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Cambridge EDITION A DV E RT I S E M E N T F E AT U R E

YOUR MONTHLY FIX OF

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LOCAL LIFE

YOUR SUMMER SORTED CAMBRIDGE FOLK FES TIVAL

TOP AL FRESCO DINING SPO TS

Cambridge Comedy Festival SUMMER COCKTAIL RECIPES

CAMBRIDGE OPEN STUDIOS

Secret Garden Party CAMBRIDGE SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL

BIG WEEKEND

© PHOTO CREDIT

STANDON CALLING

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S I G N U P TO O U R W E E K LY D I G I TA L N E W S L E T T E R

Cambridge

ED IT

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W E LC O M E

Welcome.

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E D I TO R I A L

Editor in chief Nicola Foley 01223 499459 nicolafoley@bright-publishing.com Senior sub editor Lisa Clatworthy Sub editor Siobhan Godwood

A DV E RT I S I N G

fear I say this every year, but July is without question my favourite month in Cambridge. Not only are the hazy lido afternoons, sun-dappled punting trips SIGN UP and tipsy Mill Pond evenings W E E K LY TO O U R D reaching their halcyon peak N E W S L E I G I TA L TTER at this point in the calendar, but also the events line-up is the busiest and most exciting it gets all year. First, of course, we have the Big Weekend, which in recent years has treated us to such spectacles as Slade singing Merry Christmas Everybody in sweltering July sunshine, and Boney M strutting and gyrating to Rasputin while a sozzled audience did the same right back at them. Who knows what bonkers fun this year will bring? We’ve got some clues over on page 28. For a rather more refined excursion, I can’t recommend taking in one of the Cambridge Shakespeare Festival performances highly enough. Pack up a picnic and a bottle of something cold and bask in the manicured beauty of some of Cambridge’s most gorgeous gardens while you’re treated to vivid, dynamic performances of the Bard’s best-loved works – it’s a real summer treat which takes some beating. Find out more on page 19. The fascinating Cambridge Open Studios also returns this month for its annual July jaunt, offering a chance to peek behind the doors of artists’ workspaces around the county, seeing a huge range of art and buying or commissioning original pieces, if you like. We chat to some of the artists involved over on page 41. Cambridge Comedy Festival – our city’s answer to the Edinburgh Fringe – is also back on Jesus Green this month, bringing a staggeringly huge line-up of comedians, while Wimpole History Festival, a brand-new event from the organisers of the well-loved Literary Festival, makes its debut too. My pick of the bunch though, and one which is tinged with more than a little sadness this time around, is Secret Garden Party – which will end its flamboyant 15-year run with a huge send-off this month. Having been a devotee of this glitterdrenched, fabulously fun festival for many years, I’m heartbroken to say goodbye but itching to see what they’ve got in store for the last hurrah – have a look on page 35 to see if you can be enticed to come along and join the party one final time. Enjoy the issue and see you next month!

Nicola Foley Editor in chief

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Cambridge

EDIT

Account director Natasha Blatcher 01223 499457 natashablatcher@bright-publishing.com Senior sales executive James Player 01223 492240 jamesplayer@bright-publishing.com Senior sales executive Mary Underwood 01223 499458 maryunderwood@bright-publishing.com

C O N T R I B U TO R S

Alex Rushmer, Angelina Villa-Clarke, Jordan Worland, Ruthie Collins, Siobhan Godwood, Daisy Dickinson, Sam Owens, Sam Cooke, Cyrus Pundole, Charlotte Griffiths

DESIGN & PRODUCTION

Designer Flo Thomas 01223 492242 flothomas@bright-publishing.com Ad production Lucy Woolcomb 01223 499468 lucywoolcomb@bright-publishing.com

M A N AG I N G D I R E C TO R S

Andy Brogden & Matt Pluck 01223 499450

FIND US @ CAMBSEDITION

CAMBSEDITION .CO.UK CAMBRIDGE EDITION MAGAZINE • Bright Publishing Ltd, Bright House, 82 High Street, Sawston, Cambridgeshire CB22 3HJ, 01223 499450, cambsedition.co.uk • All rights reserved. Material contained in this publication may not be reproduced, in whole or in part, without prior permission of the publishers. • Views expressed in this magazine are not necessarily those of Cambridge Edition or Bright Publishing Ltd, which do not accept any liability for loss or damage. • Every effort has been made to ensure all information is correct. • Cambridge Edition is a free publication that is distributed in Cambridge and the surrounding area

This month’s cover was designed by Flo Thomas.

AUTHOR ILLUSTRATIONS BY LOUISA TAYLOR louisataylorillustration.blogspot.co.uk

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Contents. 7 Reasons to be cheerful.

68 Review.

9 Nightlife.

70 Five of the Foodie Best.

Excellent things to enjoy in Cambridge this July

After-dark fun, from live music and club nights to comedy

15 Music blog.

Jordan from Slate the Disco gives his top gig picks for the month

17 Arts & culture. A round-up of arty, cultural events in the city, from exhibitions to theatre

24 Wimpole History Festival. We scope out Cambridgeshire’s brand new history festival

26 Art insider.

Ruthie Collins gives the low-down on arty happenings this month

28 Big Weekend.

From artisan gelato to gargantuan sundaes, we round up the best ice creams in town

Sam from Thirsty reckons it’s time to have a rethink about muchmaligned off-dry white wines

74 Cocktails.

Continuing our warm-up for next month’s cocktail festival, we serve up some tasty tipples

78 Listings.

An at-a-glance guide to what’s on this month around Cambridge

82 Family.

41 Cambridge Open Studios.

Explore the workspaces of artists across the county each weekend in July

47 Competition.

Win a champagne punt tour for you and your pals with Scudamore’s

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80 Independent of the Month.

35 Secret Garden Party.

Cambridge’s answer to the Edinburgh Fringe returns to Jesus Green

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73 Drinks.

The city’s huge, free festival returns this month – we’ve got the lowdown

38 Cambridge Comedy Festival.

83

We pay a visit to a grand dame of the local dining scene: Hotel du Vin

In the spotlight for July, Chilford Hall, one of England’s oldest vineyards

As SGP’s swansong approaches we look back at fifteen years of glittery mayhem

A DV E RT I S E M E NCTOFN E AT TEN UR TSE

Kid-friendly fun and activities for your brood this July

88 Beauty.

Daisy Dickinson shows you how to work the glitter trend this festival season

93 Interiors.

Make your house a home with these gorgeous touches

107 Home store of the month.

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We explore what The English Listed has to offer

110 Property News. The latest news and commentary from the local property market

53 Food News.

Local food news, plus our monthly food column from chef Alex Rushmer

63 Let’s Go Outside. We round up the best places in Cambridge to enjoy an al fresco meal

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NEWS

Reasons to be cheerful. CAMBRIDGE SHAKESPEARE F E S T I VA L

Cambridge Comedy Festival.

If you’ve not already ticked a visit to our city’s Shakespeare Festival off your Cambridge ‘bucket list’, make this summer the year that you do. Hosting eight productions in total, the event runs throughout July and August, offering a chance to see the best-loved of the Bard’s works performed in full Elizabethan costume in the stunning gardens of Cambridge University’s gardens. Guests are encouraged to bring along a picnic while they enjoy the shows, which this year include Hamlet and A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Turn to page 19 for all the info. cambridgeshakespeare.com

Our city’s answer to the Edinburgh Fringe, Cambridge Comedy Festival returns this month with a cracking line-up of big name stars and up-and-coming talent. Taking place on Jesus Green, the event will host comedians including Joe Lycett, Stephen K Amos, Seann Walsh and Henning Wehn in marquees on Jesus Green. There’s also street food and top beers to enjoy – turn to page 38 for the full story. cambridgecomedyfestival.com

CAMBRIDGE OPEN STUDIOS. Explore the studios and workspaces of artists and designer-makers from around the county this month at Cambridge Open Studios, which runs each weekend in July. A flourishing community of more than 400 creatives around Cambridgeshire, COS aims to bring artists and local people together, offering a chance to see, buy and commission a huge diversity of pieces. Members include painters, sculptors, jewellers, photographers, illustrators, furniture makers and more, so there’s plenty to explore – turn to page 41 for all the info. camopenstudios.co.uk

Possibly one of our favourite events of the whole year, the fabulously fun Big Weekend returns to Parker’s Piece from 7 to 9 July. Serving up three days of music, entertainment, food, drink and plenty more, the event is completely free to attend and always draws a huge crowd of revellers. This year’s festivities kick off on Friday evening when there will be a 1980s-tastic night of music, featuring the legendary ABC, as well as tribute act Wham!Duran, followed by a huge fireworks display. The rest of the weekend has loads more music and fun in store – find out more on page 28. cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

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© CHRIS WOOD

BIG WEEKEND.

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NIGHTLIFE

July nightlife. CAMBRIDGE F O L K F E S T I VA L .

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Since starting life in 1965, Cambridge Folk Festival has become one of the most acclaimed events of its kind in the world. Known for its eclectic line-up and laid-back atmosphere, it takes place yearly at Cherry Hinton Hall and showcases the cream of the folk music world, from the hottest new acts to world famous stars. This year’s performers include singersongwriter Jake Bugg, who has gone from performing the small Den stage at the festival in 2012 to headlining the main stage this year – a feat only matched by one other artist: Passenger. Also gracing the festival’s largest stage will be the Grammy Award winning Indigo Girls, plus American folk star Loudon Wainwright III. Elsewhere, Hayseed Dixie will be rocking their nutty, AC/DC meets bluegrass shtick. Cara Dillon, Lisa Hannigan, Shirley Collins and Oysterband will also be making an appearance, along with loads more. Full weekend tickets for the event, which runs 27-30 July, are sold out – but we’ve got a pair to give away over on our website. Visit cambsedition.co.uk for details on how to win. cambridgelivetrust.co.uk/folk-festival

R E G I N A S P E KTO R .

Following last year’s sold out tour, bewitching songstress Regina Spektor is back on the road around the UK, stopping off at the Corn Exchange here in Cambridge on 31 July. Born in the Soviet Union, Spektor cut her teeth studying classical piano as a young child. When her family were forced to emigrate to New York following religious persecution, she continued her training, eventually graduating from the esteemed Conservatory of Music at Purchase College. From there, she took her classical knowledge and began creating pristinely crafted, off-kilter pop, filled with captivating storytelling, which quickly earned her a cult fan base through performances at open mic nights and self-released records. Now seven albums in, she’s the high priestess of ‘anti-folk’, having performed at the White House and being nominated for a Grammy Award with one of her most famous songs, You’ve Got Time (the theme to Netflix’s Orange is the New Black). Catch her doing her thing at 7pm, tickets are available starting at £30.25. cornex.co.uk

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NIGHTLIFE

THE WILD WOOD DISCO. Get set for The Wild Wood Disco, a one-night al fresco party taking place deep in the woods near Linton. Taking its inspiration from creativity-oozing boutique festivals like Secret Garden Party and Shambala, this shindig will be bursting with fairy lit magic and glittery fun, from the dazzling art installations, lasers and lanterns to the great music and delectable food and drink offerings. Serving up a crowd-pleasing blend of disco, house, funk and soul, the Woodland Stage will play host to the legendary Jazzie B from Soul II Soul, as well as a set from the ‘Head Gardener’, aka Secret Garden Party founder Freddie Fellowes. Also getting the crowd grooving will be Bristol outfit Funk from the Trunk, plus Cambridge DJs Miss Chivers, Stuart Banks and Dave Le Reece, who between them will be spinning everything from disco to drum and bass. When all the dancing makes you thirsty, swing by the Spirited Mare for a cocktail from a horsebox, or pick up top-drawer craft beer from the Brewdog Bar. There will be Prosecco (literally) on tap and a dedicated G&T bar, not to mention the secret absinthe hut. Staving off rumbling tums in style will be Cambridge’s street food collective foodPark, whose traders will be serving up a smorgasbord of foodie delights. Feast on the likes of steamed bao, gourmet burgers and hot churros. Trinket cinema the Star and Mouse Picture Show will be screening films in the woods too, where you’ll be able to sink into a deckchair and relax, while Viva La Glitterlution will be ramping up the sparkle. The event takes place on 1 July (4pm-2am) at Horseheath Racecourse and tickets are £25. Limited camping is available for an additional £10 per person. mylittlefestival.uk

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NIGHTLIFE

Standon Calling. A boutique festival taking place near the village of Standon in Hertfordshire, Standon Calling returns for its annual shindig, 27 to 30 July. Offering a gorgeous countryside location (less than an hour away from central Cambridge), great headliners, a delicious food line-up and even an open air swimming pool, this eccentric garden party serves up an irresistibly feelgood weekend of fun for the whole family. Marking 40 years of recording and releasing music, disco icon Grace Jones is topping the music bill this year, joined by fellow headliners Orbital and Clean Bandit. Also performing over the course of the weekend are big hitters including Gary Numan, KT Tunstall, Kate Tempest, British Sea Power and Laura Mvula. Away from the main stage, the Cowshed is laying on a line-up of top electronic music

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with DJ sets from Joe Goddard (Hot Chip), Faithless and DJ Yoda, plus a takeover from drum and bass heavyweights Hospital Records. The music is only a small part of the fun, however, and there’s plenty more to explore around the site including top comedy, pub quizzes and cocktail masterclasses on The Lawn, Rockaoke, a Groove Garden and the annual Standon Calling Dog Show. There’s also a lengthy list of family fun, including a romp through history’s most grisly bits with Horrible Histories: The Best Of Barmy Britain. Food-wise, Standon Calling really levels up your usual festival fare, offering gourmet burgers from Patty & Bun, vibrant vegan treats from Club Mexicana, brilliant brekkies from London’s legendary The Breakfast Club, cheesy goodness from The Mac Factory and wood-fired artisan pizzas from Born & Raised, to name but a few. Need a little R&R? Pay a visit to the wellness area, which boasts hot tubs, yoga and meditation to rejuvenate you and get you ready for more partying. This year’s theme is Tales of the Enchanted Valley, so expect myriad mythical creatures, flamboyant fairies and beastly foes. Fancy dress is practically obligatory and the crowd always make a huge effort. Festival tickets are available at £147 for an adult, £117 for teens, £35 for kids and £5 for infants. standon-calling.com

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Now Booking. O PAQ U E POETICS.

2 S E P T, W YS I N G A RTS C E N T R E , F R O M £15

The boundary-pushing annual festival from Wysing Arts in Bourn, this year exploring a theme of the mystery of change. wysingartscentre.org

N E W M A R K E T N I G H TS . Newmarket Racecourse continues its summer season of concerts this month with performances from two legendary pop acts. First up, on 21 July, catch an al fresco gig from 80s legends Culture Club. With tracks like Do You Really Want to Hurt Me, Time and Church of the Poison Mind and Boy George presiding, they’re sure to get the crowd grooving. On 28 July, head down for an evening in the company of Texas, the Sharleen Spiteri fronted band responsible for huge hits like Summer Son, Inner Smile and Say What You Want. Having recently released their ninth studio album, the band are back in the top ten and on top form. Tickets for both shows are available from £13 in the Family Enclosure. newmarket.thejockeyclub.co.uk

SUBTERR ANEAN . 23 S E P T, C O R N E XC H A N G E , £15

A brand-new, one-day, indoor rock and indie festival for Cambridge comes to the Corn Exchange in September, delivering bands including Pins and Stone Broken. cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

PRETENDERS. 7 O C T, C O R N E XC H A N G E , F R O M £42.75

Following huge demand for their Royal Albert Hall gig, the legendary Pretenders have announced a full UK tour this autumn. Expect new-wave rock of the highest order. cornex.co.uk

P U N JA B T R O N I X . Combining Punjabi folk music with contemporary electronic beats, Punjabtronix bring their utterly fresh sound to Cambridge Junction on 19 July. A collaboration between Mercury nominated British-Indian music producer DJ Swami and a group of talented Punjabi musicians, this innovative live show creates a captivating musical and visual experience. Cutting-edge drum machines, synths and basslines meet Punjabi dhol drums, vocals, stringed instruments and the hypnotic sounding double flute, algoza, breathing life into the rhythms and traditional melodies of the Punjab. Adding to the experience will be visual projections of original digital animations and cinematic Punjabi imagery, produced by Bristol-based filmmaker John Minton. The show takes place on 19 July and tickets are £17. junction.co.uk

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SLEAFORD MODS.

7 N OV, C O R N E XC H A N G E , £21.25

Described by Iggy Pop as “definitely the world’s greatest rock ’n’ roll band”, Sleaford Mods are on tour in support of their new album, English Tapas. cornex.co.uk

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MUSIC

Music blog. J O R DA N WO R L A N D F RO M L O C A L M U S I C W E B S I T E S L AT E T H E D I S C O S E L E C T S H I S M U S T- S E E G I GS I N CAMBRIDGE THIS MONTH

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he Folk Festival might hog attention somewhat but there’s plenty more happening in our city's music venues this month, too. Hugely influential indie rock outfit Pixies at the Cambridge Junction has to be our best pick for July’s action. Having released their latest album Head Carrier earlier this year, they play the Junction as one of only a handful of dates in the UK this summer. Unfortunately this one sold out pretty sharpish, but the Junction is operating a waiting list. Another sold out one to check for last minute returns is Future Islands who play the Corn Exchange on the 1st. If you’re new to Future Islands, their music is built around rippling synths, propulsive basslines, and vocals determined to plough the rawest of emotions into the lyrics. Mode9’s Hidden Rooms appearance on the 6th is another top pick. Formed and fronted by Cambridge-based vocalist Ollie Lepage-Dean, Mode9 features some of the region’s most talented young jazz musicians, playing music with a refreshing fusion of neo-soul and jazz with just a hint of funk. Playing almost exclusively original compositions and arrangements written by Ollie himself and James Brady, Mode9 mixes smooth melodies and unique harmonies with a fiery horn section. Over at the Blue Moon, 75 Dollar Bill on the 3rd is a must. 75 Dollar Bill have mastered stripping down rock and roll to its elemental parts and rebuilding it in their own image. The duo’s electric, richly patterned music can shapeshift from joyful dance tunes to slowly changing trance minimalism, an uncategorisable hybrid which draws on early electric blues, the modal traditions of West Africa, India and the Middle East, Sun Ra’s space chords and the minimalist and No Wave histories of their home town, New York. Staying at the same venue there’s a great night in store on the 27th when Mammoth Penguins and The Hearing play. Mammoth Penguins are a three-piece indie rock band based in Cambridge. Composed of members of other bands including Standard Fare, The Pony Collaboration and Puncture Repair Kit, they got together in spring 2013 and put out their debut record in 2015. This show will see the trio showcasing new material from their upcoming album, John Doe. The songs tell the story of a man that fakes his own death, only to return to his family years later. The Hearing is Finnish musician Ringa Manner. She makes perfectly formed electro-pop with warm vocal harmonies, pop melodies and moving rhythms. The Hearing is coming to the UK especially for the Indietracks festival and this Cambridge show is a special one-off warm up appearance. Another Blue Moon tip goes down on the 14th with Moonstrips and Newts both performing. Moonstrips are a heavy psych rock outfit from Cambridge, whilst Newts bring superb noisy rock from the folk who were in Econoline and Hey Colossus.

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Over on Chesterton Road, Airways start a busy line-up for The Portland Arms on the 5th. A four-piece indie/alternative band from Peterborough, Airways had an exciting 2016 supporting bands such as Sunset Sons and Nothing But Thieves, playing the Neighbourhood Festival, and releasing their first single One Foot. A British singer, but based in the States, Callaghan’s return to the UK this month includes a Portland visit on the 6th. The tour coincides with the release of Callaghan’s latest EP The Other Side which came out last month and is the first of a trio of releases planned for this year. The Whybirds return to the Portland Arms this month on the 7th for a very special show – the last for the foreseeable future. The band are all singer/songwriters, giving the group a diverse range of songs and vocal styles, but without straying from their moving brand of Americana. Other shows of note at The Portland this month are Beguiled on the 13th and Chasing Cadence on the 12th. n

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Arts & culture.

W E E X P L O R E T H E A R T S A N D C U LT U R E S C E N E I N C A M B R I D G E , S H OWC A S I N G S O M E O F T H E M A N Y E XC I T I N G E X H I B I T I O N S A N D S H OWS TA K I N G P L AC E A RO U N D T H E C I T Y

Cambridge Summer Music Festival.

Cambridge Summer Music Festival returns for another year of all things classical, with world music, jazz and choral music also included. Music by Beethoven and for the piano are key themes this year. The Aurora Orchestra play Beethoven’s Eroica symphony entirely from memory, while Freddy Kempf performs his fourth and fifth piano concertos with the five-piece Wiener Kammersymphonie. French pianist Patrick Hemmerlé plays all 48 preludes and fugues by Bach, while Ivana Gavrić performs Schumann’s piano concerto with the Outcry Ensemble. The festival runs from 13 to 29 July, and throughout the month every Wednesday features a Sounds Green 45-minute concert as part of the festival, at the Botanic Garden. There will be food, ice cream and drinks available, and room to put down a picnic. Just pay the usual admission to the garden, with a retiring collection as you leave. Concerts take place at a variety of mostly university venues. Check website for details. cambridgesummermusic.com

A L L O R N OT H I N G .

The swinging 60s provided a sudden flash of cool in Britain’s previously buttoned up persona, and just over a year after The Beatles’ first hit came the Mods, sticking a big two fingers up at the class system and stale culture. While The Who may have been the first band adopted by these sharply dressed, working-class free spirits on their Vespas, the quintessential Mod group were Small Faces. They were a blend of style, taste and testosterone. Their street-wise members were obsessed with rhythm and blues and their music is celebrated in mod musical All or Nothing. With hits such as Whatcha Gonna Do About It, Lazy Sunday, Sha La La La Lee, Itchycoo Park and All or Nothing, they clocked up a stunning run of success. The show has been endorsed by singer and guitarist Steve Marriott’s daughter Mollie, and it runs from 20 to 22 July at the Corn Exchange. Tickets start at £18.75. cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

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A RTS & C U LT U R E

QUENTIN B L A K E AT T H E H E O N G GA L L E RY.

Quentin Blake is most known for his illustrations for Roald Dahl’s books, as well as for books by Michael Rosen and Michael Morpurgo, but his art is extensive, and some of his most recent work features in a new exhibition at The Heong Gallery. His four recent collaborations for the Folio Society since 2011 are featured in The Best of all Possible Worlds, which runs until 8 October. From the ribald to the serious and disturbing, the illustrations on display are from Candide, Fifty Fables of La Fontaine, The Golden Ass and this year’s Riddley Walker. heonggallery.com

in situ Theatre.

Cambridge’s environmental theatre company in situ is back with two different shows this month. On 1 July there’s Ghost Stories, a storytelling tour de force from director Richard Spaul. Then, from 13 to 15 July, there’s a version of Shakespeare’s Measure for Measure, titled Be Absolute for Death. Both take place at the city’s oldest complete building, the 12th century Leper Chapel on Newmarket Road. Ghost Stories features two tales from the dark side, as Richard tells Miss Mary Pask by Edith Wharton, and Pink May by Elizabeth Bowen. “Both tales,” says Richard, “as well as being deliciously scary, have remarkable twists and turns.” in situ is best known as an ensemble group, and Be Absolute for Death is a fresh take on the world the Bard portrays in Measure for Measure, one of sleaze, sex workers and authoritarian government. All performances start at 8pm. Tickets for Ghost Stories are £12, and £10 for Be Absolute for Death. Space limited, advance booking recommended. insitutheatre.co.uk

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N E W S E A S O N AT SA F F R O N H A L L .

Saffron Hall’s autumn season is brimming with classical and operatic delights, jazz, rock and folk sounds, and family shows. English Touring Opera returns with Rameau’s Dardanus on 27 October and Handel’s Giulio Cesare on the 28th. On 8 October they perform Bach’s Mass in B Minor with local schools. Singer-songwriter Richard Thompson plays on 21 October and the National Youth Training Choir present music with revolutionary themes on 20 August. Saffron Opera Group conclude the Ring Cycle with Götterdämmerung on 17 September. Around the World in 60 Minutes: A Concert for Families is on 1 October, while Foyer Jazz Club returns on 6 October. saffronhall.com

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A RTS & C U LT U R E

C A M B R I D G E S H A K E S P E A R E F E S T I VA L . All of Cambridge (almost) becomes a stage once again this month as our annual Shakespeare Festival returns from 10 July to 26 August. Taking place in some of Cambridge University’s most beautiful college gardens, the festival has been enthralling audiences with ageless tales of romance, war, magic, tragedy and farce for over 30 years. It offers a programme of eight plays each year, attracting some 25,000 annually during its eight-weeks or so summer run, and has earned a name for itself as one of the UK’s premier arts festivals. As the CSF website proudly proclaims, this is a “tour de force of Elizabethan drama”, serving up dynamic, vivid performances of the Bard’s best-loved works in full period costume. Guests gather on velvet lawns, drinking wine and picnicking while they enjoy the shows; dusk turning to night, creating a magical atmosphere. As always, the programme is split into two parts, beginning with four shows running 10-29 July. Among their number is Antony and Cleopatra, one of Shakespeare’s greatest love stories, which plays at Robinson College’s Gardens. Written around 1606, this heady tale of romance gone awry has it all: love, passion, scandal, war, death – and an ending about as dramatic as they come. Also playing, this time in the grand gardens at King’s College, is Much Ado About Nothing, Shakespeare’s sparkling battle of the sexes comedy. Sparring partners Beatrice and Benedick enjoy nothing more

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than winding each other up, and seemingly nothing can bring them together (even if their friends have other ideas). Claudio and Hero on the other hand are deeply in love and preparing to wed, but thanks to the scheming Don John, their romance takes a rather complex and unexpected turn… Also running in the first half of the programme is All’s Well that Ends Well, which will be performed in the intimate courtyard at Downing College. This courtly drama, which yields romance and intrigue in abundance, sees Bertram fleeing his home in France – and his fiancé Helena – to join in with the Italian wars, believing he can shirk his responsibilities. Helena, however, has other ideas and embarks on a quest to get her man back, by hook or by crook. Finally, the festival welcomes Hamlet – a play with a reputation so lofty it needs no introduction. Hamlet, a young student, returns home to his family home to discover his father has died and his mother has married his uncle. Visited by the ghost of his deceased father, he plots vengeance while contemplating his own mortality. All shows start at 7.30pm and adult tickets are priced at £16. Part two of the programme, which runs 31 July to 26 August, features The Merry Wives of Windsor, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, King Lear and Romeo and Juliet. Stay tuned to the next issue of Edition for all the details. cambridgeshakespeare.com

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EMMA. A joyful journey of warmth, wit, romance and mistaken intentions, Jane Austen’s Emma is one of the all-time classics. It’s set to charm audiences at the Arts Theatre from 4 to 8 July in a production that stays faithful to the source, relating Austen’s story with verve and style. Young, bright and beautiful, Emma Woodhouse has the world at her feet. When the dashing Mr Elton comes to town, she decides to perform the role of matchmaker to her new friend Harriet Smith. But to Emma’s surprise, the more she tries to manipulate the destinies of others, the less success she has, until she is forced to face her feelings and even dare to love. Tickets start at £18 and shows take place at 7.45pm, plus matinees on the Thursday and Saturday. cmbridgeartstheatre.com

Pictures in the Park.

The days when liking Abba was something to keep quiet about were completely kicked aside by the phenomenal success of Mamma Mia! The hit film and musical featured a string of undeniable classics and if you’re one of those who can’t stop singing when you hear them, make your way to Milton Country Park on 1 July for a Mamma Mia! singalong. The outdoor screening starts at 10pm, but the grounds open at 8pm with Spectrum Events providing an illuminated bar and snacks, while park café Grounds will serve hot dogs and drinks from its pop up. The Money, Money, Money required is £12, but if you buy four or more tickets they are £10 each. miltoncountrypark.org

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H OT B E D F E S T I VA L . Provocative new writing is celebrated with the return of Hotbed, Cambridge’s festival dedicated to showcasing the best in innovative theatre. This year’s theme “What Country, friends, is this?” focuses on ideas of belonging, identity and a sense of place. Audiences can sample the results this direct quote from Twelfth Night (Viola’s first words after she’s washed up on a strange shore) have inspired writers to come up with at Cambridge Junction on 8 July. Produced by Menagerie Theatre Company in association with the Junction, Hotbed has run since 2002, and this year includes new and surprising plays from high-profile writers, including Steve Waters, with work performed in unusual spaces and places throughout the venue. Menagerie will present a large-scale interactive, improvised audience participation event The Journey, and showcase play readings including five talented writers from the area. The schedule runs from 10am to 10pm. For full details check the Junction website. junction.co.uk

Sounds Green.

Cambridge University Botanic Gardens welcomes Sounds Green this month, a series of alfresco concerts which see the Garden opening late each Wednesday during July. Idyllic is an overused word, but relaxing in such a beautiful setting on a summer’s evening, picnic laid out before you and a glass of wine in hand, great live music drifting through the air, you’re certainly getting close. To further tempt, there will be food on offer from the excellent Garden Kitchen (think colourful, hearty salads, homemade cakes and plump sausage rolls), as well as ice cream from Jack’s Gelato and wines from drinks shop Thirsty – or you’re very welcome to bring your own food and drinks. Music-wise, catch Mentés Másként Ensemble and their Hungarian folk stylings on 5 July, the crowd-pleasing Dodo Street Band on the 12th, versatile ensemble Westcombe Brass on 19 July and Brazilian four-piece Afrosamba on the 26th. All performances start at 6.15pm and normal entrance fees to the Garden applies. botanic.cam.ac.uk

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HEFFERS CRIME PA RT Y. Every summer things get a little sinister, strange, mysterious, unsettling and quite possibly deadly at Heffers. What’s Your Poison?, the bookshop’s crime and detective fiction party, takes place on 6 July at 6.30pm for an evening of author readings, cocktails and brilliant books. If you’re a fan of the genre, you’re in for a treat, with 14 authors taking part. Then on 20 July Heffers hosts the launch of 111 Places in Cambridge That You Shouldn’t Miss, by Ros Horton and Sally Simmons. It encourages readers to step away from the tourist hotspots and fall in love with the city’s hidden nooks and crannies. The launch, at 6.30pm, is free to attend but booking is essential. Tickets for What’s Your Poison? are £6. eventbrite.co.uk

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BYA R D M I X E D SUMMER EXHIBITION . This time of year, with bright skies, long days and intense heat (if we’re lucky), evokes many feelings – and Byard Art’s Mixed Summer Exhibition aims to capture the season. Running from 10 July to 3 September, it features a constantly changing display of the gallery’s favourite contemporary artists. So whether you’re looking to update your home or find that perfect gift, take a stroll down to King’s Parade, where there’s something to suit all budgets and tastes. byardart.co.uk

Priscilla.

Hit after hit is guaranteed at the stage version of Oscar-winning classic Priscilla, Queen of the Desert, from 11 to 15 July. The musical is a heart-warming tale of three friends who hop aboard a battered old bus (Priscilla) and set off to perform as drag artists at a casino in the heart of the Outback. The soundtrack to their journey of self-discovery features It’s Raining Men, What’s Love Got to Do With It, Venus, Go West, I Will Survive, Hot Stuff and Girls Just Wanna Have Fun. The production, at Great Hall at The Leys, features 400 costumes, 100 headdresses and a seven-metre long bus as the centrepiece. Tickets are £9.50 to £17.50. camtheatrecompany.co.uk

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feast of history and heritage awaits at Cambridge History Festival, which makes its debut at the Wimpole Estate from 7 to 9 July. Featuring a rich programme of talks, debates, performances, workshops and activities, the event is the product of an exciting new partnership between Cambridge Literary Festival and the National Trust. Wimpole, an elegant stately home surrounded by acres of gorgeous gardens, promises to serve as a perfect backdrop for fascinating forays into the past with some of Britain’s most eminent historians. “Our aim is to engage, educate and entertain as broad a range of people as possible about the past,” explains festival director Cathy Moore. “An understanding of history, especially in volatile times, is essential to help us understand the world we live in, to help us make informed decisions about our future and, of course, to have as much fun as possible along the way.” The idea for the festival came about when Cathy was taking a walk at Wimpole one sunny evening, and was struck by how wonderful a place it would be to stage a celebration of history. “The Wimpole Estate is a jewel in the crown of the National Trust,” says Cathy. “It provides the opportunity to present a galaxy of historians in a priceless piece of our national heritage.” “We’re very lucky to have an exceptionally beautiful place to look after here at Wimpole,” agrees Anne French, Wimpole’s events organiser. “How often do you get to go to an event with views over Grade I listed parkland and lovingly tended gardens? Many of the talks will take place in the Grand Dining Room at Wimpole Hall, which I would personally say is fairly glamorous compared to most lecture theatres I’ve been in (but then I’m biased!). We already welcome visitors from all over the country and so for that reason as well we felt that Wimpole would be an appropriate location for a festival with such a wide appeal.” On the first day of the programme, catch Austentatious: an improvised Jane Austen novel. A mad miscellany of modern culture and Austen-esque mannerisms and themes, performed in Regency costume, this thoroughly impressive show is improvised anew each performance, based on audience suggestions. Previous ‘lost works’ include Sixth Sense & Sensibility, Jurassic Mansfield Park and Double O Darcy – strap on your bonnet and expect the unexpected. Also flying the flag for Austen is TV historian Lucy Worsley, who’ll be exploring the author’s life through the places which meant the most to her, a journey which also delves into search for her own Mr Darcy and decision to spurn marriage. In addition on the first day of the festival, join architectural historian Simon Thurley on a tour of noteworthy Tudor homes and learn the fascinating story of Hanna Reitsch and Melitta von

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Stauffenberg – two pioneering female pilots who acted as Hitler’s personal Valkyries while covertly supporting an attempt to assassinate him. The next day serves up a sumptuous buffet of treats for history fans, including The Court of Oberon, a play performed in true 18th century style; an opportunity to unearth the fascinating bodily secrets of prominent Victorians with Kathryn Hughes; a romp through the earliest Greek comedies and tragedies with Natalie Haynes; and the chance to pull up a seat at the table of Queen Victoria – a royal gannet who changed English food forever. Sunday 9 July yields another bounty of events, from a glimpse into the world of Anne Boleyn, England’s most scandalous and controversial queen, to a look at what Brexit means for Britishness with Andrew Marr. GOT fans look out for Winter is Coming: The Medieval World of Game of Thrones, which will reveal the historical stimuli behind George RR Martin’s behemoth fantasy series. Investigating giants, dragons and direwolves in medieval texts, old Norse gods and ravens, Carolyne Larrington will demonstrate how Martin took inspiration from the Middle Ages to construct his fantasy world. The children’s programme, meanwhile, includes a

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journey into history with Ka, a time-travelling cat; dastardly deeds and shenanigans in Putting the Mystery into History with Helen Moss; and a helping of mad science and hands-on experiments on Sunday afternoon. “Wimpole History Festival offers an extravaganza of history and provides an experience that can’t be found anywhere else in the country,” says Cathy Moore. “You’ll find world-class historians alongside historical re-enactors, bringing history to life so that you can see, smell, touch and learn about it. Hear from your favourite historians on topics ranging from the classics to the present day whilst getting up close to battle-clad crusaders, WW1 heroes and Tudor weapons. Children can try their hands at sword school, dressing up as a Roman emperor and meeting real-life falcons, whilst grown-ups can practice their warrior pose with early yoga on the lawns or enjoy a guided tour around the estate. Local pop-up food and drink stalls will provide the sustenance, or pack a picnic. There really is something for everyone – and the perfect excuse to hop in the car and explore one of the National Trust’s hidden gems.” For the full programme and booking info, visit the Wimpole History Festival website. n wimpolehistoryfestival.com

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Director’s picks. CATHY MOORE, FESTIVAL DIRECTOR, SELECTS HER MUSTSEES AT THIS YEAR ’S EVENT “It’s a tough one – I love Lucy Worsley, Andrew Marr and William Dalrymple but the events I am most looking forward to are Orlando Figes, whose book A People’s Tragedy is one of the stand-out works to document the Russian Revolution; food historian Annie Gray has written a sumptuous book called The Greedy Queen, which records what Queen Victoria ate and how she changed English food forever; Piers Brendon offers a fascinating history-in-the-making perspective on the life of HRH Prince Charles and his years spent waiting to be king; and, having watched David Olusoga on BBC4 with his remarkable series Black and British, seeing him up close will be a real treat.”

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The Art Insider.

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RUTHIE COLLINS, FOUNDE R OF C A MBRIDGE ART SALON, GIVES HER ART Y PICKS OF THE MONTH

he English winter – ending in July, to recommence in August,” Lord Byron once quipped. Let’s hope he was wrong. Summer is well and truly on us, season of festivals, holidays and picnics in abundance. This month, watch out for Something In Common, a new creative collective offering stimulating, cross-cultural events throughout the city. The result of a conversation between four friends aiming to reap the ‘untapped resource’ of Cambridge as a city – you can enjoy Jesus College’s Summer Art Exhibition with the collective on 16 July (12-2pm). It brings together world-renowned super-talents, from the first ever female Turner Prize winner Rachel Whiteread to her one-time teacher Phyllida Barlow, who was described by The Guardian as “an artistic outsider who has finally come inside” and represented Britain in the Venice Bienalle this year. Or watch out for Lebaneseborn Palestinian artist Mona Tatoum, whose exhibition at Tate Modern last year crackled, literally, with electricity. There’s also Iranian sculptor and Turner Prize nominee Shirazeh Houshiary. All this, plus more – fabulous. “Something In Common came out of a conversation amongst friends – we hope to organise fun cross-cultural events to unlock some of the wonderful things that Cambridge has to offer,” explains Harriet Loffler. Curator for Modern and Contemporary Art at Norwich Castle Museum, she’s one of the friends behind the collective, alongside curator at Wysing Arts, Lotte Juul Petersen, plus Corporate Development Manager at Whitechapel gallery, Monica Yam, and artist in residence at Wysing Arts, Caroline Wendling. Offering large-scale sculpture, capitivating installation, sunshine and an interesting crowd – it sounds perfect! Check the collective on Facebook at facebook.com/ SomethingInCommonCambridge. It’s also that time of year when the city’s studios are flung open for Open Studios. So pack a water bottle, pick up one of the cheery yellow brochures and go exploring – with 470 local artists, designer-makers and practitioners part of the COS community, there’s a huge amount to

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see. River-lovers look out for the bold, vibrant works of Frances Campbell on St Barnabas Road, whose paintings, monoprints and etchings are a snapshot into life on the towpath. Or Fernando and Pinar, at Janus Studio on Hobart Street, with stand-out contemporary work (check out thejanusstudio.wixsite.com/print). There’s a huge amount happening outside of Cambridge this year, too – including Prickwillow, where you can spot contemporary art in a converted phone box, the Phone Box Gallery. Plus, there are artists opening their studios in Ely and Waterbeach, too. Check out the Open Studios website at camopenstudios.co.uk for the full listings. This month also sees the launch of the long awaited Cambridge Art Book – the city as seen through the eyes of many of its artists. Dubbed ‘irresistible’ by Joanna Lumley, the book is a sumptuous collection of art, featuring some of the city’s best loved artists, including (and there really are too many to mention!) children’s book author and illustrator Marion Lindsay, and gorgeous painter Maureen Mace, whose work I love (pictured above). The brainchild of collage artist Emma Bennett, whose blazing work graces the cover, the book has created a huge buzz even before launching, with fans including Stephen Fry. “Having spent a happy morning perusing books in the Tate Liverpool bookshop I came back home to Cambridge with the thought of buying a contemporary art book about the city in which I live. I couldn’t believe that one didn’t exist and that was it, I was soon on a mission to create one,” Emma tells me. “I am an artist and know what an amazing array of talented contemporary artists there are working locally,” she says. There are 117 images of iconic Cambridge included, from the colleges to the river, to tucked-away treasures such as the Orchard Tea Rooms and Jesus Green Lido. Head down to Heffers from 20 July to snap up a copy or check the website, www.thecambridgeartbook.co.uk. Finally, let’s not forget that it’s the last ever Secret Garden Party festival this month (nooooo!), a hedonistic riot of art and colour leaving many with blurred memories of beauty, expression and originality. I’m also heading to the Wild Wood Disco, on 1 July, which looks set to be a smaller version of the Secret Garden Party – complete with installations, music and fun. Better still, why not go out into the wild and create your own art getaway? Take some

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Opposite page: King’s College by Emma Bennett. Top: Tree of Cambridge by Maureen Mace. Above: Houseboat by Frances Campbell

friends, a few tents, a ghettoblaster (or, um, an iPhone and some speakers), a bottle of gin, perhaps, or three, and some paint. Those with families, head out camping, get messy and creative with the kids and some canvases – make some art outside while playing Cambridge-raised star Nick Mulvey’s new single, Unconditional, an anthem to lovers and parents everywhere (www.nickmulvey.com). Or find a perfect field, take a notebook and pen a poem – In Grantchester Meadows has been inspiring writers and artists since forever. Look around you, create something you will look back on for years to come. Summer really is our time. Enjoy it. n

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B I G Weekend.

BIG WEEKEND

FA N TA S T I C F I R E WO R K S, L OA D S O F L I V E M U S I C , FA M I LY AC T I V I T I E S A N D M U C H M O R E – T H E B I G W E E K E N D R E T U R N S F RO M 7 T O 9 J U LY

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hotly anticipated fixture of the summer calendar in Cambridge, the Big Weekend returns this month for three days of fun in the heart of the city centre. Taking place, as always, on Parker’s Piece, the organisers are laying on a free, three-day extravaganza of music, entertainment, food, family activities and community celebration from 7 to 9 July. With so much on offer, there’s sure to be something for all tastes – and we’ve got all the info you need to make sure you can squeeze in as much as possible. Here’s what’s in store...

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Friday.

As soon as you clock off work on Friday, it’s time to party! Make a beeline to Parker’s Piece from 6pm for an evening of fab live music which culminates in a huge fireworks display. First up are DJs from local radio station Heart, who’ll be playing some crowd-pleasers to get everyone in the mood. Then it’s full throttle into an evening of 80s-tastic fun, beginning with Wham!Duran, who’ll be reliving the hits of two of the best bands from the decade. A riotous ride through the songs of Wham and Duran Duran, this supremely polished tribute act will be getting the crowd grooving with immortal tracks such as Club Tropicana, Girls on Film and Notorious, to name a few. The 80s theme continues with headliners ABC, who take to the stage at 9pm. Fronted by Martin Fry (and his gold lamé suit), these glitzy synth pop heroes are best known for their blockbuster album The Lexicon of Love. Containing nuggets of pure pop perfection such as Poison Arrow, The Look of Love and All of My Heart, this album secured ABC’s place in the annals of British music – but they’re not resting on their laurels, having released a critically acclaimed follow-up to the Lexicon of Love album just last year. Once you’ve danced your socks off, the evening’s festivities will be rounded off with a spectacular fireworks display at 10pm.

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Saturday.

Saturday will be serving up ten jam-packed hours of free entertainment and activities for all. Pick up mouth-watering foodie treats from the French market and grab a drink from the Cambridge Live Bar, then get exploring! Film buffs will love Cinemobile, an articulated lorry which transforms into an enclosed cinema auditorium – they’ll be showing top locallymade short films throughout the day. Fancy something a little more active? Check out the Sportzone, which will have all sorts of fun activities and games for every age group over the course of the day. One spectacle not to be missed is the life-sized mechanical elephant – in pyjamas! – who’ll be part of a series of colourful musical

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performances on the Saturday and Sunday of the Big Weekend. The elephant comes to the event as part of the India Unboxed season in Cambridge, which is celebrating the UK-India Year of Culture 2017. This programme of events, hosted by University of Cambridge Museums and the Botanic Garden, features exhibitions, events, digital encounters, discussions, installations and more within the museums and the city of Cambridge – find out more at museums.cam.ac.uk. There’s loads on offer for kids on the Saturday of the Big Weekend, including facepainting, getting messy making and creating in the University of Cambridge’s Fun Lab, and enjoying some storytelling and writing tips for budding young writers at The Big Read & Write as part of its project with local primary schools. An exciting addition to this year’s Big

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Weekend will be the ARM Gaming Hub, an interactive ‘have a go’ introduction to the world of computer games creation. The Hub will be delivered by Cambridge Regional College’s Rizing Games team, including the inspiring students who will be the next generation of leading games developers. Visitors can join in with interactive activities, which will including level design, programming, games design and more. Whether you’re looking to study or start a career in the creative or tech industries or just try some cool activities, the Gaming Hub will have something for everyone aged about eight years and up to try out and enjoy. Elsewhere, learn more about French language and culture with Alliance FranÇaise de Cambridge, throw some shapes at a silent disco, and enjoy eclectic entertainment at

the Pink Festival Tent. An LGBT festival which has been a well-loved presence in Cambridge for many years, Pink Festival will be hosting comedy, cabaret, music and drag in their marquee including the fabulous Fleurettes, and Cambridge’s own LGBT Choir. Over on the main stage, enjoy the Hungarian folk stylings of Mentés Másként, Cajon box player Heidi Joubert (formerly of Cambridge favourites Ferndando’s Kitchen), and Botown, a Bollywood band with a funk and soul twist. There’s also music from one of Britain’s best loved reggae bands, Aswad, while headlining on Saturday night will be T.Rex featuring original member Paul Fenton. Get your dancing shoes on and enjoy a glorious glam rock romp through the band’s mid-70s heyday, through hits including Get It On, 20th Century Boy and I Love to Boogie.

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Sunday.

Sunday promises to be a feast of sights, sounds and smells as the Big Weekend welcomes back its popular Mela. Offering delicious food, dancing, demos and more, the event is a huge, colourful and fun celebration of Asian culture and ethnic diversity. Enjoy classical dance and music from the Sanskruti School of Dance and the Natyanjali Dance School, as well as the Indian Cultural Association. Taste your way around samples of authentic cuisine in the community marquee and browse the treasures and trinkets on offer at the craft stalls. On the main stage catch hot gypsy jazz from local faves Django’s Tiger, and uplifting classics by the likes of Aretha Franklin and Tina Turner performed by eight-piece band Cath Coombs & The Awesome Soul Collective. Also performing is J Royale, who’ll be presenting a genre-hopping blend of bhangra, Bollywood, R&B, hip-hop, house and pop. Over in the local bands marquee, meanwhile, there will be sets from Hollowstar, SJ & The Flying Pigs, Dan Wilde, Gravy Train Trio and Sure-Can Playboys. The sports zone and French market will also continue into Sunday. Visit the Cambridge Live website for all the details. cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

M A I N S TAG E L I N E - U P. 3 P M : DJA N G O ’S T I G E R 4 P M : C AT H C O O M B S & T H E AW E S O M E S O U L C O L L E C T I V E 7 P M : J R OYA L E

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TA K I N G P L AC E 2 0 -23 J U LY, T H I S Y E A R ’S S E C R E T GA R D E N PA R T Y WILL BE THE L AST EVER. NICOL A FOLEY LOOKS B AC K OV E R FIFTEEN YEARS OF FUN AND FINDS O U T W H AT ’S I N STORE FOR THE S P E C TAC U L A R SEND-OFF

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fter 15 years of creativity, chaos and serious partying in the Cambridgeshire countryside, the organisers of Secret Garden Party have called time on the festival, announcing that this summer’s event will be the last ever. The outpouring of sadness that the news caused on social media is testament to the special place that SGP holds in the hearts of festival-goers: often imitated but never matched, the eccentricity and curious magic of this hedonistic gathering will be sorely missed on the festival circuit. It’s hard to explain the charm Secret Garden Party radiates to someone who’s not been – it’s something that you have to experience first-hand as you dizzy around the rolling meadows and shimmering lakes, greeted by a thousand glittered, beaming faces and savouring every eye-popping surprise the lovingly crafted site has to offer. Silliness reigns supreme, the spirit of togetherness is palpable and the whole place, a fancy dressfilled playground for grown-ups, feels delightfully removed from reality. Absent of sponsorship and brands, and putting festival-goers at the heart of the experience, SGP ripped up the rulebook and redefined what a festival could be, setting the creative benchmark and raising it higher with every event that passed. Fans are likely to be encouraged by founder Freddie Fellowes’ promise of a ‘phoenix’ which will rise from the ashes of SGP, but there’s no doubt that the end of Secret Garden Party signals a sad day for the festival scene in the UK. We’d recommend snapping up tickets to this year’s festival, which takes place 20-23 July, asap. In case you need any more persuasion – here’s a taster of what they’ve got planned…

MUSIC.

Secret Garden Party has never been all about the music, but while you might not get the huge headliners on offer at other festivals, there’s a brilliantly curated melting pot of different genres across the ten or so stages. Whether you’re into dirty drum and bass or solid gold disco, you’ll find your tribe. The Great Stage, nestled on the edge of a twinkling lake at the foot of a grassy hill, provides a centrepiece for the whole festival, and it’s where you’ll catch some of the biggest names. This year’s headliners include Metronomy, Crystal Fighters, Toots and the Maytals, Wild Beasts and Peaches. The Pagoda – a dance floor floating on the lake – has become the stuff of legend (so expect queues to get on to it), but it’s known for being one of the best spots for a dance, especially when the sun’s setting. This year you can catch acts including Eats Everything and Jackmaster. The serious ravers, meanwhile, will find their spiritual home in The Drop, a natural hollow in the rolling hills serving up the best home-grown underground house and techno. If that’s your vibe, venture deeper into the woods to find The Labyrinth, a hidden venue serving up sets from heavyweights such as Waze & Odyssey and Maribou State. Festival fave the Collosillyum, an open-air castle constructed with haybales, is set to host the showdown of all showdowns for drum and bass fans when labels Hospital and Ram go head to head with a line-up that includes S.P.Y, Nu:Logic and Subfocus. Secret Garden Party takes place in Abbotts Ripton from 20-23 July and tickets are available starting at £170 | secretgardenparty.com

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F U N & GA M E S . From skinny-dipping to dance-offs to fancy dress parades, there’s silliness to get stuck into around every corner at SGP – and this year will be no exception. Bearded Kitten will be resurrecting some of their favourite interactive hi-jinks, including the mud-wrestling pit and aerial tussles, while the kids’ area will have circus skills, bake-offs and crafty fun aplenty. Got moves to kill? Make a trip to the Dance Off stage, which kicks out feel-good grooves day and night and puts Soul Train to shame with its epic dance challenges.

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S E C R E T GA R D E N PA RT Y

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PA M P E R I N G .

SGP is one big theatre for visual arts, and each and every year the organisers manage to blow the crowd away with the little (and enormous) surprises sprinkled around the site. In previous years we’ve been treated to LED ‘stars’ falling from the sky, water holograms and a secret sunflower field, not to mention the annual Sunday afternoon paint fight; so we can’t wait to see what’s in store for 2017. The Great Lake will once again play host to the biggest installation of the lot – which gets ceremoniously set alight during the big burn after Saturday night’s jaw-dropping fireworks display.

There comes a point during every festival when securing some R&R becomes your main priority – and SGP excels at providing weary festival-goers with the rejuvenating they need. The Sanctuary area offers massages and therapies aplenty, a pamper parlour complete with mirrors and maquillage, and there’s even the opportunity to get your hair done at the Secret Salon. Our pampering pick goes to Bathing Under the Sky, offering saunas and outdoor hot tubs. Hungry? SGP’s food offering is always a cut above, but for a full-on feast in style, it has to be Milliway’s, the on-site fine dining restaurant.

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Cambridge Comedy Festival.

PROUD MEDIA PA RT N E R

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orget Edinburgh, we’ve got the cream of the comedy crop coming right to our doorstep this month when the fantastic Cambridge Comedy Festival returns from 19-23 July. Pop down to enjoy a star-studded line-up of funny bone tickling brilliance which ranges from the biggest names in the game to the hottest up-and-coming talent. The action takes place in a series of marquees in a picturesque corner of Jesus Green, where you’ll also be able to enjoy tasty street food and drinks from the Charlie Wells beer tent. There are more than 40 shows in total over the course of the five days, with the Jesterlarf Comedy Club Marquee hosting big name headliners and the Cambridge Junction tent focusing on the best emerging acts. Once again, Cambridge Edition will be hosting our own marquee at the festival, and we’ve got a corker line-up for you; while new for 2017 is the Blunda Bus, a double decker bus hosting great Fringe show gigs. “If you come along you’ll get to see some of the world's finest comedy performers in an intimate venue,” says festival founder Andy White. “We’ve got big names but also some of the most exciting and talented rising stars who, in a few years, will be big names themselves. We’ve kept ticket prices reasonable so it won’t break your bank balance, and some of the shows are only £6 so you can take a punt on an unknown talent. Plus, going to see comedy live is so different and so much better than watching it on TV!”

H I G H L I G H TS .

Among the comedians treading the boards at the festival is Stephen K Amos, who’ll be charming the crowd in the Jesterlarf marquee on 23 July. Eloquent and insightful, his feel-good comedy is warm and spiky in equal doses, but always hilarious. Also performing in the Jesterlarf tent is Seann Walsh, whose knack for spotting the absurdities lurking in everyday life had The Guardian labelling him “unquestionably the best observational comic of his generation”. Catch him on 21 July. Self-styled ‘German comedy ambassador’ to the UK, Henning Wehn stops by on 22 July, whilst you can also catch shows from other big hitters such as Sara Pascoe, Ed Byrne, Nick Helm, Arthur Smith and Robin Ince to name a few. Another highlight is sure to be Joe Lycett, who is joined by Ben Norris, Ian Stone and Jonathan Mayor (MC) in the Jesterlarf marquee on 22 July. Subversive and mischievous, Lycett’s wicked sense of humour is picking him up fans at an impressive rate of knots – he’s a TV regular whose star is determinedly in the ascendant, and it’s only a matter of time before he’s filling arenas. In the Cambridge Edition tent, offerings range from the barmy and brilliant horror-show-cum-Elvis-musical that is The Elvis Dead, to the caustic contemplations of Jo Caulfield. There’s

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also astonishing musical-comedy-improv from the enormously talented Abandoman, plus a multi-media extravaganza chat show with The Not So Late Show. Presented by Ross Brierley and Joshua Sadler, the duo behind UK Garage Horseracing (“the funniest thing in the world” according to Comedy Central – we’re inclined to agree), it’s brimming with sketches, short films, games and pure, unadulterated fun. Look out for local comedian David Trent in the mix in the Cambridge Edition tent, too; he’ll be riffing on international hummus day, gay cakes, and smart forks, amongst other things. There’s plenty to catch in the Cambridge Junction tent, too, including Dane Baptiste – Britain’s answer to Chris Rock – who’ll be performing his provocative G.O.D. (Gold. Oils. Drugs) show on 20 July. If you’ve got little ones in tow, the Junction tent will also be hosting some top-notch kids shows over the course of the festival. The Pub Quiz for Kids, on the 22nd, will be serving up lots of laughs, some fierce competition and top prizes, while Kidocracy envisages a world where the kids are in charge. On 23 July meanwhile, kids will love Jarred Christmas, star of CBBC’s The Joke Machine, and his beatboxing games and competitions. For listings and to book, visit the Cambridge Comedy Festival website or the Cambridge Junction website. n cambridgecomedyfestival.com

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C A M B R I D G E C O M E DY F E S T I VA L

TOP TIPS.

F E S T I VA L F O U N D E R A N DY W H I T E S E L E C T S H I S M U S T- S E E S

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“I’m most looking forward to seeing the genius that is improv musical maestro Abandoman - no two shows are ever the same but every one of them is hilarious. The Elvis Dead is another – I caught this show by chance on the last night of the Leicester Comedy Festival, and it’s like no other show you’ve seen before, a horror movie meets Elvis songs (and boy can this lad sing Elvis!). Arthur Smith is an old favourite of mine, too, plus Pub Quiz For Kids is going to be great – I love a pub quiz and this is sure to be the silliest pub quiz you’ll ever go to!”

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CAMBRIDGE OPEN STUDIOS

Cambridge Open Studios. AC RO S S C A M B R I D G E A N D T H E S U R RO U N D I N G V I L L AG E S, A R T I S T S A N D C R A F T S P E O P L E A R E P R E PA R I N G T O O P E N U P T H E I R S T U D I O S T O V I S I T O R S . W E TA L K T O S E V E N A R T I S T S T O F I N D O U T W H AT CA MBRIDGE OPEN STUDIOS MEANS TO THEM .

C ambridge Open Studios is an annual event that offers art lovers across the city and surrounding villages the chance to visit artists – often in their own homes or studios – and not only see their work, but also find out more about the creative process and life as a working artist. Cambridge may be famous for its contribution to science, technology and academia, but there is an extremely vibrant, thriving artistic community in the city, too, and Cambridge Open Studios is one of the oldest events of its kind in the country. It started life back in the 1960s, when a small group of Cambridge artists and craftspeople banded together to open their studios and workshops to the public, spurred on by a desire to make art accessible to everyone. It now involves over 470 artists every year, and has become a regular fixture on the calendars of arts lovers across Cambridgeshire. For all the artists involved it’s a wonderful opportunity to not only show their work to a local audience, but also to open their workspaces to visitors and get the chance to talk about how they work. n • Cambridge Open Studios runs for four weekends in July: this year running on 1/2, 8/9, 15/16 and 22/23. See the full artist listings at the COS website, camopenstudios.co.uk

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Morven Dalton.

Morven makes sterling silver jewellery with accents of gold and semi precious stones inspired by nature and textiles. She also produces mixed media abstract and landscape paintings. “I did Open Studios two years ago, and it was a really worthwhile thing to do. When you work as an artist you’re in your own little bubble, and don’t get the chance to talk to people. It’s good to get the chance to explain my techniques, and it’s a much more personal way of showcasing my work. I last did it two years ago – last year I had my daughter, so I had a break – and I’m still getting commissions from people who visited me back then. Visitors can look at my jewellery, and then ask me to make something similar, but slightly different, and seeing my work and meeting me at the same time really helps with that process. A few years ago I was working as a teacher, and going to Open Studios as a visitor was what inspired me to give jewellery-making a go as a career; I hope that people who come to see me might go away and decide to do something creative themselves.” COS 2017 weekends: 1 & 2 | morvendaltonjewellery.com

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CAMBRIDGE OPEN STUDIOS

N AO M I DAV I E S . Naomi – a former Edition cover artist – describes herself as an ‘urban sketcher’, and many of her pen and watercolour drawings feature scenes from our beautiful city, often with bicycles in! “This is my second year of doing Open Studios. I live just off Mill Road, and it’s quite a challenge to get my house ready to have people traipsing through and getting rid of the dog for the day! I actually paint and draw while people are coming round to visit; little miniatures so that people can see what I do and talk to me about it. I take requests from visitors, things like a Cambridge satchel, or a pair of converse shoes. I particularly enjoy it when children visit, I like talking to them and showing them how I work; last time one little boy from across the road made a display of his own drawings and showed them alongside mine!” COS 2017 weekends: 1 & 2 | naomidaviesart.co.uk

Rebecca Stark.

Rebecca makes handmade metal clocks using techniques including etching, engraving and riveting. She shows these alongside her mixed media paintings. “I’ve done lots of Open Studios; I think my first one was in 1994! I had a long break when I had my daughter and got back to it around five years ago. You get really wonderful feedback from visitors – most of the year I’m just beavering away in my studio and if you sell just to galleries you don’t get that. It’s nice to hear what people like and don’t like! People come to Open Studios, then they get back in touch to ask me to make things for wedding presents and other gifts. So it’s a good way of making contacts that then provide me with work throughout the year.” COS 2017 weekends: 1, 2 & 3 | rebeccastark.co.uk

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CAMBRIDGE OPEN STUDIOS

ALICE THOMSON . Alice produces beautiful mixed media paintings of Cambridge life, full of movement and colour. “I usually do Open Studios every other year. I’ve got a studio at the bottom of the garden, but it’s a bit too small to show the work, so I’ll probably put it up in my house. As well as completed works, I also show works in progress and my sketchbooks, so that people can see how I go about producing my paintings. I have a very loose, free style, and it’s difficult to explain to people without them being able to see it; Open Studios is a great opportunity for people to see everything in the flesh.” COS 2017 weekends: 1 & 2 | alicethomson.co.uk

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CAMBRIDGE OPEN STUDIOS

Chris Wood.

Chris creates optically kinetic works, harnessing light into patterns of light, shade and colour. “I’ve exhibited in COS since 2008; I’m an old hand! I like welcoming visitors into my home, which is in Ely, and talking to them about my work; plus, it gives me the motivation to tidy my garden! I exhibit my work in gallery and museum exhibitions across the UK and internationally, so doing COS is a good opportunity for me to show my work locally for a change. I try to make some smaller scale affordable works, suitable for domestic settings, specially for Open Studios, as my larger panels can be quite daunting, size wise – but they are all made using the same processes. I also like to make some experimental, playful work which isn’t necessarily for sale but fun to talk about with visitors.” COS 2017 weekends: 1 | chriswoodglass.co.uk

K AT H A R I N A K L U G .

Katharina works in ceramics, producing contemporary wheelthrown works featuring contrast, strong colours and bold, graphic patterns. “This is my fifth consecutive year of doing Cambridge Open Studios – even the year I had my baby, I did it for one of the weekends. After the first couple of years I was beginning to get a following, and had visitors who came back each year, so I didn’t want to let anyone down! “A lot of people don’t know what goes on behind the garden fences of Cambridge. There are so many artists who have studios and workshops in their gardens, and maybe even their neighbours don’t know! Open Studios really opens things up; now my neighbours know what I do, and other people from Cherry Hinton and the rest of Cambridge, too. Being an artist can be a very isolated way to live, because I’m always in the workshop at my wheel. So for me it’s great to meet people and talk about my work, and it helps me feel part of the community.” COS 2017 weekends: 2, 3 & 4 | katharina.klug-art.com

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H E AT H E R S TOW E L L .

Heather is a bespoke jewellery designer and silversmith; her work features vintage and antique buttons set in hallmarked silver and gold. “I’ve been doing COS since 2009. I usually show my work all around the country; this is one of the times that local people can come and see my work and find out what I do. I teach jewellery design, so it’s nice for my students to come along and be inspired. “I exhibit for Open Studios at Burwash Manor, in the Artists Marquee, with a group of other artists. As well as taking part as an exhibitor, I help to organise the gallery, which involves taking applications from other artists to be part of the marquee, organising flyers and other promotional materials. Being in the marquee is an excellent way to meet other local artists, and many of us come back and do the event year after year, so there’s a real feeling of community. I have visitors who come along to see me, but I also get to show my work to people who have come to see the other artists in the marquee, so there’s a whole new audience to discover.” COS 2017 weekends: 1, 2, 3 & 4 | heatherstowell.com

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COMPETITION

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Win a Champagne Punt Tour for 9 people!

T

his month, we’ve teamed up with Scudamore’s to give away a luxurious Champagne Punting Trip for up to nine people. Recline in comfort with a glass of chilled fizz while your chauffeur punts you along the tranquil river, sharing stories about the fascinating background of modern Cambridge and enjoying the legendary views of the Backs. Scudamore’s punts are dressed with cushions and blankets, too, as well as umbrellas – so even a bit of inclement weather needn’t spoil your fun. The tour consists of a relaxing 60-minute College Backs punt tour by a professional chauffeur accompanied by two glasses of bubbly each, perfect for sharing with friends. These tours are a great way to see Cambridge at any time of day and are particularly popular with those wishing to enjoy the river in the early evening. n scudamores.com

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PRIZE WORT U P T OH £ 315 !

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A DV EART DV I SEERT M IESNETMFEENAT TU F ERAT E URE

INDEPENDENTS' W I T H A H O S T O F FA N TA S T I C I N D E P E N D E N T S H O P S, A D E L I G H T F U L C A F E A N D A DAY S PA , T H E R E ' S P L E N T Y T O E N J OY T H I S S U M M E R AT B U RWA S H M A N O R

Burwash Manor is a group of converted farm buildings housing a collection of 15 independent, unique shops, a café and a day spa – all open seven days a week. With free parking and a children’s play area, Burwash Manor offers you a friendly, inspiring and peaceful shopping experience – the perfect antidote to the crush of the high street. Every shop has something different to offer: whether you’re after outdoor or designer clothing, jewellery, delicious organic produce, wine, gifts, haberdashery, toys, childrenswear or home and garden furnishings, they’ve got it covered! The wonderful rural location also plays host to a variety of special events, such as the ever-popular autumn Apple Day. Whatever the season, there’s always something happening at Burwash Manor. facebook.com/burwashmanor | Twitter @burwashmanor

A RT H O U N D GA L L E RY

is a haberdashers for the modern crafter. Shop its inspiring selection of yarn, quilting and dressmaking fabrics, sewing patterns from independent designers, haberdashery and threads galore. Knowledgeable staff are happy to advise you on your project, or you can sign up to a workshop in the bright studio space! 01223 778118 | @BackstitchShop

B AC KS T I TC H

If you love all things food then Burwash Larder is for you, as its philosophy is to sell the very

Established in 2012 in London, The Art Hound Gallery carefully sources and sells pieces by some of the greatest 20th century and contemporary artists. Alongside the works of internationally recognised artists it aims to promote and showcase some of the most talented emerging artists from around the country. 01223 262033 | @arthoundgallery Crammed full of stitchy goodness, Backstitch

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B U RWA S H L A R D E R

best. You’ll find Burwash Manor Farm’s pork products from the herd of Essex Saddlebacks and, in season, asparagus freshly picked from the fields. The farm shop provides fresh fruit and vegetables, a delicatessen with over 50 British and continental cheeses, a cake counter and independent butchery. 01223 264600 | @burwashlarder

C OZ Z I & B O F FA W I N E S , B E E R S & S P I R I TS

An exciting portfolio of 250 hand selected and taste verified wines! With over 40 wines under £10 and plenty more for treating yourself there is more than enough choice for every taste and budget. They also have a large selection of craft beers and spirits, too, in an ever-changing selection. 01223 265589 | @CozziBoffaWines

C U C KO O

Experience the relaxed atmosphere in this charming independent boutique; home to a mix of British and Scandinavian contemporary design. Their summer collection includes favourites; The Masai Clothing Company, Grizas, Two Danes and One Life. To complete your new look, they have an amazing selection of gifts and accessories: beautiful Laboratory perfumes, Becksondergaard scarves, S’Well bottles and Scandinavisk candles to name a few. 01223 262123 | @cuckooclothing © PHOTO CREDIT

E X P LO R E B U RWA S H M A N O R .

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D R AG O N F LY B E AU T Y S PA

Dragonfly is a unique retreat from the hustle and bustle of your busy days. Its team of highly qualified therapists is devoted to your wellbeing. Enjoy first class treatments, supreme service and an experience to cherish in this haven of relaxation. Let your senses wander and your mind unwind. 01223 263469 | @burwashdf

THE GIFT SMITH

The Gift Smith is full of gifts that will appeal to everyone, with many of the items coming from local company, Windhorse Evolution, which donates profits to struggling communities across the world. You’ll find a fun mix of gifts, from Swarovski jewellery and colourful bath bombs to handcrafted curiosities from Nepal and India. 01223 264583

INSIDE OUT

Countryside to coastal, at Inside Out you’ll find a varied collection of lifestyle clothing for ladies, men and children. Brands include Joules, Mud & Water, Quba & Co, In Wear and Vedoneire. It also stocks a fab and fun range of accessories, including scarves, bags and purses. 01223 262636

LEECH & SONS AT B U RWA S H

One of only a handful of butchers in Britain to run their own abattoir, Leech & Sons are master butchers in the truest sense. From pasture to pantry they control farming and selection through to cutting and hanging of all the meat on offer. They also sell rare breed pork from Burwash Manor farm. 01223 265555 | @leechandsons

STERLING DESIGNS

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Established in 1999, Sterling Designs specialises in sterling silver jewellery as well as unusual and innovative cards and gifts. Great lengths are taken to source stylish and contemporary pieces; silver and copper pendants and earrings being the latest trend. Whatever your taste, Sterling Designs strives

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Burwash Manor offers you a friendly, unique and peaceful shopping environment; the perfect antidote to the crush of the high street to offer a sophisticated and exciting range of products. 01223 262655 | @sterlingburwash

P R OV I D E N C E

Providence sells cabinets, homeware and decorating products. They make simple cabinetry, create beautiful colour, and try to demystify the decorating options available to their customers. Products stocked: Mylands, Treatex, and Woca for wood finishing. Farrow & Ball, Earthborn, and Providence Paint for decorating. 01223 264666 | @providenceuk

T H E M A N O R F LO R I S T

Renowned locally, this independent florist specialises in beautiful flowers for all occasions. Fresh flowers and plants are delivered daily for celebration and wedding flowers, funeral and sympathy flowers as well as flowers for corporate work. Enjoy the heady scent of the shop or have its flowers delivered directly to your door. 01223 260049 | @themanorflorist

PERSIAN TRIBAL RUGS

Visit this jewel of a shop for old and new carpets, rugs, runners, kilims and tribal artefacts. Each rug is individually chosen for its unique design, quality and durability. All pieces are personally sourced from deep in the countryside and mountains of Iran by the proprietor Farhad Erfan. 01223 264811

providing the very best traditional toys and play equipment for over 30 years. Rocking Horse specialises in traditional and modern toys. From rattles to rocking horses, tricycles to tambourines, here you will find a treasure trove of toys that are sure to excite younger visitors and raise a smile in grown-ups. 01223 264674 | @rhtoyshop

T H E S E C R E T GA R D E N H O M E & GA R D E N

At The Secret Garden you’ll find a wonderful selection of wooden and iron furniture for your garden, garden-room and terrace. Everything from arches, benches and bistro sets to planters, urns and baskets. In addition there are lamps, mirrors, lanterns and a wonderful soft furnishing collection, new and vintage pieces. 01223 260040

F LO C K C A F É

Flock Cafe serves great local coffee alongside brunches, light lunches and homemade scones and cakes. Priding itself on fresh food, made in its kitchen every morning using seasonal ingredients sourced from local suppliers. Visit at the weekend and you’ll sample some of the best pizza in Cambridge! Handmade, sourdough bases cooked in the outdoor, woodfired oven. 01223 263100 | @flock_cafe

ROCKING H O R S E TOY S H O P

Established in 1986, Rocking Horse was the first shop at Burwash and has been

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Food & drink. G E T T H E I N S I D E T R AC K O N C A M B R I D G E ’S F O O D I E S C E N E W I T H E D I T I O N ’S M O N T H LY S U P P L E M E N T

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TO P A L F R E S C O D I N I N G S P OTS .

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REVIEW: H OT E L D U V I N .

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THE BEST ICE C R E A M I N TOW N . C O C KTA I L RECIPES. C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | J U L Y 2 017

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PHOTOS BY DAISY DICKINSON

FOOD & DRINK

Food news.

A M O N T H LY RO U N D U P O F GA S T RO N O M I C G O I N GS - O N I N CAMBRIDGE AND THE S U R RO U N D I N G A R E A

Station Tavern launches bottomless roasts.

Stuck at the station on a Sunday? Turn on your heels and head straight for Station Tavern, and their new Bottomless Roasts. For £32.50 you can tuck into a traditional British feast accompanied by an endless supply of Yorkshire puddings: arguably the finest element of a roast dinner, and of which there are never quite enough. Of course, you’ll also get all the classics: goose-fat roast potatoes, cauliflower cheese, smashed carrot and swede, plus either a vegetarian Wellington, pork belly, sirloin of beef or lemon and thyme chicken. And if that lot fails to fill you up, simply signal for more Yorkshires and they’ll be tableside in the blink of an eye. Perfection. This deal also offers refreshment for intrepid Sunday lunchers in the form of limitless Bloody Marys (within an hour and a half of your booking time): the Station Tavern’s epic bar-top DIY Bloody Mary station is a sight to behold, with an array of ingredients to slake the thirst of the most adventurous foodie including horseradish, gherkins and even crispy bacon strips. Of course, an alcohol-free Virgin Mary option is available for those still considering the night before. So whether you’re despondently waiting for a rail replacement bus or just in the area and in need of a feed, head to Station Tavern for a meal that’ll get you right back on track. thestationtavern.co.uk

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FOOD & DRINK

CAU launches brunch.

We’re being spoiled for choice lately when it comes to brunching options around Cambridge, and this month welcomes another in the shape of CAU’s Buenos Aires-inspired offering. Take your pick from flatbreads filled with bacon, egg and ‘CAUchup’, or sweet potato pancakes topped with grilled pork belly, fried egg and maple syrup. There’s also a CAU take on eggs Benedict, which comes with Yerba-smoked beef, blue cheese and hollandaise sauce, plus a lighter option of coal-roasted peaches over home-made granola with natural yoghurt and a drizzle of honey. They earn extra brunch points with their morning-friendly cocktails, including mimosas. caurestaurants.com

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T H E E LT I S L E Y OPENS.

A new opening has sprung up in recent weeks from Feast & Frolic, the group behind quirky gastro hotspots The Willow Tree in Bourn and No.77 in Caxton. Building on the already excellent reputation of the company, The Eltisley boasts a gorgeous shabby chic interior with lots of eccentric touches, and serves up a menu of local, seasonal and flavourpacked modern British cuisine. Choose between BBQ sticky pork belly, sumptuous kebabs, steaks and indulgent seafood dishes including lobster with garlic butter. There’s also tacos, brisket, ribs and other crowd-pleasers, not to mention sweet treats including toasted marshmallow and fruit s’mores with chocolate sauce. You’ll find the restaurant at 2, The Green in the village of Eltisley. feastandfrolic.co.uk

B E N V E N U TO M AU R I Z I O !

Bringing a touch of ‘la dolce vita’ to Mill Road, new Italian eatery and wine bar Maurizio Dining & Co. opened its doors in mid-May and has been delighting locals since. It pays homage to the Italian tradition of aperitivo, in which drinks (think Prosecco, Franciacorta or Aperol spritz) are served with delicious bite-sized tasters of cured meats, cheeses, sun-dried tomatoes, artichokes, olives and breads. “Italians love to spend time eating and drinking together,” says Maurizio D’Apollonio, the founder of Maurizio Dining & Co. “Our relaxed social space is perfect for friends and family to share the passion and tradition of Italian food and wine.” If you’re hungry for more, Maurizio Dining & Co. also offers cecchetti (hot and cold small plates), panini, bruschetta, one main dish of the day plus an impressive wine menu with grape varieties from the north to the south of Italy. mauriziodining.com

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Parker’s Tavern.

Following a major two-year refurbishment, the University Arms hotel is set to reopen sporting a luxurious new look this autumn. Part of the transformation, on which some £80 million has been spent, is Parker’s Tavern, a brand-new dining destination which will be opening its doors in late 2017. Serving as both the hotel’s eatery and a stand-alone restaurant and bar, it will be offering a mouth-watering menu of seasonally-inspired dishes in a flamboyant dining room. Stay tuned to Cambridge Edition for details over the coming months. universityarms.com

C H E E S E F E S T I VA L AT T H E G O G . If you’re a cheese-lover, make a beeline for The Gog on Saturday 8 July, when the farm shop will be hosting a daylong celebration of fabulous fromage. Taking place 10am to 4pm, the event will offer a chance to meet world-class cheesemakers and taste your way around the very best of British cheese. The festival is being held in partnership with the internationally acclaimed Neal’s Yard Dairy, which selects, matures and sells fine cheese from across the UK and Ireland. Also present will be Mrs Kirkham’s Lancashire Cheese, who’ll be showing off their beautiful, rich and buttery cheese, made using only the milk from their own herd, as well as Jonny Crickmore, maker of Baron Bigod, a creamy, white bloomy-rind number. Julie Cheyney, maker of St Jude cheese will also be there, along with Dominic Coyte, who’s been a cheesemonger for over 20 years and is co-owner of Borough Cheese Company, which unearths the best Comté in France each year to bring back to the UK. The event is free to attend and there will be plenty of delicious treats to try throughout the day, as well as demonstrations and talks. gogmagoghills.com

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F O O D PA R K N I G H T M A R K E T. After a very sunshiny foodie extravaganza back in May, the foodPark team are back at Gravel Hill Farm this month for another evening of delicious delights, music and good vibes. Featuring the cream of the vibrant Cambridge street food scene, plus DJs, cocktails, wine bars and plenty of space to chill out, relax and chow down, these family-friendly events are a must for local food-lovers. The July event takes place 22 July and will run from 5pm to 10pm, featuring artisan pizzas from Fired Up, burgers from Steak & Honour, wings from Buffalo Joes and Spanish platos combinados from Azahar. Drinks-wise, you can slurp down cocktails from the Spirited Mare horsebox, plus tipples from Cambridge Wine Merchants and Jolly Good Beer, and finish off with dessert from Chouxstopper and Churros Bar. There will also be live music from the Alleycats (playing Disney Jazz!), Dickie DeVere and the Dorchester Mavericks, who got everybody swing dancing during their last performance at foodPark. foodparkcam.com

Iced Frappes at Hotel Chocolat Cafe.

As regular readers may have noticed, we’re big fans of the Hotel Chocolat Cafe in the Grand Arcade – a blissful little cocoon in which you can enjoy rejuvenating chocolate-based treats to refuel mid-shopping trip. In honour of summer, they’ve launched a new range which includes velvety soft-serve ice cream infused with St Lucian Theobroma cocoa nibs, as well as indulgent iced frappes. Choose between coffee and white chocolate, salted caramel brownie, regular chocolate and raspberry with salted caramel – and make sure you say yes to the addition of the mousselike creamy whip topping (heaven!). hotelchocolat.com

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Pizza Perfection. AL EX R U S HM ER S HA R E S S EC R ET S FOR C R EATING THE U LTIMAT E DI Y PIZ ZA

WORDS ALEX RUSHMER

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f there is a better, more versatile fast food than pizza then I have yet to find it. Its near-universal appeal makes it an easy crowd pleaser and its inherent versatility makes it endlessly adaptable. Cooking for friends of a carnivorous nature? Load up the base with plenty of charcuterie and cooked meats. Catering for vegetarians? Go big on the grilled vegetables and piles of leafy greens (think spinach and kale), which cook down into the most delicious pile of lightly charred goodness. I love the convivial nature of pizza, both in its creation and consumption, not to mention how well it pairs with some gutsy Tuscan red wines and enormous fresh salads. Pizza has been something of an obsession for me for as long as I can remember. My mother always made it from scratch and I have fond memories of helping to prepare the ingredients and toppings, particularly grating large blocks of cheddar on an old orange cheese grater and cutting button mushrooms into thin slices. Since then I’ve eaten hundreds all over the world, from late-night $2 slices of greasy satisfaction at a New York slice bar to ethereally thin offerings at a Luccan pizzeria with a menu running to just two items (with or without finocchio, the regional variation of salami, highly aromatic with fennel seeds).

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I’ve also developed something of an obsession over the years with trying to perfect the process at home. The dough I managed to get right a few years ago (finely milled Italian 00 flour is the key to getting the necessary gluten to develop and enable you to roll a pizza base of extraordinary thinness); the tomato sauce I learned from a Michelin-starred chef during my time as a contestant on Masterchef; and the toppings are easy to come by. What was holding me back, like many domestic cooks, was the heat available to me – or rather the lack of it. A wood-fired pizza oven will typically run at temperatures of close to 400 degrees. Consequently, the pizza cooks fast. Really fast. The base blisters and catches ever so slightly, the cheese melts quickly and the toppings stay fresh and vibrant. There are some little hacks that enthusiastic home cooks have developed over the years to try to recreate the effects of a genuine pizza oven but, good as they are, they just don’t quite cut it and I was resigned to the conclusion that I’d just have to get my pizza fix from somewhere other than my own kitchen. That was until two years ago when, as a wedding gift, we were given a small stainless steel Uuni oven that looks like a tiny steampunk train and runs on biomass wood pellets. It is a genius piece of simple engineering that reaches incredible temperatures in just ten minutes and cooks a pizza to blistered perfection in fewer than two. To say it has changed my life might be overstating it slightly but by golly, it’s definitely changed my pizzas. n

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K I N G W I L L I A M I V. Bursting with character, it’s easy to see why the King William IV out in Heydon draws in punters from far and wide. Dating back to the 16th century, this ancient pub has a lovely setting in the glorious Cambridgeshire countryside and a great beer garden to make full use of it. Their food is famously great, too, ranging from hearty pub grub to fine-dining delights. Got a veggie in tow? They’ll adore the Vegetarian Verve section of the menu, which is packed with imaginative veg-based treats. king-william-iv.co.uk

Let’s Go Outside.

P R E T T Y C O U R T YA R D S, S T U N N I N G RO O F T E R R AC E S, R I V E R S I D E R E S TAU R A N T S A N D G R E AT P U B GA R D E N S : W E RO U N D U P T H E B E S T A L F R E S C O D I N I N G S P O T S I N T OW N

Old Bicycle Shop. Sip on a craft beer or hipster cocktail and soak up some rays at the Old Bicycle Shop’s dinky courtyard. The food menu is next-level delicious, featuring scrumptious salads, loaded ‘posh’ kebabs and some excellent fish dishes, so there’s plenty to tempt for a lazy al fresco lunch. Despite its location on hectic Regent Street, this little haven manages to feel secluded and away from the hubbub, making it a pleasant spot for a few drinks in the shade on a warm day. oldbicycleshop.com

H OT E L F E L I X . Graffiti restaurant at Hotel Felix has established itself as one of Cambridge’s leading fine dining spots, known for serving up cutting-edge modern British cuisine in a cool and contemporary setting. The restaurant looks out onto a large, south-facing terrace which is ideal for pre-dinner drinks or al fresco dining on a sunny day. Soak up the views of the hotel’s glorious gardens while you sample Graffiti’s innovative fare for lunch or dinner, or indulge in a champagne afternoon tea which includes dainty finger sandwiches, freshly baked scones and choux buns. hotelfelix.co.uk

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De Luca Roof Terrace.

Sip on a glass of chilled wine and indulge in a feast of excellent Italian food at De Luca’s roof terrace, which boasts great views over Parker’s Piece. Tucked away on bustling Regent Street, this place really is a hidden gem, offering a peaceful little sanctuary in the heart of the city centre where you can wine, dine and unwind. Focusing on authentic, classic Italian fare, the menu is bursting with favourites such as seafood linguine, arancini and caprese salads. If the weather turns or you fancy heading inside, there’s a cocktail bar upstairs at De Luca which has a live pianist every Friday and Saturday night. delucacucina.co.uk

N OV I R O O F T E R R AC E . A brand new outdoor eating and drinking venue for Cambridge, Novi’s super cool ‘living’ roof terrace opened its oh-so stylish doors just weeks ago. You’ll be in Instagram heaven as you sip on botanical cocktails at this opulent, plant-filled spot which is entered via a steel staircase. Even if the weather’s not up to much, you can still enjoy the space by cosying up in the snug area, which offers heating and blankets. The rooftop bar is open from 9am until late every day. novicambridge.co.uk

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T H E W I L LOW T R E E .

It’s easy to fall in love with Bourn’s gorgeous gastro pub, with its Michelin recommended food menu and quirky, shabby chic style. Summer is the perfect time to make the trip, offering a chance to relax in the beautiful country garden out back, with its majestic willow tree and beautiful countryside views. There’s a cute terrace too, and if you’ve got a big group, check out the giant tipi for private dining events, which comes adorned with fairy lights and a fire bowl, and is perfect for 10-20 guests. thewillowtreebourn.com

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P I N T S H O P. With a location that couldn’t get more central, Pint Shop’s got it all when it comes to al fresco dining: a superlative gin selection for those allimportant G&Ts, a splendid food menu and a list of craft beers and real ales so large you’ve got no hope of walking out of there in a straight line. Most importantly, of course, they also have a small but perfectly formed outdoor terrace (above), just the thing for idling away summer afternoons. pintshop.co.uk

Double Tree.

Get comfortable on the stylish rattan furniture in the DoubleTree’s pretty garden and you’ll be treated to postcard-perfect views of the River Cam, fabulous food and a drinks selection to die for. Whilst the punts drift past you can relax and enjoy a bite from the Marco Pierre White Steakhouse Bar & Grill, tucking into juicy burgers, sticky smoked ribs and baked camembert. Alternatively, you could stop by between 1pm and 6.30pm and enjoy Marco’s Afternoon Tea, with classic sandwiches, scones and mini desserts, adding a glass of Laurent Perrier champagne if you wish. doubletreecambridge.com

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D ’A R RY ’S L I Q O U R LO F T. Located upstairs at King Street’s d’Arry’s, the Liquor Loft opened last summer and has become a popular in-the-know haunt. The story of this addition to the restaurant began when a fire ripped through d’Arry’s in 2008, prompting a major refurbishment. When renovating, they unearthed an intriguing space upstairs, filled with history. Among the discoveries was original brewing equipment from the George Scales Brewery – which inhabited the King Street spot as far back as 1866. Working around the unique original features, which include the mash tun and pot still, they have created a stylish new 80-capacity bar area, complete with al fresco seating area for drinks and dining. There are blankets and heaters to keep things cosy, a fantastic drinks list with more than 20 gins, home spiced rums and Japanese whiskies, as well as top wines and craft beer. The cocktail list is killer, too, and includes various barrel-aged concoctions such as the orange-infused Espresso Martini and the caramel and ginger Godfather. We love the look of the modern British menu, too, which is divided into a series of flavour profiles. Choose between bitter (think beer-steamed mussels with bacon), salty (like goats’ cheese flatbread with spinach and sundried tomatoes) and sweet dishes (including sweet chilli tempura prawns). There’s also umami, which fatures octopus stew; and sour, where you’ll find things like paprika and cornflour dusted whitebait with wasabi lime mayo. The Liquor Loft also hosts regular gigs and open mic nights; keep an eye on the website for more details. darrys.co.uk/liquor-loft

PETERSFIELD. Another venue from the everexpanding City Pub Company, the Petersfield opened its freshly painted doors to a warm reception back in February. The food, which is of the high-end pub grub variety, is great, the beer selection doesn’t slouch either, and we love how they’ve made the most of the cute courtyard outside. Small but perfectly formed, this fairylight adorned, peaceful little haven is definitely one to add to your list when you’re looking for an al fresco pint in the Mill Road neighbourhood. thepetersfield.co.uk

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Blue Lion Hardwick.

A fantastic spot for a little out-oftown al fresco feasting, the Blue Lion is located around five miles from Cambridge in Hardwick. The food menu is modern, seasonal and packed with top-quality local produce. Enjoy a glass of wine in the gorgeous garden while you tuck into luscious salads, sumptuous sharing plates and delicious flatbreads. Heaven! bluelionhardwick.co.uk

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VA R S I T Y.

Probably Cambridge’s most talkedabout open air drinking and dining spot, the stunning roof terrace on top of the Varsity Hotel is competition slaying when it comes to gorgeous views. Settle in for an afternoon here and you’re treated to panoramic vistas of the city’s skyline (sunset is particularly impressive), as well as a lovely cocktail list. You can grab a bite to eat, too, or head downstairs to the sixth floor to Six, the hotel’s beautiful in-house restaurant. The Roof Terrace is open daily from 12pm-8pm weather permitting. thevarsityhotel.co.uk

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Hotel Du Vin.

C H A R L O T T E G R I F F I T H S D I S C OV E R S T H AT T H I S I N - H O T E L E AT E RY I S M U C H M O R E T H A N A H A N DY O P T I O N F O R O U T- O F -T OW N E R S . . .

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W O R D S C H A R LOT T E G R I F F I T H S

ining in a hotel can sometimes be a risky venture. Within the UK’s larger cities you’ll often find high-profile chefs nestling within hostelries, but the further you travel from the metropolises, the less likely you are to encounter such pleasing pairings. You’re never completely sure if the level of attention paid to decor is matched by the quality of the offering from an establishment’s restaurant, so many travelling foodies often disregard their hotel’s in-house option, choosing to venture forth rather than risk a disappointing experience. Of course, bold culinary adventures should never be discouraged – but if you’re arriving late, if you’re tired, or if you just don’t want to roam further than your hotel’s front door, an on-site restaurant is a welcome feature.

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Thank goodness, therefore, for the Hotel du Vin group, which prides itself on offering reliably delicious bistro-style eateries that more than live up to the high expectations set by their hotels’ opulent interiors; and Cambridge’s outpost is no exception to the rule. The Bistro du Vin that’s found within our city’s Hotel du Vin isn’t just for resident guests: their small but perfectly formed restaurant is regularly packed with locals enjoying the hotel’s dependably tasty dining options, all heavily influenced by both French and British culinary traditions. My dining partner and I visited the Cambridge Bistro du Vin on a Saturday evening, and although the cosy restaurant was empty upon our arrival, the room swiftly filled with other guests until a lively buzz filled the air. We sat near the establishment’s windows to people-watch, and enjoyed the recommended aperitif of a sloe gin champagne spritz while the summer evening dwindled outside. The hotel’s idyllic location on Trumpington Street gave us plenty to gaze at: cyclists skimming past, wedding guests decanting from the

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hotel itself and even a bride and groom making their way to the next stage of their celebrations. I opted for the bistro’s signature Severn & Wye smoked salmon to start, followed by the unusual-sounding porchetta ‘French onion soup’; while my companion plumped for the salt-baked beetroot with whipped goats’ cheese, and a main course of aubergine caponata and grilled halloumi with flatbreads. A perfectly chilled bottle of Duc de Morny Picpoul de Pinet was a fruity yet elegant accompaniment to our midsummer meal. Silver-service breads swiftly arrived tableside, and our dishes followed in quick succession: my friend’s beetroot starter was deemed delicate and ideally suited to summer dining, while my salmon arrived in unexpectedly dramatic style under a glass dome filled with woodsmoke, which wafted its way around our table and lent a theatrical note to proceedings. Our main courses were hearty and delicious: the aubergine caponata was warming without being overpowering, while my intriguingly-titled porchetta arrived under a blanket of sticky sweet onion soup, topped with a single strip of crackling and a wafer-thin parmesan crisp. We split a bucket of courgette fries, which retained a delicious crunch and came in very handy for mopping up the last remnants of caponata sauce. For dessert my friend chose an elegant white chocolate and pistachio parfait which arrived topped with a dramatic tuille crisp and zingy blackcurrant jelly cubes. For my own final course, I followed a personal belief that when dining in the city which put the burnt cream on the map, one should never turn down a crème brulee – and once again, this was proved to be a wise strategy. The Bistro du Vin’s version

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Above The cosy yet elegant dining room has an wonderfully relaxing atmosphere, with friendly and attentive staff on hand Left and right The reliably delicious food more than matches the promise made by the hotel's opulent interiors

is a classic, with just the right depth of vanilla-speckled creaminess and a perfectly crackable sugar lid. If you’re looking for an eatery in which to while away a summer evening over dependably delicious food, you couldn’t do much better than the Bistro du Vin: the intimate dining room has a wonderfully relaxing atmosphere, and the staff couldn’t be more attentive. And of course, if you do find yourself wishing the experience wouldn’t end, you could always extend your stay by checking in to one of the boutique suites just a few steps upstairs – possibly the perfect conclusion to a night out in this charming corner of our city. n Hotel du Vin, 15-19 Trumpington St, Cambridge | hotelduvin.com

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Cambridge ice creams.

1 JAC K ’S G E L ATO .

Jack van Praag, the man behind Jack’s Gelato, has been delighting the tastebuds of Cambridge folk for around five years, first scooping iced delights from his tricycle and now in his own bricks-and-mortar premises on Bene’t Street. He picked up bags of experience cheffing in top-end kitchens around the world, and it shows on his ever-changing menu, which showcases exactly the kind of deliciously intriguing flavour combinations he’s become Cambridge-famous for. Sample gelatos such as salted treacle, malted milk or cardamom and rose, or opt for sorbets including Alphonso mango flavour with chili and salt, or Earl Grey and plum, all handmade using top-quality ingredients, often including herbs from Jack's own allotment. The shop is open from noon until 9pm daily. Follow @jacks_gelato for news and updates.

Aromi.

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A little corner of Sicily right here in Cambridge, the shelves of Café Aromi are lined with plump focaccia, molten mozzarellastuffed arancini, homemade pizza and bite-sized cannoli. The jewel in the crown, however, is the ultra-authentic gelato, made using a much-loved family recipe and with traditional Italian ingredients. Served in a cone, pot or sandwiched in a homemade brioche bun, you can choose between flavours such as Sicilian lemon, stracciatella, and mandorlato (crema with roasted almonds). Aromi has branches on Bene’t Street, Peas Hill and Fitzroy Street. aromi.co.uk

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SW E E T A L LY SCOOPS.

Serving up scrummy iced treats from an adorable vintage van, Sweet Ally Scoops is a regular at local events including foodPark. With retro good looks and and pretty bunting, Lottie the van pulls in the punters all by itself, but the ice cream is gorgeous, too. Sample flavours include pecan brittle, burnt sugar and salt, roasted pear, and almond and praline, all of which are handmade by local ice cream alchemist Jack’s Gelato. For true nostalgia it has to be a 99 from the Mr Whippy soft serve machine, complete with a Cadbury’s Flake – hello childhood! sweetallyscoops.co.uk

M I L LW O R KS .

If you’re a Cambridge dweller of a certain age, you might recall that the building now home to the excellent MillWorks used to go by the name of Sweeney Todds. If so, you’ll probably remember the brilliant, messy ice cream sundaes for which the restaurant was known. Happily, MillWorks has revived this tradition – introducing the mighty, comically huge Rupture Rapture. This behemoth of an ice cream sundae, which arrives studded with sparklers for extra fanfare, is a “perverse explosion” of ice cream, whipped cream, doughnut, Maltesers, salted caramel sauce, brownie and marshmallow. It’s the stuff kids (and big kids) dream of! themillworks.co.uk

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Six.

For an ice cream with a view, check out Six – the restaurant on the sixth floor of Cambridge’s chichi boutique hotel The Varsity. As well as scrummy pizzas and lipsmackingly good rotisserie chicken, they also do a mean line in ice cream sundaes. The Varsity Punt, with its meringues, strawberries, marshmallows and vanilla ice cream, is like summer in a glass, and the Dusty Road is a chocolatey, butterscotch-drenched delight. You can also go off-piste if you like, creating your own sundae laden with toppings such as mini mallows and toffee sauce. Yum. sixcambridge.co.uk

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Having it Off.

F O O D &DD RR IN IN KS K

S A M OW E N S, OW N E R O F T H I R S T Y, A S K S W H E T H E R I T ’S TIME FOR A RETHINK WHEN I T C O M E S T O O F F - D RY W I N E S

W O R D S SA M OW E N S

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ver the last decade or two, wines that are less than totally dry have had a tough time of it. Memories of sickly Liebfraumilch and Lambrusco have pushed millions of drinkers firmly into the ‘dry wine only’ camp. But while the nasty, confected sugarbombs of yesteryear can be happily consigned to the history books, let’s make sure we don’t throw the proverbial baby out with the bathwater. One of the greatest advantages of off-dry wines is their lower alcohol levels – with all the practical and health benefits this entails. Remember, alcohol comes from fermenting the sugars naturally present in the grapes, so if you have ripe grapes and are able to allow full fermentation of all the sugars, you’ll end up with a higher alcohol level in the wine. But if your fermentation stops earlier (either naturally or because of human intervention), some of those natural sugars won’t have fermented into alcohol. The result? A 7-8% ABV wine with a bit more sugar than normal. This is what we term ‘off-dry’. Yes, it was guilty of many sugary wine crimes in the past, but Germany is arguably the place to look for the world’s loveliest off-dry white wines. Part of this is down to geography and climate. Germany is a relatively cool grape-growing country, and cooler countries produce grapes that tend to have higher acidity levels. When you get the balance right between relatively high acidity and sugar in a wine, the effects can be stunning. The Mosel Valley is Germany’s second most northerly wine region, and has managed to perfect this balancing act ever since the Romans rocked up and started planting vines a couple of thousand years ago. Riesling is the main grape variety: it is the perfect leading cast member to pull off this ‘acidity + sugar’ trick. Our brilliant new Mosel producer Matthias Meierer grows nothing but Riesling. He does make some dry wines with very little unfermented sugar left in the wine. But, for us, the Mosel’s unique style calls for a little more sugar to counterbalance the naturally high acidity from such a relatively cool area. We’re importing four of Matthias’s wines, ranging from the light and eminently neckable one-litre bottles of the house wine (still a little off-dry), through a couple of other off-dry wines (the Feinherb and the Kabinett), right up to the positively sweet Auslese. None are more than 11%

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ABV; most are under 10%. When you try them, there is a luscious fruitiness that comes from the slightly higher sugar levels, but this is balanced against the freshness that comes from the acidity. They are not cloying or sickly. They are truly delicious and utterly moreish. The Mosel isn’t the only region in Germany to make great off-dry whites. Our man Nico Espenschied at Espenhof down in the Rheinhessen region, west of Frankfurt, makes a beautiful off-dry blend called Weisses Espenblatt. It is mainly Riesling, with a bit of Gewürztraminer and Scheurebe in the mix. The climate is a little warmer here than in the Mosel further north, so the wine tastes riper and rounder, but with a freshness that comes from the relatively high acidity in the wine. Again, the alcohol is low at only 11% ABV. There are few more suitable wines for quaffing on the terrace during the warmer months this summer – and as a bonus, they’re great food wines, too – especially with Asian and spicy foods. The stronger fruity flavours that come with that higher sugar level give these wines enough oomph to stand up to the stronger flavours in Asian cuisine. These are wines that offer superb quality, coupled with great value. n During July, Wines of Germany are celebrating 31 days of Riesling, a great time to enjoy and discover Rieslings. Thirsty is offering 10% off all Rieslings for the month of July – join us at Thirsty Chesterton Road or at the Thirsty Riverside to find out more.

TOP PICKS. MEIERER RIESLING FEINHERB 2015 £13.10 MEIERER RIESLING KABINET T F U D E R 8 2015 £13.6 0 M E I E R E R R I E S L I N G 2015 (1 L ) £14.30 ESPENHOF WEISSES E S P E N B L AT T 2015 £12.10

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A Summer of Cocktails. I N C E L E B R AT I O N O F C A M B R I D G E C O C K TA I L W E E K E N D C O M I N G T O T OW N I N AU G U S T, W E ’R E WA R M I N G UP WITH SOME SERIOUS SUMMER M I XO L O GY I N S P I R AT I O N F RO M FAVO U R I T E L O C A L B A R S

CAMBRIDGE C O C KTA I L WEEKEND.

Taking place 25 to 27 August, Cambridge Cocktail Weekend offers cocktails, live music, great food and fun over the Bank Holiday weekend. Having launched last year, the event is back bigger and better for 2017, this time featuring more bars, more cocktails, top street food and a great line-up of bands including Swagger, Big Ten and The Indietones. From boutique local producers such as Pinkster Gin to world-class drinks brands including Moët and Tanqueray, you’ll be spoiled for choice when it comes to tasting your way around this three-day extravaganza.

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FOOD & DRINK

TA BOUCHE. A busy café-bar during the day, Market Passage’s Ta Bouche becomes a buzzing cocktail spot in the evening. Their skilled mixologists turn out a huge range of cocktails, from classics to an exciting range of house specials.

Passionfruit Mojito. W H AT YO U N E E D

Havana three-year-old rum Passoã Fresh limes Sugar Mint Passion fruit purée

METHOD

Muddle the fruit, churn with all the liquid and mint and serve long over crushed ice.

Tiki Warrior. W H AT YO U N E E D

Malibu Kraken spiced rum Coco Re'al cream of coconut Pineapple juice Lime juice

METHOD

Mix everything together, shake and serve long over crushed ice in a signature glass.

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FOOD & DRINK

Margarita. W H AT YO U N E E D

37.5ml Cabrito Reposado 100% Agave Tequila 12.5ml Joseph Cartron Triple Sec ABV 40% Juice of a whole fresh lime (approx 30ml) Glassware: For a straight-up or saltedrim margarita, you will need a sombrero glass; for on-the-rocks use a vintage lowball

METHOD

Shake hard in a two-piece Boston shaker with plenty of cubed ice. Margarita straight up: double strain, garnish and serve. Margarita on-the-rocks: single strain over cubed ice. Frozen Margarita – find a blender, it should be in the 80s somewhere. For a salted rim, rim the glass with fresh lime first and dip in salt. For best results; freeze this garnished glassware before serving. Garnish with a lime twist.

HIDDEN ROOMS. Located in the heart of the city on Jesus Lane, Hidden Rooms offers great live music and creative cocktails.

Mai Tai.

The name of this cocktail comes from the Tahitian word for ‘good’. It’s said to have been invented at Trader Vic’s restaurant in California in the 1940s, although a rival bar claims to have invented it years earlier. Either way, it’s delicious!

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W H AT YO U N E E D

37.5ml or 1.5 shots Myers's Rum 12.5ml or 0.5 shot Triple Sec 12.5ml or 0.5 shot Orgeat Syrup 12.5ml or 0.5 shot Gomme Syrup Juice of a whole fresh lime (approx 30ml) Dash Angostura Bitters to finish. Glassware: vintage lowball

METHOD

Mix all the ingredients and hard shake in a Boston shaker with cubed ice. Single strain into glass, half packed with crushed ice. Add fresh, crushed ice to form a cone. Criss-cross bitters. For the garnish, add mint, a lime wedge and a short straw.

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What’s on. A RO U N D - U P O F E V E N T S I N A N D A RO U N D C A M B R I D G E S H I R E T H I S J U LY

1 J U LY T H E W I L D WOOD DISCO

Blissful beats all the way till 2am are guaranteed at this new bijou festival, with flavours from foodPark to keep you going for the whole ten hours, and a DJ set from Soul II Soul’s Jazzie B. 4pm | Horseheath Racecourse, Linton | £25 (earlybird £20) | buytickets.at/thewildwood

4 - 8 J U LY E M M A

A joyful journey of warmth, wit and mistaken intentions, Tim Luscombe stays faithful to Jane Austen’s comic masterpiece, as Emma is forced to face her feelings and perhaps even dare to love another.

7.45pm, Thursday/Saturday 2.30pm | Cambridge Arts Theatre | £18-£33 | cambridgeartstheatre.com

5 J U LY G R E AT WINE RIVERS OF EUROPE

Cambridge Wine Academy take you on a ‘guided cruise’, a winetasting tour of the Loire, Rhone, Rhine, Danube, Ebro and Douro. 7.15pm | Cambridge Wine Merchants, Cherry Hinton Road | £22.50 | cambridgewineacademy.com

7-9 J U LY B I G WEEKEND

ABC headline the Friday night to

get proceedings off with a bang, with Wham!Duran providing the perfect support. Aswad and T. Rex featuring Paul Fenton also perform, plus Hungarian sounds and a local band marquee. All day | Parker’s Piece | free | cambridgelivetrust.co.uk/cityevents

7- 9 J U LY WIMPOLE H I S TO RY F E S T I VA L

Lucy Worsley, Andrew Marr and Stephen Poliakoff are just some of the big names at this inaugural event, brought to Wimpole by the team behind Cambridge Literary Festival.

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Check times | Wimpole Hall | various prices | wimpolehistoryfestival.com

8 J U LY M A K E ! INDIAN A N I M A L S I N A RT

Part of India Unboxed, explore Fitzwilliam Museum’s exhibition of miniature Indian paintings of elephants, tigers and horses with artist Caroline Wendling, and create your own set of small paintings. Suitable for ages 11 to 13. 2pm-4pm | Fitzwilliam Museum | £5 | museums.cam. ac.uk/whats-on

10- 29 J U LY CAMBRIDGE SHAKESPEARE F E S T I VA L

The first four of eight plays this summer from the annual feast of the Bard features Antony and Cleopatra, Much Ado About Nothing, All’s Well That Ends Well and Hamlet. 7.30pm | Various college gardens | £16 (£12 concessions) | cambridgeshakespeare.com

11, 12, 14-16 J U LY ROOM ON THE BROOM Join the witch and her cat on their mission to defeat the dragon in Tall Stories’ magical, musical adaptation of the classic picture book by Julia Donaldson and Axel Scheffler. For ages three and up. 10.30am (except 11th), 1.30pm | Cambridge Arts Theatre | £15.50 | cambridgeartstheatre.com

18 July Russell Brand.

Now equal parts funny man and political jester, Brand returns to Cambridge two months after his last mirth-making stop in the city, with another date on his Re:Birth tour. 8pm | Cambridge Corn Exchange | £30.25 | cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

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12 J U LY A S P E R G E R ’S ARE US

The first comedy troupe of people with Aspberger’s perform their dark, absurdist sketches, followed by a Q&A. 7pm, 9.30pm | Corpus Playroom | £6-£8 | adctheatre.com

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13 - 15 J U LY B E ABSOLUTE FOR D E AT H

An exploration of Shakespeare’s Measure for Measure from environmental theatre company in situ. The Bard’s text is cut and pasted into new configurations, offering a fresh take on the world of sleaze and authoritarian government. 8pm | The Leper Chapel | £10 (£8 concs) | insitutheatre.co.uk

13 - 2 9 J U LY CAMBRIDGE SUMMER MUSIC F E S T I VA L

Founded in 1979, the festival has grown into a popular celebration of all things classical, featuring soloists, chamber ensembles and orchestras. The festival opens with Mozart’s Requiem at King’s College Chapel on the 13th. Check times | Various venues | Check prices | cambridgesummermusic.co.uk

18 - 22 J U LY DOGFIGHT

Between the Bars Theatre presents an award-winning musical that’s a tender yet brutal story of love and war. It follows one final night of partying and trouble that awaits marines on the eve of their deployment. 7.45pm | ADC Theatre | £6-£8 | adctheatre.com

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19 J U LY B U TC H E RY C L A S S – PORK

The Gog butchery team run one of the most hands-on classes. Find out why different joints cook in different ways and how to make the most of each piece. White coats and aprons provided. 6.30pm | The Gog Farm Shop | £128 | thegog.com

19-23 J U LY CAMBRIDGE C O M E DY F E S T I VA L

2 July Clean Bandit.

Formed in Cambridge in 2008, the chart-topping, Grammy-winning trio play a special woodland gig as part of Forest Live. Last year’s Rockabye single was UK No 1 for nine weeks. 7.30pm | Thetford Forest | £36.80 | cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

All weekend | Abbots Ripton | £190 | secretgardenparty.com

More than 40 shows from some of the world’s finest performers. The Cambridge Edition and Cambridge Junction tents host Edinburgh preview shows, there’s a Jesterlarf gala marquee and child-friendly chuckle shows, too. Check times | Jesus Green marquees | Check prices | cambridgecomedyfestival.com

27 J U LY L A DYS M I T H B L AC K M A M B A ZO

20-23 J U LY S E C R E T GA R D E N PA RT Y

27- 30 J U LY CAMBRIDGE FOLK F E S T I VA L

Metronomy, Toots and the Maytals, Crystal Fighters and Wild Beasts ensure that the final Secret Garden Party will go out with a bang. But as experienced SGP-goers will know, it’s not about the big acts, but all about the vibe.

South African a cappella choir referred to by Nelson Mandela as his country’s ‘cultural ambassadors’. They have toured extensively ever since appearing on Paul Simon’s Graceland. 7.30pm | Saffron Hall | £14-£35 | saffronhall.com

Jake Bug, Shirley Collins, Indigo Girls and Loudon Wainwright III headline this year’s event. Day tickets are still available for the first two days, if you haven’t got yours yet. Various times | Cherry Hinton Hall | Prices vary (discounts

for city residents for Friday) | cambridgelivetrust.co.uk/ folk-festival

29 J U LY T H E WIGGLES

Emma, Lachy, Simon and Anthony play favourite songs such as Hot Potato, Rock-a-Bye Your Bear and Do The Propeller, plus their Wiggly animal friends may join in. Suitable for ages one to five. 2pm | Saffron Hall | £16 | saffronhall.com

31 J U LY R E G I N A S P E KTO R

Russian-born American singersongwriter-pianist-guitarist drops in to the Corn Exchange on her world tour in support of her latest album, Remember Us to Life. 7pm | Cambridge Corn Exchange | £30.25-£37.75 | cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

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A DV E RT I S E M E N T F E AT U R E

Chilford Hall Vineyard. WORDS SIOBHAN GODWOOD

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F O RG E T F R A N C E : T H E S E DAYS, T O F I N D FA N TA S T I C W I N E – A N D T O L E A R N M O R E A B O U T H OW T O M A K E I T – YO U D O N ’T E V E N H AV E T O L E AV E C A M B R I D G E S H I R E …

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T

here is currently something of a boom going on in the world of British winemaking. UK wine is now seen on the menus of some of the best restaurants, and it’s not difficult to get hold of a bottle in independent shops and delis across the country. Luckily for us, Cambridge has its own stake in this flourishing trend in the shape of Chilford Hall Vineyard, between the villages of Linton and Balsham, 20 minutes outside the city centre. “Things have definitely changed a lot on the British wine scene in the last few years,” says Mark Barnes from Chilford Hall. “The UK now has its own dedicated college where you can do an undergraduate degree or a Masters in wine production. Today's winemakers understand the process a lot better than when vineyards first started cropping up here in the 1970s. Winemaking isn’t just about growing a few grapes, trampling on them and seeing what you get – there’s a huge amount of science involved, and having the resources to train our own winemakers is making a huge difference to the UK industry.” Chilford Hall started out as a farm, and was bought in the 1960s by a man called Sam Alper, a famous entrepreneur who also brought Little Chef to the UK. He planted the first vines there in 1972 and produced the first wine in 1974. “There weren’t many vines to start off with,” explains Mark, “but things progressed gradually from there; we’re up to a 20-acre vineyard now, and our wines are sold across Cambridgeshire, in shops, cafes and pubs.” The Chilford Hall range of wine – which includes white, red, rosé and sparkling wines – is made using German varieties of grapes. “When English vineyards were being re-established in the late 60s and early 70s, these were the grapes that were considered to be most compatible with our climate and soil,” explains Mark. “The grapes need to be able to ripen properly, so you find a lot of older, more established vineyards across the UK using German grapes. Those vineyards that have been established more recently, though, tend to veer towards sparkling grape varieties; English sparkling wine from those vineyards is comparable with some of the best French champagnes, and it’s a really thriving area of winemaking.” Chilford Hall is actually finding that its own pink fizz is becoming its signature wine: “A lot of people who have been here on wine tours come back and ask if we’ve got any of the sparkling rosé in particular; they remember it and are keen to give it another go!” Chilford Hall Vineyard is proud to be a part of the UK wine scene. After some of the buildings burnt down in a fire

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INDIE OF THE MONTH

Chilford Hall is finding that its pink fizz is becoming its signature wine in 2012, the owners decided to shift away from weddings and events to focus solely on the vineyard side of the business. Now, they have a thriving winery, with every part of the production process done on site. “We don’t have to outsource any part of the process,” says Mark. “We do everything here, from growing the grapes in our vineyards to producing the wine, bottling it and even labelling it. All our equipment is modern and state-of-the-art; all stainless steel, all temperature controlled and regulated, and we have a brand new bottling line and degorging equipment on site.” As well as selling wine in their shop and café, Chilford Hall specialises in tours of their vineyards and wine tastings. Available as a tour, tasting and either lunch or afternoon tea, it’s a very popular experience. “The summer is our best time for tours,” says Mark. “From now until October we run them on Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays and also bank holidays, and they are always busy. We do a morning one, which is a tour and tasting plus lunch, then a later one that includes afternoon tea, although visitors can just do the tour and tasting if they prefer.” Guests are taken for a tour of the vineyards, with a talk on how the fruit is grown and matured. Then they come into the winery and find out about the winemaking process, and the differences between making still and sparkling wine. Next, they visit the wine shop, and have a tutored wine tasting on five of Chilford Hall’s wines. After that, it’s either lunch or afternoon tea. “The wine tours and tastings can be bought through ‘experience’ specialists such as Virgin Experiences and Red Letter Days,” explains Mark, “so Chilford Hall attracts visitors from all over the country who may never have heard of us before, as well as local people who are familiar with the business. We get all kinds of visitors, from wine buffs who have bought a tour for themselves to those who’ve been bought the experience as a gift, and fancy a relaxing lunch or afternoon tea with a nice tour of a vineyard as an added bonus!” A stroll through a vineyard, a small tipple and a delicious lunch or afternoon tea? We can’t think of a better way to spend a few hours in the beautiful Cambridgeshire countryside. Particularly if pink fizz is involved! n Chilford Hall Vineyard, Balsham Road, Linton, Cambridgeshire CB21 4LE | chilfordhall.co.uk | 01223 895600

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W I M P O L E H I S TO RY F E S T I VA L F O R K I D S .

There’s loads happening at Wimpole History Festival to spark young imaginations, from an insight into the life of a medieval knight-in-training with Philip Ardagh to a trip into history with a time-travelling cat. There’s also hands-on science, sword school, falconry and a living history day to enjoy – turn to page 24 for the full lowdown on the festival. wimpolehistoryfestival.com

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Jazz & Brass in the Parks.

10 FA M I LY DAYS O U T.

Jazz and Brass in the Parks, a series of free, outdoor music concerts in Cambridge’s green spaces, continues this month. Grab a picnic and a blanket and mosey down to Cherry Hinton Hall on 16 July, when the Cottenham Brass Band will be delighting ears and getting toes tapping from 3pm to 5pm. Free to attend. cambridgelivetrust.co.uk/city-events

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SUMMER AT T H E MUSEUMS L AU N C H E S . From 22 July to 3 September, the University of Cambridge Museums will be laying on a huge programme of family activities, events and trails to keep everybody entertained over the summer holidays. Taking place at venues across Cambridge and the county, the event will bring everything from storytelling and play-based activities for younger kids, to interactive and educational hands-on activities for all ages. We’ll be bringing you the full low-down in the next issue of Cambridge Edition. museums.cam.ac.uk

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FA M I LY

M I LTO N MAIZE MAZE. A firm family day out favourite, Milton Maize Maze reopens on 14 July with a brand new design for 2017 and a giant seven-acre castle, which you’ll have hours of fun exploring from down in the dungeon to the highest turret. Also new for this year is Water Wars, an action-packed game where you get to drench your opponents! The wooden maze will be returning, and you can also bounce on a trampoline, do some go-karting, zip down a zip wire or hop on a tractor for a trip around the farm. For something a little more relaxing, you can wander round the Wild Flower Meadow, feed the fish at the reservoir or have a pitstop for tea and cake at the café. Tickets are £9.50 for adults and £8.95 for children (3-15 years old). themiltonmaizemaze.co.uk

S U N D OW N C I N E M A AT WIMPOLE.

Gather up the family and enjoy an outdoor film screening in the magnificent setting of the Wimpole Estate, as the grand gardens welcome a duo of great family films this July. First up, on 29 July, enjoy Pixar megahit The Secret Life of Pets, which shows exactly what our beloved furry (and scaled, and feathered) friends get up to when we’re not at home. Grown-ups and little ones alike will find it hilarious. Then, on 30 July, step back in time and down the rabbit hole for a screening of the original Disney Alice in Wonderland. Released in 1951, this surreal classic follows young Alice into a magical world filled with eccentric characters and stars Kathryn Beaumont as the titular Alice, Sterling Holloway as the grinning Cheshire Cat and Ed Wynn as the Mad Hatter. sundowncinema.co.uk

Gelato for Kids.

If your kids adore ice cream, they’ll be whipped into a frenzy by the prospect of this month’s kids’ session at Cambridge Cookery School, which is all about making your own gelato. Taking place on 29 July, this hands-on class will cover all you need to know about creating delicious, Italian-style ice cream using fresh ingredients and very little sugar. Leading the class, which runs 10am to 1pm, is Tine Roche, who learnt the art of gelato from artisan gelatarias in Italy, and there will be tasters galore throughout. cambridgecookeryschool.com

BLUNDERBUS O U T D O O R T H E AT R E .

Enjoy a tale about a little pup with big dreams at Milton Country Park this month when Blunderbus swing by with their feel-good show Dogs Don’t Do Ballet. Biff isn’t your average canine – not for him peeing on lampposts or scratching fleas, he’s more of a moonlight, music and walking on his tiptoes fella. In fact, he doesn’t think he’s a dog at all – he thinks he’s a ballerina! Based on the bestselling book by Anna Kemp and Sara Ogilvie, this fabulously fun production features music, puppets and of course, a ballet-dancing dog. The show takes place on 27 July from 3pm to 5pm and tickets are priced at £10 for adults and £7 for children (£32 for families). blunderbus.co.uk

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FA M I LY

Room on the Broom.

Julia Donaldson and Axel Scheffler’s classic picture book Room on the Broom gets a rework for the stage this month at Cambridge Arts Theatre. Running 11 to 16 July, the production comes our way courtesy of Tall Stories theatre company, and tells the story of the Witch and her cat on a mission to defeat a dragon. While travelling on their broomstick, they pick up a motley crew of hitchhikers that includes a beautiful green bird and a crazy frog – but they soon realise that the broomstick’s not meant for so many passengers. With the broomstick snapping just as a very hungry dragon appears, will the Witch and her new friends be able to get away in time? Expect songs, laughs and lots of fun from this Olivier Award-nominated show that’s toured Britain and the world. Tickets are £15.50 and times vary. cambridgeartstheatre.com

Family Angling Day. Enjoy an outdoorsy day with your brood on 9 July, when Milton Country Park welcomes back its annual Family Angling Day. Taking place 10am to 4pm on Todd’s Pit, the event offers a chance to have a free 30-minute session with licensed coaches who can answer any questions and offer advice. miltoncountrypark.org

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E AC H GA L A D AY. There’s a fun-packed day for a fantastic cause planned for 1 July, when East Anglia Children’s Hospice (EACH) hosts its annual gala day at Milton Hall. Running 11.30am to 5pm, the event features tasty food and drink, entertainment, stalls – and some very special guests. Kids will love the face painting, archery and bouncy castles, not to mention the chance to meet Fitz and Will, the Cambridge Cats. Grownups, meanwhile, will enjoy the food and drink delights, including a stall from local boutique gin distillery Pinkster. There are also cream teas, a candy cart, cocktails and barbecue food to enjoy, plus crumbly scones with lashings of clotted cream from the Women’s Institute. The grounds of Milton Hall will also be playing host to a range of craft and homeware

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stalls, classic cars and even a fire engine, plus live music from Arco Iris samba band. Karen Newton, EACH Cambridgeshire Fundraising Manager, said: “We’ve got lots of great muscial and dance performances scheduled throughout the day and a variety of stalls to pick up treats. We rely on fundraising events to continue to offer the best support to families and provide specialist nursing care to children and young people with lifethreatening conditions. It costs £5,300 a day to run our service across Cambridgeshire and the support from our local community never fails to surprise us. In advance I would like to thank our supporters and volunteers who are helping plan for a great day.” each.org.uk

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Glitter bug. F E S T I VA L S E A S O N I S H E R E A N D I T’S T I M E TO S PA R K L E . DA I S Y D I C K I N S O N E M B R AC E S H E R I N N E R M AG P I E A N D S H OWS YO U H OW TO G O F RO M D R A B TO F E S T I VA L FA B W I T H T H R E E S T U N N I N G G L I T T E R LO O K S

W O R D S & P H OTO G R A P H Y D A I SY D I C K I N S O N

G LOW H A R D , OR GO HOME.

I’m a bit of a magpie, and will sneak a little glitter into any make-up look regardless of the season. The great thing about glitter is that it doesn’t have to be perfect, so go wild and have fun! Using pressed glitter like the Five Pan Festival palette from Glitter Eyes (£21.99, hookedupshop.co.uk) does away with the need for adhesive, and you can simply apply with a brush. I used the shade Masquerade over my lids here, then swept a green eyeshadow under my eyes lined with kohl. Next up was Lunar and Solar Glow Mixes from Dust & Dance (£3.50 each), which glow under UV light. I then used Dust & Dance The Magician (£3.50) over their Cosmetic Glue (£2.50) to highlight my brows, before adding Beauty Boulevard Star Dust in Cosmic Child and Neptune (£12.50, beautyblvd.com).

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B E AU T Y

T H E LO O K O F L U S T R E . A simple, yet really effective look – and great for those a little wary of a full face of glitter – is glitter tears. A light coloured silver or gold works best for this, and I adore the In Your Dreams’ Chunky Gold Lileth glitter (£5.50, inyour-dreams.com). Teeny tiny stars with a fine glitter mixed in gives effortless coverage for those who don’t have time for a base eyeshadow. Start with your favourite make-up on, then – as you’re working near eyes – use Vaseline, or a gentle balm under your eyes, tapering downwards. Using a slim eyeshadow brush here is advisable. Then, being careful not to throw it everywhere or sneeze, take the same eyeshadow brush and gently pat the sparkles into place. If you can, do this over a piece of paper, so you can recycle any fallen stars and avoid mess! If you feel like getting carried away, I encourage you to try adding a softer-edged glitter over lids, like Dust and Dance Champagne Sparkles (£3.50, dustanddance.com).

P E GA - SA S S . Mermaids and unicorns are influencing this season’s fashions, and festivals are a great place to embrace the trend! For this look, start with a pretty pink eyeshadow like Totally Fetch from the Too Faced Chocolate Bon Bons palette (£39, Debenhams). Sweep generously over lids, mixing under the eyes and out to your temples with a lighter shade, then use an iridescent fine glitter over your lids. The Five Pan Festival palette from Glitter Eyes (£21.99, hookedupshop.co.uk) made this look quick and mess-free to achieve. I used the shade Prom Queen, then for under my eyes the stunningly beautiful In Your Dreams New Mermaid Gift Set (£30, inyour-dreams.com) and Iridescent Angel, followed by Iridescent Mermaid and Pink Pegasus. The set includes four glitter pots and four packs of gems. After applying Vaseline, work the glitter out, getting chunkier over your cheekbones. I’ve recently discovered Lash & Glo Beauty on Newmarket Road, which stocks Star Dust by Beauty Boulevard (£12.50). These chunky glitters come packed with gel and a brush for a striking glitter parting, but are safe to use on skin too. I applied the shade Supernova in a semicircle over my cheeks for a Pegasus wing effect bordering my eyes. Always finish with falsies, and I love the Huda Beauty Scarlett lashes (£15.50, cultbeauty.co.uk) for this.

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A DV E RT I S E M E N T F E AT U R E

Property edition. 93

MAKE A HOUSE A HOME.

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P R O P E RT Y NEWS.

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INTERIORS

All these little things. F RO M A WA L L O F FAVO U R I T E B O O K S T O A S TAT E M E N T R U G – I T ’S T H E P E R S O N A L D E TA I L S T H AT E L E VAT E A HOUSE INTO A HOME . READ O N T O F I N D O U T H OW T O A D D A T O U C H O F PA N AC H E T O YO U R I N T E R I O R S

© PHOTO CREDIT

© ABIGAIL EDWARDS

WORDS ANGELINA VILL A-CL ARKE

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Left Be & Liv’s Peony wooden lampshade, £299 Above Graham & Brown’s Goemetric Diamond Pendant, £45 Below Thibault Industrial Retro Pendant Chandelier, £169.99, from MY Furniture

L I G H T B U L B M O M E N T.

H O M E H E R I TAG E .

Lighting is no longer an afterthought in a home. Statement lighting is often a key focus in a design scheme, with a huge range of styles to choose from across the high street. On trend at the moment are industrial-style materials such as concrete, copper and brushed metals; mix with bare Edison bulbs and coloured cords to add a textural layer. Lynda Everett, co-owner of Abode Living, advises homeowners to be adventurous with both scale and materials, and says: “Try eye-catching materials or oversized designs – these work well grouped in the kitchen or dining areas. Geometric lighting is another key trend this year, with spherical, hexagonal and cylindrical designs that create a strong focal point.” For drama, look to Be & Liv’s new Peony wooden lampshades which are available in black and white. Janne Uusi-Autti, co-owner and designer, says: “The easiest way to add atmosphere to your home with lighting is to choose fittings and lamps that create a beautifully diffused, dappled light. Designs that have intricate perforations will give this.”

Lucy Mortimer, founder of Galapagos, the mid-century furniture makers, gives her advice for home styling

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1. L AY E R :

Mix vintage pieces with modern elements.

2. ZO N E :

Carve out a small corner to create a quiet retreat.

3. B E B O O K I S H :

Books add warmth and colour to a space.

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INTERIORS

Create an inviting corner Above The Hugo table lamp, £59, from Abode Living, is made from copper and concrete to reflect current trends

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SHELF LIFE. We all have collections of vases, pictures and collectibles but it’s how you display them that will separate a cluttered surface from a curated one. Invest in artfully designed shelving, such as the Elmari Shelving at Furniture Village or the Hexagon Shelving at Swoon Editions, as a good starting point, and get rid of anything you don’t love. PIB Home’s ladder bookshelves are a relaxed version of built-in shelving, and the perfect showcase for your favourite things. Thomas d’Estienne d’Orves, director of PIB, says: “The key to styling shelves is to artfully mix things up – gather together sculptures, vessels and favourite pieces – but stick to a colour palette for a coherent theme.” Books also add character to a home. If you have enough space, create a reading corner, so your favourite tomes are on hand, and add a cosy statement chair and pretty reading light. Bookshelves can be carved out of a number of spaces – such as under the stairs, in alcoves or – if you are lucky – in their own designated library rooms. Think about colour coding the shelves and keep an eye out for larger coffee-table books to add variety and interest. You could even invest in a statement book wallpaper to give a room a ‘bibliotheque’ theme – such as the white Library Mural from Graham & Brown.

C U R AT E YO U R S H E LV E S . Eve Waldron, who owns an interior and architectural design practice in Cambridge, gives her tips O P T I M I S E D S PAC E .

If tight for space, choose multi-functional shelving, and use the bottom shelf as a desk.

P L AY YO U R D I S P L AY.

Use shelves of different lengths and stagger them for a pleasing composition, placing larger items on the bottom shelves.

C O LO U R C O D E .

Group things in uneven numbers, and use colours to group like items to give cohesion. evewaldron.com

PIB Home has a selection of interesting shelving Above Pahkina Shelf, £668 Right Eight-step Studio Stepladder, £200 Far right Big Ladder Bookshelf, £369

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INTERIORS Bring drama to your floors with Lisa Todd Designs’ Jitterbug Rug, £785, and matching linen cushions, £120 each

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TEMP TING TEXTURES. It’s the final details and well-chosen accessories that can bring a room to life. If you have wooden floors, search for the ultimate statement rug, like those available from Lisa Todd Designs, which are like works of art for the floor. “The trend for bare boards continues,” she says, “and the desire to have fun and add personality to our homes is becoming more and more evident. A big, bold and beautiful rug will inject a striking statement into any room.” Blend cushions and throws in complementary colours. Bronte by Moon is a good source of textiles and home accessories, while Smallable has beautiful rugs, throws and cushions in a modern, muted palette. For a luxury addition, Galerie’s new marble mural wallpapers are wonderfully sophisticated, while Abigail Edwards’ new whimsical wallpaper designs give character and charm. “For those who are a little frightened of using pattern, consider a calming monochrome wallpaper design that can appear to be more like a soothing texture from a distance and it is only when you are up close that you can see the detail of the design,” she advises. Finally, Anna Schmidt, founder of Also Home, which supplies simple, Scandi homewares, suggests using tiny luxury touches to bring comfort and warmth to the home: “Add a splash of colour with accessories to bring the wow factor, and my favourite is a large oversized cushion in bed – it is so inviting.”

Simple things. KALEIDOSCOPE HOMES’ CAREY PINDER GIVES HER TO P T H R E E S T Y L E T I P S *Choose a statement light to reflect your personality. *Layer up soft throws and cushions to add cosiness. * Invest in one stand-out piece of furniture for a nod to luxury.

Top left Tribal Indian embroidered cushion, £42, Angela Reed Top right Bronte by Moon’s Athens lambswool lurex throw in Vienna Gold, £89.95 Above Kaleidoscope’s Tripod Floor Lamp, £115

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Stockists. ABIGAIL EDWARDS 07946 455277 abigailedwards.com ABODE LIVING 01273 621116 abodeliving.co.uk ALSO HOME 01483 608 611 alsohome.com ARBOL HOUSE 01244 329643 ovohome.com BE & LIV beandliv.com BRONTE BY MOON brontebymoon.co.uk DELCOR 0191 237 1303 delcor.co.uk EVE WALDRON 01223 470 370 evewaldron.com FURNITURE VILLAGE 0800 804 8879 furniturevillage.co.uk GALAPAGOS 01483 901273 galapagosdesigns.com GALERIE WALLCOVERINGS 01892 700730 galeriehome.co.uk GRAHAM & BROWN 0808 168 3795 grahambrown.com KALEIDOSCOPE 0871 244 2770 kaleidoscope.co.uk LIBRA 01223 895800 thelibracompany.co.uk LISA TODD lisatodddesigns.com MY FURNITURE 0800 092 1636 my-furniture.com PIB HOME 020 3445 5150 pib-home.co.uk SMALLABLE 020 3445 0146 smallable.com SWOON EDITIONS 020 3389 7550 swooneditions.com WILLIS AND GAMBIER 01733 318 400 willisgambier.co.uk

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O CC A S I O N A L Y E T V I TA L . Introduce personality and interest with a couple of key pieces of furniture. A bright velvet chair or a chic chest of drawers, for instance, can add a talking point to a room. Libra’s bone-inlaid drawers are ideal for hallways – they hide the clutter and add a touch of glamour. Cambridgeshire-based Willis and Gambier stock a range of lifestyle furniture such as industrial-style side tables, while MY Furniture is a one-stop shop for unusual shelving and of-the-moment designs, such as the Alveare hexagon-shaped coffee tables. Arbol House’s marble and brass table, complete with bird legs, is a stylish and witty addition to a living room, and owner Bartek Ostojski comments: “A brave choice in the form of a characterful piece is often what elevates a room from pleasant to ‘Wow!’. Follow your own taste and don’t let fashion dictate to you, as these probably won’t be the designs that you’ll love forever – find something that speaks to you personally.” Meanwhile, Delcor – which has showrooms across the country and has been flying the flag for British craftsmanship since 1967 – is the perfect place to source statement items, such as Chesterfield footstools and velvet sofas. n

Above Delcor has a wide selection of sofas, chairs and footstools, which are made to measure in Northumberland. The brand is renowned for its dedication to British craftsmanship; prices vary

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OLYMPIA HAND LAMP

£59, pib-home.co.uk

MARBLE PRINT CUSHION

£25, marksandspencer.com

BONE INLAY HUMBUG CHEST

£1,872.50, thelibracompany.co.uk

CONTENT BY CONRAN ELMARI TALL SHELVING

£499, furniturevillage.co.uk

Edition loves. PALM TABLE LIGHT

£365, abodeliving.co.uk

CAIRNGORM THROW

VENUS BOOKENDS

£29, Kaleidoscope.co.uk

£94 for two, miafleur.com

ENCORE CHAIR IN ELECTRO MAZE

£1,495, galapagosdesigns.com

WHITE MARBLE TABLE BY MADAM STOLTZ

£275, ovohome.com

MONACO FOOTSTOOL

from £536, delcor.co.uk

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I N T E R I O R S S P OT L I G H T

The English Listed.

F

WORDS ANGELINA VILL A-CL ARKE

rom the vital design stages of a build to those all-important finishing flourishes, such as sourcing fine art for your walls, The English Listed is a one-stop shop for every concern you could have when it comes to renovating or rebuilding a home. The company was founded by husband-and-wife team Frazer Stannard and Tolly Nason. With a background in joinery and building, Managing director Frazer is an expert in restoring period properties, particularly listed buildings. Creative director Tolly, meanwhile, is the company’s in-house interior and creative consultant, as well as being a renowned glass artist in her own right. Whether it’s a period fireplace renovation or a conversion of a Grade II listed barn, the couple pride themselves on their attention to detail. With a team of master builders on hand, their passion lies in making sure that the integrity of the building is met, while conforming to conservation policy and meeting modern day environmental standards. “We’ll move mountains to maintain the integrity of the building, but we also want to make it as practical and environmentally sound as possible. It’s about striking the right balance,” says Frazer. Tolly agrees: “Our aim is to give beautiful old buildings a new lease of life – and help people create homes they love living in.” “As conservation specialists, we have a wealth of knowledge and experience working with listed buildings and buildings of special interest,” Frazer continues. “Such buildings are generally the most problematic with a high level of criteria to fulfil. Working closely with our architect and conservation experts, we can define the best way forward to maintain the integrity of the heritage building while moving it forward into the 21st century.” Tolly continues: “We believe that once beautifully restored and renovated, a historical building or a modern extension should be showcased by an equally stunning interior that is both complementary to the origins of the building but also reflects modern living. We try and save as many original features as possible. Inspired by quintessential English lifestyle and modern, Scandinavian design, our interiors are a perfect blend of the old and the new, and work harmoniously with heritage buildings, while bringing contemporary design into each home.” Successfully bringing together two different skill sets, the couple recently won an SCDC Built Heritage Award for ‘The Ark’, a studio space located in Abington, Cambridgeshire. The building won first place for ‘Contemporary Design sympathetic to the Historic Environment’ and the couple consider it a perfect representation of everything that The English Listed does. From working with wattle and daub plaster to traditional panel work, and from lime renders to thatching, the company has spent many years gathering a team of expert master builders, with bespoke joinery a speciality. “We’re very proud of restoring 30 timber windows, using original crown and

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cylinder glass, for the Grade 1 listed Quendon Hall in Essex in just 24 days!” says Frazer. When it comes to the end of a project, Tolly has curated a homeware collection with an emphasis on timeless style and natural materials. From stylish Danish homeware to ironmongery from the Belgian company Dauby, The English Listed has sought to discover new finds from all over the world that sit perfectly with classic English architecture. In addition, the company represents the work of five British artists – as well as Tolly’s own glasswork – which can be seen at their HQ at 17 West Street (itself a unique building, dating back to 1720, which they have painstakingly restored). “Our showroom, retail space and fine art gallery in St Ives brings to life the aesthetic of The English Listed and represents the full spectrum of our expertise,” says Frazer. “We’ve also just launched our new web store where you can shop our carefully edited selection of homeware. It means we can reach even more customers who are further afield. We hope they are inspired by our passion.” n The English Listed, 17 West Street, St Ives, Cambs, PE27 5PL | englishlisted.com | 01480 301600

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Marketing myths.

I

S A M C O O K E , PA R T N E R AT C O O K E , C U R T I S & C O, S C Y T H E S T H RO U G H T H E S M O K E A N D M I R RO R S O F E S TAT E AG E N T S M A R K E T I N G P L OYS

’m writing this on 9 June. But I reckon you’re reading it a fair while after that. Printed media doesn’t work like Twitter, it takes time to compile, print and distribute nice things like this magazine, so perhaps I’ll have to refresh your memory as to what 9 June was (or is for me) – results day for the general election. Ring a bell? I expect you can remember it, but all sorts might have happened between my now and your now. There’s half a chance you may not even get to read this if there’s been a bit of global thermonuclear warfare and everyone is toast – after all, you wouldn’t want the sort of prime minister who was scared to start a bit of a nuclear war. That red button isn’t going to press itself. Assuming that hasn’t happened and you are reading this (hi!), you’ll be relieved to know it’s not a political piece, but last night and this morning has reaffirmed my belief that the Great British public isn’t as gullible as marketeers might think we are. We don’t like soundbites, we see through sales speak and we can tell the difference between honesty and dishonesty. I’m in marketing. It’s what we do here at Cooke Curtis & Co, but from the start we wanted to do the honest type of marketing. Got a house for sale next to a sewage works? Stick it in the brochure, it’s not as if viewers won’t see it when they turn up. Small garden? Measure it and put the measurement in the brochure. Some people want a small garden and those that want a big one aren’t going to buy if you trick them into a viewing. We deliberately try to drop the platitudes. We don’t sell ‘deceptively spacious’ properties, we tell you the floor area and let you decide if it’s spacious enough. In our view most people buying and renting property round here are brighter than most estate agents and any attempt to evade the truth is easily spotted. Catch someone being economical with the truth once and you’ll never trust them again. Estate agents are mainly better than we used to be. There was even a law brought in to make sure of it – The Property Misdescriptions Act 1991 laid out very specifically what can and can’t be said, making criminal prosecutions of estate agents very possible and actually quite regular. Until it was quietly repealed in 2013 – who needs consumer protection after all? Sorry, I said no politics. When we started CC&C two years ago we looked at everything estate agents did and decided what brought real value to customers and what was just sales nonsense. The idea was to be honest, drop the waffle and trust people to know the difference. But I’m a bit ashamed to say there was one particular thing to which we didn’t apply that rule, one thing that we knew to be a fallacy but chose to perpetuate – the value of having a ‘London office’. Many other estate agents pushed this as being critically important to selling a Cambridge house and we feared if we were one of three agents called to a valuation, and

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two of them boasted of a London office and we didn’t, we’d be disadvantaged. But we’re two years old now, have the courage of our convictions and the confidence to speak the truth: the whole London office thing is utter rot. Of the highest order. Think about it. What happens at these London offices? Do them there London folk walk in, having stooped to pick up some gold paviours, and ask for a list of what is for sale in Cambridge? Do they knickers. London has the internet, people in London go on that to look for houses. Like everywhere else. And it’s not like Cambridge is some picturesque coastal Welsh fishing village laying there undiscovered – if you work in London and want to move to somewhere commutable that is cosmopolitan, safe, with good schools and lots of culture, Cambridge will be on your list of places to look. Of course it will: it’s good here and everyone knows that. There may, possibly, be some people who want to move out of London ‘to the country’ but don’t know where to. And they may, by chance, walk into a London estate agency to try to help them decide, but that London agency has thousands of houses for sale all across the country; they can’t exactly ‘push’ Cambridge as the only place to go. And even if they did, would that buyer just buy whatever was for sale with that one agent in Cambridge? No. They’d go on the internet. Because in London they have the internet. They honestly do. And if you take the time to investigate these London offices you’ll soon see they’re not necessarily what you might think. One of them is named after a very posh part of London. The poshest part by board game standards. But it’s not even in that part of London. There’s another one that’s heavily promoted, whose website doesn’t let you drop the little yellow Google Streetview man on their address, presumably because you’ll spot it’s an anonymous dead-end back street with little to draw anyone down there unless they want to see where Chopin stopped in just before he gave his last public performance to Polish refugees in 1848 (admission: this is not some piece of trivia I know; if you take the time to grab the little yellow man from Google maps direct you'll see a blue plaque telling the tale). So there you go, people of Cambridge and nearby. That’s the truth. London offices aren’t what you may have been told they are. And we’ve made the decision not to pretend otherwise by dropping our links to one. All you now need to do is uphold my faith in you and not choose an agent other than me to sell your house because of the massive list of mythical cash-rich buyers they’ll put in a mythical black cab and send up from their London office. Which isn’t even actually theirs as they share it with somewhere between 100 and 800 other provincial estate agents. Did they not mention that? One day I’ll visit one of these London offices just to see how big their filing cabinets are – they must be massive to hold every house from every agent who pays their subscription. I mean, they must use filing cabinets to keep all the property brochures in, right? No one in London uses the internet...n

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P R O P E RT Y N E W S

F I R S T R E S I D E N TS M OV E I N TO N O RT H S TOW E . Based on the site of the former RAF Oakington base between Cambridge and Huntingdon, Northstowe is a brand new town for Cambridgeshire which will eventually house an anticipated population of around 24,000. The first 92 homes to be finished, built by Bloor Homes, welcomed their new inhabitants in the last few weeks, with more buyers poised to move in over the coming months. This phase of the development, which consists of a range of two-, three-, four- and five-bedroom houses, includes two four-bedroom show homes which opened to the public in May. “We are immensely proud to be delivering the first homes at what is the largest planned new settlement in England in 50 years,” said Monika Hanlon, Regional Sales Director at Bloor Homes Eastern. “I would encourage anyone interested in living here to visit our sales office and show homes where they can find out more about the homes we are building and view the plans for Northstowe as a whole. “The interest in the early releases at Northstowe has been phenomenal and we are delighted that over a quarter of our homes have already been reserved off-plan,” she continues. “The first residents will have the opportunity to be the first to use a range of amenities such as a primary school and community buildings. They will also be able to use the super-fast fibre broadband that will be available to all residents, adding to the benefits of living in the town. With its close proximity to Cambridge and excellent transport links to the city, Northstowe

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has proved to be an extremely popular development with buyers looking for high quality and affordable homes in this soughtafter area. The town is connected to the north and east by the Cambridgeshire Guided Busway, with a stop close to the development. This provides a direct connection to Cambridge and offers an integrated transport link with the new Cambridge North mainline railway station.” bloorhomes.com

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