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YOUR MONTHLY FIX OF

LOCAL LIFE

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A R T S & C U LT U R E EXHIBITIONS, THEATRE & FESTIVALS

COMPETITION WIN A LUXURY MINIBREAK!

FOOD & DRINK NEW OPENINGS, RECIPES & REVIEWS

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S I G N U P TO O U R W E E K LY D I G I TA L N E W S L E T T E R

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EDITORIAL

Editor in chief Nicola Foley 01223 499459 nicolafoley@bright-publishing.com Chief sub editor Beth Fletcher Senior sub editor Siobhan Godwood Sub editor Felicity Evans Junior sub editor Elisha Young

ADVERTISING

Group ad manager Sam Scott-Smith 01223 499457 samscott-smith@bright-publishing.com Senior sales executive Harriet Abbs 01223 499464 harrietabbs@bright-publishing.com Key accounts Chris Jacobs 01223499463 chrisjacobs@bright-publishing.com

CONTRIBUTORS

Alex Rushmer, Angelina Villa-Clarke, Cyrus Pundole, Charlotte Griffiths, Siobhan Godwood, Sue Bailey, Daisy Dickinson, Jordan Worland, Ruthie Collins, Anna Taylor, Charlotte Phillips

DESIGN & PRODUCTION Designer Lucy Woolcomb lucywoolcomb@bright-publishing.com Ad production Man-Wai Wong manwaiwong@bright-publishing.com

MANAGING DIRECTORS Andy Brogden & Matt Pluck

CAMBSEDITION .CO.UK FIND US @CAMBSEDITION CAMBRIDGE EDITION MAGAZINE Bright Publishing Ltd, Bright House, 82 High Street, Sawston, Cambridgeshire CB22 3HJ, 01223 499450, cambsedition.co.uk • All rights reserved. Material contained in this publication may not be reproduced, in whole or in part, without prior permission of the publishers. • Views expressed in this magazine are not necessarily those of Cambridge Edition or Bright Publishing Ltd, which do not accept any liability for loss or damage. • Every effort has been made to ensure all information is correct. • Cambridge Edition is a free publication that is distributed in Cambridge and the surrounding area.

This month’s cover illustration was created by Laura Bryant, senior designer at Bright Publishing

Author illustrations by Louisa Taylor louisataylorillustration.blogspot.co.uk

fter such a mixed bag over the last few months, it’s impossible to know whether we’ll be enjoying a balmy Indian summer or an autumnal chill this September, but whatever the weather, there’s plenty to keep you busy in Cambridge. The always-intriguing Open Cambridge returns to celebrate the city’s wonders, offering a chance to explore a nuclear bunker, an astronomy observatory, the imposing tower at the University Library and plenty more between 13 and 14 September: choose which of Cambridge’s nooks and crannies you’d like to discover on page 23. One Cambridge wonder I believe is always worth celebrating is Mill Road: a truly unique corner of the city that teems with fantastic indie cafes, pubs and shops. This lively street has had a bit of a tough time lately due to various closures, railworks, roadworks and a devastating fire at one of its oldest shops, but as we seek to highlight on page 70, there are more reasons than ever to pay a visit. There’s news of some tasty new openings in our food section, as Scottish craft brewery BrewDog finally opens the doors to its city-centre bar and Thai eatery Giggling Squid announces plans to take over the spot previously home to Jamie’s Italian – get the lowdown on page 45. We also meet the man behind Eric’s: the much-loved posh fish and chip shop, which has recently opened the doors to its third branch in St Ives. Find out how he and his team plan to bring a bucketful of seaside charm to the whole of East Anglia over on page 40. Another local business with big dreams, Anna’s Flower Farm in Audley End is in the spotlight on page 61, while flowers are also the focus of this month’s recipe: a sunflower pesto that utilises the plant’s petals to delicious effect. Also inside, we explore the Ely house that was once home to Oliver Cromwell (page 24), show you how you can win a luxurious minibreak on the north Norfolk coast (page 27) and, as always, highlight the best theatre, gigs and festivals to seek out. Enjoy the issue and see you next month!

Nicola Foley EDITOR IN CHIEF

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6 ● STARTERS Top things to do and see in the city, plus our favourite social media pics

11 ● ARTS & CULTURE Exhibitions, concerts and theatre highlights to enjoy in September

19 ● ART INSIDER Ruthie Collins, founder of Cambridge Art Salon, shares her arty picks of the month

20 ● BOOK CLUB A coming-of-age story to curl up with this September: David Nicholl’s Sweet Sorrow

23 ● OPEN CAMBRIDGE Explore the city’s hidden gems with tours, talks, open days and more

24 ● HISTORIC HOME We take a look around the house in Ely that once belonged to Oliver Cromwell

27 ● WIN A MINIBREAK! Win a weekend away on the north Norfolk coast and stay at the stunning White House hotel

40 ● CATCH OF THE DAY

28 ● AFTER HOURS

Edition meets the man behind cult fish and chip shop Eric’s

Anna Taylor shows us around her gorgeous Audley End-based flower farm

Comedy, gigs, festivals and more nightlife fun this month

45 ● FOOD NEWS

68 ● INDIE OF THE MONTH

31 ● LISTINGS

All the latest news and gossip from the Cambridge food and drink scene

In the spotlight this month, Fratelli Hair on Mill Road

Our at-a-glance guide to the top events and goings-on this September

48 ● REVIEW

70 ● MILL ROAD SPOTLIGHT

36 ● COMMUNITY HUB

We sample the Sunday roast at Provenance Kitchen’s Brix & Mortar restaurant in Whittlesford

Reasons to love this vibrant street, from great cafes to the beautiful new mosque

Community events, charity news and more, from your local hub

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61 ● FLOWER FARM

51 ● CHEF’S TABLE

78 ● BEAUTY

Chef Alex Rushmer on what’s cooking in his kitchen this month

Daisy Dickinson rounds up the beauty products on her radar this month

52 ● RECIPE

81 ● WEDDINGS

A uniquely British take on pesto, featuring sunflowers

Your guide to throwing the ultimate Cambridge wedding

54 ● CAMBS ON A PLATE

93 ● EDUCATION SPECIAL

Dr Sue Bailey dives into local food history, making some intriguing discoveries

Experts advise on choosing the right school for your kids, plus a look at the area’s adult learning

57 ● FESTIVE FUN

115 ● HOME EDITION

Top spots for Christmas parties, including an intriguing Prohibition-themed pop-up

Garden tips, interiors inspiration and the home products we love

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STA RT E R S

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O U R FAVO U R I T E C A M B R I D G E I N S TAG R A M P I C S O F T H E M O N T H . H A S H TAG # I N S TAC A M B F O R A C H A N C E TO F E AT U R E ! FOLLOW @CAMBSEDITION ON INSTAGRAM FOR MORE GREAT PICS OF CAMBRIDGE

RETRO HEAVEN

VINTAGE FURNITURE FLEA Pick up a pre-loved treasure for your home at Cambridge Vintage Furniture Flea, taking place on 21 September at St Barnabas Church on Mill Road. Voted Best Fair by The Vintage Guide to London, this day-long market offers all kinds of homewares, including furniture, record players, ceramics, lighting and barware. With a focus on quality and affordability, the event offers a celebration of mid-century style from the 50s onwards, with a range of top vintage traders from across the UK, plus a specially curated local contingent. From Ercol tables and chairs to toys, telephones and cameras, there’s sure to be something to delight shoppers with a love of retro style. It’s £2 entry from 11.30am, or you can bag early-bird access for £3 if you want first dibs on the bargains. judysvintagefair.co.uk

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STA RT E R S

DON’T MISS!

DR AG ON BOAT FE S TIVAL Cambridge Dragon Boat Festival returns on 7 September for a day of action on the river and bankside fun. Taking place on a stretch of the Cam at Fen Ditton, the festival sees clubs, companies and groups of friends battling it out in traditional Chinese-style dragon boats, while there’s entertainment, food trucks and a bar to enjoy for spectators. It’s all in aid of a great cause, too, raising tens of thousands of pounds each year for Addenbrooke’s Charitable Trust. dragonboatfestivals.co.uk

GREEN DREAMS SEPTEMBER ESSENTIAL

CAMB R IDGE E CO HOM E S

MILTON COUNTRY PARK FESTIVAL Get out and about in the great outdoors with your family when Milton Country Park welcomes back its annual Autumn Festival on Sunday 22 September, featuring food, live music and plenty of outdoor adventures in this beautiful green space. Running from 10.30am until 5pm, the event celebrates local creatives, groups and community projects with an emphasis on family fun. Up-andcoming local bands will take to the stage, plus favourites like ska outfit Big 10 feature as headliners. There will also be street food, real ales, a miniature steam train, woodland craft workshops and hay play. Active types can get stuck into canoe and paddleboard safaris, while those who prefer to relax can enjoy a hot drink and cake in the vintage tea tent.

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Need ideas to make your home more environmentally friendly? Check out Open Eco Homes, 22 and 28 September, which has helped hundreds of Cambridge families make their homes greener over the last decade. Get inspired with tours of some of the city’s most beautiful low-energy homes, and peek through the keyholes of renovated and new properties with a chance to chat to people who made them. There are also talks and workshops to coincide with the event; visit openecohomes.org for information.

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T H E AT R E • A RT E X H I B I T I O N S • CO N C E RTS • B O O K C L U B

‘EN PLEINE FORME’ BY SOPHIE VERGER, appears in Byard Art’s Exhibition of Sculpture, 5-29 September. Find out more on page 17.

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© KETTLE’S YARD, UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE, 2019. PHOTO BY STEPHEN WHITE

J E NN I F ER L E E : T H E POTTE R’S S PAC E Kettle’s Yard is currently hosting the first solo exhibition of renowned ceramicist Jennifer Lee in the UK since 1994, featuring 40 works spanning her career, and including a number of new works made especially for Kettle’s Yard. Described by Edmund de Waal as “the embodiment of place, complex and intrigue”, Lee’s pots focus on the interaction between materials and elements, evoking ideas of time, place and process in a way that feels both ancient and contemporary. Lee is from Aberdeenshire and studied at Edinburgh College of Art. Her pots are hand-built, unglazed stoneware, with smooth surfaces and rich colours. The root of Lee’s process lies in the earliest forms of vessel making and her pots are coloured by introducing raw metal oxides into the clay. The oxides react when the pots are fired to achieve the distinctive effects that are typical in her work. The exhibition is running until 22 September. kettlesyard.co.uk

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DINO B IRD S AT MU SE UM OF ZOOLOG Y Birds are not only reptiles, they are living dinosaurs, too! They feature as part of the biggest permanent addition to the Museum of Zoology displays since it reopened last year. Visitors may not expect to chance upon a chicken among the reptiles in the new displays, but the museum is highlighting that birds are a specialised group of reptiles, having evolved from small velociraptor-like dinosaurs 150 million years ago. The idea that birds are living dinosaurs has been proved after the discovery of countless feathered dinosaur fossils. Still need convincing? Well, did you know that crocodiles are more closely related to birds than they are to lizards, snakes and turtles? “Museums still tend to separate birds from reptiles in their galleries”, says the museum’s director, professor Paul Brakefield. “We want to create a trend for making the relationship between birds and other reptiles much clearer.” Included in the new displays is a reproduction of the fossil vertebra of the largest known snake to have ever lived, the brilliantly named Titanoboa. The huge reptile case exhibits snakes, lizards, crocodiles, dinosaurs and the extinct flying and swimming reptiles that lived alongside them, plus explaining where birds fit in. Another new display features turtles, from the extinct horned giant tortoise Ninjemys (yes, tortoises are, technically, turtles) to tiny terrapins. Perching birds, a group containing more than half of all living birds, have their own new display, featuring finches, crows and thrushes, as well as the birds-of-paradise group from Australasia, famous for their elaborate dances to attract a mate. The museum is open seven days a week and is free to explore. museum.zoo.cam.ac.uk

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N EW S E A SON AT ARTS TH EATR E From gripping thrillers to witty comedies; beautiful ballets to star-studded dramas, the new season at Cambridge Arts Theatre is brimming with first-class entertainment. In time-honoured style, the season will be rounded off with a glittering panto, running from late November until early January. This year’s all-singing, alldancing show is Cinderella, starring ballet dancer Wayne Sleep as an Ugly Sister, plus Cambridge’s legendary panto dame, Matt Crosby. Another must-see for families is Malory Towers, an adaptation of Enid Blyton’s classic boarding school-based series of books. Midnight feasts, Cornish clifftops, live music and breathtaking animation await on this adventure with Darrell, Mary Lou and the rest of the gang between 4 and 7 September. Things take a turn for the sinister when The Girl on the Train comes to town from 23 to 28 September. Based on Paula Hawkins’ successful novel, the play follows heavy drinker Rachel, who longs for a different life. Her only escape is on her commute, when she watches a happily-in-love couple as her train passes their house. But when one half of the couple disappears, it becomes apparent that all is not as it seems, and dark secrets are waiting to be unearthed... Also bringing a chill to the Cambridge air later in the year is The Lovely Bones: a heartrending story of life after loss which runs 4 to 9 November. An adaptation of Alice Sebold’s novel that Stage Review describes as “nothing short of a masterpiece”, the show follows the brutally murdered Susie Salmon in her afterlife, as she watches over her family. Fancy something a little lighter? Join comedian and actor Miles Jupp for The Life I Lead, a funny, moving portrayal of David Tomlinson’s fascinating life story. A World War II fighter pilot who went on to famous roles such as Mr Banks in Mary Poppins, Tomlinson’s real life is every bit as extraordinary as the parts he played. Catch the show from 10 to 14 September. Also promising laughs is Posh, which follows the debauchery of an exclusive Oxford Uni dining society with echoes of the Bullingdon Club. First performed in 2010, Posh’s harpooning of privilege and entitlement has never felt more relevant. There’s dance, too, courtesy of captivating all-male dance troupe BalletBoyz (15 to 16 November), plus live music from vocalist Clare Teal and her ‘Big Mini Big Band’ (3 November). The Cambridge Greek Play returns for its triennial outing from 16 to 19 October, this time with epic tragedy Oedipus at Colonus by Sophocles. Performed entirely in Ancient Greek, this Cambridge University tradition dates back to 1882, and counts Rupert Brooke and Tom Hiddleston among its alumni. cambridgeartstheatre.com

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CAMBRIDGE MUSIC FESTIVAL Justin Lee, director of Cambridge Music Festival, is concerned by research that suggests people under 30 going to a classical concert for the first time feel unsure about the reserved nature of the audience, and how to behave. He’s on a mission to change all that, and is keen for his festival to appeal to as broad a range of listeners and audiences as possible, shaking up traditional preconceptions of what a classical music concert looks like. “If someone wanted to see classical music in Cambridge done differently, I wouldn’t really know where to point them,” he explains. “One thing we’re trying to ask with the festival is, ‘does it have to be that way?’” Justin points to the group of people aged 30 or under who are streaming classical music – up 42% last year – and listening to it via the radio. But just 7% of audiences are in this age group. He suggests part of the problem is that concerts often feel conventional, in programming and presentation. Among his highlights for Cambridge Music Festival, which runs 6-14 November at venues across the city, is saxophonist Amy Dickson’s performance of Philip Glass music for the violin, using circular breathing. “On a violin, it’s possible to create the continuous figures that Glass wrote. On a saxophone, you’ve got to breathe. She’s playing a wind instrument and breathing in at the same time, which is pretty amazing,” he says.

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Catch that on 7 November at Emmanuel United Reformed Church, and at the same venue on the 14th Trio Manouche, inspired by the Parisian swing of the Hot Club, play the music of Django Reinhardt, arrangements of swing icons like Nat King Cole and their own material. “This should be more like a pop concert than a classical performance,” Justin says. “It’s really vibrant, feel-good music, with banjo, violin and accordion.” Leading experimental pianist Zubin Kanga plays the Mumford Theatre on 13 November. He focuses on new technologies, including film, AI, motion capture, animation and virtual reality. “What Zubin Kanga does simply doesn’t conform to most people’s notions of classical music. Most probably aren’t even aware that it’s being done,” says Justin. The Choir of King’s College and the Academy of Ancient Music join forces at the college chapel on the 6th – the opening day of the festival – to perform Handel’s Coronation Anthems. “These anthems were performed at King George II’s coronation in 1727 and were an immediate hit. The most famous, Zadok the Priest, has been performed at every British coronation since – not to mention being the inspiration behind the Champions League football anthem. This will tingle the spine and lift the spirits.” cambridgemusicfestival.co.uk

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A AM CONC E RTS Rising young soprano Rowan Pierce joins the Academy of Ancient Music for two sacred cantatas in AAM’s latest performance in Cambridge, Rejoice!, at West Road Concert Hall on 22 October. Handel’s Gloria was only rediscovered in 2001, and showcases soprano voice in a series of dazzling movements. Bach’s Jachzet Gott in allen Landen pairs solo soprano with trumpet, played by AAM’s principal trumpeter David Blackadder. Also featured is Let the Bright Seraphim from Handel’s Samson. Earlier next month, the Cambridgebased orchestra begins its Beethoven 250th anniversary celebrations with his complete incidental music for Goethe’s play Egmont, alongside the modern premiere of the Mass by Dussek at The Barbican, in London, on the 2nd. Violinist Viktoria Mullova joins forces with AAM’s director and harpsichord virtuoso Richard Egarr for works by Haydn, JS and CPE Bach at The Apex in Bury St Edmunds on 18 November. aam.co.uk

LON D ON AFRIC AN GOSP E L C HOI R Enjoy the irresistible sounds of Paul Simon’s Graceland brought to life this month by the London African Gospel Choir, who’ll be performing the album in full at the Corn Exchange on 21 September. It’s the second time this show, which includes renditions of songs such as You Can Call Me Al and Diamonds on the Soles of Her Shoes, has come to Cambridge, after enjoying a lively outing at the Junction last winter. Tickets are £28. cambridgelive.org.uk S E P T E M B E R 2 019

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SCULPTURE AT BYARD ART King’s Parade gallery Byard Art’s latest exhibition focuses on sculpture. From Sophie Verger’s studies of animals in bronze, including elephants, camels and hippos, to Wendy Freestone’s contemplative groupings of people, also in bronze, there’s something for everyone.

Sophie Verger, born in Paris, has exhibited in the French capital, Germany and the Netherlands. Since focusing on shields in the late nineties, she now draws inspiration from wildlife. Wendy Freestone’s work, meanwhile, explores themes of family, home, memory, moments and observation.

Although her current work is on a small scale, in the past she has created lifesized bronze figures. If you do decide to buy something, purchases can be spread out through the Own Art scheme. The exhibition runs from 5 to 29 September. byardart.co.uk

CHITTY CHITTY BANG BANG The magical musical full of catchy songs, tall tales, a high-flying car and scares (child catcher anyone?) comes to the ADC Theatre from 18 to 28 September. Theatre company Pied Pipers is delighted to be one of a few select groups chosen to produce the musical, 50 years on since the release of the hugely popular film. Starring Dick Van Dyke, co-written for the screen by Roald Dahl, and based on Ian Fleming’s 1964 novel, it’s become an all-time classic, with Fleming’s original inspiration coming from racing cars built in the 1920s, which were informally known as Chitty Bang Bang. Be prepared to drive, sail and fly from an authentic post-war Britain to a fantastical land, as Caractacus Potts tries to free his children with the help of Truly Scrumptious. As Grandpa Potts says, “never say no to adventures”. Tickets start at £9, no performance on the 23rd and matinees available on September 21, 22, and 28. adctheatre.com

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RUTHIE COLLINS, FOUNDER OF CAMBRIDGE ART SALON, GIVES HER ARTY PICKS OF THE MONTH t may be September, but it’s not too late to indulge in the last of the summer shows in the city. Those fascinated by the animal world will love Evolution as Inspiration at the Museum of Zoology, opened by David Attenborough earlier this summer, which features works by one of the world’s leading naturalists, Jonathan Kingdon. The exhibition, developed in partnership with Cambridge Conservation Initiative (CCI), runs until 15 September and is a bright, bold insight into what Attenborough describes as the ‘profound questions’ of how animals work. “Artists play a crucial role in exploring, understanding and communicating the conservation of nature,” commented CCI’s John Fanshawe, co-curator of the show. “CCI’s crosscutting arts, science and conservation programme works with a growing range of artists through exhibitions, events and residencies to celebrate our cultural connections and interdependencies on biodiversity.” The Museum of Zoology is a creative hub of inspiration when it comes to accessing conservation in the city, and is also one of the most family-friendly museums in Cambridge: perfect to take children to, with plenty of resources and well-trained guides to keep them informed and entertained. You can also still catch Jennifer Lee: the potter’s space at Kettle’s Yard this month, which runs until 22 September.

It’s the first solo exhibition of the renowned ceramicist’s work in a UK public gallery since 1994, and it shows 40 works spanning her entire career, as well as new pieces made for the exhibition at Kettle’s Yard. You can also see a selection of objects chosen by Jennifer Lee at the Fitzwilliam Museum to accompany this show – also until the 22nd. Jennifer Lee won the LOEWE Craft Prize in 2018 and was described by Edmund de Waal as “the embodiment of place, complex and intriguing”. So, if you’ve never considered the way a humble pot can impact the space around it – go visit. Also this month at the house at Kettle’s Yard is a final chance to catch Geometria, a new body of work by AnnMarie James, made in response to Barbara Hepworth’s sculpture, Group of Three Magical Stones (1973). Hepworth’s own sculpture is hauntingly beautiful, with James’ work a metamorphic response that includes paintings, prints and a quilt, a fascinating artistic interpretation of works lifted from art history. There are plenty of new exhibitions opening this month, too. Notably, on 9 September at New Hall Art Collection, what looks like a fascinating offering from photographer Anne-Katrin Purkiss entitled Creative Connections: Portraits of Women Scientists and Artists. Women in science have been photographed and invited to nominate an artwork from the collection, to help explore the connectivity between art and science. Purkiss herself

“The Museum of Zoology is one of the most family-friendly museums in Cambridge” CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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has work in the National Portrait Gallery, and her photography has appeared in The Guardian, The New York Times and Nature – she looks set to highlight a fascinating interplay between gender, science and art in this show. Finally, STRAY – a collective of Cambridge-based artists whose aim it is to create work that transcends the predictable and ‘strays away’ from safe but staid Cambridge boundaries – open their latest show on 13 September in Norwich’s Undercroft art space. Cambridge’s favourite artists have work in the show, including Deanna Tyson, Sue Law, Rosemary Catling and Judy Logan, joined by guests such as Susie Olczak and Cheryl Warren. Highlights include a kimono catwalk show on 21 September from textile artist Deanna Tyson, whose use of textiles as punchy political commentary is often bold, outspoken and bitingly incisive – what she calls “Kimono With Attitude.” “Many of my kimono are created from a feeling of anger or even despair. I feel a kimono coming on when something bothers me,” Tyson explains. “I paint, stitch and appliqué my narratives, exploiting the movement and freedom that this 3D form allows, whilst layering the kimono as a storyteller layers themes or a painter, paint. My work always begins with the concept, and I ruminate, sometimes for weeks, sometimes months, sometimes even for years, until I can see in my mind’s eye a way forward.” “The range of work planned is both dynamic and fully engaging”, says guest curator of the show, Sue Law. “Artists featured include specialists in sculpture, textile art, painting and public interactive artworks – it really will be visually spectacular and lots of fun.”

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BOOK CLUB C AMBRIDGE ED IT ION

BRINGING YOU TOP NEW FICTION PICKS, AUTHOR INTERVIEWS, DISCOUNTS AND LOTS MORE BOOK CHAT, THE EDITION BOOK CLUB IS A PARTNERSHIP WITH CAMBRIDGE LITERARY FESTIVAL AND HEFFERS WORDS BY CHARLOT TE GRIFFITHS

SWEET SORROW BY DAVID NICHOLLS FUNNY, MOVING AND NOSTALGIC, THIS COMING-OFAGE NOVEL PERFECTLY CAPTURES THE AGONY AND EXHILARATION OF FIRST LOVE AND THE CONFUSION OF THE TEEN YEARS new David Nicholls book,” says the press release, “is a major publishing event” – and they don’t just mean logistics. The internationally bestselling author’s books are adored by readers and critics alike: his third novel, One Day, was published ten years ago and won the 2010 Galaxy Book Of The Year Award: Us, his fourth book, was longlisted for the Booker. David’s very human and very humorous style both breaks your heart and gives you hope, and his experience and talent for screenwriting means it’s all too easy to visualise the events of his stories as the narratives unfold. In short, they’re unmissable – and Sweet Sorrow, his newest creation, is no exception. Though part of the appeal of David Nicholls’ books is that certain emotions, feelings and challenges are universal experiences – such as first love, and growing up – for anyone who came of age in the 90s, Sweet Sorrow is a double dose of soft, sun-soaked nostalgia. Set in June 1997, the summer after the main character Charlie Lewis has taken his GCSEs, this poignant book charts that uncertain time when there’s no more revision to do and everything is changing – and not necessarily for the better. At home Charlie is effectively caring for his father, who is battling his own demons around his broken marriage and loss of purpose, and the future holds a great deal of uncertainty. But then one day

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BOOK CLUB

L UC Y CAVE N DIS H F ICTION P RIZE OP E N S FOR EN TRIE S September isn’t just about new pencil cases: it also marks the start of Cambridge’s unique literary prize’s annual call for entries. Run by the college of the same name and open to women over 21 years of age, the Lucy Cavendish Fiction Prize seeks unpublished novels that marry “literary merit with unputdownability” and asks for the first 40 to 50 pages of the tale, plus a synopsis of the remainder. Past success stories include Gail Honeyman’s Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine, which first appeared on the Fiction Prize shortlist back in 2014. Other shortlisted authors have enjoyed similar glories: Frances Maynard’s The Seven Imperfect Rules of Elvira Carr and Laura Marshall’s Friend Request to name two – and a splendid way to spend an evening is by nosing through past entries to the longlist. Grab a cup of tea and head to the Lucy Cavendish website to get started. With the prize gaining interest and prestige with every year, it’s worth keeping an eye on their longlisted and shortlisted writers, whether you’re an aspiring author or simply a keen reader – if only to get ahead on the next crop of talented female writers. If you’re considering making a submission, you’ve got until January 2020 to enter your work – best get that room of one’s own sorted sooner rather than later...

Charlie meets a young woman called Fran Fisher, and his world shifts on its axis. Fran’s insight, new way of looking at the world and generosity of spirit changes everything for Charlie. “This summer’s a bastard, isn’t it?” Fran says at one point. “Sun comes out, sky’s blue if you’re lucky and suddenly there are all these preconceived ideas about what you should be doing, lying on a beach or jumping off a rope swing into the river or having a picnic with all your amazing mates, sitting on a blanket in a meadow and eating strawberries and laughing in that mad way, like in the adverts. It’s never like that, it’s just six

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“Summer’s so sad, because you’re meant to be so happy” weeks of feeling like you’re in the wrong place with the wrong people and you’re missing out. That’s why summer’s so sad – because you’re meant to be so happy…. And it just goes on and on and on, doesn’t it? Infinite, and never how you want it to be.” Named for a line from Shakespeare’s Romeo & Juliet, and with mood and tone summed up perfectly by the 1994 Pulp song David’s Last Summer (a song that’s specifically named in the acknowledgements as a source of inspiration), Sweet Sorrow is an utter treat of a book. Some paragraphs will make you burst out in uncontrollable laughter: some

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will make you catch your breath at the pain and hurt so perfectly expressed. It feels far too flimsy to simply recommend Sweet Sorrow as a summer read – though it is, of course, the perfect book to be devoured on sunny afternoons or while lounging by a pool – but it would also make a superb diversion from the chill of winter, as it’s so beautifully evocative of those long, balmy halcyon summers that everyone remembers from their youth. Get hold of a copy however you can and join the multi-millions of readers who have a special place in their hearts – and on their shelves – for David Nicholls’ novels.

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A RTS & C U LT U R E

WHETHER YOU’RE A RESIDENT OR A VISITOR, OPEN CAMBRIDGE OFFERS THE CHANCE TO DISCOVER NEW CORNERS OF THE CITY iscover the city’s hidden nooks and crannies at Open Cambridge, which returns for a 12th year this September. With more than 80 events, it’s a chance to see treasures which are normally off-limits to the public, including art, architecture and exquisite gardens, plus hear stories about our city’s heritage and fascinating residents, from Viking invaders to spies and scientists. “The Open Cambridge weekend offers a fantastic opportunity to celebrate the city and enjoy its distinctiveness; the ancient Colleges, the picturesque ‘backs’ and the incredible architecture, old and new, all combine to create a place we feel lucky to live in,” says Open Cambridge coordinator Sue Long. “It’s always been an extraordinary city and we hope this year’s Open Cambridge showcases all those big and little wonders.” For wining and dining in a jawdropping setting, check out the annual Open Cambridge dinner, taking place in the historic splendour of the Corpus Christi dining room. A three-course feast featuring a special guest speaker, it promises to begin the weekend in style on Friday 13 September. Sure to be popular are the free tours that bring the rich history of the city to

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life, with tales of famous names, fantastic achievements and infamous student pranks. Literature lovers can explore the University Library to learn how the team there takes care of eight million books, and take a peek at the Victorian and Edwardian collections housed in the building’s imposing tower. There’s a chance to see the stacks at Queens’ College Old Library, which holds 30,000 volumes, many annotated by generations of Queens’ scholars, and the 17th century St John’s College Old Library, which houses collections spanning over 1,000 years. Then join in with the Literary Cambridge tour to discover some of the many novelists, poets and playwrights connected with the city. The Observatory at the Institute of Astronomy on Madingley Road will open its doors to guide visitors around marvels which include the great Northumberland and Thorowgood telescopes, and the neoclassical Observatory building itself, which dates back to 1823 and houses one of very few specialist astronomical libraries in the country. There’s also an opportunity to venture down into the city’s – thankfully never needed – nuclear bunker, located at the County Council’s office buildings.

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If you love a stroll around a beautiful garden, you’re spoiled for choice, with many colleges opening the gates to their manicured grounds. Admire the Victorian borders at Selwyn, the roses at Wolfson, and the cures, curiosities, tastes and essences at Madingley Hall’s Medicinal Garden – they’ll be hosting a lunchtime BBQ once you’ve worked up an appetite. There’s art, too, courtesy of a tour of New Hall’s impressive collection; the largest accumulation of works by female artists in the whole of Europe, and science, at the Biomedical Campus, where you can join a tour around this world-leading centre of academia, research and health. Cambridge’s new Eddington neighbourhood will be laying on a whole day of fun, offering talks, tours, live music, food and entertainment on the 14th. With samba bands, street food and a spotlight on sustainability, it’s a perfect opportunity to visit this fascinating new suburb. Open Cambridge 2019 runs 13-14 September. Visit opencambridge. cam.ac.uk for more info.

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O L I V E R C RO M W E L L

Inside Oliver Cromwell’s House STEP BACK IN TIME TO THE ENGLISH CIVIL WAR AND MAKE UP YOUR OWN MIND ABOUT WHETHER THE LORD PROTECTOR WAS A HERO OR A VILLAIN WORDS BY NICOLA FOLEY

reasonous traitor? Murderous tyrant? Or champion of social justice and democracy? Oliver Cromwell is one of the most divisive characters in British history – a man whose name continues to inspire heated debate more than 350 years after his death. Whichever side of the fence you stand on, there’s no denying the fact that Cromwell’s time in politics was one of the most remarkable our country has ever seen. After the execution of King Charles I in 1649 signalled an end to the civil war, the monarchy was overthrown and the country left kingless, but Cromwell refused to take the crown, instead choosing the title of Lord Protector. A short-lived period of republican rule ensued (the “Commonwealth of England”,

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undergirded by the iron fist of Cromwell’s New Model Army), until the restoration of the royals came in 1660 when Charles II took the throne. To this day, it’s the only time in English history that the country has been without a monarch; a period that had far-reaching implications for notions of parliamentary sovereignty and the influence of the monarchy. The question of whether the former Lord Protector was a hero or a villain is asked at the Oliver Cromwell’s House attraction in Ely, where Cromwell lived with his family between 1636 and 1646. “Visitors get a chance to make their own decision after they’ve been round the house,” explains Aileen Sharp, Ely’s Tourism Development Officer. “We ask

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O L I V E R C RO M W E L L

them to vote by placing a musket ball into the barrel of a rifle, and each month we count the votes. Overall the results are always in favour of him being a hero!” After a refurbishment in spring, the house offers visitors the chance to get a glimpse into the home and domestic life of Cromwell, exploring recreated rooms, as well as making your way through an exhibition that tells the story of the civil war. The house is comprised of eight rooms, including a decidedly creepy ‘haunted bedroom’, and visitors can see food typical of the time in Mrs Cromwell’s kitchen, try on clothes from the period and play with toys from the era, offering a vivid snapshot of 17th-century life. Audio handsets bring the story of the house to life, or, new for 2019 is ‘The Cromwell Quest’, an augmented reality trail on which families search the nooks and crannies of the house for seven lost coins from the civil war, solving riddles to help them along their way. If you fancy getting even more immersive, there’s also an interactive escape room experience, based on the heritage of the building and Cromwell’s life. These atmospheric challenges plant visitors in the former Tithe Office, an

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“The house offers a glimpse into the life of Cromwell” original 17th-century, oak panelled room where Cromwell once sat and counted taxes. “Groups of up to eight people have to work together to find clues and solve puzzles in under 60 minutes. You’re working against the clock, but if you get stuck, the puzzle master can give you clues to help you along the way if you need them,” says Aileen. “It’s perfect for family and friends to get together to celebrate a special occasion, or for corporate parties to have some interactive fun.” If you like being spooked, meanwhile, you can join in with a murder mystery night in this historic building – a unique dining experience where guests are

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encouraged to embrace their inner thespians. Attired in 17th-century garb, guests mingle and enjoy drinks in the parlour before sitting down to dinner in Oliver Cromwell’s kitchen. “While everybody’s eating their food, the maid comes through and informs them that there’s been a murder and that everyone is a suspect – and then the mystery begins,” laughs Aileen. There’s also the chance to experience an autumn harvest feast on 2 October, when you can hear all about and try Mrs Cromwell’s favourite recipes, as well as learning about how preserves were made for the year ahead. Events are rounded off with the Festival Feast in December, which gives guests the chance to enjoy a Christmas as it was during the time of the Commonwealth. Traditional festivities were banned during this tumultuous time, and so people had to celebrate behind closed doors – don’t worry though, they still loved a good mince pie. So why not go along and hear about the life and times of this towering figure in British history? From Fenland farmer to king in all but name, Oliver Cromwell’s story remains as fascinating as ever. You might even discover a relevance to modern-day politics you’d never imagined, as Aileen explains: “In the political climate we’ve got currently, with Brexit and everything that’s going on in parliament, it has been compared to Cromwell’s times!” olivercromwellshouse.co.uk

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CO M P E T I T I O N

WIN A STAY AT THE WHITE HOUSE We’re giving away a luxurious two-night stay at this stunning north Norfolk hotel

W O RT H

£300

his month, Cambridge Edition has teamed up with the gorgeous White House to give away a luxurious escape to the heart of the north Norfolk countryside. Nestled in a valley between Brancaster Beach and Burnham Market, this unique hotel is a secluded gem within easy reach of beautiful coastal scenery, fabulous dining destinations and great shopping. Offering a five-star B&B experience, visitors can enjoy a thoughtfully stocked

honesty bar and chef-prepared breakfasts, with all the comfort and style of a luxury hotel, but none of the fuss. There are 12 individually designed bedrooms inside, each equipped with Roberts radios, rain showers, Nespresso coffee machines and luxury toiletries. Downstairs, meanwhile, you’ll find lush reception rooms, sumptuous velvet sofas and a tranquil walled garden to relax in. Sound good? Head to our website to be in with a chance of winning a two-

night stay for two people sharing a room at The White House, complete with a bottle of champagne for you and your guest on arrival. You’ll also be treated to a breakfast buffet with a delicious choice of locally sourced, home-cooked breakfasts. Visit cambsedition.co.uk and hit the Competitions tab for more details on how to enter. The White House, 5-7 Sussex Farm, Burnham Market, Norfolk PE31 8JY stayatthewhitehouse.co.uk

T&Cs: The winner will receive a two-night stay at The White House with breakfast for two people, including a bottle of champagne on arrival. Prize must be claimed within six months and booking is subject to availability. No cash alternative is available. Competition closes on 1 October.

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NIGHTLIFE

NOW BOOKING GRUF F R H YS 21 OCT, STOREY’S FIELD CENTRE, £22.50

THE NIGHTLIFE EVENTS NOT TO MISS THIS MONTH

Occasional Super Furry Animals frontman plays his latest batch of songs, interspersed with strange tales.

BARN S COURT NEY 21 OCT, JUNCTION, £15

Breakout folk/pop/blues star Barns is on a Rolling Stone list of the ten new artists you need to know about.

MY STERY JETS 5 NOV, JUNCTION

Purveyors of pure pop heaven tour in support of their sixth album.

THE CAMBRIDGE NIGHT FESTIVAL T HE DARK NESS

Beats and bright lights combine for a great-looking new multi-genre festival running throughout the night on 5 October. The Cambridge Night Festival will be spread across three stages at the Junction, with each one catering for a different style – house, disco and breakbeat. The festival aims to put the fun back into clubland, with The Cuban Brothers starring on the main stage, and Plump DJs on the breakbeat stage. If house is your thing, catch Kid Crème on the Jacfest stage, while Radio 1 DJ legend Seb Fontaine – who has described The Wild Wood Disco near Linton as one of his faves – is also appearing, no doubt with an eye and an ear on how The Cambridge Night Festival compares. A purpose-built double decker Disco Bus – complete with sound system, lighting and DJs – will pump out tunes, and dance music royalty in the shape of Norman Jay will also play a set. He supposedly coined the phrase ‘rare groove’, and first came to attention playing warehouse parties and on the then-pirate station Kiss FM in the 1980s. Doors open at 9pm on the 5th, with music right through till 6am (last entry 1am); minimum age is 18. General release tickets are from £27.50, and VIP tables are also available. jacfest.com

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6 DEC, CORN EX, £32.50

Only this band could play an ‘Easter is cancelled’ tour at this time of year.

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NIGHTLIFE

WIN E GU M S Wine Gums comedy night returns to the University Centre Wine Bar on 8 September with a line-up that’s guaranteed to make your sides hurt. Back from the Edinburgh Fringe, join Tom Ward, Ben van der Velde, Adele Cliff, Benji Waterstones and compere Nessie Ward for much mirth – and free wine gums. Tickets are £12 in advance. cambridgelive.org.uk

Gig Guide JORDAN WORLAND FROM LOCAL MUSIC WEBSITE SLATE THE DISCO GIVES HIS TOP LIVE MUSIC PICKS FOR THE MONTH AHEAD

ambridge’s post-rock heroes Black Country, New Road are scattered around the UK, but are coming back to us on 29 September. The enigmatic six-piece’s show at The Portland is our must-see gig this month. Expect a hypnotic blend of spoken word, saxophone and metallic judder from one of the country’s most exceptional and exciting new acts. Fast action is required if you’re to catch Bill Ryder-Jones in the intimate setting of the Unitarian Church (28th) as this one is close to selling out. Multiinstrumentalist, producer, arranger and composer, Ryder-Jones has a career spanning 15 years and counting. Starting out as The Coral’s guitarist in 1996, he’s since embarked on solo exploits, including If..., an orchestral reimagining of Italo Calvino’s If on a winter’s night a traveller, to film scores and solo albums. He’s in town to showcase his latest release, a piano-only version of his 2018 album, Yawn. As always, there’s a busy month at The Blue Moon, but our top pick from the packed line-up comes on the 21st. Sunday Driver are back and performing as a full band in their home town for the first time in quite a while. They’ll be showcasing material from their muchanticipated third album. The line-up is complemented by the crystalline vocals of Kerry Devine, the melodic hooks of Jeremy Tuplin, and neoclassical, downtempo pianist and songwriter, Alexander Carson. Back at The Portland Arms, there is another gem courtesy of power pop darlings Martha on the 3rd. This Durham four-piece expertly craft songs that are energetic, passionate, political and finished with lush, four-part harmonies – autumn nights were made for bands like Martha. An exceptionally busy month at The Portland Arms also sees shows from The Pale White (10th), Damo Suzuki (18th), Kyan (23rd) and former Tribes frontman Johnny Lloyd (24th). Jeffrey Lewis & The Voltage play a brilliant style of scuzzy, urban indie-rock-folk, like a 21st-century mash-up of Sonic Youth, Pete Seeger and R Crumb. They’re at the venue on the 25th, while the thrilling Pulled Apart By Horses (26th) are also well worth a look.

GARY N UMAN Synth-punk-industrial pioneer Gary Numan plays the Corn Exchange on 7 October in a tour that marks 40 years on the scene. First hits Are Friends Electric? and Cars broke the mould, taking his unique sound to the top of the charts. He was a big influence on Nine Inch Nails, and in turn said they influenced his own later work. Tickets from £35.50. cambridgelive.org.uk

L A R A ZA’S L IVE L IN E -U P Tapas restaurant and cocktail den La Raza has a mouth-watering array of live music coming up this month. One to look out for is Funk Jam run by Shake Your Tail Feather on the 5th: a friendly funk, soul and jazz jam open to musicians, listeners and dancers. There’s also funk, rock and cheese when Swagger play on the 6th, while The Dead Geoffreys bring energetic covers on the 12th. laraza.co.uk

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W H AT ’ S O N

YOUR AT-A-GLANCE GUIDE TO EVENTS AROUND CAMBRIDGE THIS MONTH

5-7 SEPTEMBER

7 SEPTEMBER

CAMBRIDGE FESTIVAL OF DRAMA

WYSING POLYPHONIC X SOMERSET HOUSE STUDIOS

Nine short plays, an improv session and a writing workshop comprise this celebration of drama. Watch the plays, form an opinion, and discover if professional adjudicator Chris Jaeger agrees. 7.45pm, plus 2.30pm on the 7th | ADC Theatre £10, £30 full festival | adctheatre.com

Wysing Arts Centre’s annual music festival promises to push boundaries in innovative ways. This year, Somerset House Studios guest curate, with four stages, and films and talks. 1pm-1am | Wysing Arts Centre from £30 | wysingartscentre.org

6 SEPTEMBER

7 SEPTEMBER

SINDHU VEE: SANDHOG

THE KING IS BACK

Loving your children, spouse and ageing parents is hard work, as Vee – host of Radio 4’s Comedy of the Week podcast – explains in her Edinburgh Fringe sell-out show, Sandhog. 7.30pm | Cambridge Junction £15.50 | junction.co.uk

Starring leading Elvis Presley tribute artist Ben Portsmouth, who in 2012 won the Elvis Presley Enterprises ‘Ultimate’ contest in Memphis, the first from outside the US to do so. 7.30pm | Cambridge Corn Exchange from £28 | cambridgelive.org.uk

10-14 SEPTEMBER

THE LIFE I LEAD Starring Miles Jupp, this is the tale behind Mary Poppins’ Mr Banks, aka legendary British actor David Tomlinson. Renowned for playing the English gent, his meeting with Walt Disney came to encapsulate a life of adventure and heartbreak. 7.45pm (except 12th), 2.30pm Thursday and Saturday | Cambridge Arts Theatre | from £20 cambridgeartstheatre.com 13 SEPTEMBER

JASPER CARROTT’S STAND UP AND ROCK Stand-up comedy favourite Jasper Carrott teams up with the Bev Bevan Band – led by ELO founder Bev Bevan, naturally! – for a night of comedy and classic hits. 7.30pm | Cambridge Corn Exchange from £25 | cambridgelive.org.uk 13 SEPTEMBER

FLINT MOORE Described as sounding similar to acts as diverse as Pearl Jam and Mumford and Sons, Flint Moore’s music is powerful, delicate and raw. 7pm | Cambridge Junction £17 | junction.co.uk 14-15 SEPTEMBER

WILLOWFEST The Willow Tree in Bourn hosts a family-friendly food and drink festival. Enjoy live music, woodfired pizzas, local beers, a gin bar, arts, crafts, face painting and fun with inflatables. 2pm | The Willow Tree, Bourn £10 to £15 | feastandfrolic.co.uk

4-7 SEPTEMBER

MALORY TOW E R S The original ‘girl power’ story focuses on Darrell Rivers, who starts school with an eager mind and fierce heart. But can she learn to tolerate the infuriating Gwendoline Lacey, or save the school play? Suitable for ages eight and up. 7.45pm, 2.30pm Thursday and Saturday | Cambridge Arts Theatre from £21 | cambridgeartstheatre.com

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15-16 SEPTEMBER

BALLETBOYZ Two works, set to original scores, created by the BalletBoyz dancers and Olivier Award-winning choreographer Christopher Wheeldon. 7.45pm | Cambridge Arts Theatre from £25 | cambridgeartstheatre.com

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W H AT ’ S O N 16 SEPTEMBER

WANDLEBURY ADVENTURERS: FIRESIDE COOKING A chance for eight- to 12-year-olds (unaccompanied) to join Wandlebury Adventurers to learn how to cook over an open fire. Places limited, so book ahead. 6pm | Wandlebury Country Park £15 | cambridgeppf.org 17-21 SEPTEMBER

POSH The Riot Club are back in business... This time, they must behave – but is that even possible? Tyger Drew-Honey (Outnumbered) stars in this new play by Laura Wade (The Watsons, Home, I’m Darling) about the notorius, exclusive Oxford University club. 7.45pm, 2.30pm Thursday and Saturday Cambridge Arts Theatre | from £20 cambridgeartstheatre.com 18 SEPTEMBER

WINE AND TAPAS TASTING Cambridge Wine Merchants and ¡Qué rico! Tapas join forces for another exploration in Spanish wine tasting. This time the focus is on how Spanish grapes are used elsewhere in the world. 7pm | Cambridge Wine Merchants, Cherry Hinton Road | £37.50 | cambridgewine.com 18-22, 24-28 SEPTEMBER

30 SEPTEMBER

CHITTY CHITTY BANG BANG

PENGUIN CAFE

Musical theatre reaches for the skies – not unlike the beloved flying car of Caractacus Potts – in this production that marks just over half a century since the film’s release. The show has been made available to select community producers, so catch it while you can. 7.45pm, plus 2.30pm on 21st, 22nd, 28th | ADC Theatre | from £9 | adctheatre.com

Combining classical, folk and world music for a unique sound, Penguin Cafe was formed in 2009 by Arthur Jeffes, following in the footsteps of his dad Simon Jeffes, of Penguin Cafe Orchestra. 7.30pm | Cambridge Corn Exchange | from £27.50 cambridgelive.org.uk

21 SEPTEMBER

LONDON AFRICAN GOSPEL CHOIR Much acclaimed by artists from all genres, including Annie Lennox, Justin Timberlake and Madonna, this talented choir visit the city to perform Paul Simon’s album Graceland. 7.30pm | Cambridge Corn Exchange £28 | cambridgelive.org.uk

24 SEPTEMBER

AN EVENING WITH BRADLEY WIGGINS A show that offers a rare chance to hear the fivetime Olympic gold medallist and Tour De France winner share his career highlights. 7.30pm | Cambridge Corn Exchange £35.50 | cambridgelive.org.uk

21 SEPTEMBER

CAMBRIDGE SKA FEST 4 Ska Fest is back, this time celebrating the 40th anniversary of 2Tone, with a tribute to the music from the well-loved record label that featured The Specials, The Selector, The Beat and early Madness. 7pm | Cambridge Junction £14 | junction.co.uk

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28 SEPTEMBER

DERVISH Bringing traditional Irish music to audiences for more than 25 years, Dervish have played at Glastonbury and Rio festivals, and feature some of Ireland’s finest traditional musicians. The renowned Cathy Jordan leads on vocals. 8pm | Cambridge Junction £21 | junction.co.uk

25 SEPTEMBER

ALICE ROBERTS: DIGGING INTO BRITAIN’S PAST

KATHRYN WILLIAMS

Anthropologist Professor Alice Roberts has been broadcasting for almost 20 years, since joining Time Team as a bone expert. 7.30pm | Cambridge Corn Exchange from £18 | cambridgelive.org.uk

The singer-songwriter has chalked up a dozen albums and her songs range from Americana to playful jazz reworkings and much more. 8pm | Cambridge Junction £18 | junction.co.uk

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30 SEPTEMBER

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A DV E RT I S E M E N T F E AT U R E

LOVE CAMBRIDGE GIFT CARD

WHAT IS LOVE CAMBRIDGE?

Love Cambridge is the brand developed by Cambridge BID to deliver events and projects designed to animate and entertain our city. These include the Love Cambridge gift card, open-air cinema nights, Wimbledon screening, magazines, maps and much more. Follow us on social media to be kept up to date with what’s going on in Cambridge this summer.

Take the guesswork out of buying a gift and support the local economy with a Love Cambridge gift card. Accepted by a variety of businesses around the city, from shops and bars to hairdressers and beauty salons, the cards can be topped up online, from £10 to £500, making them an ideal prezzie. Launched by Cambridge BID, the cards can be purchased at love-cambridgegiftcard.com or at the Visitor Information Centre, and work in the same way as a store card, but for the whole city! More than £50,000 worth of Love Cambridge gift cards have been purchased so far, with over 200 businesses accepting them across the city. These range from brands like John Lewis, Topshop and YO! Sushi, to indies including Millers Music, Aromi and Podarok.

LoveCambridge_ Love Cambridge lovecambridge_ love-cambridge.com

SPOTLIGHT ON GREEN STREET Running between Sidney Street and Trinity Street, pretty, cobbled Green Street is one of the city’s best shopping areas, offering both big-name brands and unique independents. For a bite to eat, Tabanco is a top-notch tapas bar serving barrelled sherries, fine wines, delicious small plates and larger Spanish-inspired feasts. Plus, you can enjoy traditional afternoon teas down the road at Harriets. Bill’s, meanwhile, serves breakfast, lunch and dinner in a cheerful, familyfriendly setting. Style-savvy shoppers will know Green Street to be home to a clutch of great indie boutiques, including Harriet Kelsall Bespoke Jewellery, milliners Laird Hatters, and shoe shops Modish and Sundaes. There’s also premium women’s clothing on offer at Oska and Jigsaw, plus the bargains galore rails of TK Maxx to explore. Once you’re all shopped out, head to Cambridge Gin Laboratory, which offers ginthusiasts the chance to create their own gin, tasting their way through a variety of gins and distillates, tweaking their blend until they find their perfect recipe. You can also go on a boozy journey into the world of molecular mixology at an Experiential Cocktail Evening, creating basil caviar and sipping foaming Parma Violet cocktails: it’s a must-try for adventurous cocktail lovers.

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A DV E RT I S E M E N T F E AT U R E

A WINDOW TO THE WORLD IN CAMBRIDGE

Cambridge residents and visitors will be able to enjoy window views from across the world via one small window in the centre of the city this month. Put This in Your Window and Think of Me is the latest exhibit at the pop-up gallery The Window at Silver Street, a small window fronting the University of Cambridge’s Land Economy office that is thought to be the city’s smallest art gallery. From Arts Territory Exchange, this latest exhibit is a collaboration between artists in remote and wilderness locations. Focusing on the themes land, territory and ownership, each view comes with a QR code

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that can transport visitors to these locations with the click of a phone to view more about the artists and images via websites, films and performances. Sponsored by Cambridge BID, this is the fourth pop-up exhibition at The Window at Silver Street, which is run by Art Language Location (ALL), a not-for-profit, collaborative organisation, run by artists based in Cambridge working at the intersection between art, text and place. Its aim is to support artists and projects to bring exciting and experimental text-based art to unusual and interesting locations. Find out more at artlanguagelocation.org

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CO M M U N I T Y H U B

HELP WOOD GREEN HELP ANIMALS ood Green’s aim is to bring pets and people closer together, providing pets with the loving homes they deserve, while empowering owners with the knowledge to take the very best care of their beloved pets. Last year, Wood Green found homes for more than 4,000 pets, and the dedicated team gave one-to-one care and support to 2,343 pets and their owners. Sponsoring a pet pen is a meaningful way to be part of rescue pets’ journeys at Wood Green and help the financial effort in providing the best-quality treatment and care possible – from food and veterinary care to love and training. Pets at Wood Green stay for an average of 30 to 35 days, meaning you will play a vital role in a number of pets’ lives. You will receive regular updates from your dog, cat or small animal pen, seeing first hand how your support is making a difference. Sponsor a pet pen today by visiting woodgreen.org.uk/donate

“Join a happy parade of cyclists who show Cambridge what can be carried on a bike” CAMBRIDGE FESTIVAL OF CYCLING

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ambridge Festival of Cycling returns this September, with Camcycle working hard alongside a variety of partners to bring together more than 20 cycling-themed events. It begins on 1 September with a family friendly ride to Milton Country Park and a picnic on the grounds. There will also be multiple social rides, plus bike maintenance sessions, a photography workshop, a film night and even some Shakespeare from the HandleBards, a troupe of cycling actors. The flagship event is the Cargo Carnival, the chance to join a “happy parade of cyclists as you show the city of Cambridge what can be carried on a bike – from pizza to puppies!” Departing from Lammas Land at 11am

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on 21 September, the peloton tours the city centre before returning to a fair with food and drink, a cargo bike tryout arena and other bike stalls. Also look out for the CamcyleQuest: a cycling treasure hunt by Camcycle and Tees, which offers a chance to find out more about Cambridge and explore cycle routes with family and friends. If you collect all the answers to the clues, you could win some great prizes. Over at the Museum of Technology, they’ll be exploring the techy side of cycling on the 7th. You can hear from a range of speakers and enjoy tasty food, virtual reality bike races, bicycle-themed crafts and a gears workshop. cambridgefestivalofcycling.org

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CO M M U N I T Y H U B

R A D I O GAGA

CAMBRIDGE MUSIC CELEBRATED JULIAN CLOVER AND LUCY MILAZZO, HOSTS OF CAMBRIDGE 105’S BREAKFAST SHOW, SHARE THE ONES TO WATCH ON THE LOCAL MUSIC SCENE ne of the things we’re the proudest of at Cambridge 105 Radio is our support for local music. We recently completed a weekend of broadcasts from the Cambridge Folk Festival and, in early September, we’re celebrating the cream of local talent in the annual NMG Awards. There is an interesting blend between the two events. We spent quite a bit of time listening to music being performed in The Den, the red-tented area of the Folk Festival, which has given an early stage to artists including Jake Bugg, Wildwood Kin and Nick Mulvey. Nick is a Cambridge artist through and through. He studied at Chesterton Community College – the 2014 Mercury Music Prize nominee still remembers his head of year, Lloyd Brown – and has played regularly in the city. In five years, Nick has made the transition from The Den through to his 2019 role as guest Folk Festival curator. Nick told us that the organisers were happy with any music he wanted to bring to the table, conscious he might expand

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the remit a little. “I found myself initially looking at some folk stuff and then I stopped and I thought, ‘Actually, that’s not what this is about’. I mean, the Cambridge Folk Festival is evolving. But they have a really clear commitment to their roots.” His selections, which included the combination of Catrin Finch and Seckou Keita, the layer sound of Rachael Dadd, and the hip-hop/jazz/electro influenced Fofoulah, gave the festival added depth. Music should, after all, be about going on a journey. Nick has recently completed a UK tour, but is happy to wait a while before he gets back in the recording studio for an album follow-up to 2017’s Wake Up Now. “I don’t want to create for 18 months and then tour for two years and then create. Little and often,” he explains. “It’s now all one creative flow, whereas in the past you write a song, and it might be six months until you’ve got a whole batch and you go to record the song – and then it could be a further six months before release.” Just beginning their musical journey are Hollowstar and Gaffa Tape Sandy. The

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two bands are among the live performers at this year’s NMG Awards, being held for a second year at The Apex arts venue in Bury St Edmunds. St Ives-based Hollowstar have been regulars on Cambridge 105 Radio, but have subsequently picked up radio play on Planet Rock and BBC Radio 2. Fellow performers Gaffa Tape Sandy, a Bury St Edmunds band who have gained recognition from both Radio 1’s Huw Stephens and NME, are also firmly on the ones-to-watch list. Both the indie and rock categories look set to be fiercely competitive. There’s also been a resurgence in acts in the under-18 category, so much so there will be two awards – one for the bands and another for solo artists. And, if you’re attending The Apex or watching on Facebook Live, listen out for one half of your Cambridge Breakfast team, as Lucy takes over as the unseen voice of the NMG Awards. Julian Clover and Lucy Milazzo present Cambridge Breakfast, weekday mornings from 7am, on Cambridge 105 Radio.

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R E C I P E S • R E STAU RA N T R E V I E W • C H E F ’ S TA B L E • CA M B R I D G E O N A P L AT E

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E R I C ’ S F I S H A N D C H I PS

WITH THREE BRANCHES ACROSS EAST ANGLIA, ERIC’S FISH AND CHIP SHOP IS ATTRACTING EVER MORE FANS WITH ITS CHEERFUL SEASIDE CHARM. NICOLA FOLEY CHATS TO OWNER ERIC SNAITH ABOUT HIS WINNING FORMULA

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E R I C ’ S F I S H A N D C H I PS egular visitors to the north Norfolk coast will likely be familiar with Eric’s: Thornham’s much-loved posh fish and chip shop. Set in a chi-chi cluster of shops at Drove Orchards, minutes from the beach, this stylish little restaurant made a mission of elevating the nation’s favourite dish, blending nostalgia and modern influences with delicious results. As well as the classics, the menu tempts with Japanese-style fish cakes, battered gherkins, black pudding fritters and fried jam sandwiches, all washed down with a glass of excellent prosecco or Eric’s own Seaza ale. The meeting of old and new is reflected in the design of the restaurant, too, which combines Formica tables and stripy-deckchair seaside charm with a bright, industrial-style look. Your average ten-a-penny chippie this is not. The eatery’s many fans will be happy to learn that Eric’s is expanding, having opened new restaurants in both Holt, Norfolk, and St Ives, Cambridgeshire, in the past few months. At the helm of this burgeoning collection is Eric Snaith, who cut his teeth in the hospitality industry cheffing at his family’s hotel near Brancaster in Norfolk. “I grew up in Titchwell Manor, which was my parents’ business, and has been in the family for 31 years. I sort of fell into it, started helping out on pot wash and stuff and doing the odd day in the kitchen, and just really enjoyed it,” he explains. “I went travelling for a year and then when I came back, worked in a couple of other establishments, and then the opportunity came up at the hotel. They needed me, so I went back there – I was head chef for about 14 years in total.” Boasting an impressive three AA Rosettes, Titchwell Manor has earned an excellent reputation for its creative fine dining – but Eric had dreams of creating

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ABOVE Combining nostalgia and simplicity with the kind of excellent standards modern diners expect defines Eric’s approach to the restaurants

something altogether different to run in tandem with the hotel. “I liked the idea of doing something that was a complete contrast to what our core business was, which was at the higher end of the market, and doing something that appealed to everybody,” he says. “And approaching the ultimate dish to the nation – fish and chips – but approaching it differently in terms of the quality of the ingredients. I was conscious that people knew me from the hotel, but I didn’t want to do a cheffy take on fish and chips, I wanted to do traditional fish and chips, but make it better, doing things like putting real beer in the batter, making sure it’s the crispiest batter it can be. The chips are blanched and cooked to order, the mushy peas are made with great seasoning and butter. When I was researching, it seemed like most places were just trying to work on margin all the time, because it’s always been seen as a cheap dish, but the cost of produce is going up, and we just hoped that

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people would be willing to pay that extra pound or two for much better quality.” The first Eric’s opened in 2015 after a long search for suitable premises, and quickly became a must-visit along its pretty stretch of coastline. A year or so in, the team realised that the concept had the potential to roll out across more locations. “Holt was always one of our favourites: it wasn’t too far away, it’s quite an affluent area and a lot of our customer base was coming out of Norwich anyway, so it sort of bridged that gap. While we were setting that one up, an opportunity came up in St Ives, which hadn’t been a location we’d thought of, but the developers of the site knew our restaurant and knew the North Norfolk coast, so we got chatting, and it seemed like a good opportunity. The more I looked into St Ives, the more I liked the area,” says Eric. Set in a unit on a small retail park, sitting alongside the dayglo frontage of mega brands like Subway, the new premises is a big departure from the quaint buildings that house the other two branches of Eric’s – presenting a challenge that has been relished by the team. “We looked at the design from a different angle, and tried to make it all fit a little differently,” he explains. “There are certain things in the branding that we keep repeating, like the Formica tables and

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E R I C ’ S F I S H A N D C H I PS

“Kids love our fish and chip restaurants” tiled walls – so there are familiar touches, but we want them to feel almost like they’re stand-alone restaurants. We didn’t just repeat everything like some big chain.” As well as adapting the look and feel of the restaurant, another challenge has been appealing to a different clientele. In Thornham, the majority of customers are on holiday or popping in for a treat, whereas the St Ives site is serving busy workers on lunch breaks and families from the area nipping in for takeaways. “I think the biggest thing is people understanding what we are,” Eric muses. “In the first few weeks there were a lot of people just trying us in comparison to their usual fish and chips takeaway, but we’re getting to a point now where there are a lot more people coming in and using it as a sit-in dining experience as well. And that’s

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great – what’s always worked so well is that the kids love our fish and chip restaurants and all the little touches for them, but also the grandparents love it, because of the tradition. It’s a good place for all generations. Everybody’s happy with the offering – and that’s actually really unique.” With the Thornham outlet continuing to flourish and the new branches doing a roaring trade, is the ultimate goal to have an Eric’s on every high street? “I think we’ll sit tight for 18 months,” laughs Eric. “We want to concentrate on the operations of the business – to make

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sure the branches are running as well and as efficiently as they can. I’ve always thought there’s really good potential in it, but we need to see what’s right for us. We might just stick with the three. We might look to expand a lot quicker. But the plan for now is to consolidate for a year, see where we’re at. “I’ve always been tempted with Cambridge, Bury St Edmunds and Ely,” he adds, grinning. “We’ve nearly signed on a site in Norwich a couple of times as well, so we’ve definitely got an eye on the whole of East Anglia...” ericsfishandchips.com

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FO O D & D R I N K

A MONTHLY ROUND-UP OF GASTRO GOINGS-ON AROUND CAMBRIDGESHIRE

BREWDOG CAMBRIDGE OPENS Popular brewery BrewDog has finally opened the doors to its Cambridge branch, following a launch party at the end of August. Located at the multistorey Bene’t Street building previously home to CAU, the Aberdeen craft brewers will be serving up the excellent beers they’re known and loved for around the world, including Punk IPA, Dead Pony Club and Clockwork Tangerine, as well as specials from the taps and some bites to eat. Need a little sustenance to soak up the beer? Good news: the venue will be serving a menu that includes brunch (and spiced Bloody Marys), plus burgers, wings and more. brewdog.com

S T N E OT S FARM E RS’ MAR K E T Taking place every second and fourth Saturday of the month, the St Neots Farmers’ Market offers an array of foodie treats in an appealing, historic setting. Traders include the award-winning Ampthill Bakery, plus three fantastic butchers selling great cuts of meat, and seasonal, local veg from L B Stewart. There’s also Brocklebury’s delicious pies to try, and Meah’s Curry Sauces – and those with a sweet tooth should make a beeline for The Fudge Can, which recently was awarded three gold stars in the 2019 Great Taste Awards, for their cream caramel latte fudge. The market takes place rain or shine, and is a great chance to try and buy the wares of top producers from around the region. CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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COM M U N I TY BAC KING FOR T H E THRE E TUN S The Three Tuns, an historic pub in Guilden Morden, has reopened after the community banded together to fund its renovation. A Grade II listed building that dates back to the 17th century, the pub closed down six years ago, but was listed as an Asset of Community Value in October 2014 under the Localism Act, enabling the community to buy and reopen it. With 280 shareholders, it’s one of the only community-owned pubs in the region, and is already building a reputation for its great food offering and selection of local beer and wine. At the helm are Megan Friskey and her husband Peter, who brings a wealth of experience from senior chef positions at establishments like The Crown & Punchbowl, Horningsea. thethreetunsguilden.co.uk S E P T E M B E R 2 019

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GIGGLING SQUI D: COMING SO ON! The stunning Wheeler Street building that used to house Jamie’s Italian is being transformed in preparation for the opening of Giggling Squid, a Thai restaurant with branches across the UK. Known for its bright, floral-inspired interiors and authentic dishes, the restaurants are the brainchild of Thaiborn Pranee Laurillard and her husband Andrew, who wanted to bring a true experience of Thai eating to the UK. “For me, what was missing from the food scene was that Bangkok feel – energetic, informal, adventurous and truly welcoming, where food is celebrated and you don’t have to dress up to enjoy it,” explains Pranee. “It’s relaxed, no standing on ceremony – just having a good time over something tasty.” The Cambridge outpost joins the existing 32 branches of Giggling Squid across the country, and will be serving up favourites like salt and pepper squid and massaman curry. The lunchtime tapas menu, a big hit at the other Giggling Squids, will also be on offer, plus there’s vegan and veggie choices and a kids’ menu. “Cambridge combines both history and modern vibrancy – exactly like us!” adds Pranee. “We are delighted to be opening in the epicentre of the city and can’t wait to welcome guests into our Giggling Squid family next summer.” gigglingsquid.com

STICKIES POP-UP There’s a new dining experience coming to town in the shape of Stickies, a pop-up cafe from the co-owner of Stickybeaks cafe Lucy Robinson, together with her sister Emma. Promising to bring “a taste of city cafe culture to local villages”, there are events scheduled so far on 9 and 14 September at All Saints’ Hall in Cottenham. The menus promise inspiring salads with Middle Eastern influences, sandwiches, frittatas with different fillings and homemade sausage rolls, plus cakes, cookies and a nice selection of drinks. “There’s a great community cafe in the village, but there’s definitely room for something a bit different,” says Emma. “We miss the fresh and original food we served at Stickybeaks and so do our regulars and friends. We hope they will come and try Stickies in Cottenham.”

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FO O D & D R I N K R E STAUR ANT REVIEW

Brix and Mortar WE PAY A VISIT TO PROVENANCE KITCHEN’S CAFE, DELI AND RESTAURANT – AND SAMPLE THE FAMED SUNDAY ROAST DINNER WORDS & PHOTOS BY NICOLA FOLEY

t was just over four years ago that Provenance Kitchen first surfaced in Cambridge, armed with a vintage Airstream van, oodles of enthusiasm and a dream of bringing “fast slow food” to the city. Bridging the gap between restaurant dining and street food, the menu championed seasonal, local produce, cooked to perfection over charcoal and fire. Fast forward to January of this year and Provenance has followed in the footsteps of other stars of the Cambridge food-truck scene like Steak & Honour and Jack’s Gelato, opening the doors to its own permanent residence. Named, appropriately enough, Brix and Mortar, this Whittlesford cafe, deli and restaurant has enabled founders Kate Holden and Greg Proud to take their flourishing business to the next level, bringing their distinctive food to a much wider audience. THE SET TING

Located in an old farm building on a sleepy country road, Brix and Mortar surprises you from the second you turn into the ample car park. First of all, it’s huge – 120 covers huge, in fact: a bright, contemporary space that houses not just seating for diners, but a smart little deli, a well-stocked cake counter, walled garden, courtyard and orchards out the back. Its

spaciousness makes it a great venue option for a larger gathering, and co-founder Kate tells me they’re doing a brisk trade in parties and corporate events (its handy location, minutes from the M11, doesn’t hurt either). THE FOOD

“Interesting, creative and modern British food cooked over charcoal and wood; elevating our dishes to the next level,” is how Kate sums up the menu, adding: “We like to keep things simple”. As well as simplicity, a commitment to seasonality shines through on the menu, as does the passion for local produce – in fact, the restaurant boasts that many of the ingredients used are sourced from within a five-mile radius of the premises. You can expect beautiful cuts of local meat, homegrown herbs and exquisite veg sourced from Flourish in Hildersham, produce supplier to many a Michelinstarred eatery. Provenance is also big on seafood, be it whole-cooked octopus, roasted turbot, plump sardines or mackerel; skewered and grilled over charcoal and served with juicy cherry tomatoes. Fans of the fruits of the sea are in for a real treat. They seem to be on to a winner with the concept: the restaurant was full of life on the afternoon we stopped by for lunch, buzzing with families, couples and groups of friends settling down to lazy

Sunday feasts. We kicked ours off with a creamy burrata drizzled in chilli and mint dressing, served with courgette strips and a good wodge of chewy sourdough, as well as some truly magnificent pig head croquettes. Perfectly cooked, with a crunchy exterior and plenty of rich, smoky pork inside, these tasty deepfried cylinders came paired with burnt pickles and dollop of fiery mustard mayo, delivering big flavours in a beautifully presented package. Starters speedily consumed, it was time to sample one of the muchrecommended roast dinners that have had local foodies beating a path to Brix and Mortar’s door. You’ll have to book in advance to secure a spot for your Sunday lunch here, but it’s 100% worth a bit of forward planning. Succulent slices of Hereford beef sirloin (you can also try Suffolk lamb or Somersham pork), finished on the hearth for a distinctive fire-seared flavour, are served with jumbo Yorkshire puds, homemade horseradish and your own jug of rich gravy. Add in a generous helping of crunchy, golden roast potatoes, charred leeks and sticky roast carrots and beetroot, and you’ve got yourself one of the best roast dinners in Cambridgeshire. The beautiful homemade desserts (we tried a zingy lemon tart and a ‘chocolate nemesis’ with dreamy salted caramel ice cream), rounded off a fantastic meal in style. THE VERDICT

“Interesting, creative and modern British food cooked over charcoal and wood” S E P T E M B E R 2 019

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An obvious passion for provenance and produce, combined with a menu full of crowd-pleasing dishes and a stylish, versatile space, make Brix and Mortar a fantastic addition to the area’s food scene. Whittlesford, you’re a lucky village indeed to have a gem like this on your doorstep, but there’s more than enough here to lure in diners from significantly farther afield. provenancekitchen.com

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FO O D & D R I N K

W HAT:

A cafe, deli and restaurant that serves modern, creative British food using seasonal and local produce

W HER E:

Hill Farm Road, Whittlesford

HOW M UC H ?

Starters from £7 Sunday lunch from £12

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FO O D & D R I N K CHEF’S TABL E

A TRIP TO FRANCE MAKES ALEX RUSHMER REFLECT ON THE UNIVERSALLY POPULAR COMBINATION OF BREAD AND BEANS, IN ALL ITS DELICIOUS FORMS

f all the delicious meals I ate while away in rural France, the single tastiest element was a simple dish of local beans cooked with onion, garlic and olive oil, and freshened at the last minute with plenty of parsley. The bean was a local variety, grown with great pride close to Nantes, called a mogette. It has the appearance of a large haricot, but is blessed with a rich creaminess normally achieved solely by the addition of much dairy-based fat. The barbecued merguez was perfectly acceptable and the salad, pepped with a sharp vinaigrette, was also good, but it was the beans I went back to multiple times, scooping up obscene mouthfuls with a torn baguette laden with salty, pale-yellow butter. That marriage – of bread and bean – wasn’t something I’d given much thought to previously, but as the sun set, through a fuzzy haze of muscadet wine, I realised how much I’ve relied on that happy combination for most of my life. It began, as I’m sure it did for many, with Heinz and Warburtons. Slices of pappy white bread, gently blackened by the toaster, pooling with melted butter and topped with a whole tin of lurid baked beans, was a regular Saturday lunch (or late breakfast when my weekends began to involve Friday night trips to the pub). Obviously, I still return to beans on toast on occasion: no amount of artisanal French beans will ever wrestle that particular duo from my affections. But since then, my culinary horizons have been broadened and I’ve experienced a significant number of dishes combining stodgy bread and pulses that have kept much of the world nourished and full over several centuries. At university, I graduated from beans on toast to hummus. The carbohydrate element with which I conveyed mashed chickpeas to my mouth was irrelevant, and could come in any one of a number of forms – from 50p supermarket baguette to boldly adventurous home-made flatbreads (plain flour + water + salt + dry, scorching

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“The tastiest element was a simple dish of local beans” hot pan = passable pitta bread), and during exam term provided at least half my daily calorie intake. Since then, almost every combination of pulse carried by a wheat-based vehicle has passed my lips, filled my belly and nourished my soul. From breakfasts of ful (dried broad beans cooked with fiery spices) with fluffy rolls in Ethiopia and lunches of falafel in charred flatbreads in Toronto, to mid-afternoon bowls of harira soaked up with cracked wheat bread in Marrakech and dinners of dal and chapatis in Rajasthan, each and every one has left me happy and replete – and continues to do so from my own kitchen several years down the line. What makes this particular combination so universally appealing

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is because it fills four criteria that are crucial for much of the world: the belly can be filled with something delicious and nourishing for very little cost. Pulses are a great source of protein and vitamins and, what’s more, once dried they have an almost indefinite shelf life. Of course, this adds the slight inconvenience of soaking, but even this can be avoided by using a pressure cooker, in which it is possible to transform a dried chickpea into something soft enough to blend into hummus in just under an hour. Now that’s definitely worth raising your pulse for.

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Sunflower pesto ALEX RUSHMER SHARES A RECIPE FOR A BRILLIANTLY BRITISH TAKE ON PESTO

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© CHARLOTTE GRIFFITHS

RECIPE

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RECIPE

By far the most productive vegetable bed we have in the garden is the one filled with sunflowers. Obviously I’ve always known the seeds are edible, but I’ve also been experimenting with other parts of the flower. The young flower heads, so reminiscent of artichoke, can (at a push) be braised or steamed before they open up, and I’m sure there is something to be done with the stems and leaves. Maybe by next summer I will have figured it out. Far more pleasing, and far less effort, are the petals. They are mildly sweet and gentle and make a wonderfully colourful addition to the salad course at Vanderlyle. Used with toasted sunflower seeds, they can also be blitzed into a brilliantly British take on pesto. Feel free to include additional flavours – roasted garlic and fresh soft herbs would be great before mixing through pasta, or it could even be stirred through sour cream to make a stunning dip.

INGREDIENTS

• 65g sunflower seeds • A pinch of salt, to taste • The zest and juice from half a lemon • 150ml rapeseed oil • The petals from one large or two small sunflower heads STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE

• Lightly toast the sunflower seeds in a dry frying pan – just to colour ever so slightly without scorching them. It should bring out the natural nuttiness of the seeds without adding any bitterness. • Leave to cool for ten minutes, then add to a blender, food processor or pestle and mortar. Pulse, or pestle, enough to break them up but without turning them into a smooth paste. • Add the salt, lemon zest and rapeseed oil and mix again to combine. • Finally, add the sunflower petals and blend one final time to break them up, but not purée the sauce. • Check the seasoning and add more salt or lemon if necessary. • Serve immediately, or pour into jars and top with oil to preserve for at least a week.

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CA M B R I D G E O N A P L AT E

Game on for organic SEPTEMBER BRINGS NOT ONLY A CELEBRATION OF ORGANIC PRODUCE, BUT ALSO THE PLEASURE OF EATING GAME, SAYS DR SUE BAILEY

appled sunlight drifts through the trees and the crow of a cock pheasant is heard in the undergrowth. Outside our cottage, by the back door on a cast iron hook, hangs a brace of pheasants, strung together with orange twine. They are ready for us to pluck, gut, then roast till golden, stuffed with soft pink quinces. We’ll be adding some of our allotment kale and leeks, some spices, a pinch of creativity and a measure of our appreciation of countryside heritage. But first, let’s step back in time. Before the Fens were drained in the 1630s, Tudor Cambridgeshire was rich in game that could be trapped and sold on the market, given to the manor house or consumed in college halls. Game played a healthy and easily accessible role in local larders. Medieval physicians recommended partridges as one of the healthiest of all the game birds, being “of moderate heat and moisture and generating good blood”, while Elizabethan Cambridge graduate Sir Hugh Plat wrote one of the earliest household recipe books, Delightes for Ladies, giving recipes for

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boiled larks or sparrows (which we’d no doubt balk at today). By the 18th century, land enclosure had occurred and legally controlled shooting had been imposed by landowners, with risky game poaching becoming more frequent as common land declined. However, by the 19th century, strict laws started to relax, with the sale of game being legalised and guns licensed under the Game Act of 1831, which is still in force today. This legal protection fixes the dates of the seasons of various species so they can reproduce and preserve an ecological balance, covering red and black grouse, partridge and pheasant; the birds that are commonly known as ‘game birds’. Obviously, there were many economic reasons for the enclosures, and the regularisation of game was an important factor in the diet of the aristocracy and the smallholder. It’s also worth noting that until the turn of the last century, most food grown or reared was just natural food: the term organic did not exist. No agrochemicals and sprays were used to enhance growth and yields, as the petrochemical industry was in its infancy. The new agricultural techniques, although with short-term benefits, had risks of longer-term side effects such as soil compaction and soil fertility decline, plus the worry of toxic chemicals entering the food supply. Partly as a response to this, 1930s educationalist Rudolf Steiner developed biodynamic farming. Then, in the 40s, Sir Albert Howard (graduate of St John’s College) was an organic farming pioneer and a principal figure in the early organic movement. Cambridge has long been a supporter of organic produce, with Arjuna on Mill Road being early organic suppliers over the last 49 years. Cambridge Organic Food Company’s owner, Duncan Catchpole, says: “In the 21 years we have been in

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CA M B R I D G E O N A P L AT E

“Game is healthy and often locally sourced” business, we have seen a tremendous change in the Cambridge organic food scene. Awareness about the environmental impact of food is greater now than ever before, and more people are making conscientious decisions to eat food with a lower environmental footprint. Membership of our organic box scheme is at a record level.” It also should not be forgotten that fundamentally, game birds are organic and wild. The importance of game in our diet has decreased, but game is healthy and often locally sourced. In Cambridge and nearby villages, The Art of Meat, The Gog Butchery, Leech & Sons in Shelford and Mill Road Butchers all sell top-quality game when in season. When I speak to Sam Carter, owner of Restaurant Twenty-Two, one of the most respected restaurants in Cambridge, he tells me they take full advantage of game season. “Rabbits, hare, pigeons, pheasant, partridge, venison, grouse and mallard are all likely to feature on our menu. Dishes such as grey-legged partridge with parsley root, trompette and jus gras; loin of venison with salt-baked kohlrabi, blackberry and chocolate; and roasted wood pigeon with pine, celeriac and pear. “Mill Road Butchers have an eye for quality produce and an understanding of what we are trying to achieve,” he

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continues. “They have a great relationship with local shoots and dealers, and we’re already discussing the first orders. In terms of ‘organic’, where possible we use local producers who operate in an organic way. It is not always financially viable for small-scale local producers to get certified as organic, so we work directly with suppliers on a trust basis to guarantee organic produce regardless of a certificate. We are supplied locally by Jake Ball at Seed To Feed micro farm, which grows organically, sustainably and ethically.” Another local restaurateur, Alex Rushmer at Vanderlyle, also mentions his supplier. He and Lawrence Butler work directly with farmers, growers, producers and suppliers to create ingredient-led menus that ebb and flow through the seasons. “We are not dogmatic about anything we cook, but we just happen to be cooking vegetables at the moment. We use Flourish Produce, which is about as organic as you can possibly get, and the best produce we can get our hands on. The owner, Calixta Killander in Hildersham, specialises in growing for chefs with an ethos of sustainability.” So, whether you are a vegetarian eater of organic produce or a dyed-in-thefeather game eater, remember the benefits, learn from history and support your local suppliers, growers and restaurants.

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PLANNING A CHRISTMAS PARTY FOR FRIENDS OR COLLEAGUES? GET THESE TOP VENUES ON YOUR RADAR, PRONTO TA BOUCHE

City centre nightspot Ta Bouche is a great shout if you want a festive night out, right in the thick of the city centre. The Market Passage venue has various Christmas party packages in store: book a table for any size group and get espresso martinis, pornstar martinis and mojitos for a bargain £5 all night. And book for eight or more people and you’ll each be given a free ‘gin-gle berries’ bottled cocktail to take home. Larger groups might be interested in booking the pop-up Ta Bouche Bar, which allows you to hire out half the venue, complete with your own personal bartender. Fancy something a little more immersive? Guaranteed to get you in the Christmas spirit is the Festive Cocktail Masterclass, which is ideal for groups and priced at £25 per head. Guided by Ta Bouche’s mixologists, you and your gang will have lots of laughs learning about, creating and trying some extraspecial Christmassy tipples. MOONLIGHT SPEAKEASY

Step inside the glamorous world of the Neon Moon Burlesque and Cabaret Club for the Moonlight Speakeasy: a Prohibition-inspired pop-up Christmas and New Year’s Eve party. “Seductive hijinks with smoking-hot burlesque and cabaret entertainment, ice-cold, artfully crafted cocktails and our ‘nip and a wink’ appetiser menu straight from 1920s New York,” is what the organisers promise at this intriguing party, which will take place at 12a Members’ Club on the Market Square. If you’re looking for a group gathering with a unique twist, this could be the one for you – get in touch with the team for details on packages.

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LA RAZA

Subterranean bar, club and restaurant La Raza ticks all the boxes for a Christmas party, offering tasty tapas, great cocktails and a lively dance floor. The Christmas party menu is available from 22 November to 24 December, with prices starting at just £16 for a two-course lunch. You’ll be greeted with a glass of fizz and treated to Spanish delicacies like cured meats and manchego, sweet potato tortilla bites, calamari, and churros and toffee dipping sauce: the perfect antidote to the turkey and stuffing overload! VINYL

Cambridge’s retro city centre nightclub Vinyl will be going all out this festive season, with private rooms and VIP experiences of all shapes and sizes available. If you want to dance the night

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away on a light-up dance floor under the shimmer of the disco balls, this is the place for you. The venue has dedicated party planners who can tailor a night out especially for your group depending on your requirements, leaving you free to party away to unashamedly cheesy tunes from across the decades. SIX

One of the best-looking restaurants in the city, Six at the Varsity Hotel offers spectacular panoramic views of the city, fabulous cocktails and delicious food. It’s the perfect location for an extraspecial festive shindig, whether you’re after a drinks reception and buffet or sit-down meal. Santa hats, crackers and Christmassy cheer come as standard, and the spacious restaurant can accommodate up to 140 for a seated meal.

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A DV E RT I S E M E N T F E AT U R E

COME FLY WITH US P-51 Mustang; sharing with passengers their beauty and power. As well as your once-in-a-lifetime flight, experiences with Aerial Collective include a gift bag containing a logbook and souvenir flight-suit patch, plus free entry for you and a plus one to IWM Duxford, Britain’s largest aviation museum. If you book a flight, you receive a boarding pass, with the option of adding a personalised message if the voucher is a gift. Whether for yourself, a loved one, colleague or friend, a flight on a vintage warbird with Aerial Collective is an experience that will be cherished forever. Find out more at aerialcollective.co.uk and begin the adventure of a lifetime today.

ABOVE If you want to buy an Aerial Collective voucher as a special gift, you can add a personalised message to the boarding pass

© GEORGE ROMAIN

erial Collective is a group of people, talents, flying machines and places, all striving to achieve one common goal: to allow those who seek it the rare opportunity to have their senses engulfed as they soar above the clouds and into living history. Through Aerial Collective’s engineering and flying expertise, you too can experience a blur in the line between man and machine and, in doing so, become part of the collective. Based out of the Aircraft Restoration Company’s hangars at Duxford Airfield in Cambridgeshire, you’ll find the two-seat Supermarine Spitfires, Charlie and Indy, as well as other iconic aircraft such as the

© GEORGE ROMAIN

Experience the wonder of soaring high above the clouds with Aerial Collective

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F LO W E R S

WORDS & PHOTOS BY CHARLOT TE GRIFFITHS

NESTLED DEEP IN THE ESSEX COUNTRYSIDE YOU’LL FIND ANNA’S FLOWER FARM, A HAND-GROWN BUSINESS THAT’S BLOSSOMING

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uilding a garden is one of those tasks that gets more complicated the closer you look at it. You can, of course, take the welltravelled route and head to a nursery, grab the first flowers that look nice, pop them in a hole and wonder why they don’t make it past a single season – but a well-planned, thriving patch requires research, a lot of groundwork and thoughtful, considered planting before you’ll start to see the first blooms. And it’s much the same with a business – especially for Anna Taylor, whose deep love of plants and talent for styling flowers has blossomed into a thriving ‘cottage garden’ industry. Nestled deep in the heart of Audley End’s village is the red-brick-walled garden that’s home to Anna’s Flower Farm: it’s tucked away, just about visible on Google Earth as ten-ish tidy rows of green amongst the mature trees and sprawling buildings that make up the historic neighbourhood.

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IMAGES Whilst the location is as photogenic as you might expect, Anna points out that everything on the site has a job to do, even the chickens...

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Approaching the farm leads you past neat, white-walled workers’ cottages and through a grassy paddock, before a small sign reassures that you are in the right place and haven’t just driven across one of English Heritage’s lawns. Anna’s Farm is normally a hive of activity (quite literally: two bee colonies are a recent addition to help boost pollination). There might be a flowerarranging workshop taking place around a table in the recently cleared studio, or you could stumble across a children’s class deep in the leafy beds – or perhaps just Anna and her team, picking and cutting blooms for an upcoming event. Much like the flowers that blossom and fade almost hourly, every day at the farm is different, but embracing that ephemerality is at the heart of Anna’s ethos. One of her many clients is Kettle’s Yard, where Anna supplies event decoration and her trademark posies of seasonal flowers for small spaces within the exhibition rooms. When the internationally acclaimed artist

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ANNA’S CAMBRIDGESHIRE

Ai Weiwei recently visited the gallery, he took a single photo of Anna’s flowers and uploaded it to his Instagram account, attracting nearly 2500 likes. Anna was overwhelmed by the artist’s interest, writing in a thoughtful blog post that the enormity of the event was that the pictured posy could “never be replicated: it is a snapshot of that day. The day after, the blooms will have opened and developed a little further… a little posy of cut flowers in your home, on the kitchen table, in the hallway welcoming you and your guests home are simple luxuries that we can all have in our daily lives. It can be just a few branches or a single flower enjoyed for its exquisite, natural and ephemeral beauty: pure luxury for all”. Anna reiterates the significance of the small posy of flowers when we meet in her farm on an afternoon in late summer, drinking tea in dappled sunlight as butterflies flit around the peonies. “My mum used to put little posies around the house: one on the sideboard, one on the

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bureau and one on the mantlepiece,” she says. “She’s never liked a big vase of flowers because it doesn’t fit the proportions of their sixties house – and everyone always goes on about how lovely they are, but she just has a little snip round her garden. I think that’s what I’ve been inspired by – and I want other people to be able to make them, too.” As well as supplying flowers for events, businesses and some of the most prestigious places in our city – if you’ve eaten at Parker’s Tavern, you’ve dined beneath Anna’s astonishing dried-flower displays or sipped a cocktail alongside her botanicals – she also offers a growing set of workshops, either based at her farm or out on location at special places around our region. “We do lots of classes: arranging classes and the year-long ‘Grow Your Own Cut Flower’ classes. I think our growing class is absolutely amazing – it’s expensive,” Anna acknowledges, “but we do so much on the class, and attendees take home every element – loads of

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I love going to Kettle’s Yard: I really like The Garden Kitchen there. I used to eat with them at the Botanic Gardens a lot, I’d take the children when they were very little, because it’s such a good place for them – they do good coffee and good cakes, plus it’s walled and the children can’t escape... I also love the Henry Moore Studios & Gardens just outside Bishops Stortford, over the border in Hertfordshire. You can explore his house and studio, and see many of his sculptures – it’s really special. It’s not open all year but definitely worth a trip. On a sunny day I’d head to Grantchester, maybe take the inflatable kayak and do a bit of wild swimming… If I was going OUT out, I’d go to NOVI – I love their bar, and I designed their roof terrace garden – they’ve been huge supporters of my work from the beginning.

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“With gardening, the more you learn, the more you realise there is to learn” ranunculus, daisy plants etc. However, we’ve also started breaking it down into individual sessions so people can just attend one section. For instance, in early autumn, they’ll see dahlias growing and arranged, in winter they learn how to lift and store the tubers – we show how every plant is treated throughout the seasons.” Though Anna’s been designing gardens and working in horticulture since she was 21, having a fixed space to farm flowers has been a long-held dream. “Originally I was self-employed, and then I worked for two years for a local company: we’d do natural swimming pools, huge projects where we completely changed the nature of a garden – really amazing – but I stopped working for them when I had my children.” As Anna already lived in a cottage in Audley End, she knew the land agents and was able to move quickly when offered the opportunity of taking on this unique space. “We had our own cottage’s garden already, and didn’t know we’d get the walled garden: this was Lord Braybooke’s garden, but he died the summer before last. Then in February last year we were offered the adjoining space and what was their mower shed as well,” Anna says. “We’re still doing all the propagation in our cottage garden, but we’re really just getting to grips with what the space can do. We’ve hired out the studio a few times for hen parties or private classes; a children’s clothing designer is booked in to use the walled garden for a photoshoot… We’d love to do more of that: there are so many little vignettes and corners that would work…” Although everything found on the farm is as beautiful as claimed, it’s also there to

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work – the bees are there as pollinators rather than honey providers, and the chickens tucked into a shady corner are grateful recipients of the slugs and snails found elsewhere in the beds; the eggs are a bonus. And those beds work hard, producing crop after crop of organic and seasonal blooms throughout the year. “The thing about growing flowers is that you can’t just shove them in and expect them to grow – they’re very demanding. But with gardening, the more you learn, the more you realise there is to learn,” Anna says. “When we first came into this space, nobody had worked the ground. We came in with a turf lifter and excavated all the beds, and then doubledug them – that’s traditional, that’s what you’re told to do – but then I went to this lecture by a man called Charles Dowding, talking about ‘no-dig’. He said, ‘Just lay down cardboard and put organic matter on top: it doesn’t even need to be that well rotted’. You put the cardboard on top of bindweed, on top of grass, anything, and then you want five, six inches of organic matter on top, and the idea is that by the time any roots get down to the cardboard, it’ll have been taken down by worms, which do the work for you. It’s total win-win: you’re not disturbing the soil’s microorganisms, it’s far quicker and it suppresses all the weeds – within six months you could be planting it. It’s funny, when you do things sustainably it tends to be better for the plants anyway…” Right now, Anna is in the process of building the business back up after baby Margot’s recent arrival, which understandably slowed the plantswoman’s

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pace. Several of her trademark creative, collaborative events are already planned for later in the year, extending her focus on ephemerality to one-night-only experiences, such as August’s ‘Dine Among The Flowers’ dinners in the walled garden. This saw her team up with local chefs, chocolatiers and ceramicists, and couldn’t be replicated if they wanted to. “We made special vessels, plates and bowls just for the night, which people could then buy at the event, so rather than us wash them up you could just take them away with you,” Anna explains. Anna is also planning to trial a membership offering in the autumn, where fans of the farm can attend exclusive events, get first dibs on booking workshops and choose to receive regular posies – or the necessary blooms to enable people to make their own posies. “I just want more people to know about us: to come here, see the farm and hang out,” Anna says. “We’re also going to trial opening up one day a week while we’re working, so people

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can just sit and have a cup of tea, maybe make our shop more formal… we’ve also got a few people who are going to start volunteering with us – it’s exciting!” In the end, it all comes back to that eye-catching little posy. “It’s just so simple,” Anna says. “I really think there’s a tide turning: the interest in cut flowers is a bit of a revolution that I think aligns with the growing interest in craft, and being sustainable. Getting a factory to grow a flower, fly it in and then for us to put it on our table – the whole thing just feels wrong, in the same way that we now think about food. If you grow something really lovely, and cut it and enjoy it in the house, and then get to see another flower come up, it’s so rewarding and so simple – and you’re going to sit at that table anyway, so you might as well make it beautiful. You’re doing a little bit for wildlife, for the environment, and you get that little bit of pleasure – it’s winwin. And totally attainable.” annasflowerfarm.com

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LIFELAB IS COMING! Make new discoveries at a jam-packed two-day science event

ou’re living in a global centre for new discoveries. Right now, people are finding ways to personalise medicine for patients, they’re measuring how obesity could affect your children and discovering new ways to help our bodies fight disease. On Friday 27 and Saturday 28 September, you have the chance to make your own breakthroughs when LifeLab transforms venues around Cambridge into discovery zones for all ages. Part of European Researchers’ Night – Europe’s largest public science event – LifeLab offers a fun, diverse programme of pop-up, interactive activities in public spaces in Cambridge, Peterborough and Ely. Brought to you by five organisations: the Wellcome Sanger Institute, the European Bioinformatics Institute, the Babraham Institute, the University of Cambridge and the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, LifeLab invites you to discover the ground-breaking research happening on your doorstep. For two days, the people making these discoveries are popping up across the local area to share what they’ve found with you. And the best part is, most of it is free! LifeLab’s Cambridge programme includes science-themed stand-up, a popup lab in The Grafton Centre and a chance to meet the researchers behind the science. Across the three LifeLab locations, there are activities to appeal to all tastes and ages. Whether you like to get handson, browse an exhibit, or enjoy a chat, there’s something for you, your friends, and family. Above all, there are plenty of chances to share your opinions and ideas as you chat to the people making exciting discoveries happen. For a taste of what to expect, watch last year’s video at youtu.be/1dhxyIAV4QA To find out more, follow @camlifelab on social media or visit camlifelab.co.uk

CAMBRID GE EVENT S FRIDAY 27 SEPTEMBER KIDOLOGY

Just what are these kids talking about? Join scientists as they try to guess the science topics being described by a group of children. Do they know what it is? Does anyone? Relive an 80s game show classic with a special science spin. 7pm–8pm | Cambridge Science Centre | No booking Arrive on time | Free Ages 14+ LIFELAB LATE AT THE SCIENCE CENTRE

LifeLab is taking over the Cambridge Science Centre for one night only! Join scientists from across Europe to chat about their research and explore the Science Centre’s range of science activities. Make sure you don’t miss the Kidology game show, on between 7pm and 8pm. 7pm–9.30pm | Cambridge Science Centre | Drop-in Free | Ages 14+

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Join LifeLab for a special edition of its lively monthly discussion series with local researchers who will try to convince you that their favourite gene is the best! 7pm–8.15pm | Espresso Library No booking | Arrive on time Free | Ages 16+ THE VARIABLES PRESENT LIFELAB SPECIAL

Join a line-up of budding comedians from the world of science and technology as they take a humorous look at their life in the lab. 7.30pm–10.30pm | Cambridge Junction | Booking required | £6 (£4 concessions) | Ages 18+ SATURDAY 28 SEPTEMBER ADVENTURE CENTRE

PUNTSEQ – EXPLORING THE MICROBES IN THE RIVER CAM

Visit the LifeLab discovery playground and discover how gaming helps us explore the brain and test your detective skills to find changes in DNA. 10am–6pm | The Grafton Centre Drop-in | Free | All ages

Find out what’s lurking beneath the water that flows through the city of Cambridge with the scientists behind the project. 7pm–8pm | The Portland Arms No booking | Arrive on time Free | Ages 18+

Discover how biology and computer science work together to benefit human health. 10.30am–5pm | Cambridge Science Centre | £1/€1 on the door | All ages

QUIDS IN TO CODE!

THERE ARE ALSO EVENTS IN PETERBOROUGH AND ELY. READ MORE AND BOOK ONLINE AT CAMLIFELAB.CO.UK

© LIFELAB

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LifeLab is brought to you using funding from the European Commission. Join LifeLab’s celebration of the globally leading research that is happening in the Cambridgeshire region. Over two days, you could learn something new, find a future career and perhaps see another side of science. LifeLab looks forward to seeing you there!

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INDEPENDENT OF THE MONTH I ND IE OF T HE MO NT H

Fratelli Hair SIOBHAN GODWOOD DISCOVERS WHY THIS FAMILY-RUN SALON IS A CUT ABOVE THE REST

or Joey Altomonte and his older brother Luigi, the idea of starting a hairdressing business together started with a family conversation around the dinner table at home in Cambridge. “Luigi said, ‘I want to do hairdressing,’ and I said, ‘Yeah, that sounds cool!’” recalls Joey. “Our dad said that if we were going to do it, we should go into it with the aim of running a business together. Our uncle is a barber who has his own shop in Cambridge, and our dad runs his own business in the city, too, so it seemed like a natural goal, although it was a while before it actually happened.” Both brothers started out working in London for a company called Jingles. Back in Cambridge, Joey worked at Toni & Guy for ten years while Luigi was at Al Couture, and Toni & Guy for seven years. One day, their dad spotted a salon on Mill Road, run by his neighbour, Ron, was up for sale. “Ron wanted to retire,” says Joey. “My dad reminded us of that conversation around the table 12 years previously. I said no to begin with; I was happy where I was. But Luigi, being two years older,

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was ready to take a chance on running a business. I gradually began to see that if we were going to do it, this was the perfect opportunity. So I decided to go for it, and it was the best decision I ever made.” The brothers completed on the building in October 2013, and opened two months later. Running a business with your brother has its ups and downs, admits Joey. “We’re hot-headed Italian brothers, and we shout at each other every five minutes,” he laughs. “But I love him dearly, and if there’s something Luigi’s passionate about, then I let him take the reins, and he does the same for me if there’s something that’s really important to me. And sometimes we meet in the middle. But one of the secrets of our success is that we also have Kathryn; she’s the scales, the one who keeps us balanced. I’ve known her for years, and she officially joined Fratelli a year after we opened, but she’s been there guiding us and helping us right from the start.” The rest of the team at Fratelli are hugely important to the success of the

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business, too. “The ethos behind our salon is that we are a family,” says Joey. “When you describe a family, maybe you’ve got the crazy uncle, the quiet cousin, the one who’s not actually related but is always there anyway… that’s what Fratelli is like; everyone is unique and individual, but we’re a family all the same, and each person brings their own strengths to the table. We want every customer to feel welcome at Fratelli; everyone who works here has a lot of talent and a lot of experience, and we are always pushing the creative, innovative side of what we do.” In 2018, Fratelli became a genderfree salon, meaning that its pricing is based entirely on the time taken on an appointment, not on whether a customer is male or female. “Some women have short hair, some men have long hair, and it doesn’t seem right that women should be charged more simply because of their gender. We call it gender neutral, but a more accurate phrase is ‘equality pricing’. The price is based on you as an individual,” explains Joey.

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INDEPENDENT OF THE MONTH

“We are independent. We can do what we want, and take risks on issues that are important to us” He admits that he’s had calls from clients, and from other hairdressers, saying that they don’t get it. “Some people say, ‘I don’t understand what I’m booking in for.’ But we have an hour appointment as a first step for every new client, and we get to know you and your hair, and then you’ll just get the length of appointment that you need with your stylist. Lots of customers find they actually save money, and it’s important to us to be fair, and give everyone the best service that we can,” Joey explains. “A lot of our local customers tell us how great they think our equality pricing is,” he continues. “There’s a very active, passionate LGBTQ+ community in Cambridge, particularly around the Mill Road area where we’re based, and we’ve

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had clients thanking us for what we’ve done, and some who say they’ve come to us specifically because of it. It’s not a system that pleases everyone, and some people do take the mickey. But we’re not a corporate company, we are independent: and that means we can do what we want, when we want, and we can take risks and make changes on issues that are important to us. We don’t have to answer to anyone else.” Being part of the Cambridge community is important for Joey and Luigi, and they try to give back to the city by getting involved with local charities. “So far this year we’ve raised £10,700 for Rooprai Spinal Trust,” says Joey, “A friend of mine, Marrianne Rooprai, was involved in an accident when she was 27, and

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the charity raises money to help people affected by spinal cord injuries. I ran the London Marathon in April, and the RideLondon-Surrey 100 in August, and our clients have been amazingly generous in supporting some of our fundraising activities in the salon. “We also work with a local charity called Something To Look Forward To. Anyone who is having treatment for cancer can visit the website and bid for a treat – anything from a free haircut with us to afternoon tea at Browns. The charity is always looking for other businesses to offer treats, so it’s a great local thing to be involved with, and something that we’re really proud of,” Joey concludes. Fratelli Hair, 215 Mill Road, Cambridge CB1 3BE, 01223 241212, fratellihair.co.uk

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TOP SPOTS TO VISIT ALONG ONE OF THE CITY’S MOST VIBRANT STREETS

R E LE VAN T RE C ORDS Relevant is riding the wave of the vinyl resurgence in style. Upstairs is a friendly, fairy-lit cafe lined with band posters and filled with mismatched furniture (there’s a few tables out the front, too), while downstairs is a retro record store stuffed with new and pre-owned vinyl, ranging from new releases to rare collectors’ editions. From breakfast time to cocktail hour, this place is buzzing, and there’s often live music or themed evenings (our favourite being pizza, prosecco and board games night). Committed crate diggers, look out for the Record Store Day festivities each April, when you can enjoy a day of bands, a great atmosphere and a chance to pick up covetable RSD rare releases.

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M I L L ROA D S P OT L I G H T

URBAN LARDER

THE S EA TRE E A smart little fish and chip bar on Mill Road’s Broadway, the family-run Sea Tree has been a hit with locals since it first opened its doors over a decade ago. Why? Firstly, the choice is excellent, whether you’re after a classic battered cod, juicy sautéed tiger prawns, crab cakes, a rustling dish of calamari or a soul-warming bowl of fish stew, served with a hunk of crusty bread: there’s plenty to tempt beyond your bog standard fish and chips. All the fish is cooked to order, battered, grilled or pan-fried, plus there’s gluten-free or low-calorie options, and veggie choices. There’s even a wet fish counter where you can pick something up to take home and cook (if you have any especially niche fishy requests, they’ll source it from their suppliers at Billingsgate Market). The homemade condiments, which include wasabi sauce and salsa Verdi, are a cut above the usual, too.

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© NICOLA FOLEY

A cosy cafe in the heart of Mill Road, Urban Larder is known for serving a cracking coffee, a tremendous toastie, and perhaps most famously of all, a delectable doughnut. The latter are unveiled to punters at 11am each Thursday, creating what can legitimately be described as a stampede towards the counter. There’s a new flavour each week, with recent offerings including Key Lime Pie and lemon and poppyseed, and you can win yourself one if you manage to ‘guess the guest’ via Urban Larder’s social media pages before the tray of sugar-dusted goodness hits the counter every Thursday. We have to mention the great, homemade sausage rolls and Scotch eggs too, plus if you fancy doing a spot of shopping there are usually some nice chutneys, oils, jams and cards from local artists to peruse.

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Responsible for many a brutal hangover for Mill Roaders, the tiny (it seats only 20) but excellent 196 is an essential stop-off on any night out in this corner of the city. Once you’ve been seated – easier said than done in an establishment this compact – you’re presented with a handwritten menu that opens up a world of libationary possibilities. Keep it classic with a negroni or martini or sample a more exotic tipple, such as the Jalisco Sour: whichever you choose, you’ll be in the safest of hands with 196’s clever mixologists. In summer, drinkers line the pavement with daquiris watching Mill Road go by, whereas in winter, the bar becomes a cosy cocoon, all steamed up windows and candlelight, making it a cocktail bar for all seasons.

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M I L L ROA D S P OT L I G H T

L I MONCE L LO A little slice of Italy in the thick of Mill Road, Limoncello is a deli, cafe and neighbourhood favourite. The many varieties of pesto, imported from an artisan producer in Sicily, are a big draw – so fantastically flavoursome and tasty they can elevate a hastily thrown-together penne-and-sauce dinner to an authentic Italian feast (good slathered on a cracker or slice of bread, too). But that’s far from all Limoncello offers: there’s a garden outside to relax and enjoy an Aperol Spritz and antipasti, or you can stop by in the evening for classic Italian dishes like homemade lasagne or tortellini, finished off with a scoop of gelato. It’s ideal for gifts too, with floor to ceiling shelves of olive oils, biscotti, and – of course – bottles of limoncello.

CULINARIS A foodie Aladdin’s cave that’s filled to the brim with delicious delicacies, Culinaris opened in December 2015 at 88 Mill Road, rather bravely launching for business on the day of the chaotic Mill Road Winter Fair. Since then, this speciality food store has become known and loved for its huge selection of cheeses, well stocked charcuterie cabinet and endless array of artisan condiments, sauces, chocolates and sweets from around the world. Our top tip is to swing by for a lunchtime sandwich, choosing whichever component parts you fancy from the fresh counter, to be served between two thick slices of freshly baked bread. Feeling lazy? You don’t even have to leave the house: these sensational sarnies are orderable via Deliveroo.

VAN DERLYLE The new restaurant of local celebrity chef (and Cambridge Edition columnist) Alex Rushmer, Vanderlyle opened its doors on Mill Road in March this year. Having built up a fan base in the city over his five years running The Hole in the Wall in Little Wilbraham, diners were falling over themselves to book a table at the restaurant, which offers a set five-course tasting menu with a focus on seasonal, vegetable-led dishes. The menu ebbs and flows with the seasons, but always showcases produce from a line-up of great local producers. The drinks flights are fantastic, too.

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M I L L ROA D S P OT L I G H T

ATITHI Mill Road has more than its fair share of top-notch curry houses – any of which could have made their way on to this list, but one you may not have discovered yet is relative newcomer Atithi. It opened its doors at the start of this year, promising “contemporary Indian cuisine with a sophisticated twist”, and serving an outstanding six-course tasting menu, as well as à la carte, vegan and vegetarian menus, plus the Dawat (sharing) menu. Manning the stoves is head chef Kamaladasan, who spent eight years at the Michelin-starred Tamarind in London, honing his unique style. His creations include six-hour slow-cooked Hyderabadi lamb shank, and stuffed paneer with Indian five spice and dried pickled fig – there’s also staple dishes such as butter chicken masala and daal makhani on the menu.

MILL ROAD BUTCHERS

Beloved of foodies and restaurateurs across the city, Mill Road Butchers stocks a wide range of meat from highly regarded suppliers such as Dingley Dell Farm and Sutton Hoo. As well as meat, the shop sells tasty pies, pasties and other savoury bites, and, after makeover courtesy of local design wizards Loci Interiors, is possibly the most stylish butchers shop you’ll visit. “Hilariously funny, ambitiously hipster butchers with a passion for supplying the best products and customer service around,” is how they describe themselves – and we’re inclined to agree! CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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M I L L ROA D S P OT L I G H T

SC OT T’S

© NICOLA FOLEY

The newest addition to Mill Road’s bustling line-up of independent cafes, you’ll find Scott’s where Golden Curry used to sit, on the corner of Mill Road and Kingston Street. There’s lots to tempt on the menu, beginning bright and early at 8am daily with breakfast, which includes hearty shakshuka, avocado smash and “The Big”: a stonking Full English featuring Mill Road Butchers’ sausages and bacon, homemade baked beans, and thick slices of sourdough. The lunch menu takes its inspiration from New York deli-style sandwiches and salads, while the evening yields sourdough pizza with a mouthwatering range of toppings, some of which take ingredients and inspiration from other traders along Mill Road (ours is a ‘Culinaris’, please). The coffee’s sourced from London’s excellent Caravan roastery, and there are cocktails available too, making it a great spot for any time of day.

T R ADIZION E An in-the-know gem, Tradizione is the place for affordable, authentic Italian food. Serving steaming bowls of pasta, lasagne, focaccia sandwiches and world-beating pizza, all in a friendly setting, its fans ensure this restaurant is generally packed. You can also bring your own booze – pick up a bottle of something tasty from Bacchanalia up the road and enjoy delicious food and drink on a shoestring. © CHARLOTTE GRIFFITHS

TOM’S CAKES

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This smart little bakery and cafe is helmed by the talented Tom Dolby, who built up a name for himself selling his delicious wares at farmers’ markets for years before opening up the original Tom’s Cakes in St Ives. A resounding hit with locals, the bakery went from strength to strength, leading him to open a second branch on Mill Road in 2016. He transformed what was the loveably scruffy CB1 into a sleek, modern café that locals adore for its gorgeous cakes, cloud-like meringues and macarons, freshly baked sausage rolls and oversized scones.

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M I L L ROA D S P OT L I G H T

THE OLD CHEMIST SHOP Forget identikit Ikea furniture and problematic fast fashion and get yourself to The Old Chemist Shop, which stocks a fantastic range of vintage clothing, collectibles and homeware. Whether you’re in the market for retro barware, a piece of jewellery with a story, quirky period clothing or just to have a browse and be inspired, it’s a friendly, accessible place that makes vintage shopping fun. The shop houses various different brands, including Vintage Home & Wear, which specialises in unique clothing ranging from steampunk regalia to 1940s flapper dresses – all of which are available to buy or hire. © NICOLA FOLEY

CAMBRIDGE MOSQUE If you haven’t visited this architectural beauty, which opened in April this year, make your way down to the Brookfields end of Mill Road and prepare to be stunned. Inspired by both Islamic and English design traditions, this pioneering mosque was the product of a decade’s worth of planning, created by Marks Barfield Architects (whose other work includes the London Eye), alongside a geometer, artists and a garden designer. Set back from the street, the building is entered via a garden with fountains encircled by a seating area; a vaulted timber structure drawing the eye upwards towards the magnificent golden dome. As well as being visually impressive, the mosque is a model of sustainability, making use of natural light, solar panels and groundsource heat pumps, and utilising grey water and rainwater to flush WCs and irrigate the grounds, leading it to be widely described as Europe’s first eco-friendly mosque.

B AC C HANALIA Taking its name from a Roman festival of excess, Bacchanalia keeps the hedonistic spirit alive with its well-stocked shelves of premium booze. This much-loved shop has been serving the Mill Road community for a whopping 20 years, having opened as a sister shop to the Victoria Road branch back in 1999. What it lacks in size, it more than makes up for in choice – stocking a huge range of great wines and artisan spirits. The beer selection is especially impressive, with brews from all over the world on offer, plus cask conditioned local draught beer which customers can enjoy straight from the tap. The team host regular tastings in store too, and will happily supply your drinks for private events.

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B E AU T Y

WORDS BY DAISY DICKINSON

eptember is one of my favourite months for many reasons. Beautiful, balmy late-summer evenings and the warming glow of the landscape turning an autumnal hue, making the seasonal colour palette pop. And for me, warm tones in make-up are everything. Typically, the ‘rules’ say if you have brown eyes, you’re lucky in that most eyeshadow colours will suit you. It’s as simple as using the colour wheel and choosing colours opposite your own, so opt for deep purple, bronze or gold to make brown eyes bright, and for blue eyes, rich browns and terracotta will work well for you. Green eyes are said to be the rarest colour of them all, and to make them stand out, red sits opposite on the wheel. If that siren shade is too much, go for dark pinks and maroons. Zoeva is known for its pigmented palettes, and the Voyager Matte Eyeshadow Palette (£14, cultbeauty.co.uk) is the perfect starter palette if you’re new to warm shades. Use Across the Street as a transition shade in the hood, and blend the top three colours across the lid for a sultry look. Use a thin brush to buff Chat Late At Night under the outer corner of your bottom lashes for a little more vamp. I’m a big fan of a shimmer to really add fuel to fiery shades, and Huda Beauty is really packing the petrol. Pick up one of the Obsessions palettes from Cult Beauty for £25 each, and you’ll find nine shades including mattes and shimmers. Use a damp finger to press the shimmer shades

over shadow in the centre of your eyelid, and smooth out. The perfect palette for stashing in your bag, the Nyx Ultimate palette in Phoenix (£16, Boots) is packed with autumnal shades to see you through the season. Hot tip: if you want to add punch to light shades like the yellow in this palette, invest in a white liner, like Nyx Slim Eyeliner Pencil in White (£3.50, Boots), or use concealer carefully patted over lids to act as a priming base, before packing the colour over the top with a finger or fluffy brush. Who doesn’t love a Naked palette from Urban Decay? The Naked Heat (£42, John Lewis) doesn’t disappoint. This is a great eyeshadow palette for those who want to warm up their look without getting too spicy, with subtle, wearable shades. If lippie is more your thing, fear not – there are some stunning shades for the golden season. I would encourage you to be brave and go for something bold. Too Faced Melted Matte Gingerbread Man is the one, if you can find it, but this coveted shade is often sold out, so try (ironically) Sell Out and Lady Balls mixed together for a hack (£19 each, Asos). Nyx Liquid Suede Cream Lipstick in Orange County (£7, Boots) is pumpkin perfect, and for a more sultry smile opt for Kat Von D in Exorcism (£17, Debenhams), which is long-lasting and freakishly good.

THE ONE THAT I WANT Beautiful packaging, cruelty free and vegan. Lime Crime is smashing it when it when it comes to creative make-up. The Lime Crime Venus palette (£34, cultbeauty.co.uk) is the winner for warm shades. With eight outrageously pigmented shades, including rustic reds, browns, burgundies and pretty, pinky nudes – you’ll be set for the season.

“There are some stunning shades for the golden season. Be brave and go for something bold” S E P T E M B E R 2 019

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WEDDINGS PA RT I I

Big day bright ideas

FROM GORGEOUS VENUES TO HEN WEEKEND INSPIRATION, AND NOT FORGETTING THE FINISHING TOUCHES, WE HAVE ALL YOU NEED TO PLAN YOUR CAMBRIDGE WEDDING WORDS BY SIOBHAN GODWOOD

LARKHALL FARM WEDDINGS Makeup: Flashkate Bridal Makeup Model: Ashlea Lauren Dress: Petitcoats and Pocket Watches Photography: blackcravat.com larkhallfarm.com

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WEDDINGS

Vibrant venues WHETHER YOUR WEDDING IS BIG OR SMALL, FORMAL OR LAID-BACK, THERE ARE PLENTY OF BEAUTIFUL LOCATIONS TO CHOOSE FROM

BASSMEAD MANOR Bassmead Manor Barns, complete with its own moat, is nestled within acres of Cambridgeshire countryside in Staploe, near St Neots. Every couple has exclusive use of the venue, whether it’s an intimate dinner for 50 or a lavish event for 150. Say your vows in the traditional, beamed barn, then enjoy drinks and dinner, prepared by the on-site Galloping Gourmet catering team, in one of the exquisitely designed modern spaces. bassmeadmanorbarnsweddings.co.uk

MURRAY EDWARDS COLLEGE There’s no fixed formula for a wedding, and at Murray Edwards College, there’s the space and flexibility to create the day you want. This unique, contemporary venue offers scope to use the space in truly imaginative ways – perhaps incorporating barbecues, afternoon tea on the lawn and games – or even a bouncy castle! There are facilities to cater for up to 270 in The Dome, and Murray Edwards also offers on-site parking and is just a five-minute walk from Shire Hall Registry Office. “Our gardens are popular for drinks receptions and photographs,” says Chris Pope, general manager of residences, catering and events. “Our friendly team is on hand to provide ideas, discuss options and help with planning before the big day.” murrayedwardsevents.co.uk

SECRET GAR DEN AT BURWASH MANOR You may be familiar with Burwash Manor in Barton as a fab retail destination, but did you know that there’s a gorgeous wedding venue there, too? The Secret Garden is a charming walled garden, with pretty wrought-iron furniture and a gazebo dotted around, and a luxurious marquee that can seat up to 90 for your wedding breakfast. It’s available to hire from February through to early September, and really is the ideal setting for a dream country wedding. burwashweddings.com

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WEDDINGS

THE GRANARY ESTATES In the charming village of Woodditton, just 15 miles outside of Cambridge, the 18th-century Granary Barns offer the perfect setting for a relaxed and intimate wedding day providing space, flexibility and plenty of originality and character. With two barns licensed for civil ceremonies, the barns can accommodate up to 180 guests and are surrounded by picturesque cornfields and beautiful woodlands, with an idyllic courtyard nestled in the centre. The barns have flint walls and exposed beams throughout, to give a classic, yet contemporary feel. There are two original barns, linked by an open glass walkway, with a stunning private

courtyard which has been beautifully landscaped and features original farming antiques. The award-winning team at The Granary Estates is experienced in helping couples organise their special day, from the early booking stages until the last guest leaves. The venue also offers on-site accommodation in the form of two Granary Cottages, located down a quiet driveway and surrounded by peaceful fields. Both have three double bedrooms, fully equipped kitchens and private gardens. Meadow Cottage also boats an impressive make-up lounge, which is perfect for bridal parties. thegranaryestates.co.uk

SOUT H FARM This venue in the heart of the stunning Cambridgeshire countryside is family owned and has gorgeous gardens, barns and a Grade II listed country farmhouse. Couples get exclusive use, and there are four indoor ceremony spaces to choose between – or the beautiful summerhouse outside. Twinkling fairy-lit cherry trees line the driveway and the historic barn buildings offer a fantastic choice of reception spaces. The stunning backdrop of South Farm means you can take your pick of spots for perfect wedding photos. Accommodation includes a beautiful bridal suite and guest bedrooms, and there’s also a unique collection of handpainted Romany caravans where guests can stay, while the more adventurous guests can pitch a tent and camp in the paddocks! south-farm.co.uk

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L AR K HAL L FAR M Larkhall Farm is a charming place to have the wedding of your dreams. Co-produced by Catherine Watling (director of Neon Moon), and Bob and Lou Taylor from The Fox, Burwell, this unique pop-up venue is located on a beautiful rural farm, offering everything needed for your perfect big day. It’s an inclusive venue, welcoming all with open arms, and it’s perfect for festival and vintage-style weddings. Yearly availability is limited so it’s worth enquiring sooner rather than later. facebook.com/larkhallfarm

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WEDDINGS

SWYNFORD MANOR

Swynford Manor is an 18th-century country house in Six Mile Bottom, near Newmarket, surrounded by seven acres of stunning gardens. Every detail of your wedding is provided for, from the bridal preparation room and the sweeping staircase for the perfect entrance, to the terrace that’s ideal for drinks. Plus, there’s the garden room, which makes an excellent space for the meal and dancing afterwards. What really makes Swynford Manor stand out are the alfresco wedding options. The beautiful pergola is licensed for civil ceremonies, and can be draped with flowers to make a dreamy outdoor wedding location, with the Cambridgeshire countryside forming a gorgeous backdrop. You can even have your wedding breakfast outside, and the garden room is available if you want to take things indoors after the ceremony. swynfordmanor.com/weddings

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WEDDINGS

It’s all in the detail CAMBRIDGE IS HEAVING WITH LOCAL SUPPLIERS TO TAKE ALL THE STRESS OUT OF ORGANISING THE FINE DETAILS OF YOUR WEDDING

GI FT LIST

WEDDING CARS

This is one of the best bits! Most couples choose a list at a department store – John Lewis is a popular choice (johnlewisgiftlist. com). But if you fancy something a little more unconventional – or you already have a kettle and a toaster – why not go for an arty wedding list? Byard Art on King’s Parade offers a gift service; and Art Hound gallery at Burwash Manor offers a personal, bespoke service for anyone looking to invest in a special piece of art. byardart.co.uk thearthoundgallery.com

Maybe you have always dreamed of rolling up to your wedding in a classic Bentley S1 – or perhaps making a more modern entrance in a sleek Aston Martin DB9? Either way, Cambridge Wedding Cars has a vehicle for you. You can even choose a M*A*S*H-style US Army Jeep! cambridge-wedding-cars.co.uk

IN THE MOOD FOR DANCING If you’re looking for a brilliant wedding reception icebreaker, or a way for your guests to build up a good appetite for the cake, then why not consider a ceilidh from Cambridge University Ceilidh Band? It makes a nice change from, or addition to, the usual wedding band or disco. cucb.co.uk

RAISE YOUR GLASSES There’s nothing worse than running out of booze at a wedding. OK, there are some things worse, but it’s definitely up there as one of the big worries. How much wine will people actually drink? And how many bottles of fizz do you need? It would be awful to run out, but what if you buy too much, and waste money you could have spent on some of the other details? Well, fear not, because Cambridgebased Thorne Wines has the answers to all of those concerns. Husband-and-wife team James and Ellie Thorne offer a service that is far more personal than the wine packages offered by most venues; and there’s a good chance they can save you money, too. In the

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planning stages, they will come to your home with a selection of wines for you to taste and discuss, so they can find out what you really like, and tailor a package specifically to you, your budget, the number of guests and the food you’re serving. Even if your venue offers its own wine package, James and Ellie are confident they can find fantastic wines more cheaply, even with the corkage added on. Plus, you can order as much as you like with no worries about getting too much, as it’s all on a sale-or-return basis. To set up your appointment, email James at james@thornewines.com. thornewines.com

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WEDDINGS

Happy hens WITH BEAUTIFUL CAMBRIDGE AS THE BACKDROP, YOUR HEN PARTY IS GUARANTEED TO BE A WEEKEND TO REMEMBER

PICK U P A PUNT If you’re having your hen party in Cambridge – whether you’re a local or you’ve chosen the city because it’s such a beautiful place to visit – then you’re going to want to include punting as part of your celebration. Let’s Go Punting offers a range of hen party experiences to add on to your chauffeured trip, including a scavenger hunt and afternoon tea, punting with cocktail making and a Latin meal, or life drawing and a three-course feast. Minimum group size is six people, and the price varies depending on your package. With most packages, you can bring your own drinks, and there’s a handily placed wine merchants on Quayside where you can stock up! letsgopunting.co.uk cambridge-hen-party.co.uk

COCK TAI LTA S TIC There’s often an expectation on hen weekends that you should do some kind of group activity, and cocktail making is a great choice for people who don’t really like group activities, but definitely like drinking. Plus, it’s a genuinely useful life skill. Our favourite Cambridge venue for brushing up your mixology is La Raza on Rose Crescent, which offers sessions for groups of four or more. You’ll get to learn all about the art of cocktail making, get tips for recreating the drinks at home, and – the best bit, of course – you get to drink your creations! laraza.co.uk/workshops

VIP TREATMENT A hen night is a once-in-a-lifetime party – hopefully – and wherever you choose to go, you want to be able to sit with your friends, relax and chat; not cram in to a crowded bar with the rest of Cambridge. Cocktail bar Ta Bouche will set aside an area just for your party, and make sure you’re regularly supplied with drinks and food, too, should you want it. Just like your very own VIP area! tabouche.co.uk

B RIDAL SHOWC A SE Brides to be, mark 22 September in your diary, when you can see a collection of top-quality wedding suppliers, from florists to photographers, exhibiting together at the Island Hall Bridal Showcase. The day will begin with an elegant fashion show, followed by a chance to meet with suppliers including Country Tipis, Cambridge Dining, Vow Bridal and Two Little Cakes bakery. It’s also a chance to see Island Hall, a stunning venue in Godmanchester, dressed for a wedding, with a floating canopy on the lawn, tipi bar, floral arrangements and even live music, providing plenty of inspiration and a beautiful backdrop.

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A D U LT E D U CAT I O N • D E CO D I N G L E AG U E TA B L E S • B AC K TO S C H O O L

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E D U CAT I O N

INTERPRETING SCHOOL RESULTS CAN BE A CONFUSING BUSINESS. CHARLOTTE PHILLIPS FINDS OUT HOW TO DECIPHER THE DATA

hen it comes to choosing a school, that iceberg metaphor isn’t half apt. Visiting in person or online may give you a feel for the buildings, the grounds and the equipment, but what parents actually see when they’re choosing a school is about 10% of what life there is all about. The bottom line is that it’s all about context. To be able to make an informed decision, it helps to know what the information you’re presented with can tell

you and – more to the point – what it can’t. Many families start off with the results. In theory at least, they leave nowhere to hide. Either a school is successful or it’s not. With national league tables published online within days of the results coming out, parents are able to see not just how well the school is doing, but how it compares with others. But whether the most recent results dazzle or disappoint, they are a snapshot

“Not all schools are in the newspaper league tables, believing them to be highly misleading” CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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E D U CAT I O N in time, representing just one year in a school’s life – one chapter in an evolving story – and should be approached with caution, particularly as some schools don’t even appear in them, says John Attwater, principal of King’s Ely. “Not all schools are in the newspaper league tables – this is an opt-in process and many top schools decided some years ago not to take part, believing them to be highly misleading,” he explains. And he stresses that league tables are, at best, “only one tool for helping to choose a school”. He adds: “All are focused only on exam results at GCSE or A-level. They measure averages only, so broadly speaking, a school towards the top of the league tables will tend to be academically highly selective (their average child will be a high-flyer), while one lower down will recruit from a broader range of ability, but may still contain a large number of highflyers and teach excellently.” For some children, an unashamedly academic environment can be just what they need. For others, including those who may be very able, a more mixed intake will be a better fit. “Don’t get the wrong impression from those schools that don’t have a high bar entrance exam and slightly lower GCSE scores,” says Richard Settle, head teacher at Sancton Wood School. “If you’ve got a mixed cohort, schools that are achieving above the national average are doing something pretty right,” he says. If results are OK-ish, but in gentle decline compared with a few years back, parents should be asking why. Plenty of schools will have a blip that could be down to a revamped subject, a new syllabus or even variations in pupils’ ability. In smaller schools with correspondingly diminutive year groups, it can take just a few pupils in a marginally weaker cohort to do rather worse than anticipated, so results show a significant dip – only to shoot up again the following summer when a higher-achieving group of pupils sit their exams. “Bear in mind that if you’ve got a school with one or two form entry, it only needs one or two students

“If you’ve got a mixed cohort, schools that are achieving above the national average are doing something pretty right” S E P T E M B E R 2 019

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not to do so well to massively skew a league table standing, so be careful on that as well,” warns Richard Settle. And if you’re still none the wiser (schools can be surprisingly reticent about the amount of detail they go into), it’s worth asking for a breakdown of grades for each subject. Most schools will be glad to share this information, as well as telling parents the number of candidates taking the exams in each subject. Again, it’s all about context. If one pupil takes GCSE German and gains a top grade, it will show

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E D U CAT I O N

up as 100% – but tell you almost nothing about how strong modern languages teaching is at the school. Again, seek comparisons with previous years. That side-by-side column will tell it like it is. Ask about progress, too. Many schools assess pupils – state schools are required to do so – at regular intervals. Most schools now measure ‘value added’ – aka the way pupils perform against others of similar raw ability, so ask whether and how this is done, says John Attwater. Their goal is to improve on the raw material they

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start off with, so children do better than you’d have expected them to. How much better can vary substantially, but good teaching that challenges children and inspires a real love of learning can make an enormous difference. Seeing where that learning takes place can also give families a nice, warm feeling. Nothing beats seeing just where the school is investing its money, from high-tech science labs (clinical white with splashes of primary colours is a wish list must-have for many a department head

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these days), to multisports pitches and multilevel libraries. Context applies here, as well. There’s no doubt that new buildings (always photographed with all the lights on, ideally across a lake at sunset), can be hugely impressive. The canny parent, however, will want to know who gets to use them and when. A new theatre that stands empty for most of the time because only the super-talented are chosen for the mega summer production might not be quite the showstopper it first appears. And take a second look at that fabulous library. Are there gaps in its shelves or are they stuffed full of immaculate-looking books? If so, where are the queues of pupils arriving in their dozens to relax, read and borrow? It’s also important to look at how well grounds and buildings are looked after by staff and pupils, says John Attwater. “Clearly well-used and loved, even if that means looking worn by the summer term and waiting for annual maintenance, is much better than pristine and unused. But there’s a difference, too, between well-used and neglected or abused: a school and its pupils’ attitude to their environment often reflects their attitude to each other.”

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“It is critical the school choice works well for family life, or it will be a source of stress” Then there’s the location. Countryside schools may offer dreamy tree-lined drives, listed buildings and green acres of fields stretching into the distance. City centre establishments, on the other hand, pride themselves on their ability to couple an urban setting with unbelievably imaginative architecture. Good design can take you a long way when space is at a premium. City centre or fairytale idyll, it’s worth doing a reality check and seeing how well the school gels with families’ lifestyles. Given that more parents than ever before are dual earners with full-time jobs, that last-minute dash to collect an unwell child or drop in that missing violin,

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homework or permission slip could end up feeling a lot more like a Brothers Grimm special than The Enchanted Wood. “It is critical the school choice works well for family life, otherwise it will always be a source of stress, which will inevitably be transmitted to the child,” points out John Attwater. “Location and accessibility are therefore important, whether for day or boarding schools.” It’s also sensible to get an insight into a school’s culture and see whether – as the song has it – you feel ‘one of the family’. It’s a fair bet that all schools’ literature for prospective parents will stress the welcoming, friendly vibe. Some have a highly distinctive ethos.

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“Choosing a school for your child is a personal matter to them” St Christopher School, an independent school based in Letchworth Garden City, for example, prides itself on its reputation as ‘not your typical independent school’, where pupil happiness stems from a focus on the individual. “It’s important when you look round and talk to people to see if you feel comfortable,” says Richard Settle. “If you feel uncomfortable and slightly out of place, the chances are your child is going to as well.” If you want to know how it would feel to be a school family and check the school walks the walk, try to speak to current families – some have parent ambassadors who are always happy to talk to prospective parents. Sancton Wood will do its best to match you with a family who joined in similar circumstances – relocating at short notice, for example. Ask what they – and their children – like about the school. Find out if they have any niggles. Minor (the odd duff school lunch, for example) is as you’d expect: no school, after all, is perfect. Major issues – many unfilled key teaching posts, sudden staff departures, consistently poor communications with parents – deserve further investigation. Finally, but most importantly, ensure that when you’re considering a school, you’re always doing it from the perspective of your child. And that means considering the whole picture, says John Attwater. “In the same way most people wouldn’t pick a spouse from a league table of their statistics, and would probably rightly regard someone with suspicion who was keen to be measured in that way, choosing a school for your child is a personal matter to them, and you really do owe it to them to do a proper matching process.”

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ALL-ROUND EXCELLENCE

Just south of Cambridge, Felsted School offers unrivalled education opportunities

recently crowned National U18 Cricket Champions, with many others playing at a high level across the school’s core sports of rugby, netball, tennis, hockey and cricket. Current partnerships with Essex Cricket, Saracens and Northampton Saints rugby, and Saracens Mavericks netball ensure a pathway of excellence is in place for those excelling in these sports.

TOP 5% IN THE UK

Felsted School is ranked in the top 5% of all schools in the UK Government league tables for A Level performance progress. This is why a Felsted education has become the popular choice for many parents in the region, who appreciate our focus on pupil well-being, small class sizes, dedicated teachers and variety of flexible boarding and day options. Felsted, situated on a stunning 90acre village campus and just 45 minutes south of Cambridge, offers a choice of A Levels or the IB Diploma in the Sixth Form, a superb careers and leadership programme and global exchanges. There’s also numerous opportunities to succeed at a high level in sport, the arts, CCF, public speaking and more. The Times Education Supplement shortlisted Felsted for ‘Prep School of the Year’ and ‘Sport School of the Year’ earlier this year, endorsing the superb provision for children from the age of four.

JUNIOR GUILDHALL PARTNERSHIP

Cambridge, where they can take advantage of wide open spaces, superb on-site extracurricular activities and modern boarding facilities. Felsted offers families a variety of flexible boarding options to suit busy working lives, with a school bus leaving Trumpington on a Sunday evening for weekly boarders. NATIONAL SPORTING REPUTATION

FLEXIBLE BOARDING OPTIONS

More and more children are reaping the benefits of going to school outside

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Felsted has an enviable reputation, locally and nationally, for the high quality of its sporting teams. The girls’ cricket team was

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As well as a fantastic music school with many opportunities to perform, those showing outstanding talent may study at the Junior Guildhall in London, as part of a partnership with Felsted. This combination of top-level tuition in music and academics offers an exceptional educational package for top young musicians. Join Felsted at its Open Morning on Saturday 28 September or sign up for one of Felsted’s Autumn Taster Days. Visit felsted.org or contact the admissions team on 01371 822605/admissions@ felsted.org for details.

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CHARLOTTE PHILLIPS EXPLORES THE BENEFITS OF ADULT LEARNING, AS WELL AS THE OPPORTUNITIES AVAILABLE IN CAMBRIDGESHIRE

hen it comes to adult education, our area isn’t so much rich in opportunities as at billionaire levels – several times over. There’s almost nothing you can’t learn, from resurrecting long dormant skills to acquiring expertise in a new field. You can accumulate professional qualifications to boost your promotion prospects in an existing career, or to help you move in a new direction altogether. Local learners certainly seem to be convinced. In the last academic year, almost 2,500 adult students signed up for courses at Hills Road. At Madingley Hall, home of the University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education (ICE), there were 4,800 enrolments last year; a figure that’s predicted to rise to at least 5,500 in the 2019 to 2020 period. The figures are particularly impressive given the difficulties faced by adult education providers over the last few years. While universities are feeling the love in terms of public funding and attention (over £8 billion more in 2017-18), that’s definitely not the case for the 50% of 18 to 30 year olds who don’t make it to college, or for older non-graduates, says a recent report from the Department of Education. Between 2009 and 2018, funding for adult learning fell by 45% and the number of adult learners dropped from four million to 2.2 million between 2005 and 2016. Other countries take a different approach: in France, lifelong learning for workers is viewed so seriously that employers are assessed every six years to make sure they’re doing enough of it. It’s also free. “It’s legislative and it’s mandatory,” says Dr Deirdre Hughes, associate fellow at the University of

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“Adult education will make this country prosper, as well as individuals and their families” Warwick, Institute for Employment Research (IER), and author of an influential report, Adult Education: Too important to be left to chance. As the French have presumably discovered, it’s not just adult learners who lose out from reduced access to education and training in later life, but society as a whole. Get the quality and accessibility right, and everyone benefits. That means – among other things – making the organisations that offer adult education accountable, and ensuring the education that’s on offer really cuts it when it comes to preparing people for a world where flexibility and multiple careers are fast becoming the norm. While local providers are doing their bit – Cambridgeshire skills courses are available to help locals gain the essential skills and qualifications that will get them back into employment or progress in their career – those days may be some way off. Instead of government-funded training (and paid leave for employees while they’re doing it, as in France), UK workers instead have the longest working week in Europe, according to the Trades Union Congress. It’s not hard to understand why, after a hard day’s slog in the workplace, people feel like going home and putting their feet up rather than going back to school. The irony is that people who stand to benefit most from additional training and education – those with fewer skills and qualifications – are the ones least likely to access it, according to a recent Office of National Statistics analysis. Some people cited a lack of confidence as a barrier to learning or training. Others just didn’t have enough time.

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No wonder the IER report by Dr Hughes, published in 2016, called for more joined-up strategic thinking so that disadvantaged adults could carry on learning – and take their places in the workplace. There’s still a long way to go,” she says. “The numbers are falling in terms of adults going on to continue in education. That poses a serious threat to not just economic prosperity, but to actual adult prosperity in day-to-day lives.” It’s all so different from the can-do approach of 100 years ago when the 1919 Report on Adult Education was published. This argued that adult education wasn’t a luxury, but a national essential. If citizens were better educated, they’d also be better equipped to benefit society as a whole. Universities were to play a big role in adult education, actively recruiting older students and being prepared to spend big money on establishing new departments to look after them. That spirit should be rekindled today, thinks Dr Hughes. “We need to focus nationally on adult education,” she says. “It will make this country prosper, and individuals and their families prosper.” In spite of all the obstacles, adult learning institutions in our area are making strenuous efforts to ensure that courses are inclusive and accessible – and that those who would struggle to pay for their courses don’t miss out. “We’ve faced many challenges with the changing economic environment and funding cuts, but we’re still fighting fit,” says Zoe Sweet, Adult Learn and Train officer at Cambridge Academic Partnership, where – among the impressive range of courses offered at venues across our city – students may qualify for full funding to study English and Maths up to GCSE level. So, who is signing up for courses? It’s a varied lot of people, with an equally wide range of motivations, interests, goals and ages. At Hills Road College, half last year were aged between 20 and 39, something that’s “perhaps reflective of available income and fewer responsibilities”, says the college spokesperson. It’s a similarly varied picture when it comes to other providers in our area.

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ADULT EDUCATION IN N UMBERS 2 50+ Number of courses offered at ICE

5.7%

68:32

2.6%

3.7 %

Percentage of students at Hills Road with a learning or physical disability

Ratio of female to male enrolments at Hills Road

Students aged under 20 in adult education at Hills Road

Students aged 70+ in adult education at Hills Road

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FIVE COURSES WITH A DIFFERENCE Undergraduate diploma in Archaeology: Death and the Ancient World (ICE) Painting without boundaries (Hills Road) Flower arranging: Japanese ikebana (Adult Learn and Train) Disco dancing (Hills Road) Eco beeswax wrappers (Adult Learn and Train)

“We’re seeing the retirement age being extended and people in their 50s and 60s thinking, ‘I’ve paid the mortgage off, perhaps the kids have finished university and now I want to start a business, write my autobiography or change career completely’,” says Dr James Gazzard at ICE. Some learners are contemplating a mid-career reboot of their future lives. “They’re thinking about the 100-year life as well, having to work until they’re 70 or 80,” says Dr Gazzard. Some are also concerned about the impact of Industrial Revolution 4.0, the brave new era of machine learning. Brilliant news if you happen to be a perfectly honed algorithm, slightly less so if you’re one of the carbon life forms that it could displace. In the UK as a whole, the number of younger students is still small (2.6% at Hills Road last year), but it’s likely to increase as growing numbers of 19 and 20 year olds decide against going away to college, either so they can earn money while studying part time, or because of learning disabilities. At the other end of the age spectrum, there are the third-age learners. “They’re incredibly engaged and they often have the time and the money to invest, really exploring new disciplines,” says Dr Gazzard. These motivated students feature

at other venues, too. Last year just under 4% of last year’s student cohort at Hills Road were aged 70 or over. Unsurprisingly, the need to widen access and tailor courses to an increasingly challenging future is something that adult education providers in our area know all about. Educational offerings are constantly being honed in terms of content, relevance and learner satisfaction. Providers are keen to stress that learning as an adult is a very different experience from when they were little. “What we’re trying to do is be the open university element of Cambridge, so the students get all the quality and resources of Cambridge, but we’re not judging you on your previous education,” stresses Dr Gazzard. ICE is also widening access with financial support, with bursaries that may be available to prospective students who haven’t previously attended university, are on state benefits or where a state pension is their sole form of income. Learners and their needs are at the heart of the process, agrees Zoe Sweet at the Cambridge Academic Partnership. “When considering provision, we look at the location carefully, we try to ensure accessibility is available for all and, wherever possible, free parking is available. We look at the timings of the courses, deliberating the targeted audience and

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their potential learning barriers,” she says. At Hills Road, meanwhile, a dedicated learning support team provides specialist support to disabled students with learning difficulties and physical disabilities. With providers making it easier than ever before to start learning, the most difficult decision may be which course to opt for. Hills Road could help you see the world differently by learning one of the many languages on offer, including Arabic, French, Italian and Turkish, or help boost your earning power by signing up for courses in website design or running your own business. Or you could simply let the music carry you away with a recreational course in dance (ballroom, Latin or – newest of the lot – disco). Want to develop your ability to think innovatively? (A top skill for the future, according to employers.) How about ICE’s new diploma in creativity? Coaching is also proving extremely popular there, as are courses in international development and international relations. For those seeking to turn an interest into a new career, the silver jewellery course offered by Adult Learn and Train can lead to learners creating their own hallmark and starting a business. “We’ve also had learners who have joined an art class and become inspired to go on to sell their own work, or go on to teach,” says Zoe Sweet. Whoever you are and whatever your current aspirations or previous educational experience, providers in our area are ready to help you. “Often, we see people who are concerned about the future,” says Dr Gazzard. “What we believe we can do is bring the very best of Cambridge to you and do that in a way that’s accessible.”

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A DV E RT I S E M E N T F E AT U R E

GENOMICS ONLINE

Find out about free courses that reach more people, support learning and inspire careers he emphasis on genomics and its role in health and disease is rapidly redefining biological sciences, as well as becoming far more widely discussed, sparking interest from wider and more diverse audiences who wish to explore genomic science and its impact on society. At the Wellcome Genome Campus Advanced Courses and Scientific Conferences (ACSC), a series of courses have been developed to enable as many people as possible from diverse backgrounds to access training in genomics and bioinformatics. There are ten free online courses, open to all, with the aim to broaden global reach and expand the diversity of its programme, making it assessable to adult learners and the continuing education sector. This innovative series of interactive courses, created in collaboration with scientists from the Wellcome Sanger Institute, and delivered in partnership with the UK-based digital social learning experts, FutureLearn, cover a range of key topics, such as: genomes, bacteria, disease, antimicrobial resistance, genomics application in healthcare, computational tools and genetic counselling. The courses reach a wide audience including biomedical researchers, healthcare professionals, undergraduates and even secondary school teachers. The

introductory course, Bacterial Genomes: Disease Outbreaks and Antimicrobial Resistance, is a great resource for scientists and non-scientists alike, including interested members of the public who are keen to learn more about this topic. All the courses aim to make even the most complex and challenging biomedical and genetics concepts assessable and digestible to adult learners from all backgrounds and levels of interest.

YOUR FUTURE S TARTS NOW Each course takes place twice a year, providing plenty of opportunities to start or return and complete the training, so learners can work through them at their own pace to get the most out of all the resources. Seize the opportunity to learn and interact with leading researchers and fellow learners from across the world. The educators look forward to welcoming you or your class to a course of your choice. Join a course now at: bit.ly/ACSC_elearn If you have a question on how these courses could benefit you, your class or institute, please email: Catherine.holmes@wellcomegenomecampus.org

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Some of the more advanced courses, aimed at scientists and healthcare professionals, are particularly valuable tools for continuing professional development as they offer free professional accreditation opportunities. Content is delivered via a mix of videos, featuring scientists from leading international research institutes, articles, and tests and quizzes to check and validate learning. Some courses also include practical exercises and peer review activities. All learners on successful course completion receive a free certificate to acknowledge their hard work and new knowledge skills. For teachers, these courses are useful resources to aid secondary education. Educators can introduce elements from them – such as videos and articles – in their lectures and seminars. The FutureLearn course platform provides a forum to talk through ideas, learn collectively and consolidate and enhance learning. Learners can interact with leading researchers and fellow learners internationally. “Our courses provide an opportunity for self-directed learning, making them complementary to busy lifestyles. Each course offers activities to support different preferred styles of learning, plus the opportunity to do practical exercises makes it easy for people to immediately apply their new-found skills,” says Dusanka Nikolic, education developer (online courses).

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XXXXXXXXX

© GEORGE AT ASDA

E D I T I O N LO V E S • E A R LY AU T U M N GA R D E N S • N E W S E ASO N I N T E R I O R S I N S P O

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GA R D E N S

ANNA TAYLOR, OWNER OF ANNA’S FLOWER FARM IN AUDLEY END, SHARES WHAT’S GOING ON IN THE GARDEN THIS MONTH t’s no coincidence that September still bears that ‘back to school’ feeling in us all, regardless of age. For me, this month is the beginning of the horticultural year. It’s my favourite time, that feeling of a fresh start ahead of another growing season; try new planting ideas, plan new floral arrangements, scour the catalogues and simply enjoy a renewed opportunity to evolve. I love the light, temperature and ambiance of this month. Summer soars with gorgeous light, warm air and abundant borders, whilst autumn overtakes with shorter days, heavy dew and the beginning of mists. In our area, frosts are not expected until October, and if there is a southerly wind on the 21st, a fine autumn or ‘Indian summer’ are usually guaranteed. For gardeners, the harvest allows us to reflect on the year’s successes and some of the lessons learned. That’s why it is good to keep a diary as the year progresses. Every year I wish my diary was as diligently tended as my garden, but when I have kept it up, I have discovered so much about which plants have thrived and why, or recalled pleasing plant combinations, both in the border and bouquet. After taking a bit of a break in August, garden tasks begin in earnest again. On a dry day, collect seeds and sow for early annuals and perennials next year, and

store a few for sowing next spring. Plant out your June- and July-sown annuals; continue to tie in and cut your flowering plants. There are still several weeks’ worth of flowering and I like to drag this out for as long as possible. For late colour in the borders and pots, you can rely on dahlias and bulbs. In fact, there are bulbs for every month and it’s great to judiciously plant them all over the garden for little fireworks of interest throughout the year. Right now, I am

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enjoying pink nerines, gladiolis in dark, inky maroon, and waiting patiently for the deliciously scented acidanthera. Dahlias are filling gaps left from the biennials and spring flowering plants that have been cut back. It’s a great tip to plant up dahlias and bulbs in large pots to grow on in the late spring, and then place into gaps in between planting – just keep an extra eye on these as they will dry out quicker than when planted directly in the beds. Remember, repeat flowering plants will use their energy to make seed for the next growing season unless you snip off the spent bloom, also known as deadheading, which happily generates another flower. Keep watering weekly with a seaweed feed for hungry plants. Begin to plant spring bulbs including narcissus and fritillaries, trim topiary and hedges, and plant evergreens. It’s also a good time to sow grass seed and repair lawns.

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INTERIORS

A NEW SEASON IS THE PERFECT TIME TO REFRESH YOUR HOME. TAKE NOTE OF THE LATEST INTERIOR TRENDS AND YOU CAN BE IN STEP WITH THE MOST CREATIVE DESIGNERS. FROM CRAFTED ACCESSORIES TO GLAMOUROUS FURNITURE, ANGELINA VILLA-CLARKE REVEALS THE NEWEST IDEAS WITH STAYING POWER

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INTERIORS

aking its cue from a Japanese style of living, schemes that embrace a simple yet elegant look have an enduring appeal. Warm up a pared-back design with the layering of textures. Think minimalism with heart. Chunky knitted throws, sheepskin rugs and copper lighting juxtaposed against white floors, the palest pink walls and neutral linen sofas to add cosiness and interest. “Wabi-sabi is the Japanese philosophy based on the acceptance of imperfection,” explains Judy Smith, Crown’s colour consultant. “It’s very much of the moment. Chalky tones of clay and soft pinks make a colour palette that is natural, championing the imperfect and the handmade. The final look is minimal, but still characterful, with colours blending into each other in total harmony.” For added warmth, use slate grey, petrol blue and the lightest ‘mist’ green on walls, doors and skirting boards. Benjamin Moore’s Regal Select and Aura paint colours offer a range of on-trend hues to choose from. Meanwhile, light shades of flooring create an airy and open feel. “Whitewashed or limewashed floorboards make a room appear larger,” says Sarah Escott, Amtico’s design manager. “They reflect the natural light from outside onto the ceiling. If the room decor is kept minimal, white floors will enhance textures and colours, providing the perfect bright background.” Giving a sophisticated finish is Paint & Paper Library’s new Monochrome paint collection, which launches this month. It includes six nuanced pairs of black and white shades, which is fitting with the minimalist approach. Marketing director Ruth Mottershead explains more: “Many of the world’s most elegant interiors, old and new, have used black and white colour schemes to achieve maximal

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CALM INFLUENCES MISSPRINT CO-FOUNDER REBECCA DRURY’S TOP TIPS

Chalky colours can create a sense of tranquillity. Previous page Velvet Evening and Soft Grey Suede, £21.50 for 2.5L, Crown Paints Main image New Black and Clean White, £49.50 for 2.5L, Paint & Paper Library Top Smoked Glass, Wheatgrass and Liqueur, £18 for 2.5L, Crown Paints Middle, left Gentleman’s Gray and Guacamole, from £23 for 0.94L, Benjamin Moore Middle, right Signature Mansion Weave flooring, from £70 per m², Amtico, Bottom Tropics Jungle wallpaper, £72 per roll, MissPrint

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Natural textures, such as a knitted throw, provide a tactile quality. Embrace natural light – perfect for creating a bright, airy feeling.

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“Wabi-sabi is based on the acceptance of imperfection” Top Snowdrop sofa in Periwinkle Chelsea Bloom, £1,840, Sofa.com. Left Bed and accessories, prices vary, John Lewis Bottom Mable daybed, from £625, Sofa.com

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impact with minimum effort. In truth, it’s a disarmingly simple principle, and the considered, subtle combinations in the Monochrome colour card avoid any unpleasant, harsh contrasts of pure jet black and bright, brilliant white.” When it comes to living rooms, keep your space looking effortlessly chic by decluttering, investing in one or two pieces of statement furniture that you love, and opting for built-in storage. “For pared-back styling, pick one or two complementary colours to bring your scheme together. We have some great core hues, such as our deep Midnight Blue and softer mid-grey Shadow, and from there you can add gorgeous pops of colour to add interest,” advises Vanessa HurleyPerera, chief product officer at Sofa.com. Meanwhile, Zoe Stewart, decorative bed linen buyer at John Lewis & Partners, says that the look is perfect for bedrooms. “We look to muted colours in the bedroom not only to reflect our personal style, but also to influence the way we feel. Go for warm and bright hues, which can be incredibly energising,” she says.

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INTERIORS

M I X AND MATCH INTERIOR DESIGNER JOANNA WOOD ON HOW TO ACHIEVE ENGLISH COUNTRY STYLE Use a mixture of floral fabrics, botanical prints and embroidered textiles. Opt for a patterned wallpaper inspired by the English countryside, such as woodland scenes or wildflowers. Mix up furniture. A Chesterfield sofa next to a wingback armchair in a different fabric gives an eclectic feel.

Adam Black, co-founder of Button & Sprung, also advises how to create a minimalist look that adheres to an eastern philosophy. “A zen bedroom will make use of natural daylight and colours will include light, bright tones with soft neutral walls, and upholstery in natural hues.” Perfect for a cosier feel, the classic English country house has long been a source of inspiration for designers. Roaring fires, thick rugs and well-crafted furniture are homely and welcoming. Modern schemes are combining these with silver stag head motifs, quirky botanical prints and sage green and mulberry colourways. Tasha Green, director of Weaver Green, which creates handwoven rugs and textiles made from recycled plastic bottles, says: “Country-house style represents an ease of living in classically inspired interiors. It’s about beautiful things being used in a relaxed way. It is not about the latest fashions, but instead there is a focus on well-crafted furniture, lovely textiles and stand-out lighting that will last the test of time.” Giving a practical – and attractive – focal point is a wood-burning stove, a nod to the imposing fireplaces of old. For a contemporary look, opt for a brightly painted finish, like those available at Arada Stoves. “Fires have been used in the English country home for as long as people have been living in buildings. It’s not just the warmth of a stove that makes an indoor fireplace so appealing – it’s also the

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smoky aroma, crackling sound and warm light,” says Jon Butterworth, sales director at Arada Stoves. Bringing a hint of decadence, the final big trend is inspired by a refined glamourous look – think pewter, marble and velvet blended with Art Deco lines, fringing and iridescent finishing. Farrow & Ball’s metallic wallpapers, which include sumptuous damasks, geometrics and delicate florals, are perfect to achieve the look, as are Sofa.com’s deep velvet armchairs and sofas. Offering an edited range of opulent furniture, as well as an interior design advice service, Juliette Thomas, the director and founder of Juliettes Interiors, suggests pairing “luxurious seating, upholstered in exquisite fabrics, such as velvet and nubuck, with contrasting console tables made in the finest materials for a rich finish.” Soft carpet underfoot adds to the plush aesthetic. Elements London’s collection of premium carpet designs form the ideal base for the glam trend. “The beauty of a neutral carpet is that it allows you to be as creative as you like with your furniture. Our TekSilk composition also feels super soft underfoot,” says Gregory Powley-Lynch, operations director at Elements London. Add in statement lighting, like that at Pooky, a bold piece of art and a curvy sofa, like those at The Sofa and Chair Company, to pull the decadent look together. Nicola Bissoli, head of interior design at The

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INTERIORS Opposite page, far left Accessories, prices vary, Joanna Wood Top left Holly bed in Pumice, from £695, Button & Sprung Middle left Lottie table lamp, £130, Pooky Bottom left Hardy Stove, prices vary, Arada Stoves Main image Lotus BP2067 metallic wallpaper, £130 per roll, Farrow & Ball Below, left Balzac side table, £325, Andrew Martin Below, right Hockney armchair, £1,365, The Sofa & Chair Company

S TOC K IS TS Amtico 0121 745 0800 amtico.com

Arada Stoves 01297 632050 aradastoves.com Andrew Martin 020 7225 5100 andrewmartin.co.uk Benjamin Moore 01753 575756 benjaminmoorepaint.co.uk Button & Sprung 03333 201 801 buttonandsprung.com Crown Paints crownpaints.co.uk Elements London 020 7394 5016 elements.london Farrow & Ball Cambridge 01223 367771 farrow-ball.com Joanna Wood 020 7730 5064 joannawood.com John Lewis & Partners Cambridge 01223 361292 johnlewis.com Juliettes Interiors 020 7870 7415 juliettesinteriors.co.uk MissPrint 01277 350 581 missprint.co.uk Paint & Paper Library 0845 880 5844 paintandpaperlibrary.com Pooky 020 7351 3003 pooky.com Sofa.com 0345 400 2222 sofa.com The Sofa and Chair Company 020 8993 4415 thesofaandchair.co.uk Weaver Green 0844 414 2155 weavergreen.com

Sofa & Chair Company, suggests: “To achieve a glam look, it’s important to create a focal point in your scheme. This could be a sofa or armchair, in a bold colour or rich texture, such as velvet, a statement chandelier or even a large piece of artwork.” “It is the exuberant Miami nightlife that defines this look,” rounds off Martin Waller, founder and creative director of Andrew Martin. “Elaborate Art Deco shapes meet sunset oranges, pinks and the flash of neon lights. Just glorious!”

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INTERIORS GREEN VELVET FRINGE CUSHION £53, thefarthing.co.uk

DITA FRINGED SMALL CABINET IN MUSTARD GOLD £820, audenza.com

ALHAMBRA CEILING PENDANT IN BURNISHED COPPER £99, atkinandthyme.co.uk

E DI T ION

WOOL THROW BORDEAUX EDGE £240, oggetto.com

PALM TABLE LIGHT £395, abodeliving.co.uk

GABRIELLI BLACK VELVET OTTOMAN from £880, thesofaandchair.co.uk ZAHRA BAA SHEEPSKIN STOOL £245, limelace.co.uk

BOTANICA MAXIMUS LUXURY TUFTED RUG £395, frenchbedroomcompany.co.uk

SILVER METAL STAG HEAD £21.95, melodymaison.co.uk

LAKE HOUSE EGGSHELL PAINT £29 for 0.94L, benjaminmoorepaint.co.uk

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Profile for Bright Publishing

Cambridge Edition September 2019  

Cambridge Edition September 2019