-Class CLIL Results with SCIENCE FUSION and BOLDPRINT

Intercultural Moving out of the Communicative comfort zone Competences: A Critical Assessment of EFL Teaching

The Truth about Testing and Certification

Teaching for Success: Understanding Learners

N Davila Don Diego 1 Engaging ears, eyes and minds: Authentic listening at every level

M Fuhrken Don Diego 2 How to create a motivating learning environment with songs

B Vallejo Don Diego 3

L Sánchez Don Diego 5

M Bradbury Don Diego 6

“I don’t speak English. Task repetition I just studied it at revisited school”

Effective classroom observations for coordinators

Unconscious Bias: the elephant in the classroom

L Lansford Don Américo

G Smith Don Genaro

S Conway L Robbins Doña Socorro

P Haines Don Julián

E Haupt Doña Sol

SJ Brown Don Diego 4

N Bilbrough Doña Adelita

Exhibition and coffee break (Don Diego) Plenary session E (Don Alberto 1) The Truth about Professional Development for Teachers, Damian Ross Academic Teaching Visual Literacy in a Four skills for learning Play and Learn Excellence: the British Visual Age and innovation Council’s response to EMI challenges

Teaching for Success: Fostering a growth Taking Responsibility mindset in EFL for Professional students Development

L Meza Don Diego 1

G Suarez Don Diego 2

D Santana Don Diego 3

H Díaz Don Diego 5

21st Century LACKING Skills, so what about becoming Critical Thinkers?

The Sound of Trust

Teaching for Success: Teaching in the 21st Managing the Lesson century. Is it all about technology?

K Van Landeghem Don Genaro

E Conway Doña Socorro

The FLE-X factor: have you got what it takes?

13:15 – 14:15

Concurrent sessions

E

E Creemers MC Contijoch R Thummler Don Américo 14:15 – 15:45

JL de Paz Don Julián

C Bauer Doña Sol

Real English, Real Learning

Thine Own Self: learning about linguistic rights

Add me on Snapchat! - What!?! Snapchat stories in ELT?

Fostering creativity and thinking skills

S Lever Don Diego 3

M Ferrin Don Diego 4

O Rugerio Don Diego 5

Become a 21st How Visual Literacy can enhance learning century creative teacher in the 21st Century

YOU FIRST- Learning in the Here and Now

Teaching for Success: We Aren’t Just Promoting 21st Teaching English Century Skills (Critical Thinking)

M Sierra Don Américo

C Roca Doña Socorro

S Aggrey Doña Adelita

Lunch

15:45 – 16:45

F

Kid’s Box Updated Second Edition

A Flores Don Diego 6 Social-Emotional Learning: what it is and why it matters

E Lizarraga D Segura Doña Adelita

Teachers’ and learners’ perceptions of EGLF for intercultural communication

Concurrent sessions

M Dosal Don Diego 4

G Ronzón Don Diego 1

M Rubio R Jiménez M Rodríguez Don Diego 2

E Barba Don Genaro

16:45 – 17:30

Exhibition and coffee break (Don Diego)

17:30 – 18:30

Plenary session F (Don Alberto 1) Remote Teaching and the Future of ELT, Alison Devine

18:30 – 19:30

Raffle and closing ceremony (Don Alberto 1)

J Collins Don Julián

G Suarez Don Diego 6 Literature with a small l

B Taylor Doña Sol

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Venue Map Don Américo

Don Genaro

Doña Socorro

Floor 2

Foyer - Floor 2

Exhibition Room Don Diego

Don Diego 5

Don Diego 6

Room Lobby

Don Diego 1

Don Diego 2

Don Diego 3

Don Diego 4

Floor Registrations

Doña Socorro (Concurrent sessions) Don Genaro (Concurrent sessions) Don Américo (Concurrent sessions) Don Diego 1, 2, 3, 4 (Concurrent sessions) Don Diego (Exhibition Room) Don Diego 5, 6 (Concurrent sessions) 6

Floor 2


Venue Map Don Emiliano Doña Adelita

Don Julián Doña Sol

Floor 4

Foyer - Floor 4

Don Alberto 1 Plenary Sessions

Don Alberto 2

Room

Floor

Don Alberto 1 (Plenary sessions) Don Alberto 2 (Lunch) Doña Sol (Concurrent sessions)

Floor 4

Don Julián (Concurrent sessions) Doña Adelita (Concurrent sessions) La Terraza (Lunch)

Floor 6

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Join the British Council Mexico Teacher Training and Consultancy

We are always keen to hear from suitably qualified and experienced ELT professionals who would like to join our English Team as freelance Teacher Trainers, Consultants, Speaking Examiners and/or venue staff for exams.

THE IDEAL CANDIDATE: is self-motivated and actively seeking to continue his or her professional development

is flexible, creative and solutions oriented

is passionate about teaching, training and customer care

shows commitment to projects and accountability for the outcomes

interacts well with others colleagues, school/education authorities, teachers, and trainees

works well individually and in a team

is available to travel and can work at weekends

has at least five years’ teaching or training experience

has experience in writing or developing materials for ELT

has a C1/C2 level of English, if not a native speaker of English

Is educated to postgraduate level (DELTA/ DOTE, Masters, except for exams venue staff)

If you are interested in joining our team, please email an updated résume and a letter outlining your availability to Pilar Aramayo Prudencio pilar.aramayo@britishcouncil.org.mx or Liliana Sánchez liliana.sanchez@ britishcouncil.org.mx

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BBELT 2017 app The free app allows you to: browse and search the Conference Programme; select individual sessions and add them to a conference planner; share your thoughts via a variety of social media connections; access the British Council website, the interactive exhibitors map and more. This year we are celebrating the 5th anniversary of BBELT and the app has special features for you to join our celebration.

Reading your programme We Don’t Live in Igloos: Identity and Intercultural Communication Kathryn Laura Sagert

Speaker´s Name

P » IC › 21 CS » Don Diego 1

Topic(s)

Type of Session

Room

Title of session

Topics: Types of sessions: P

»

Presentation

W

»

Workshop

CP

»

Commercial Presentation

IC

»

Intercultural communication

N&NN

»

Native and non-native speaker teachers

21CS

»

Developing 21st century skills

D&I

»

Diversity and inclusion in ELT

TT&D

»

Teacher training and development

LM&R

»

Literature, media and other resources

LT

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Learning technologies

TE&A

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Testing, evaluation and assessment

IL

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Independent learning

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Academic programme Friday, 17 February 2017

Plenary session A 09:20 – 10:20 Don Alberto 1

NESTs and LETs: ensuring successful collaborative practices

Fiona Copland Native English speaker teachers (NESTs) have been travelling

Drawing on a recent British Council sponsored project

the world teaching English for hundreds of years (Keaney,

Investigating NEST schemes around the world: supporting

2016). However, the road has not always been smooth and

NEST/NNEST collaborative practices and on the publication,

recently NESTs and ‘native speakerism’ (an ideology that

LETS and NESTs: Voices, Views and Vignettes, this presentation

promotes the notion that the best English teacher is a native

will examine the experiences of NESTs and LETs as they work

English teacher) have been roundly criticised in a range of

together and the challenges they face. It will put forward

contexts from academic journals to the media. However,

suggestions for ensuring successful collaborative practices

criticism has not stemmed the flow and many countries

so that the language teaching experience is a rewarding one

actively recruit NESTs, whether for their English language

for all.

skills or in order to meet the demand for English language teaching which cannot be met by local English teachers (LETs).

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Fiona Copland is Professor of TESOL at the University of Stirling, where she is also Deputy Associate Dean of Research in the Faculty of Social Sciences. She has worked in Nigeria, Hong Kong, Japan and the UK teaching English and training teachers and has extensive experience of teacher education at Master’s level. Her research interests include discourses of teacher education, teaching English to young learners and native English speaker teachers. She has published in these areas and also in linguistic ethnography, co-writing, Linguistic ethnography: collecting, presenting and analysing data, with Angela Creese. She is co-editor, with Sue Garton, of the Palgrave Macmillan Series International Perspectives in TESOL.

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Concurrent sessions A 10:35 – 11:35 We Don’t Live in Igloos: Identity and Intercultural Communication Kathryn Laura Sagert

P » IC › 21CS » Don Diego 1

How can we possibly teach our students about the entire range of cultures of people who use English as their first language or as an international lingua franca? Realistically, we can’t. Regardless of our cultural background, however, we can make a significant contribution to helping students develop more effective intercultural and interpersonal communication skills by creating opportunities to reflect on the factors shaping our own perspectives and those of others. In this session, we will discuss the complex nature of identity and intercultural competences and look at some simple awareness-oriented activities that can be used in different teaching contexts. Originally from Canada, Laura Sagert has worked in ELT in Mexico City for 20 years. She is a teacher and language advisor at CIDE and holds a master’s in TEFL. Her key interests include English for academic purposes (EAP), open educational resources (OER), literacy, and lifelong learning.

…And they all lived happily ever after! Sarah Fash

CP » LM&R » Don Diego 2

If you would like to create a magical learning environment filled with stories, art projects, music, puppet shows (and more!) in your preschool classroom, then University of Dayton Publishing has good news for you! We are introducing a program that is full of books, songs, games and art projects that is sure to delight preschool children and foster confidence while systematically developing the skills they need to become independent readers and writers. Come and learn how to make your classroom a place where children can live Happily Ever After! Sarah Fash has been writing language arts and EFL curriculum for over ten years and is in her 17th year of teaching. She holds a multiple-subject teaching credential, a CLAD certificate, and a master’s degree in curriculum and instruction, with an emphasis in teaching English as a second language.

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Comparing communicative behaviour in L1 Spanish and L2 English Jenna Briggs-Fish

P » IC » Don Diego 3

In our classrooms we practice speaking skills, but how often do we ask ourselves what our students do in their first language when they communicate. This presentation reports on an MA research project to analyse and compare EFL students’ communicative behaviour in recorded interactions in L2 and in L1, Spanish. The study explores the listener’s role in conversation and the little words that are often said without thinking, like uhuh or aha. Here I share the qualitative and quantitative findings which reveal certain discoveries about how students behave in L1 and L2 and we consider possible implications for teaching speaking. Cambridge graduate, Jenna, teaches English at ITESO, Guadalajara and is certified IELTS examiner. She holds a post-graduate diploma in education and has recently completed an MA in Applied Linguistics from the University of Nottingham, UK. Her areas of interest lie in intercultural communication, pragmatics and first and second language acquisition.

Fire Up Your Generation Y Classroom Claudia Roca

CP » IL » Don Diego 4

Teaching four skills is no longer enough! This Generation Y needs to be challenged, they are more visual then ever, engage more when online work is involved, and they love critical thinking. They need a balance of innovation, purposeful learning, authentic content, multimedia and technology. SURE, Helbling's four-level course offers one of the best learning experiences with its awesome video program, thought-provoking readings, CLIL, exam preparation, and our super-friendly E-Zone Learning platform. Check it out! Claudia Roca has taught English for more than 20 years at all levels. She has given workshops in Mexico and Central America, working in the publishing field as Academic Coordinator and Academic Consultant. Currently she is in charge of the Academic Support at Helbling Languages Mexico and Central America.

Heutagogy, edupunk, knowmads, invisible learning; what’s all this Abelardo Romero Fernández

P » 21CS » Don Diego 5

Heutagogy, Edupunk, invisible learning; these are some of the new educational trends that technology has brought with it to create the “knowmads”; the future workers. As teachers in the 21st century we have to understand that education is changing and that we have to adapt our way of understanding education or we will suffer the consequences of these changes. In this session the speaker will reflect about the new educational trends that are creating new educational paradigms, the new truth about teaching and learning, what heutagogy is, what edupunk means, who the knowmads are and what the invisible learning is. Abelardo Romero Fernández is a full-time researcher and teacher at BUAP. He has two B. A. degrees; one in “Lenguas Modernas” (BUAP) and the other in “Pedagogía” (UNAM). He also holds a Master’s Degree in “Educación Superior” (ULSA). Currently he is studying a PhD program in Education.

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Let’s Play to write Pamela Sabugo • Kiku ko Villegas

CP » TE&A » Don Diego 6

Let’s Play to Read Write focuses on engaging children in the process of expressing themselves through written language. It begins with the letters meaningfully represented in the context of a word and then on words as part of sentences. This gives children a way to use letters and words as well as the chance to practice writing using grammar conventions such as capital letters at the beginning of sentences and punctuation marks at the end. The didactic sequence of this book leads children towards free expression using what they previously learned in order to write a sentence to share their ideas with their friends and family. Graduated from college with a degree in Childhood Education, Pamela also attended the Teacher’s Training Course and studied to be a Kindermusik Educator. She has worked as an early childhood educator for developing social, emotional and intellectual skills through the use of music. She has worked teaching children how to read and write in English. Certified bilingual teacher in Texas, USA. Kiku ko worked as a bilingual teacher with immigrant children in Houston, Tx. Bachelor´s ´degree in preschool education by CENEVAL. Currently she is working as a bilingual teacher with preschool children. Master´s degree in environmental design at Cornell University, Ithaca, NY.

Tackling stereotypes in ELT Brad Bawtinheimer

W » IC › N&NN › D&I › TT&D » Don Américo

Both native and non-native speakers of English have encountered some form of stereotype in their ELT career. In this talk, we will exam both positive and negative consequences. In addition, choosing materials and language that don’t perpetuate common stereotypes can have a direct effect on how our students view themselves and the world around them. We sometimes unconsciously aid in pre-conceived notions that our students have. We’ll examine how to make smart choices and lead by example. If we want to break one stereotype, we have to break them all. Brad Bawtinheimer, originally from Canada, is an international speaker based in Mexico City. He specializes in technology and utilizing 21st century skills. Additionally, he is the co-author of several text books in the primary, secondary and young adult markets. He is a senior academic consultant at Cambridge University Press, Mexico.

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The truth about English teachers Andrew John Starling

P » N&NN » Don Genaro

It is a fact that today there are more teachers of English who speak a different first language than teachers who speak English as a first language. In recent years the latter have come under attack, and institutions and students have been criticised for preferring native speakers of English. Indeed, discourse around the topic often suggests that the two groups are somehow incompatible and in conflict (native ‘versus’ non-native speaker teachers’). This presentation examines the dangers of this type of categorisation, questions the rise in negative attitudes towards the first-language English teacher, and makes a case for equity and balance.

Andrew Starling is the Regional Content Manager (English) for Pearson Learning Services HispanoAmerica. He has over 20 years of experience in the field of English language teaching as a teacher, teacher trainer, director of language centres and speaking examiner. Andrew is also author of a number of ELT coursebooks.

Teaching for Success: Knowing the Subject (Teaching Unplugged) Manoj Harpalani

W » 21CS » Doña Socorro

Many teachers have expressed either interest or concerns to free themselves of coursebook materials, aids and technology in the classroom. So, can learning happen without a textbook and these aids? If so, how can it be done? How do we measure learning? Can learners see progress in their learning? In this workshop we will look at underlying principles that inform DOGME teaching and methodology. The main principles being that DOGME is born out of the communicative approach and is conversation driven, materials light and above all the focus being on emergent language from the students in the classroom. Manoj Harpalani is a teacher of English at British Council in Mexico City. He has been in EFL for six years working as an adult and YL teacher and teacher trainer with state school projects and has spoken at teacher training conferences such as TEC.

Teaching for Success: Integrating ICT Jake Russell

W » LT » Doña Sol

One of the major dilemmas of the ESL teacher in recent years has been related to the use of Information Communications Technology (ICT) in the classroom. Some of the questions we ask ourselves as ESL teachers could include: What is ICT and why should we integrate it into our classes? What are the benefits? What are the drawbacks? Will using ICT only prove to distract students or is it important to keep up with the times? This workshop will attempt to answer these questions and provide a number of practical and useable tips and activities. Jake is a teacher and Adult Courses Coordinator at British Council Mexico. He has previously worked in Japan, the UK and Spain as a teacher of English.

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ESOL - Principles for academic digital presentations Adriana Recke

P » TT&D › LT » Don Julian

Digital presentations given by teachers are currently being prepared inefficiently, as students are often saturated with visual, auditory and reading inputs, while an oral explanation is given and music is added, cramming the students´ attention. Modality, contiguity-spatial and contiguity-time principles should be considered, including adequate visuals synchronicity to enhance memory retention and transferral of information for practical usage to new circumstances and situations, following Moreno & Mayer principles and making digital presentations more effective. Adriana Recke Duhart, English teacher for over thirty years, with different certifications from recognized institutions; has an Education Sciences Bachelor´s Degree and a Master in Education Technology from the ITESM; has published articles on learning styles. She is currently coordinating the Language Centre at the Universidad Anáhuac México Sur.

Core skills for teacher development: a perspective from online postgraduate study Caroline Moore Pat Grounds Teresa Castineira

P » 21CS › TT&D » Doña Sol

Postgraduate study is gradually becoming a normal part of EFL teacher development and with today’s possibilities of engaging in online or distance Masters or Doctoral studies the options are increasingly accessible. Engaging successfully in international postgraduate study, however, requires a number of core skills, including the ability to perceive, reflect on and interpret wider discourses in the light of one’s own complex and emergent classroom realities. Using first-hand accounts from successful postgraduate candidates from Mexico, we discuss how key skills are developed over the course of their studies and then provide space for questions and discussion from the audience. Caroline Moore (Phd Language Studies) is involved in ELT and teacher education through her work with the University of Guadalajara as a full-time lecturer and with the British Council as an academic consultant. She tutors on the Southampton online MA in ELT, in collaboration with the British Council, Mexico. Pat Grounds (Phd Language Studies) specializes in professional training and development in ELT as an academic consultant for the British Council and a number of universities in Mexico. She currently tutors on the University of Southampton’s online MA in ELT, offered through a partnership with the British Council. Teresa Castineira is a full time professor/researcher at BUAP. She holds an MA in ELT (Aston University) and a doctorate in Applied Linguistics (Macquarie University). Her main academic interests include e-learning/teaching, systemic functional linguistics and multimodal critical discourse analysis. She has been an online tutor at the Master’s in ELT (University of Southampton and the British Council).

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Plenary session B 12:20 – 13:20 Don Alberto 1

Whose truth is it anyway? Truth is untruth insofar as there resides within it the reservoir of the, as yet, unrevealed

Thom Jones To begin with…

It will be interactive, there will be workshop elements and

...We will look at the truth of intercultural communication and

learning and doing…there will be NO communal singing or

the real reasons students study and teachers teach. We’ll

anybody forced to do star jumps.

sort through some of the received wisdom on methods, skills and how we can divest them of cultural agendas while trying

There will be shouting, throwing things and probably some

to promote elements of inclusion and promotion of diversity.

sweeties involved somewhere.

We’ll shake the native teacher fallacy and see what elements of gender, age, race and cultural bias fall out of the bottom

Main points to be covered:

of the packet. » The truth of the classroom structure We’ll then move on to the meat of the above sashay through

» Classroom control

ideas, by unpicking some actual classroom uses…

» Swiss Army knife lessons-ensuring you have back up

…Two things we often hear in class: “PUT THAT PHONE AWAY!”

plans up your sleeve

and “SPEAK ENGLISH!”. Both typify some grave concerns in

» Ways to use your phone as a valid educational tool

the EFL classroom underlying a serious disconnect between

» A selection of communicative teaching exercises that will

teacher and taught, and a skewed educational compass that points to a North that has moved. We will use the display of a variety of creative exercises for all levels and ages to explore the themes of technology, resources, 21st century skills, ingrained responses, relevance and motivation.

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work at all levels » Motivating them all-students and staff


Thom Jones has lived in more than a dozen countries and delivered training in over 70. Having been a truly useless student (and proving it frequently by failing all the exams he was set) he started his professional life as a waiter before going into teaching, then management, before going freelance. Formerly part of the senior executive at Embassy CES before becoming Director of Operations USA for Studygroup he returned to the UK to work with Trinity College London and now works with a variety of organisations on a wide variety of projects. He is principal of Oxford College International summer programme for SBC and runs his own company: Brock Solutions Agency. He presents regularly around the world on a range of topics and is a guest lecturer at four universities. He is also a freelance trainer in business and management. Ten years ago he cycled from the UK to Turkey, travelling through 11 countries. As a charity fundraiser, he arrived at IATEFL 2015 in Manchester having cycled from Frankfurt in only five days, accompanied by round the world cyclist Julian Sayarer. Julian got there first. He is rubbish at maths. His mother thinks he is great.

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Concurrent sessions B 13:35 – 14:35 Helping groups accept classmates with special needs through awareness activities Joep Van der Werff

W » D&I » Don Diego 1

As a teacher, you may encounter one or more students with special needs such as attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), dyslexia, a physical handicap, or an autism spectrum disorder, to name a few. These students are sometimes ignored or treated unfairly by classmates. Awareness training addresses these negative perceptions by providing information in the form of activities for the whole class. In this workshop you will learn generic strategies and specific activities to increase students’ awareness of their classmates’ “differentness.” With these techniques you can help a class better understand and accept their peers. Joep van der Werff is a corporate academic coordinator at Interlingua and freelance author. He has worked as a teacher, teacher trainer, and editor. His latest textbook is ELLevate 2 for McGraw-Hill Asia (2016). Joep has been learning about special needs students for many years.

Find out all about the British Council’s Online Courses David Connolly • John Partain

CP » TT&D › LT » Don Diego 2

The British Council has been organising and coordinating online courses for well over ten years. We offer general English-language courses, such as the best-selling LEP (Learn English Pathways), as well as a variety of teacher-training courses (e.g. CiPELT, CiSELT and TKT). Among the options available are self-access courses and tutor-led courses (with or without live webinar sessions). In this session, David will talk about the British Council’s online courses from the admin point of view, the point of view of the tutor, and from the client’s perspective. Three lucky participants will receive free access to the eight-level LEP online course! A graduate of the University of London, David is currently the English Online Product Development Manager for the British Council. He has been involved in ELT for nearly 40 years, with extensive experience as a teacher, teacher-trainer, academic co-ordinator, publisher’s representative, consultant, editor, translator, proof-reader, developer and online course admin. John Partain is a teacher trainer/ online moderator for the British Council and will be reviewing in detail one of the following online PD (professional development) certifications offered by the British Council TKT – Teaching Knowledge Test CiSELT – Certificate in Secondary English Language Teaching CiPELT – Certificate in Primary English Language Teaching

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Creating a Culture of Acceptance: Inclusion through Collaborative Learning Estela María Krause y Feria Helene Albrechtsen Svendsen Renate M Thummler Blum

W » D&I » Don Diego 3

We are all alike and need to be included; to belong. Inclusive education in a Special Education Needs’ (SEN) effort has attracted much attention all over the world. In this workshop a quick review of what inclusion is, will be defined/ explained, as well as a brief picture of its status in Mexico. Practical collaborative activities/tasks will be carried out and evaluated by the audience. In this, hopefully, very interactive session our participants will have the opportunity to share their knowledge and, moreover, valuable experiences they have had or plans/proposals for the institutions they work at. Estela Krause has got a BA on English Literature from UNAM, the RSA Dipl. TEFLA and English Phonetics Certificate (UK). She has been an English teacher and a teacher trainer for over 30 years. At CENEVAL she is a BA in TESOL certifying panel member. Affiliation: Freelancer Academic Consultant at Instituto Patria Tercer Milenio, CENEVAL, OUP and British Council Mexico. Helene Albrechtsen Svendsen BA in English Language and Literature from UNAM: MA Comparative literature UNAM, PhD. Education Universidad La Salle. English and Danish Teacher. Teaching undergraduate and graduate levels at various universities in Mexico City, including the subject of Inclusion to teachers studying the Master’s degree. Academic consultant at CENEVAL Affiliation: Freelancer. Renate M. Thummler Blum Dip. R.S.A teaches ESP at UNAM. Freelance teacher trainer both F2F & on-line, academic consultant for the British Council and editor to the English Language Teachers Contact Scheme (ELTeCS) Latinamerica and the Caribbean. At CENEVAL she is a BA in TESOL certifying panel member and certified examiner for Cambridge ESOL. Affiliation: British Council Consultant and Teacher at Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria y Zootecnia/UNAM and Freelancer.

Empowering Teachers and Students for Integral 21st Century Success Mónica Fuhrken

CP » 21CS › TT&D › LM&R › TE&A » Don Diego 4

Positioning Teachers and Students for Integral 21st Century Success World-class educational quality and improved results require the best resources, careful planning and thoughtful implementation. The task of ensuring that teachers and students receive the quality support and tools they need can oftentimes be daunting. Complete and integral educational solutions require quality professional development, continuous assessment, and best-in-class educational materials to be successful. Come discover the ways in which you can empower everyone in your educational context with the tools they deserve to ensure success in the 21st Century. Mónica Fuhrken, M.Ed, brings extensive and deep experience and knowledge to the teaching of English. She studied English Literature B.A. and another B.A. on Integrated Education. She holds a master’s degree in education (M.Ed) and has taught English at all levels. She also holds the RSA Diploma for Overseas Teachers of English (DOTE) from Cambridge University.

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Teaching for Success: Using Multi-lingual approaches (CLIL) Kieran Baker

W » IC › D&I › TT&D » Don Diego 5

Societies, schools and classrooms all have a multilingual nature. Whether that be a minority or a majority, all languages should take part in our learning environments – and furthermore, encourage people to be inclusive outside of the classrooms. With a brief overview of the strategies involved, Kieran will offer you some useful tips, guidance and activities that will help you to take a learner’s linguistic background into account in order for you to make pedagogical choices that respect and capitalize on your learners´ linguistic diversity. There will be no clamming up about CLIL here…

Kieran Baker has worked at the British Council in Mexico for 2.5 years. He has worked across all ages and all levels, currently withdrawing from his focus on Early Years and Young Learners and transferring his knowledge from those areas to classes with Adult learners.

Flash: Saviour of Complicated Classes Tracey Sinclair

CP » TT&D › TE&A › D&I » Don Diego 6

Sometimes a class full of teenagers is a bit like The Little Shop Of Horrors: you give your students (plants) everything normal and yet your students still do not comprehend (grow). Something different is needed; perhaps a flash of inspiration. This talk will discuss different ways of assisting your students to be enlightened. Topics such as managing different learning styles and abilities as well as pronunciation will be discussed. Tracey Sinclair started teaching in state schools over 30 years ago in her native New Zealand, where she graduated in pedagogy. She furthered her skills by becoming a qualified EFL teacher in London. At present she works as a teacher trainer and international speaker when not in the classroom teaching.

Accent, culture, communication: What are the targets for global learners? Lewis Lansford

CP » IC › 21CS » Don Américo

Globally, the majority of English-language conversations don’t involve a native speaker. Using TED talks by non-native English speakers, this session explores these questions: What are the teaching implications of English as a Lingua Franca? How should teachers approach non-standard or ungrammatical input? How do we prepare learners for realworld communication? Lewis holds a Masters of Arts degree in TESOL from the University of Arizona. He’s taught English for over 20 years internationally, and has developed teaching materials for learners of all ages. He’s the author of National Geographic Learning’s “Keynote”, an ELT series for young adults featuring TED Talks.

22


The digital future is our digital present Rosalía Valero

P » LT » Don Genaro

The digital future is here now. We should really be talking about the digital present as mobile learning continues to gain fast traction around the edges of traditional education. Let’s talk about the digital knowledge, skills, and tools that language educators should have for teaching and learning, for example: » the digital disruption: What is it? How has it affected our life? » the digital classroom: BYOD (bring your own device), the digital language context » skills and knowledge for digital language teaching/learning: sourcing and evaluating materials, planning and much more. Rosalia Valero is Head of Assessment Services for Cambridge English Language Assessment in Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean. She holds an MSc in Teaching English from the University of Aston.

Teaching for Success: Assessing Learners Kim Beadle

W » TE&A » Doña Socorro

Everyone has their own methods and beliefs around assessment and evaluation; Should it be done? How should it be done? When should it be done?. Who should do it?... In this workshop we will look at Assessment FOR Learning (AFL), a more motivating, relevant and useful process of evaluating for both the learner and the teacher as it allows results to be fed back in to a course for immediate development and promotes achievement rather than failure. We will look at the benefits of AFL and some methods and activities that can be used in different teaching contexts. Kim Beadle is the Head of Training and Development at British Council in Mexico City. She has been in EFL for 10 years working as an adult and YL teacher, teacher trainer, examiner and online tutor and has spoken at conferences such as BBELT, MEXTESOL and TEC.

Exploiting video outside the classroom for language learning purposes Philip Haines

W » TT&D › LT » Doña Adelita

Although more and more classrooms are becoming equipped with video technology, it is still not a standard. However, the lack of video playing equipment within the classroom doesn’t mean that teachers should forget about the medium. Most students have easy access to video material outside the classroom. What teachers need are the ideas for how to exploit it for language learning purpose. This workshop will offer and explore such ideas. Philip Haines is teacher trainer, ELT author, and international conference speaker. He has been living in Mexico City since he moved there from the UK in 1995. He has a particular interest in material and activity design. Philip works as the Senior Academic Consultant for Oxford University Press, Mexico.

23


Truth, opinion or hoax? How can we know? JoAnn Miller

P » 21CS › LT » Don Julián

How many of our beliefs about language teaching and life in general are really true? Just because we read something on the Internet or hear about them in training, are they necessarily true? How much of the information we receive is fact or just the results of educated opinions or even purposeful manipulation? Learn how to critically assess the “truths” we live with. Become critical thinkers by learning techniques such as distinguishing between causation vs. correlation, evaluating statistics, and recognizing the tricks that are used in the media to manipulate us daily. JoAnn Miller has taught in Mexico City for 45 years. She was teacher and coordinator at the IMNARC (18 years), Institutional Coordinator at UVM (9 years), on the Board of Directors of TESOL, Editor, and now Associate Editor, of the MEXTESOL Journal. She’s currently a freelance trainer and materials developer.

Teaching For Success: Managing Resources Lea Hunnings

W » TT&D » Doña Sol

The internet. Textbooks. Puppets. Ipads. Flashcards. Realia. The modern teacher is fortunate to have so many resources for enhancing the teaching and learning experience in their classroom. However, such a variety can become a focus of stress for educators: What resources should we use? How can we use them effectively? How do we make sure the students are learning? In this workshop we will attempt to answer these questions by examining and analysing some different types of classroom resources including music, drama, flashcards and Cuisenaire rods, and focus on a framework of key principles for their effective use. Lea Hunnings is a teacher with British Council Mexico. She has been working in ELT since 2007, and has taught in Spain, Ireland, Thailand and Myanmar. She has worked as a YL and adult teacher, teacher trainer, international education development consultant, and online tutor, and has spoken at conferences in Asia.

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Plenary session C 16:00 – 17:00 Don Alberto 1

The play’s the thing

Nick Bilbrough Sometimes when we think of drama we think of complex

to exact wording, practice in all four skills, motivating and

archaic language, or we think of struggling to feel the

authentic language and activity, instances of culturally and

motivation for a particular line, or if, like me, you went to

contextually appropriate pragmatic use, and integration of

primary school in Britain in the 1970’s, you may think of

linguistic with paralinguistic communication. Cook, G. (2000)

standing for what seemed like hours and being a tree!

Language Play, Language Learning. Oxford University Press.

But drama as a tool for learning EFL can be a much more

In this interactive plenary, I’ll reflect on my experiences as

straightforward and down-to-earth matter. It’s something that

both a language learner and teacher, and propose a strong

can be incorporated into almost every lesson, and it doesn’t

rationale for the practice and performance of scripted

necessarily require acting skills, or lots of time or practice.

dialogues and sketches as a core component within a

Having said that, its potential to promote learning is high. It’s

modern, lexical (Lewis 1993) or ‘play’ based (Cook 2000)

a great way to bring to life the language in the coursebook

syllabus.

and to make it meaningful and memorable, and on top of all this it is fun. As Cook (2000) put it: The rehearsal and performance of an appropriate play combines the best of both structural and communicative syllabuses: rote learning and repetition of a model, attention

26


Nick Bilbrough has been involved in language teaching for over twenty-five years, and has taught in three continents in a wide range of interesting and challenging contexts. He is a regular speaker at national and international conferences worldwide. He holds an MA in Drama in Education and is particularly interested in the role of drama and storytelling techniques in second language learning. He is the author of two resource books in the Cambridge Handbooks for Language Teachers series: Dialogue Activities (2007) and Memory Activities for Language Learning (2011), as well as Stories Alive, a free resource book of story based activities for young learners, published by British Council Palestine, and numerous short articles. He has designed and delivered a vast range of development courses for language teachers, focusing on innovative and creative approaches to language teaching, and now works part time in London at the Sharek centre http://sharekcentre.com/, in the training of teachers of Arabic. Most of his time and energy is now devoted to the registered charity he established, The Hands Up Project https://handsupproject.org/ – teaching English through online storytelling and drama to disadvantaged children in Palestine, Jordan and Pakistan.

27


Concurrent sessions C 17:15 – 18:15 The Social SAC: attracting and motivation unbelievers Jane Holmes Magdalena Ávila Pardo

P » IC › 21CS › IL » Don Diego 1

We come from an area devoted to tourism, but our students arrive with limited experiences of learning English, yet have a need of English for work opportunities. Social centres are community spaces with a common theme, in this case, practicing the use of English. The Self Access Centre (SAC) is open all day to help students share ideas, resources and information in a relaxed setting. This is a way to attract students to learn English because they can choose how they participate, interacting with their peers. This support system lowers students’ anxiety, increases motivation and interest and helps the student to have a more positive attitude towards language learning. Jane works in the Universidad del Caribe, Cancun as the Director of the English Department where she has a special interest in Self Access, motivation and cultural restraints. Magdalena Ávila Pardo has a Masters Degree from Southampton University and is working on her Doctorate in Self Access and agency.

Platforms + Wattpad = Writing Francisco Ricardo Chávez Nolasco

W » 21CS › LT » Don Diego 2

Every day new devices are available and in order to interact with them hundreds of applications and programs are developed. Some of them get popularity and disappear (MySpace), others stay longer and some others are maintained for several years (FB). But only few gain so much popularity and recognition quickly as Wattpad. Here a concluded project, which relates the developing of writing skills using an educational platform and the usage of a worldwide publishing application as Wattpad, will be presented. The ideas and processes that were followed will be shown to let other learn how linking these tools is possible. Professor Ricardo Chávez holds a degree in Educational Development and ICT. Certified as Online Tutor and being a professional web master he teaches at BECENE. He has been working with different platforms and excels Moodle and BB. At present he is moving into clouding with real applications of theoretical connectivism.

28


Clear Writing - Clear Communicaction Ulrich Schrader

P » IC › 21CS » Don Diego 3

What are the elements of clear, effective communication in writing? Many times written communications are incomprehensible because of an ill-conceived purpose of the communication, insufficient information or faulty language. Unnecessary further back and forth communication is then necessary to clarify the original message. A balance needs to be struck between brevity and explicitness in order to achieve sufficient clarity and to elicit an appropriate response from the recipient of the message. In this presentation suggestions for writing clearly from the outset are offered and discussed and some simple texts will be analyzed and improved. Ulrich Schrader (MA in TESOL from the University of the Americas in Mexico City) was a teacher trainer, school administrator, and English teacher for many years. He is continually fascinated by language teaching and learning. He has been involved in MEXTESOL for 25 years and is currently the academic consultant.

The 4 Ps of Assessment: A wonderful idea!!! Beatriz Ceballos

CP » TE&A » Don Diego 4

Educators need to better understand the role of assessment in today’s education and how to support all students in enhancing their learning through continuous assessment. Our session will focus on key features and activities that help both teachers and students in maximizing learning. We will analyse The 4 Ps in Assessment. This is a combination of ongoing Assessment Tools a teacher can use to assist the process of his students’ learning. Prescriptive but ungraded feedback enables students to reflect on what they are learning and why. The main goal of this session is to help learners improve performance and achieve successful outcomes and also to help students focus on learning instead of just grades. Beatriz Ceballos has been involved in assessment, teacher training, teacher development and curriculum design for the last 25 years. She has been Director of Studies and Coordinator for several schools. She was involved in Cambridge English exams as oral examiner, Team Leader and EFL Professional Presenter for more than 15 years. She is currently working for Oxford University Press as Assessment Specialist.

29


LEP Language and Methodology: Opening a window of opportunities Paloma Varela • Julio Mundo

W » TT&D » Don Diego 5

As of next year, learning English language will be compulsory for state primary school students in Mexico. This programme presents a huge demand for qualified language teachers which exceeds the available pool of qualified candidates. One possibility might be to make wise use of the qualified Spanish teachers. That is, teach them language and methodology. DipTESOL, PgCertTESOL, CerTEB, Paloma Varela is an Academic Consultant and e-tutor for various institutions among them the British Council; author and content editor for several publishers too. At CENEVAL she is a BA in TESOL certifying panel member. Currently, she is completing her second year of the MA in TESOL at Sheffield Hallam University. BA TEFL, Julio Cesar is an experienced English language teacher. He is currently in charge of training and supervising the BA in TEFL certifying panel members at The National Centre of Evaluation (Ceneval). He is also and academic consultant and language teacher for various institutions among them the British Council. Currently, he is completing his MA in ELT at Universidad del Estado de Mexico.

Making the Right Noise (Primary Edition) Steve Lever

CP » TT&D » Don Diego 6

With the best will in the world, there are times when things in the primary classroom go wrong. It is hoped that during this session colleagues will gain some insight into what might be going wrong and what techniques to try to put it right. Although no-one can promise that primary children will always behave, it is hoped that a broader understanding of some of the issues involved will be helpful in reducing times when they don’t. Steve Lever holds a BA (Hons) from Leeds University. After teaching EFL for eleven years, he joined Express Publishing in 2001 and has been travelling ever since. He has a strong interest in teaching through drama and critical thinking in education. He also works as a freelance translator and editor.

The shocking truth about online learning Dan Humm Soriano

P » TT&D › LT » Don Américo

The shocking truth about online learning is not how rapidly it is growing in popularity or how it will form the future of how we all will learn – these are well known. What will come as a shock to many teachers is that online learning has been proven to be more effective than traditional models and also that it can build a bigger sense of community. This talk will reveal the best ways for you to learn from the lessons of online learning and incorporate its best practices into your teaching – either face to face or virtually. Dan Humm Soriano is a teacher trainer, writer and editor living in Mexico. He has worked in ELT since 1996 and specialises in the creative use of digital educational tools. He has written a number of course books and for publications including MET and English Agenda for the British Council.

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Reacting in Writing Robert Hill

P » LM&R » Don Genaro

We will focus on creative writing as a response to reading fiction. What if the characters in stories (and characters outside the stories, too!) wrote to each other? What would they write? And what would they write in their private diaries? We’ll show how getting learners to write letters, journals, diaries and even poems provides valuable practice in both written fluency and reading comprehension and interpretation. After graduating in English Language and Literature from the University of Oxford, Robert Hill taught in Spain, Greece and England before settling in Italy, where he taught for many years at the universities of Verona and Milan. He is the author of ‘The Black Cat Graded Readers Handbook’.

Teaching for Success: Planning Lessons and Courses Emily Hardy

W » LM&R » Doña Socorro

A lesson plan consisting of ‘Unit 5 p124’ doesn’t really inspire us as teachers or motivate our students. Coursebooks are useful as a general guide for our courses, but most of the time we find ourselves adapting and supplementing them to meet the needs of our learners. In this workshop we will look at ways of exploiting the activities in a coursebook in a creative and time-efficient way that will benefit teachers with planning and engage learners with a dynamic classroom. Emily Hardy is the Head of Young Learners at British Council in Mexico City. She has been working in EFL for over 9 years as an adult and young learner teacher, examiner and teacher trainer. She has lived and worked in China and Vietnam and has been in Mexico for nearly two years.

Native or non-native? Bringing the debate into our classes Mareck Kiczkowiak

W » N&NN » Doña Adelita

If we are serious about promoting equal employment opportunities for ‘native’ and ‘non-native speaker’ teachers in ELT, it is not just important to encourage schools to rethink their employment policies, but also to discuss native speakerism more openly with students and teachers. To this end, the session will be comprised of several awarenessraising activities which will allow the audience to question their own beliefs about ‘native’ and ‘non-native speakers’ and their roles in ELT. Participants will walk away with an array of practical activities they can use in their own teaching and teacher training. (See biodata on page 45)

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Achieving better results: Cambridge Learning Solutions Orelly Palmas

CP » TT&D › LM&R › TE&A » Don Julián

As dedicated and committed teachers, coordinators and directors, we are always looking for ways in which we can enhance our English programmes, so that, we can achieve better results for our learners. However, what approaches, materials, techniques, tools are best to achieve such task? This presentation will outline the insights that Cambridge pedagogy research brings to ELT and how Cambridge Learning Solutions can help you achieve better results, from customised material to high quality professional development. Orelly Palmas, MA holds a BA in Teaching English as a foreign language and an MA in Applied Linguistics and ELT from Surrey University, England. She has taught foreign languages and ESP in Mexico and the U.K. Mrs. Palmas is the Cambridge Learning Solutions Projects Coordinator at Cambridge University Press.

Teaching for Success: Using Inclusive Practices Alys Beider

W » D&I » Doña Sol

ESL practice is commonly situationed within contrasting cultural environments with varying student considerations. We are all made aware of the importance of recognising Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI), but how much of it do we implement in the classroom? And how much of it has a positive and lasting impact on learners? This workshop will present an overview of common EDI practice, and look at some practical ways it can be incorporated into the classroom with confidence and dynamism. Attendees will take away a set of new activities and a more pragmatic understanding of the subject in an educational setting. Alys Beider is a Teacher of English at British Council Mexico. She has been in EFL for 2 years working as an adult, YL, corporate and online teacher and currently holds the roles of EDI and Teachers Representative for the British Council Mexico City Teaching Centre.

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Theatre time at BBELT 19:20 – 21:00 Don Alberto 1

¡Silencio, Romeo! Lo que el amor puede, el amor lo intenta (Silence, Romeo!) (Versión de Romeo y Julieta de William Shakespeare)

Seña y Verbo: Teatro de Sordos Dos familias de idéntico linaje, una ciudad: Verona, lugar de

» Adaptación y dirección: Carlos Corona*

nuestra escena. Un odio antiguo que engendra un nuevo

» Traduccion Ingles-Español: Alberto Lomnitz*

odio. Y ahí, bajo la misma entraña de nuestros dos enemigos,

» Actor sordo y traductor: Roberto Elías de Loera

nacieron dos amantes, bajo una mala estrella. En la tradición

» Actor sordo y traductor: Eduardo Domínguez

literaria occidental, Romeo y Julieta se ha convertido en la

» Actriz oyente: Karla Valeria Monroy Fabbri

historia de amor por excelencia y no sólo en teatro sino en

» Actor oyente: Daniel Ortiz Velázquez

diversas disciplinas han abordado reiteradamente la historia

» Músico y Voz: Luz Olvera

de los amantes de Verona.

» Músico y Voz: Sebastián Lavaniegos » Asistente de dirección: Estela del Rosario Rivera Meneses » Combate escénico: Félix Terán Barrera » Escenografía e Iluminación: Alita Escobedo » Vestuario: Fernanda García » Traductor e intérprete: Elihu Zárate

*Miembro del Sistema Nacional de Creadores de Arte

34


Seña y Verbo: Teatro de Sordos one of a kind cultural company in Latin America, is conformed by deaf and hearing professional actors. In its plays, for adults and children, Mexican Sign Language is combined with spoken Spanish creating shows equally enjoyed by the Deaf and the Hearing. Seña y Verbo: Teatro de Sordos, empresa cultural única en América Latina, está conformada por actores profesionales, sordos y oyentes. En sus obras, para adultos y niños, se combinan la Lengua de Señas Mexicana y el español hablado para crear espectáculos que gozan sordos y oyentes por igual.

35


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Mexico and Central America Country Manager Miguel Calderón miguel.calderon@hmhco.com 55 36 53 85 49

Central Mexico Educational Sales Consultant Mónica Fuhrken monica.fuhrken@hmhco.com 55 54 38 72 72

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British E d it i o n

NEW


Academic programme Saturday, 18 February 2017

Plenary session D 09:00 – 10:00 Don Alberto 1

Native speakers are better teachers: debunking the myth

Marek Kiczkowiak There is a persistent belief in ELT, an ideology if you will –

However, do these arguments about the superiority of ‘native

often referred to as native speakerism, that ‘native speakers’

speaker’ teachers hold any water in a world where English

are better teachers. They are better because they have

has become a global lingua franca? In this talk I will debunk

superior knowledge of the language. A wider vocabulary.

some of these myths about ‘native speakers’, and argue that

Better pronunciation. They are more fluent. They are unique

all teachers, whether ‘native’ or ‘non-native’, should be hired

sources of cultural knowledge. Their teaching methodology

for their pedagogical skills and professionalism, rather than

is better.

for a language they unwittingly picked up as children. To do so, I will refer to appropriate research and literature, as well

And this belief has been sold and marketed around the world,

as my own experience as an English teacher, teacher trainer

leading to a situation where the vast majority of ELT jobs in

and language learner.

the private sector around the world are for ‘native speakers’ only. A situation where practically any ‘native speaker’ with

I will end the talk by suggesting what each and every one of

or without a 4 week TEFL certificate can travel the world

us involved in ELT can do to tackle native speakerism and

teaching English. A situation where many students prefer

to bring back professionalism and equality into our industry.

‘native speakers’, because they are constantly told to prefer them.

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Marek is originally from Poland and since doing the CELTA and graduating with a BA degree in English Philology, he has taught English in seven countries in Europe and Latin America. He is currently based in Leuven, Belgium, where he teaches academic English at the local university. He also holds Cambridge DELTA and is working towards a PhD in TESOL at the University of York. He has published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at international conferences. His research interests are English as a Lingua Franca and native speakerism in ELT. He advocates equal professional opportunities for ‘non-native’ English speaking teachers through TEFL Equity Advocates (www.teflequityadvocates. com), co-authors The TEFL Show podcasts (www.theteflshow.com) and keeps a now sporadically updated blog about ELT at TEFL Reflections (www. teflreflections.wordpress.com). He also gives face-to-face and on-line teacher training sessions about native speakerism and English as a Lingua Franca: http://tefl-equity-courses.teachable.com/ He’s also a keen language learner and is currently learning his 7th, Dutch. You can find him on Twitter @ marekkiczkowiak and @teflequity

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Concurrent sessions D 10:15 – 11:15 Developing expertise: A framework for teachers and coordinators Norma Davila Iglesias

W » 21CS › TT&D › TE&A » Don Diego 1

Teachers and coordinators need to talk with each other and be willing to learn, so that we are all moving forward in improving practice. In this workshop, teachers and coordinators will learn how to engage in rich conversations through a framework for teaching named “Learning-focused Supervision”. Such framework is a growth-oriented process that embeds four essential qualities: » Developmental » Standards- driven » Customized » Data-based The main goal of this workshop is that teachers and coordinators become aware that the more actively engaged a teacher is in the evaluation process, the more learning will occur and the greater commitment to that learning. Norma Dávila holds a Master of Education from Universidad Panamericana. She has worked as an English Teacher at the Anglo, UNITEC and Tec de Monterrey. As a Second Language Specialist for Semper Altius, Norma trained teachers in Central America, Italy and Switzerland. Norma is Teacher Support Manager at Cambridge University Press.

World-Class CLIL Results with SCIENCE FUSION and BOLDPRINT Mónica Fuhrken

CP » LM&R » Don Diego 2

Today’s learners must experience learning in ways which reflect an increasingly demanding world. CLIL provides a framework through which learners can achieve increased competence and skills by preparing for life outside of the language classroom. Science Fusion 2017 is a comprehensive, best-in-class program which provides the tools for learners to achieve amazing proficiency through CLIL along with the BOLDPRINT® series, which is known for its worldwide results with language learners and its exciting, edgy content. Discover how your learners can achieve the best language competency. (See biodata on page 21)

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Intercultural Communicative Competences: A Critical Assessment of EFL Teaching Bogar Vallejo Martínez

P » IC › D&I » Don Diego 3

Economic crises, religious conflicts, urbanization, and social instability continue to fuel movement of people (Bartlett, Rodríguez, & Oliveira, 2015). As a result, multilinguism and multiculturalism have become common elements in many nations including Mexico. Current pedagogical and didactical strategies in Second Language Teaching (SLT) are “designed to guide learners toward becoming viable contributors and participants in a linguistically and culturally diverse society” (Moeller & Nugent, 2014, p. 1). The significance of this investigation lies in its attempt to examine the factors that affect Intercultural Communicative Competences in EFL teaching-learning process in private elementary schools. Bogar Vallejo is a Language Coordinator with 20 years hands-on experience in education committed to promote a passion for teaching and learning. He has a Master’s degree in Education at ITESM. Winner of the Cambridge English Peter Hargreaves 2017 IATEFL scholarship. At the moment, he implements Second Language teaching-learning models.

Moving out of the comfort zone Sarah J. Brown

W » TT&D » Don Dego 4

In this session, participants will consider what is expected of us as English teachers and by whom, what our roles and responsibilities are, together with the challenges we face in our different contexts. Based on those reflections, participants will identify their teaching “comfort zone”, and their potential “learning zone”. The concepts of agency and reflection on practice will be examined and applied to this idea of moving out of our teaching comfort zone in order to grow as teachers. Participants will engage in a series of reflective activities in order to initiate, or reignite, their process of on-going professional development. Sarah has been involved in ELT for 23 years. She is currently an academic coordinator and teacher at ITESO University, Guadalajara, but has also worked freelance as a teacher trainer and materials developer. With ITESO, she has participated in training sessions with public school teachers working with the National English Programme.

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The Truth about Testing and Certification Liliana Sanchez

P » TE&A » Don Diego 5

Any educational institution that adopts or implements a testing and certification system must be aware that without D, the ABC of exams is useless. Assessment that is reliable and valid but that causes no change in the learning and teaching process should not be promoted. In this presentation we will explore the value of the key components of testing, and question the validity of certification when there is no driven change. We will also explore the certification services offered by the British Council Mexico Exams centre. Liliana Sánchez is the Country Exams Manager at the British Council Mexico and a Cambridge English Delta tutor and ICELT tutor and moderator. Liliana holds an MA in TESOL from Canterbury Christ Church University in England and she is a regular presenter at conferences such as Mextesol, LABCI and IATEFL.

Teaching for Success: Understanding Learners Milton Bradbury

W » TT&D » Don Diego 6

As all teachers know, every learner is different. All have different personalities, preferences and interests. Many classrooms will have a mixture of learners who are there for intrinsic (because they love learning languages!) and extrinsic (to improve work opportunities) reasons. So how do we, as teachers, create an environment in which all learners are motivated to engage in the classroom and continue their learning at home? In this workshop we will look at strategies of how to motivate students, make classes more learner-centred and increase learner autonomy with the objective of understanding our students better. Milton Bradbury is a teacher at British Council in Mexico City. He has been working in EFL for 6 years as an adult and YL teacher and is currently studying the DELTA. His interests in teaching include making the classroom more learner-centred and tailoring classes to meet students’ needs.

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Engaging ears, eyes and minds: Authentic listening at every level Lewis Lansford

CP » IC › 21CS » Doña Adelita

Accents, fast speech, idioms and slang – these features of spoken English make listening one of the biggest challenges learners face. But low-level learners don’t want to wait to learn real English – they want to understand it now. And even at higher levels real-world listening continues to be challenging. How can teachers help learners at every level engage with authentic input? Using TED Talks as examples, this session looks at some of the brain science related to listening and offers practical tips for how to create success-oriented lessons for the classroom at any level. (See biodata on page 22)

How to create a motivating learning environment with songs Gemma Smith

CP » 21CS › LM&R » Don Genaro

Participants in this seminar will explore practical ways to make the most of their young learners’ energy, curiosity and enthusiasm in order to facilitate the learning process. Ideas on how teachers can exploit songs in the ELT classroom will be presented which are guaranteed to liven up their classes. A former member of the Institute for Learning, Gemma has over twenty years’ experience in the field of EFL. She has worked as an ESOL Lecturer, ELT editor, and as an academic consultant. She has been awarded Grade One Outstanding for her teaching practice, by OFSTED, consecutively, and has edited and developed both print and digital ELT materials on behalf of various publishing houses.

“I don’t speak English. I just studied it at school” Sarah Conway • Lauren Robbins

P » TT&D › TE&A » Doña Socorro

In a study of primary and secondary schools in Mexico, we evaluated both individual students’ progress in English and schools’ English programs as a whole. This evaluation process provided a clear overview of the challenges schools face and what schools can do to improve their students’ results as English language learners. Join us as we walk through this process, demonstrate how you can apply it to your own school, and share some of the conclusions of our research. Sarah Conway has been involved in ELT for twelve years, nine of them in Mexico. She has an MA in Applied Linguistics with ELT from the University of Nottingham. She lives in Mexico City and is the Professional Services Manager at University of Dayton Publishing. Lauren Robbins has been a teacher, coordinator, writer and editor. She was trained at the Anglo Mexican Foundation and holds the Dip. TEFLA. She is the Director of Publishing and Professional Services ELT at University of Dayton Publishing.

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Task repetition revisited Nick Bilbrough

W » TT&D » Doña Adelita

Task repetition has long been recognized (eg Lewis 1997, Thornbury 2001) as an effective way to encourage learners to produce more accurate, more complex, and more fluent language. But, as teachers how can we incorporate repetition into our classes whilst maintaining the same level of engagement and motivation. In this practical workshop we’ll explore this issue and try out a range of activities which are immediately usable for language classes at a range of levels. (See biodata on page 27)

Effective classroom observations for coordinators Philip Haines

CP » TT&D » Don Julián

Few coordinators doubt the benefits of classroom observations. It is important for guaranteeing quality, identifying training needs and helping individual teacher's professional development. However, implementing an effective classroom observation program is no easy task, especially since being observed can be a stressful experience. In this session we will look at the factors we need to take into consideration for effective observations and help you decide which are the most appropriate for your institution and context. (See biodata on page 23)

Unconscious Bias: the elephant in the classroom Engeli Haupt

W » D&I » Doña Sol

Are you aware of how your brain works to make quick decisions and judgments? In this session the presenter will explain the concept of implicit bias: the unconscious beliefs we hold about things and people. Become more aware of some of your own unconscious biases in the classroom after taking part in activities to explore and mitigate these biases. Finally, we will discuss how these activities could be adapted for your context, so you can use them to make an impact on your staff or learners. Engeli Haupt is a materials writer, teacher trainer, and teacher at British Council Mexico. Some of her areas of interest include learning styles and the use of ICT in learning. She has a Masters in Educational Technology and is currently an Equality Diversity and Inclusion representative for the Teaching Centre.

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Plenary session E 12:00 – 13:00 Don Alberto 1

The Truth about Professional Development for Teachers

Damian Ross “Innovation in strengthening and expanding a diverse

During this presentation we will look at the evidence for

education workforce is critical to improving education.”

investing in teacher development, and what good professional development looks like. We will consider the roles of policy-

(The Learning Generation,

Investing in education for a

makers, school leaders and teacher educators, but focus on

changing world – The International Commission on Financing

how teachers themselves can be effective in identifying and

Global Education Opportunity)

responding to their own development needs.

“If we leave the current young generation without adequate

The British Council’s Continuing Professional Development

schooling, we doom them and the world to future poverty,

framework for teachers represents our global understanding

environmental ills, and even social violence and instability for

of, and expertise in, teaching and teacher development, and

decades to come.” (UNESCO GEM report, September 2016)

is a key tool for teachers trying to assess their own needs. We will look at how to use the framework, discuss the needs of

The vital role of teachers both in education and wider

the audience, and consider a simple development planning

society is self-evident, but there is growing recognition

template.”

among governments and international organisations that there needs to be more emphasis on supporting teacher development.

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Damian Ross leads support in implementing the British Council’s approach to teacher development, Teaching for Success, for British Council teams across the globe. He is a specialist in education and English language development management, with 16 years’ experience of teaching, training and educational project management in various locations across Europe, the Middle East, and Central and Southeast Asia. After several years teaching English in Europe and Asia, Damian joined the British Council as a Teacher Trainer in Jordan in 2006. He had various management and training roles at British Council teaching centres before taking up a regional role in Eastern Europe and Central Asia, working with national governments and training institutions to support teacher education and development. He then moved to Indonesia, where he led both teacher development and English language development programmes across the country. In his current role with the British Council global team, Damian is responsible for the ensuring that British Council Teacher Education and Development work leads to a lasting, sustainable difference to student learning experiences and achievement. This involves making sure British Council teams have the skills and tools to understand their context, to analyse needs within education systems, to identify the right development activity to respond to those needs, and to learn from and share those experiences.

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Concurrent sessions E 13:15 – 14:15 Academic Teaching Excellence: The British Council Response to EMI challenges Laura Meza

P » TT&D » Don Diego 1

Throughout the world the number of degree courses that are being taught in English has increased significantly over recent years. Often neither teachers nor students are native-speakers of the language they are using, which can cause frustration on both sides. This session will discuss the challenges educators face in a globalized world where Universities are moving towards using English as a medium of instruction (EMI). We will present Academic Teaching Excellence (ATE), a training course developed by the British Council to help higher education institutions face these challenges. Participants will learn about the principles and the research behind this innovative course which was designed in close co-operation with the University of Oxford’s Department of Education. Laura A. Meza holds a Master’s Degree in Education from the University of Exeter. She is the British Council’s ATE certified trainer for Latin America. Laura has been a teacher for over 20 years and has centred her interest on teacher education for more than 15. She currently lives in Long Beach, California where she writes and edits ELT materials.

Visual Literacy in a Visual Age Gabriela Suarez Melendez

P » 21CS » Don Diego 2

Our world is changing fast. Faster than we can keep up our traditional way of thinking and communicating. In an increasingly complex, demanding and competitive 21st Century, the development and technology have changed the way we communicate, so, now it is crucial that we can extend our view of literacy and to include new literacies in our English Language classroom. As we know Visual Literacy is one of the most important literacies of this century. In this talk, we will be looking at what Visual Literacy is and how it can easily be incorporated into our current teaching practice Gabriela Suarez majored in education at the UPN. She has done research and developed an early education system. Gabriela has been an English teacher for more than 15 years and has been involved in consultancy using bilingual and ELT programs, she is currently an Academic Consultant for Richmond Publishing.

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Four skills for learning and innovation Dixie Santana

W » 21CS » Don Diego 3

Education in the 21st century offers challenges which will have to be faced with imagination. This workshop will present activities for fostering communication, collaboration, creativity, and critical thinking in the language classroom. Presenter and participants will discuss why these four skills are important and will practice designing activities they can use in their own classes. Dixie Santana has been involved in ELT for over 30 years. She holds a PhD in Education from ITESO University. She is currently the academic head of the Language Center at Universidad Panamericana in Guadalajara.

Play and Learn Maribel Dosal

CP » TE&A » Don Diego 4

Play and learn is a collection of three books, which aims to teach English to preschool children in a fun and meaningful way. Exercises and activities in the series seek to strengthen communicative approach in which even the youngest students start assimilating and remembering simple language structures and not just single words. This will allow them to use English to communicate. This series considers the demands and requirements of the Learning Improvement Route designed by SEP. Maribel Dosal was born in Mexico City. She studied Pedagogy at Universidad Panamericana. She has a Master’s degree in Family and Education Counseling from Universidad de Villanueva in Spain. She has worked in education for more then 12 years. She is currently the academic director at Colegio Monteverde.

Teaching for Success: Taking Responsibility for Professional Development Heriberto Diaz

W » TT&D » Don Diego 5

Lifelong learning is important not only for students, but also for teachers. When teachers think of professional development, teacher training programmes, master´s and certifications come to our mind, but what other learning opportunities do we have? How can we continue our professional development given our particular situations and resources? In this workshop we will explore CPD (Continuing Professional Development) and the ways we have to make it an ongoing process. We will look at the many opportunities we have to reflect on our existing practices and to start getting involved in activities that will improve our teaching in our particular context. Heriberto Díaz works at the British Council as a teacher, examiner, teacher trainer and online tutor. He has been in ESL for 27 years working as an adult and YL teacher and has spoken at conferences such as MEXTESOL, ANUPI, BBELT and UNAM. He is also the Coordinator of the Language Department at CIDE.

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Fostering a growth mindset in EFL students Angélica Flores

W » 21CS › D&I » Don Diego 6

The world is setting high standards in business, communication and social environments. To be successful, not only do our learners need to know how to use the language communicatively but to develop skills and attitudes which help them reach the standards they pursue. As language teachers, we can provide them with tools which allow them to grow their mindsets. There are many activities in the classroom which allow learners to change their mindsets. Discover how through your language lessons, you can build the ideal environment towards growth mindsets in your classroom. Angélica has more than 23 years of experience in ELT. She started teacher training 19 years ago. She has delivered and designed many teacher’s development courses and workshops in different teaching environments. She has a master’s degree in Teaching English. She is an online tutor, material designer and academic consultant.

21st Century LACKING Skills, so what about becoming Critical Thinkers? Edouard Francois Hubert Creemers María del Carmen Contijoch Escontria Renate M Thummler Blum

W » 21CS » Don Américo

In this interactive workshop the 21st century ELT skills directed to Critical Thinking (CT) will be dealt with. Embracing changes and communicate inter-culturally are part of the above. The effective Critical Thinking (CT) process will also be discussed. The definition about what CT means will be covered, as well as what a description of what a ‘Critical Thinker’ is. How to become a critical thinker keeping in mind standards and strategies for CT will be included as part of the elements of thought. Examples of- and strategies on how to incorporate CT will be shared, and put into practice. Edouard Creemers teaches General and Business English, prepares students for Cambridge FCE, CAE and BEC (Business English). He has his Business English academy. He does teacher training; such as TKT, CiSELT and CET, online. He holds the ICELT, Dip.TESP and the e-moderators essentials. He is lecturer at national/international teachers´ events. PhD María del Carmen Contijoch Escontria holds a masters degree in Applied Linguistics from UNAM and a doctorate in Applied Linguistics from Macquarie University. She has worked at CELE-UNAM for 30 years. Her academic interests include course design, autonomous learning, reading comprehension and e-learning. (See biodata on page 21)

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The Sound of Trust Koen Van Landeghem

P » 21CS › TT&D › LM&R › LT » Don Genaro

Research on motivation has resulted in dozens of theories about learning and development, but what science tells us is not always what we apply in class. This sesión introduces some of the most relevant schools of thought on motivation, such as the XY theory, the Z theory, the Needs-Achievement theory, and Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi´s Psychology of Optimal Experience. It illustrate how they all connect to motivation in language learning and some of the more recent theories on whole person teaching. The take-away are perspectives on input, trust, styles, accountability and freedom that impact learning in class as well as online environments. Koen is the director for Helbling Languages in Mexico. He accumulates many years of experience as a teacher, trainer and in ELT publishing. He worked as a Digital Learning Consultant in the Americas and Asia. Koen is also a certified organisational coach who specialises in Change Management and Optimal Performance.

Teaching for Success: Managing the Lesson Eve Conway

W » TT&D

» Doña Socorro

Have you ever wondered why one classroom management strategy works really well with one group of learners and not another? Are you tired of a ‘’one-size fits all’’ approach to managing the lesson? The reality is that our learners all have different cognitive, social, emotional and motivational needs and implementing classroom management strategies for teens is very different to handling a class of toddlers. This workshop explores some of the differences between our learners and ways in which teachers can better match classroom management strategies to student needs. Eve Conway is a teacher and teacher trainer, currently working for the British Council Mexico City. She has worked in Spain, Vietnam and Mexico and her interests include teacher development, young learner methodology and teaching pronunciation. She is a teacher trainer on the Trinity College London moderated TYLEC (Teaching Young Learners Extension Certificate).

Teaching in the 21st century. Is it all about technology? Erika Lizarraga • Dante Segura

W » 21CS › LM&R » Doña Adelita

It is undeniable that teachers need to be prepared so as to face the challenges of teaching a generation of digital native learners, i.e. get familiar with the use of technology and integrate it as part of their teaching practice. But… What happens when it all fails? What are the basic skills that teachers still need to have in order to keep their students engaged and ensure that learning happens in a class? This talk will explore what areas teachers need to develop and analyse ideas about how to keep students busy in both a technology driven or non technology driven world. Erika Lizárraga holds a BA in English Literature from UNAM and in Teaching English from CENEVAL and a Dip RSA from Cambridge ESOL. She is a materials writer, a certified oral examiner, and a validated trainer from the University of London, to deliver CPD courses. She has given seminars in Mexico, Central, South America and Asia, and is currently working as an ICELT coordinator at the British Council. Dante Segura has been a teacher of English for 24 years. He is a teacher trainer, editor, translator and academic consultant, as well as an oral examiner for Cambridge English Assessment. He has trained teachers from all around Mexico, Central and South America and the Caribbean, and is currently working as a project coordinator and course tutor for the British Council.

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Kid’s Box Updated Second Edition Jose Luis De Paz

CP » LM&R » Don Julián

Well-loved by children and teachers the world over, Kid’s Box is bursting with bright ideas to inspire you and your pupils. Perfect for general use, the course also fully covers the syllabus of the Cambridge Young Learners English (YLE) tests, preparing your students better than ever for success at Starters, Movers and Flyers. Join us to find out what is new and get ready to be updated! José Luis de Paz is a full-time senior academic consultant at Cambridge English. He started as a primary teacher in 1990. He has delivered workshops and conferences at different national and international events. His main areas of interest are curriculum design, professional development and storytelling.

Social-Emotional Learning: What It Is and Why It Matters Christopher Bauer

W » 21CS › D&I » Doña Sol

What is Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) and how can it be applied to the EFL classroom via textbooks, online activities and group and team building? SEL is the process of learning social and emotional skills and it’s just as important as learning reading and math. Case studies show that social and emotional development can push student learning to its maximum potential by learning to use the five key classroom strategies to promote and reinforce positive social and emotional learning. We will work through some of those to develop a better understanding of how SEL makes that special “fit” in our classes. Chris Bauer is a free-lance consultant and teacher trainer who studied Business Administration at Our Lady of the Lake University and EFL at the ITESM. He is founder of Quality Teaching Language Advisors providing English courses in companies and consulting to private schools to develop ELT programs. He has worked extensively with the SEP in teacher training programs including TKT certification. He is also an ACT/SAT test prep instructor in the United States.

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Concurrent sessions F 15:45 – 16:45 Teachers’ and learners’ perceptions of EGLF for intercultural communication Gloria J. Ronzón Montiel

P » IC » Don Diego 1

This paper will present and discuss some of the findings about the perceptions of language teachers and learners on the notions of English as a global lingua franca (EGLF) for intercultural communication. The data was collected through different qualitative methods among teachers and learners of two basic mandatory language courses in a Mexican Higher Educational Institution as part of a PhD study. This presentation aims to raise teachers’ and learners’ awareness of the teaching and learning implications of an essentialist view of the notion of intercultural communication and a limited understanding of EGLF. Gloria Ronzón is about to finish a distance PhD at the U of Southampton, UK. Her research area is the development of ICC in ELT. She holds a BA in languages, and a MA in teaching Spanish as a foreign language. She is a language counselor at SAC-UV, Córdoba.

THE FLE-X FACTOR: Have You Got What It Takes? Maribel Rubio Chiu Raúl Alejandro Jiménez Rosales Marcela Nefertity Rodríguez Moreno

W » TT&D » Don Diego 2

According to our experience, the art of teaching involves three important aspects: language proficiency, didactics, and what we call the FLE-X factor. This workshop has been primarily designed for students who are in the process of becoming language teachers. We invite you to find out if you’ve got what it takes to be in front of a group through experiencing a little taste of drama and acting exercises and to reflect about the potential benefits that having the FLE-X factor may bring to your teaching practice. Maribel Rubio Chiu holds a BA in Language Teaching from the University of Colima and a MA from the University of Southampton. She teaches English and Literature. She is interested in drama in the English classroom and is in charge of the Artistic Club of the School of Languages. Raúl Alejandro Jiménez Rosales holds a BA in Language Teaching from the University of Colima. He teaches English in the School of Languages of the same University and is the Coordinator of a Program for Children of the same school. He is interested in teaching young learners. Marcela Nefertity Rodrìguez holds a BA in Language Teaching from the University of Colima and MA form the University of Santander in Teaching and Investigation. She teaches at the School of Languages of the University of Colima and is the Coordinator of a Program for Children of the same school.

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Real English, Real Learning Steve Lever

CP » 21CS › TT&D » Don Diego 3

Teachers are aware that their learners will soon move into the real world and what they learn before they leave can have a direct effect on their prospects. The shift from a knowledge based to a skills/competence based approach has gone a long way to merging classroom teaching with real-life needs – gradually being reflected in international exams. Learners still need to be taught linguistic, sociolinguistic and pragmatic awareness, but explored and re-enforced in context. We will be focus on the practicalities of how to teach so that learners are aware of the connection between language choices and effective communication. (See biodata on page 30)

Thine Own Self: learning about linguistic rights Melissa Ferrin

P » D&I › TT&D » Don Diego 4

In this talk we will look at UNESCO’s Universal Declaration on Linguistic Rights, especially at the points that specifically deal with education and language learning. By doing so, we can reflect on our practice and exercise our profession in a manner that up holds the human rights of others and teaches all our students to respect those rights. This way we can contribute to the creation of a future where cultural and linguistic diversity are cherished, and therefore be true to ourselves, inside and out of the classroom. Melissa Ferrin has lived and worked in the Mixtec and Papaloapan regions of Oaxaca for 19 years. She has taught EFL to all ages and is currently a Linguistic Rights Ambassador for Cepiadet, AC. She has a bachelor’s degree in Latin American Studies, TEFL certificate, and Post-Graduate Diploma in Educational Management.

Add me on Snapchat! - What!?! Snapchat stories in ELT? Omar Rugerio Pineda

P » LM&R › LT » Don Diego 5

Nowadays, students live a media-driven life in which they feel the need to use smartphones to communicate with their peers all day. Teachers should not perceive media as an enemy; on the contrary, they should perceive it as an ally as well as an advantage to teach more learner-centered classes in which students demonstrate their creativity and learn from it in a positive, motivating and engaging way. This presentation intends to share with attendees the experience of using Snapchat as a means to make tasks more communicative using TBL. Omar Rugerio is an ESL teacher and teacher trainer at Escuela Normal de Amecameca. He has studied English in Mexico (UAEM) and in the USA (NDMU); he holds a BA in TEFL (ENA) and is currently finishing ICELT; his areas of interest include teacher training and research.

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Fostering creativity and thinking skills Gabriela Suarez Melendez

CP » 21CS » Don Diego 6

Teaching children in a fun way, keeping them engaged and motivated is every teacher’s dream. In this session we will explore how to cater students’ different needs at the same time we help them develop their creativity and thinking skills. Join us to explore Thumbs Up! Second edition. In this journey we will combine engaging contents, language skills development, and the 21st Century Skills in one series. Experience being able to work with the 4Cs in a studentcentered classroom, to plan classes that deserve both thumbs up for meaningful language learning. (See biodata on page 54)

How Visual Literacy can enhance learning in the 21st Century Mei-li Sierra

P » 21CS » Don Américo

Visual literacy teaches a collection of competencies that will help students think through, think about and think with images. The purpose of Visual Literacy in the classroom is to enable students with an effective ability to interpret, recognize, appreciate and understand information presented through visual stimuli. In this presentation, teachers will become aware of the importance of how visual language should be an integrated part of teaching and learning literacy. Mei-li Sierra holds The In- Service Certificate In English Language Teaching among other certificates by Cambridge University. She has worked as an English Teacher and English coordinator for over 17. She is currently an Academic Consultant at Cambridge University Press giving seminars all over Mexico.

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Become a 21st Century creative teacher Enrique Barba

W » 21CS » Don Genaro

21st century skills such as the 4C’s, 3R’s, ICT’s, and others are essential to student and professional success. English being one of the key subjects in the 21st century places EFL teachers in a privileged position. Having the opportunity to teach other key subjects using English as a medium gives us a great opportunity. In this workshop, participants will put in to practice some of these skills to make them successful 21st century teachers. Enrique Barba Navarro has a degree in Teaching English as a foreign language. He has been at the Universidad Panamericana campus Guadalajara since 2003 and is currently an all level and ESP teacher. He finished the ICELT certification offered by the British Council at the ITESO.

YOU FIRST- Learning in the Here and Now Claudia Roca

CP » TT&D » Doña Socorro

Students often under-perform when teachers are too focused on outcomes or ignore the learner as a whole person. American Jetstream is a six-level adult course by Helbling, co-authored by Jeremy Harmer. Jetstream connects to the whole person, and moves your students in a state of flow. They achieve better learning through memory training and critical thinking, as well as developing emotional and cultural awareness. Students develop key skills for a wide range of international exams. (See biodata on page 13)

Teaching for Success: Promoting 21st Century Skills (Critical Thinking) Steve Aggrey

W » 21CS » Doña Adelita

Critical thinking refers to making reasoned judgements that are logical and well thought out and provides an important framework for teachers to use to develop students’ confidence in their capacity to learn and work independently and collaboratively.’ In this workshop we will look at ways of thinking that encourage students not to simply accept all arguments and conclusions they are exposed to but rather have an attitude involving questioning such arguments and conclusions. We will look at Bloom’s Taxonomy that can assist teachers in designing performance tasks, crafting questions for conferring with students, and providing feedback on student work. Steve Aggrey is a Teacher at the British Council in Mexico City. He has been in EFL for 3 years working as an adult and YL teacher. Steve has previous experience in Corporate Training and Development focused on employee personal and professional development.

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We Aren’t Just Teaching English Jennifer Collins

CP » 21CS › LM&R » Don Julián

Students need strategies to be lifelong readers and writers. Zaner-Bloser STRATEGIES FOR READERS and STRATEGIES FOR WRITERS offer K–6 students a process-based approach, 100 percent in-line with U.S. educational standards. The research-backed program teaches reading and writing through interpersonal and intercultural relationships. It also fosters 21st century skills that serve students in college and beyond. Learn how to build dynamic classes around engaging literature and informational texts, and learn how to transfer that enthusiasm to fun, step-by-step writing projects. Jennifer grew up hiking in the Pacific Northwest. She has 15 years’ experience editing and writing. She worked for news outlets in the United States and Cambodia and earned an Msc from Columbia University before transitioning to teaching. Now senior editor at University of Dayton Publishing, she still loves hiking.

Literature with a small I Barbara Taylor

W » IC » Doña Sol

Literature with a small l - a source of rich linguistic input and learner involvement and motivation. This workshop aims to encourage the use of literary texts as a resource for stimulating language activities. We will be looking at ten generative procedures for developing language activities for literary texts, from short storie, poems and plays to song lyrics. Participants will be actively invoved and will have the opportunity of experiencing some of the activities firsthand. Barbara Taylor, RSA Dip TEFLA, is currently a freelance Teacher, Teacher Trainer and Academic Consultant. She has been a Teacher, Teacher Trainer and Examiner for over 45 years. Her interests in the field lie in Teacher Development, Learner-centred instruction and Learning for the 21st Century. Her hobbies are cooking, window-box gardening and walking her dog.

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Aptis is the quick and afforable way to obtain the Mexican National Certification (CENNI) Aptis for Teachers Quickly and accurately determine the English proficiency levels of teachers and students working in educational contexts Whether you are testing teachers of English, maths or science, or students training to become teachers, Aptis for Teachers will quickly indicate how well your candidates can use the English skills that are important for everyday educational settings.

Aptis Advance

Is the latest addition to the British

Framework of Reference for Languages). Who is it for? Aptis Advanced is for organisations and levels of

What does Aptis Advanced do? The test has been designed specifically to meet the needs of younger language learners (13-17 years old), testing their skills through familiar topics and scenarios. Questions reflect activities that occur in a teenager’s everyday life This modern approach to testing allows not only to focus

the same inbuilt flexibility at its core - a tailored and relevant assessment result. Test takers are awarded an A if they are lower than B1 level.


Plenary session F 17:30 – 18:30 Don Alberto 1

Remote Teaching and the Future of ELT

Alison Devine Whether it’s teaching tens of thousands of Uruguayan

this be through high-end videoconferencing equipment and

primary school children via videoconferencing in association

fibreoptic lines or platforms such as Skype, Adobe Connect

with Plan Ceibal, delivering teacher training into Iraq from

or Zoom. Skilful use of the technology gives the remote

Argentina via Skype, supplementing online self-access

teacher real presence in the classroom, with both remote

courses for primary and secondary school teachers in Chile

teachers and students reporting effective interaction. Many

via Zoom, or working with companies to provide business

students find the flexible and innovative new technologies

English classes for groups of managers dispersed across

highly motivating.

different countries, remote teaching offers an ideal solution in situations where providing a face-to-face teacher or

In this session, we will share with you how the British Council

trainer is impossible, difficult, costly or dangerous - or simply

has been working with this new blended learning model,

when joining a lesson remotely offers a more convenient

which offers the potential to transform ELT in many parts of

alternative for busy people.

the world.

Remote teaching is essentially ‘virtual face-to-face teaching’, whereby lessons are delivered via videoconferencing, whether

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Alison is Director Remote Teaching and Regional English for Education Systems Lead, Americas, currently based in the Buenos Aires Remote Teaching Centre, the British Council’s global flagship hub for ‘virtual face to face’ teaching. Her 24 year career with the British Council, the UK’s international organisation for cultural relations and educational opportunities, has included postings in Japan, Malaysia, Greece, the United Arab Emirates, Taiwan and Brazil. Alison has a particular interest in education, having been awarded an MBE for her work in international education, and is currently focusing on increasing friendly knowledge and understanding between the UK and other countries through remote teaching. Alison is involved in several ‘virtual face to face’ teaching projects, including the teaching of English via videoconferencing into Uruguayan primary schools in partnership with Plan Ceibal, and remotely delivered ELT projects in Mexico and Chile. She holds academic and professional qualifications in ELT, marketing and business, including PGCE Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages, MA English as a Second/Foreign Language, the Chartered Institute of Marketing’s Professional Diploma in Marketing and an MBA. Outside of work, Alison enjoys learning new musical instruments, swimming, travelling, good views (particularly mountains and lakes), and learning about new cultures and different ways of thinking.

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Exhibitors ASOCIACIÓN MEXICANA DE MAESTROS DE INGLÉS, MEXTESOL Contact: Ulrich Schrader Email: uschrader@mextesol.org.mx

BODELI OSNAYA Contact: Miguel A. Osnaya Email: miguel@bodeli.com.mx

HELBLING Contact: Alejandra Bravo Parkman Email: abravo@helblingelt.com

HOUGHTON MIFFLIN HARCOURT Contact: Mónica Fuhrken Email: monica.fuhrken@hmhco.com

CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS

OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS MÉXICO SA DE CV

Contact: Leon Díaz Ortiz Email: ldiaz@cambridge.org

Contact: Lourdes Paez Email: lourdes.paez@oup.com

DELTI

PEARSON MEXICO

Contact: Gabriela Ballesteros del Olmo Email: gdelolmo@delti.com.mx

Contact: Mireya Uriarte Email: mireya.uriarte@pearson.com

EDITORIAL IZTACCIHUATL DE MONETRREY S.A. DE C.V. (EDIMSA)

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC LEARNING, A PART OF CENGAGE

Contact: Juan Carlos Guazano Medina Email: jguazano@edimsa.com.mx

Contact: Jenny G. Rodríguez Cuevas Email: jenny.rodriguez@cengage.com

EDITORIAL VICENS VIVES

RICHMOND PUBLISHING

Contact: Cynthia Berenice Rebollar Email: cvr@vicensvives.com.mx

Contact: Laura Pérez Aguilar Email: marketing@richmondelt.com

EMPRESER S.A. DE C.V.

TRILLAS

Contact: Ana Laura Martínez Email: alaura.martinez@empreser-elt.com

Contact: Rosario Barrera Email: lavigaprofesores@trillas.mx

PLANEACION Y DISTRIBUCION DE PUBLICACIONES ESPECIALIZADAS B.S. S.A. DE C.V.

UNIVERSITY OF DAYTON PUBLISHING

Contact: Veronica Villegas Guzman Email: avillegas@booksservices.co.uk

GESS MEXICO Contact: Claudia Valdes Email: cvaldes@ejkrause.com

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Contact: Elizabeth Álvarez Mar Email: nalvarez@ediciones-sm.com.mx

VIDEONET Contact: Yadir Ogarrio Tello Email: yogarrio@videonet.com.mx


Index by name Aggrey Steve ...................................................................................63 Albrechtsen Svendsen Helene .............................................. 21 Ávila Pardo Magdalena ..............................................................28 Baker Kieran ....................................................................................22 Barba Enrique .................................................................................63 Bauer Christopher ........................................................................58 Bawtinheimer Brad ....................................................................... 14 Beadle Kim .......................................................................................23 Beider Alys .......................................................................................32 Bilbrough Nick ........................................................................27, 50 Bradbury Milton .............................................................................48 Briggs-Fish Jenna ......................................................................... 13 Brown Sarah J. ................................................................................47 Castineira Teresa ........................................................................... 16 Ceballos Beatriz .............................................................................29 Chávez Nolasco Francisco Ricardo .....................................28 Collins Jennifer ...............................................................................64 Connolly David ...............................................................................20 Contijoch Escontria María del Carmen .............................56 Conway Eve .....................................................................................57 Conway Sarah .................................................................................49 Copland Fiona .................................................................................11 Creemers Edouard Francois Hubert ....................................56 Davila Iglesias Norma ..................................................................46 De Paz Jose Luis ...........................................................................58 Devine Alison ..................................................................................67 Díaz Heriberto Díaz........................................................................55 Dosal Maribel ..................................................................................55 Fash Sarah ........................................................................................ 12 Ferrin Melissa .................................................................................. 61 Flores Angélica ...............................................................................56 Fuhrken Mónica ..................................................................... 21, 46 Grounds Pat ..................................................................................... 16 Haines Philip ............................................................................23, 50 Hardy Emily ...................................................................................... 31 Harpalani Manoj ............................................................................. 15 Haupt Engeli ....................................................................................50 Hill Robert ......................................................................................... 31 Holmes Jane ....................................................................................28 Humm Soriano Dan.......................................................................30 Hunnings Lea ..................................................................................24 Jiménez Rosales Raúl Alejandro ............................................60

Jones Thom ..................................................................................... 19 Kiczkowiak Mareck ............................................................... 31, 45 Krause y Feria Estela María ...................................................... 21 Lansford Lewis ........................................................................22, 49 Lever Steve .............................................................................. 30, 61 Lizarraga Erika ................................................................................57 Meza Laura .......................................................................................54 Miller JoAnn .....................................................................................24 Moore Caroline ............................................................................... 16 Mundo Julio .....................................................................................30 Palmas Orelly ..................................................................................32 Partain John ....................................................................................20 Recke Adriana.................................................................................. 16 Robbins Lauren ..............................................................................49 Roca Claudia ........................................................................... 13, 63 Rodríguez Moreno Marcela Nefertity ..................................60 Romero Fernández Abelardo ................................................. 13 Ronzón Montiel Gloria J. ............................................................60 Ross Damian ....................................................................................53 Rubio Chiu Maribel .......................................................................60 Rugerio Pineda Omar................................................................... 61 Russell Jake ..................................................................................... 15 Sabugo Pamela .............................................................................. 14 Sagert Kathryn Laura Sagert.................................................... 12 Sánchez Liliana ...............................................................................48 Santana Dixie....................................................................................55 Schrader Ulrich ..............................................................................29 Segura Dante .................................................................................57 Seña y Verbo: Teatro de Sordos ............................................35 Sierra Mei-li ......................................................................................62 Sinclair Tracey ................................................................................22 Smith Gemma .................................................................................49 Starling Andrew John .................................................................. 15 Suarez Melendez Gabriela ................................................54, 62 Taylor Barbara ................................................................................64 Thummler Blum Renate M ................................................ 21, 56 Valero Rosalía .................................................................................23 Vallejo Martínez Bogar ...............................................................47 Van der Werff Joep ......................................................................20 Van Landeghem Koen ................................................................57 Varela Paloma Varela....................................................................30 Villegas Kiku ko .............................................................................. 14

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Acknowledgements The British Council would like to thank the following people and organizations for their contributions to the conference.

» Adriana L. Sánchez León (Conference manager)

» Iveth Pompa Ruiz (Conference support)

» Alejandro Excobar (Legal support)

» Jaime Rodriguez Olmos (Conference support)

» Ana Rosa Gutiérrez Orozco (Conference support)

» Jennifer Cosgrave (Conference support)

» Cecilia Ingelmo (Finance support)

» Jesús Cuevas (Registration)

» City Express Alameda (Accommodation)

» Jorge Kareh (Marketing & Communications)

» Dante Segura (Conference support)

» Julieta Jimenez (Conference support)

» Denise Valenzuela López (Conference support)

» Karina Villarreal Soriano (Conference support)

» Diana Cumpean (Conference support)

» Kim Beadle (Teaching for Success Academic

» Duplicate Asesores Gráficos (Printing services) » Erika Lizárraga Robles (BBELT 2017 Academic

Committee) » Fanny S. Alfredo (Design) » Felipe Montero (Finance support) » Francisco Rosas (Finance support) » Fundación Humanista de Ayuda a Discapacitados

– FHADI (Customer care) » Gabriela García (Conference Support) » Germán Sánchez (Registration) » Grupo Lahe (Registration) » Hilton Mexico City Reforma (Venue) » Hivisa Viajes (Travel Agency) » HSBC (Financial services) » Ignacio Estrella (Programming) » Imaquinando, S.A. de C.V. (Event production and

branding) » Irma Piña Silva (Conference support) » Insight Mobile (Conference App)

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Programme) » Laura Meza (BBELT 2017 Academic

Committee) » Liliana Padilla (Marketing & Communications) » Liliana Sánchez (BBELT 2017 Academic

Committee) » Mariana Nova (Marketing & Communications) » Maria Luisa Castanedo (Master of ceremony) » Multimex (Printing services) » Patricia E. Millán Arroyo (Conference support) » Pilar Aramayo Prudencio (Conference

Director) » Ricardo Gerrero (Marketing &

Communications) » Teresa Pichardo (Promotional products and

services) » Unión Impulsora de Hoteles (Accommodation) » Voluntary members of staff (Customer care) » Zaira Ríos (Finance support)


Customer Satisfaction Questionnaire BBELT 2017 We are constantly trying to improve the quality of the work we do and we place great importance on the views of the people we work with. Please help us to improve and develop our services further by completing this brief questionnaire. Your responses will be treated anonymously. Please tick one box to indicate the extent to which you agree or disagree with each of the following statements Strongly disagree

Neither agree nor disagree

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1. This event met my expectations. 2. Overall, this was a high quality event. 3. I have acquired new knowledge and/or skills from taking part in this event. 4. How likely is it that you would recommend the British Council to a friend or colleague? Circle one number where: 0 = Very unlikely to recommend; 10 = Very likely to recommend Very unlikely to recommend

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Very likely to recommend

Please circle one or more of the following answers: 5. What did you value most of BBELT 2017?

Plenary sessions

Concurrent sessions

Venue

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6. How did you learn about BBELT 2017?

Facebook

Twitter

Web page

Word of mouth

Videos of presentations

Materials and activities

Photos of the event

7. What would you like to find at the BBELT webpage? 8. Do you have any suggestions as to how we could improve similar events in the future?

Please turn over to the other side.

Other Please specify:

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We very much hope that you have gained personally and professionally from your contact with the British Council and we hope to remain in touch with you. Your feedback will help us to improve the services we provide in the future. Please complete your details below. How we use your information The British Council will treat all personal data in accordance with UK law and its own privacy policy. The British Council may wish to contact you for further feedback at a later date. Yes, I am happy to be contacted to provide more feedback. We may want to use your information to send you details of British Council activities, services and events (including social events) which may be of interest to you. Yes, I would like to be sent details of British Council activities, services and events.

Name Job title Organisation/Company/School Email address Contact telephone number Postal Address

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Signature

Raffle Nยบ Thank you very much! Under UK Data Protection law you have the right to ask for a copy of the information we hold on you, for which we may charge a fee, and the right to ask us to correct any inaccurate information. If you want more information about this please contact your local British Council office or the Data Protection Team dataprotection@britishcouncil.org. Or see our website http://www.britishcouncil.org/home-data-protection.htm

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Keynote British English

Through life-changing stories, respected thinkers and authentic presentations, Keynote promotes a deeper understanding of the world and gives student the courage and means to express themselves in English.

• • • • •

UTHENTIC LISTENING A 21st CENTURY SKILLS SYLLABUS REAL WORLD INSPIRATION THOUGH TED TALKS PRESENTATION SKILLS SYLLABUS CREATIVE THINKING /NGLEARNINGLA

A PART OF CENGAGE

For more information please visit ngl.cengage.com/keynote


Free BBELT 2017 app available

OUR MISSION WE SEEK TO CREATE MUTUAL UNDERSTANDING BETWEEN THE UNITED KINGDOM AND THE WORLD, THROUGH THE CONSTRUCTION OF RELATIONSHIPS WITH PEOPLE, INSTITUTIONS AND GOVERNMENTS.

ENGLISH We transform the teaching landscape and English language learning in Mexico through training programmes and certification of teaching competencies. We offer stimulating and rewarding English language teaching in order to help students reach their full potential.

EDUCATION AND SOCIETY We elevate the quality of education systems as well as stimulate academic, professional and institutional collaboration between Mexico and the United Kingdom. Similarly, we strengthen collaboration with the research community for the development of scientific and technological projects that result in a high social impact.

ARTS We seeks to contribute to enriching the country’s culture, generating bilateral conversations in matters of public policy, skills development, emerging talent promotion and diffusion of different artistic expressions as essential factors to strengthen the social fabric of each society.

BBELT 2017 The Truth About Teaching  

CONFERENCE PROGRAMME

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