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LOCAL LIFE

E - L U M I N AT E F E S T I VA L • F E E L- G O O D R E C I P E S • C A M B R I D G E ’S W E L L- B E I N G WO N D E R S • W I N A M I N I B R E A K • T H I S M O N T H ’S T O P G I GS • F O O D & D R I N K

S I G N U P TO O U R W E E K LY D I G I TA L N E W S L E T T E R

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Welcome.

ather than making January a month of stern resolutions, a time of frugality and punishing yourself after the overindulgences of Christmas, why not seize this time of year’s infectious ‘new beginnings’ sentiment and try something new? As we show you over on page 69, Cambridge is positively teeming with fascinating courses and classes for the later-in-life learner, whether you want to master a new language, indulge your creative side with an artsy evening class, finesse your culinary skills or play detective in forensic science class. Take a look, you’re almost guaranteed to find something that will spark your imagination. If you’re feeling a little less than energetic after all the mad rushing around that Christmas brings, head over to page 55, where we take a look at some of the best spots around for a bit of self-care and pampering. As well as special offers at spas, there’s a round-up of some of the best eateries in the city for a feast that’s packed with goodness, as well as a look at a few offkilter fitness trends on offer in the city which will have you grinning and glowing your way to a healthy 2018. January’s not a month known for its vibrant social calendar, but we’ve searched high and low to bring you some great inspiration to get you out and about this month. Jordan from Slate the Disco gives you the lowdown on the unmissable live music events of the month over on page 24, while there’s theatre, circus and a rather special cinema screening to be found in our Arts section (from page 7), not to mention an array of tasty gastro goings on over on page 29. However you spend it, I hope you have a wonderful January – see you next month!

Nicola Foley

E D I TO R I A L

Editor in chief Nicola Foley 01223 499459 nicolafoley@bright-publishing.com Senior sub editor Lisa Clatworthy Sub editors Siobhan Godwood, Felicity Evans

A DV E RT I S I N G

Senior sales executive Chris Jacobs 01223 499463 chrisjacobs@bright-publishing.com Sales executive Banoo Moaven 01223 492240 banoomoaven@bright-publishing.com

C O N T R I B U TO R S

Alex Rushmer, Angelina Villa-Clarke, Charlotte Griffiths, Charlotte Philipps, Cyrus Pundole, Daisy Dickinson, Elodie Cameron, Jordan Worland, Ruthie Collins, Siobhan Godwood

DESIGN & PRODUCTION

Editorial designer Flo Thomas 01223 492242 flothomas@bright-publishing.com Ad production Man-Wai Wong 01223 499468 manwaiwong@bright-publishing.com

M A N AG I N G D I R E C TO R S

Andy Brogden & Matt Pluck 01223 499450

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CAMBSEDITION .CO.UK CAMBRIDGE EDITION MAGAZINE • Bright Publishing Ltd, Bright House, 82 High Street, Sawston, Cambridgeshire CB22 3HJ, 01223 499450, cambsedition. co.uk • All rights reserved. Material contained in this publication may not be reproduced, in whole or in part, without prior permission of the publishers. • Views expressed in this magazine are not necessarily those of Cambridge Edition or Bright Publishing Ltd, which do not accept any liability for loss or damage. • Every effort has been made to ensure all information is correct. • Cambridge Edition is a free publication that is distributed in Cambridge and the surrounding area.

This month’s cover illustration was created by Flo Thomas. See more of Flo’s illustrations on Etsy at HeydayDesignsUK or at heydaydesigns.co.uk.

Editor in chief

Author illustrations by Louisa Taylor louisataylorillustration.blogspot.co.uk

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Contents. 7 Arts & Culture.

A round-up of arty, cultural events in the city, from exhibitions to theatre

15 e-Luminate Festival. We take a look at what’s in store for Cambridge’s festival of light

18 Indie of the Month.

We pay a visit to Burwash Manor’s innovative art gallery

21 Competition. Win a minibreak at The Belmont Hotel, Leicester worth over £350!

22 Nightlife. Gigs, comedy and more after-dark fun this month

24 Gig Guide. Jordan Worland from Slate the Disco shares his top live music picks

29 Food News. The latest news from Cambridge’s gastro scene, including Burns Night events and info on the best dining out deals this month

37 Chef’s Column.

Alex Rushmer on the many and varied delights of pulses

38 5 of the Foodie Best.

This month we’re tasting our way around some of the tastiest vegan eats in town

43 Drinks.

Elodie Cameron from Thirsty offers some suggestions for a boozy January

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44 Recipes.

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A trio of healthy but delicious family-friendly dishes

48 Listings.

Your at-a-glance guide to the month’s top events

50 Family.

Shows, outdoorsy fun, skating and museums to keep your brood entertained this month

55 Wellness.

We take a look at some of Cambridgeshire’s wellbeing wonders, from spas to fitness classes and eateries

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65 Beauty.

News, advice and top buys from our beauty aficionado Daisy Dickinson

67 Education Spotlight. CIS consider what the future might hold for today’s students

69 Get on Course.

Fancy trying something new this January? We round up the cream of the courses and classes in the area

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75 Business.

Eco-conscious, historic or gleaming and modern: a look at some of the county’s top business venues

85 Interiors.

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Make your home a cosy haven with a little help from our interiors pro Angelina Villa-Clarke

97 Home Store of the Month. We have a chat with local company Cambridge Kitchens & Bathrooms

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Arts & Culture.

P L AC E : R E L I N K I N G , R E L AT I N G , R E L AY I N G . Artists from Italy, Slovenia and Bosnia Herzegovina come to Cambridge this January for PLACE: Relinking, Relating, Relaying, an exhibition taking place at The Ruskin Gallery and Gallery 9 project space on Norfolk Street. The exhibition is organised by Art Language Location (ALL), a not-for-profit, collaborative organisation run by artists based in Cambridge which aims to support artists and bring innovative, exciting and experimental text-based art to unusual and interesting locations across Cambridge and beyond. PLACE will feature an exciting and varied range of artworks that consider themes of community, locality and communication. Highlights include a new linguistic soundscape by Andreja Džakušič, a shared meal with Simon Macuh participating via Skype from Slovenia, and a real-time run from London to Cambridge by Veronique Chance. There will also be a range of interactive projects which you can get involved with, including a collaborative painting devised by Maja Rubinic, and a postcard project by Jo Miller. “We are delighted to be bringing new art to Cambridge and to be working with friends from many different countries on a shared project and it is exciting to be bringing such a diverse range of artworks and approaches to Cambridge,” says Robert Good, chair of ALL. “In the current climate of uncertainty, our exhibition will be a great opportunity to show how art and creativity can be a force for good, connecting people from different communities and sharing experiences across cultures and beyond boundaries.” The exhibition runs 25 January to 1 February artlanguagelocation.org CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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All images Sculptures from the Larger than Life exhibition at the Heong Gallery, bringing together acclaimed works by sculptor Elisabeth Frink

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THE ART INSIDER.

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RUTHIE COLLINS, FOUNDER OF CA MBRIDGE ART SALON, GIVES HER ART Y PICKS OF THE MONTH

anuary arrives: a month to embrace the new year, and a time of promise. “Here’s the world for one day silver, lit by love,” says Clare Crossman in Gifts from Winter, found in her newly published collection, The Blue Hour (Shoestring Press). The title, The Blue Hour, describes twilight, a phrase from the early days of filmmaking. Reading the collection, curled up with a hot chocolate, as twilight approaches, is the perfect antidote to the austerity of this time of year. It’s full of glittering beauty, darkness, loss and warmth – peppered with regional and city references, which lovers of Cambridge will adore. “I think we live in a time now where everything is changing shape and shifting, much as happens in the early evening when outlines blur and merge some things becoming starker some things melting away…” explains Clare, whose work has also been published by leading independent publisher, SALT Publishing. Yet despite the shapeshifting, haunting loss, she captures simple beauty, brilliantly, with some humble, heart-stopping lines: “In case we never return/I am taking a jar of rain,” (The Leaving). “The past remains, we live now, the future is fluid. I hope anyone who buys this book will find poems that resonate with them in some way,” she says. Check clarecrossman.info. This month, also catch mesmerising sculpture at the Heong Gallery. Larger than Life brings together the acclaimed works of ‘non-conservative’ (Arie Hartog) figurative sculptor, Dame Elisabeth Frink. Warning – if you’ve come here post the Fitzwilliam Museum’s blockbuster show Degas: A Passion for Perfection – there are no semi-naked Parisians here, scandalous, about to leap onto stage in a tutu. Instead of sensual froth, Frink’s world burns with shamanic energy: it’s primeval and mythical. Expect scorching portrayals of aggressive male archetype, too – her most famous Google Head series was inspired by 1960s Algerian politician General Oufkiv. “I feel my sculptures are what a human being or animal feels like, not what they necessarily look like. I use anatomy to create the essence of human and animal forms and their freedom of spirit,” said Frink in 1979. Described as a ‘oneoff’ by Frink herself, her world-acclaimed Walking Madonna, normally found in Salisbury, is lithe with a sinewy movement of her own (fully clothed). She rises, in the gallery, to greet you – but don’t be offended if she’s unsmiling. An everyday

woman, she’s just getting on with it. Whatever ‘it’ is, Frink’s large-scale bronze, pays unprettified tribute. In the artworld we’re not used to seeing unglamourised women with their clothes on, respected for invisible work. Frink’s Walking Madonna first went public in 1980. She appears a world apart from the 1980s Madonna of Like a Prayer pop fame – but, like Degas’ Ballerina, she’s also a trailblazing, shimmering cry from the static women of devotional iconography. Unpinned from her pedestal, void of milky smile, she’s walking, briskly – a symbol of “dignity and creativity over militarism and totalitarianism disregard of human dignity and rights” (Dean of Salisbury). She’s no Iron Lady, but there’s inspiration in her wiry strength. Watch out for an exhibition tour on January 10th at 6pm, plus the Elisabeth Frink Symposium on January 20th, with a fantastic range of speakers – both bookable on Eventbrite. com. Check dow.cam.ac.uk/cultural-life. However, if January starts to get too much, then sod it all – have a cocktail. Watch out for Alan Hudlestone’s show at d’Arrys on King Street this month, with several of his works on show in this favourite cocktail haunt. Alan is one of Cambridge’s long-standing popular artists whose joie de vivre attitude spills out into his work, which is influenced by Impressionism and Pop Art. So head over and enjoy this range of 14 pictures in pastel, pencil, watercolour and oil. Check alanhudleston.co.uk for information. Finally, if still in need of that pick me up, head over for the last few days of Cambridge Art Salon and Care Network’s Pearls of Wisdom Postcards exhibition at Stir, funded by Cambridge City Council and Cambridgeshire Community Foundation. Last summer, I interviewed elderly residents for their pearls of wisdom, which over 50 children from The Grove Primary School turned into artworks, eight of which were selected to be sold in packs of postcards. The children all won the High Sheriff’s Award, as supported by the Cambridgeshire Community Foundation, for their work – so massive congratulations to all of them! The colourful works were created with help from artists Sa’adiah Khan, Cathy Dunbar, Daisy Tempest and Sukey Sleeper. We’ve been running a #pearlschallenge asking people to send the postcards (available for £2 a pack, from Stir), to loved ones and family, posting their messages to social media – so please take part. January is a fabulous time to really think about what you’d like to achieve in the year. If you could choose, what wisdom would you like to leave behind? Have a fabulous new year, all. n

It’s full of glittering beauty, darkness, loss and warmth – peppered with regional and city references, which lovers of Cambridge will adore

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ACTING NOW. Based in Cambridge, Acting Now is a group which works to transform lives through theatre, running projects which help empower, promote self-awareness and create hope and confidence. Using physical theatre techniques, the group works with people at risk of social exclusion, from adults with mental health challenges to refugees or people with learning disabilities. January sees the launch of two new physical theatre courses, open to all, which cover devised theatre, movement, improvisation and neutral mask, plus the advanced group will devise a contemporary play from scratch using various different physical theatre techniques. The beginners’ physical theatre course takes place at Ross Street Community Centre (on Mondays at 6.30pm to 9pm weekly, from 15 January) and the advanced class is at the same time at St Matthew’s Church on Wednesdays (from 17 January). Both are priced at £145 for nine sessions. For artists and creatives (from any sector), there is also the Theatre of the Oppressed Workshop, a day-long session designed for artists and creatives from all sectors who want to develop a tool for communication, debate and social change within their communities. It takes place on 10 February and is run by Marina Pallares, Acting Now’s founder and artistic director, who has more than a decade’s worth of experience working around the world using theatre as a tool for social change. It runs from 12pm to 6pm at Ross Street Community Centre and is priced at £65. actingnow.co.uk

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CITY OF BIRMINGHAM SYM P H O N Y O R C H E S T R A . “Something brilliant and exciting” was the brief behind City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra’s return to Cambridge for the first time in seven years. And that means a dose of Haydn, Bruch and Bartok, whose Concerto for Orchestra is described by CBSO’s chief executive Stephen Maddock as “one of the most thrilling rides in 20th century music”. Bruch’s Scottish Fantasy similarly “plays around with folk tunes,” while Haydn’s Symphony No 7 completes the programme. Catch CBSO at the Corn Exchange on 18 January. Tickets from £32. cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

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SING-A-LONG-A SOUND OF MUSIC AT ELY CATHEDRAL. Enjoy The Sound of Music in the delightfully apt setting of Ely Cathedral this month, when a special, singalong screening of the Rodgers and Hammerstein classic will be shown on 27 January. In what’s promising to be the ultimate January blues buster, a live choir (in habits) will be belting out the tunes, with guests encouraged to dress up and sing right along with them. Don your finest lederhosen, climb ev’ry mountain, ponder how to solve a problem like Maria, hiss the countess, cheer on Maria and wipe away a tear at the sweetly-sung Edelweiss, plus enjoy drinks, snacks and interactive prop bags. The event starts at 7.30pm. elycathedral.org

SW E E N E Y TO D D . Journey into the shadowy streets of 19th Century London this month for Cambridge Operatic Society’s (CaOS) production of Sweeney Todd. Running 17 to 20 January at the Arts Theatre, this theatrical treat tells the twisted tale of Todd: an unjustly exiled barber with vengeance on his mind. Wrongly imprisoned by a lecherous judge who framed him and ravaged his wife, he returns home to London and assumes a new identity as the ‘demon barber of Fleet Street’. At this gruesome hairdresser’s, the daily jobs include slitting customers’ throats and bundling the bodies downstairs where they’re cooked up into ‘meat pies’ by Mrs Lovett and served to hungry Londoners. The pies are a hit but the grisly fun is just beginning for Todd, who won’t rest until he has the judge in his chair and a blade in his hand… Directed by Chris Cuming and with musical direction by James Harvey, the production follows CaOS’ well-received 2017 production of Annie and the company’s NODA Awardwinning Sister Act. cambridgeartstheatre.com

R O M E O A N D J U L I E T. One of Cambridge’s oldest student drama groups, the Marlowe Society, brings its production of Romeo and Juliet to Cambridge Arts Theatre this month, promising a vibrant reimagining of the Bard’s greatest love story. Performed by a large ensemble cast of actors and musicians, fair Verona is switched for the streets of Spain, where a crowd mingles in a plaza ready for a fiesta. The sounds of flamenco echo down the streets as a knife glints in the sun, setting the scene for a pair of star-crossed lovers to meet their tragic fate. Dedicated to performing high-quality performances of Elizabethan, verse and non-realist plays, it’s the latest in a line of many for The Marlowe Society, whose recent offerings included acclaimed productions of Edward II, Measure for Measure and Doctor Faustus. A hotbed of acting talent for Cambridge University, the society has launched the careers of some of the brightest British stars including Sir Ian McKellen, Tilda Swinton, Tom Hiddleston and Rachel Weisz, as well as counting poet Rupert Brooke amongst its alumni. Catch them in action from 24 to 27 January, tickets are £18 to 28. cambridgeartstheatre.com

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CIRCUS OF HORRORS. Way back in 2011, The Circus of Horrors wowed the Britain’s Got Talent judges with their thrilling freak show of an act, firebreathing, sword-swallowing and aerial acrobat-ing their way into the nation’s hearts. They’re currently celebrating their 21st anniversary with The Never Ending Nightmare tour, which promises an edgeof-your-seat journey into a twisted Alice in Wonderland-style horror story filled with bizarre, beautiful and brave acts. As they themselves sum it up: “If Quentin Tarantino had directed Cirque Du Soleil then you would be only halfway there.” Not for the faint of heart, expect the unexpected at this impressive and unique production, which plays at the Corn Exchange on 29 January. The show starts at 7.30pm and tickets start at £24.75. cornex.co.uk

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FAN TAS TIC W I T H E - L U M I N AT E , C A M B R I D G E ’S F E S T I VA L O F FA B U L O U S L I G H T I N S TA L L AT I O N S , P O I S E D T O R E T U R N , R U T H I E C O L L I N S F I N D S O U T W H AT ’S I N S T O R E CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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ebruary is the worst month of the year in Cambridge,” James Fox, this year’s celebrated guest curator of e-Luminate, the region’s most popular light festival, tells me. Familiar from his appearances as an art historian on CNN, Sky Arts and the BBC, BAFTAnominated Fox is also a Fellow of Gonville and Caius College here in Cambridge. An expert on colour, which is this year’s theme for the festival, he’s a perfect fit. “It feels like the end of a long winter, when spring hasn’t yet arrived – it’s exactly the time we need something like e-Luminate.” Taking place on 9-14 February, the festival will once again deliver a series of large-scale light projections; extraordinary displays of colour which draw thousands to the city’s hotspots every year. Fox snapped up the invitation to work with e-Luminate from artistic director of the festival, Alessandra Caggiano, who was inspired by his knowledge and interest in the theme of colour. “I’m a willing accomplice,” Fox says. “It’s an absolutely fantastic programme and appeals to so many generations, and Cambridge has played a very important role in the development of theory related to light, so is a fantastic setting for a festival exploring colour.” Indeed, our modern day understanding of colour and light starts with Isaac Newton, who was the first scientist to understand the rainbow prism and its composite colours, while at Cambridge. In the 19th century, James Maxwell Clerk demonstrated the theory of the electromagnetic field, connecting light, electricity and magnetism. “It’s a good place to be working on colour today,” Fox enthuses, “with several colour specialists working here, including neuroscientist John Mollen. Or Simon Baron-Cohen [Sacha Baron Cohen’s cousin], who’s an expert on autism, touching on how the brain understands colour. Plus, at the Fitzwilliam Museum, there’s Spike Bucklow, a leader in pigments.” You can

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see several prominent scientists and innovators at the festival, as part of the programme. “Working with James for the next edition of e-Luminate Cambridge is an immense pleasure and privilege. I am truly excited at how the artistic programme has taken shape,” commented Alessandra Caggiano. “James is also a much-loved public figure thanks to his work as a TV presenter; I believe this will help our mission to get more people involved in the festival to discover the best of Cambridge’s artistic talents, technological innovations, and heritage in a new light.” Fox’s book, The Meaning of Colour will be released in early 2018. “I’ve been working on it for about three or four years, looking at the meaning of colours

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throughout history, starting with black, ending with green and the environment. The exhibition programme is the result of a lot of thinking about colour which is in the book,” says Fox. See projection artist Ross Ashton’s optical illusions on the Senate House, an LGBT themed design created by Lumineer Studio on Cambridge Guildhall, and the Fitzwilliam museum illuminated by a series of stunning images of colourful artefacts taken from museums across the city. Highlights of this year’s festival include British conceptual artist Robert Montgomery, whose influences include East London graffiti artists and the poetry of Phillip Larkin. He’s creating a large scale illuminated ‘light poem’ installation, on King’s College Chapel. Montgomery’s poems are bold, human and visceral – this will be a treat, indeed. Also included in this year’s festival is a fabulous programme of projections inspired by the community, Bright Lights – The Colours of the Brain, from Cambridge-based art organisation, Oblique Arts. “We have been working on Bright Lights since July 2017, hosting several workshops with community groups such as Cambridge Manor Care Home, Rowan, Art Works and Thrifts Walk Studios, to create imagery for the projections. It’s been a lot of fun, with people dancing, singing and exploring their own creativity,” says lead artist and project co-ordinator, Sarah Steenhorst. “We are excited to be part of the e-Luminate Festival again this year. It’s important to us that artists collaborate with non-artists in the community to explore their creative potential. Coming together in CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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this way, we have achieved an engaging and thoughtprovoking outcome of high quality. During the project we’ve looked at the ‘creative brain’ in all its colourful glory,” adds Bev Carpenter, also lead artist and project co-ordinator, as well as a driving force behind Oblique Arts. The project, which includes the work of over 150 people in the drawings and moving image elements, has already appeared as part of Bright Lights CB4 throughout North Cambridge. Watch out for their stunning projections, as part of the programme. e-Luminate regulars can also expect a Trail of Light again, through the college chapels, listening to choirs, at each stop. There’s a chance to try your hand at a light painting workshop with photographer Lucinda Price at the Guildhall, too. Fitness fans will love Glow Games: sports – including badminton, table tennis, netball and basketball – played in the dark with UV lighting at the Guildhall. Plus, there's a wine tasting event at Hotel du Vin at which you can taste and learn about different wines and the fascinating effect different light has on the palate. “Colour is life and colour is the product of life. The most abundant pigment in the world is chlorophyll, green, without which, there wouldn’t be any life. Red is the colour of haemoglobin, the colour is produced by life and the production of life, makes colour,” says Fox. “You can’t have colour without life – e-Luminate is a celebration of those things. Who would want to live a life without colour? It would be a monochrome world.” n For full details of all e-Luminate Festival event dates and tickets go to cambridgelivetrust.co.uk/e-luminate

“You can’t have colour without life – e-Luminate is a celebration of those things. Who would want to live a life without colour? It would be a monochrome world”

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The Art Hound. T H I S GA L L E RY I S T H E N E W K I D O N T H E B L O C K I N O U R A R E A , B U T I T ’S A L R E A DY C H A N G I N G T H E FAC E OF THE CAMBRIDGE ART SCENE

WORDS SIOBHAN GODWOOD

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id you know that you can see a genuine Damien Hirst, right here in Cambridgeshire? Neither did we until we heard about the stunning Art Hound Gallery, which opened its doors late last year at Burwash Manor. The business began in London in 2012, selling at the major arts fairs around the UK and to private clients. “We were based on the King’s Road, selling to private clients, trade, and exhibiting in different parts of the country,” says Tom Arnold, Director at The Art Hound. “Then the opportunity came up for us to open a gallery here at Burwash Manor, which obviously we grabbed with both hands!” This move has brought a new audience to the gallery and the artists whose work they sell and exhibit. “Primarily, what we are is dealers, we buy and sell works by some of the most famous artists from all over the world,” explains Tom. “We deal a lot with the young British artists of the 90s, such as Damien Hirst, Tracey Emin, Gavin Turk, those sorts of people. Then we buy and sell works by great 20th and 21st century artists such as Peter Blake and Eduardo Paolozzi, the grandfathers of pop art, and also a lot of work from the Mourlot Studios in Paris. It was a really famous printing studio that made lithographic prints of artworks by Picasso, Matisse, Chagall and Alexander Calder, as well as many others. These beautiful, original prints make it very affordable to have work by these artists in your own home, and are one of the best-kept secrets of the art world. “As an offshoot of that we are working with the printmakers of today, and a lot of new art coming out of the urban art scene in London and the US.” So, given that so much of the UK art scene is London based, how has the move out to our neck of the woods affected Tom and the business? “Any changes that it has brought have been very positive for us,” says Tom. “We have a huge amount of work online and we still do art fairs all around the country. Then, of course, we are bringing those works that we previously sold in London to a new audience, which is quite exciting. There’s a great tradition of art in Cambridge, with the Fitzwilliam and Kettle’s Yard, and it’s been very encouraging

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to see how enthusiastically we have been greeted by the people of the city.” Burwash is also a fantastic location for visitors to Art Hound from other parts of the country, as it’s accessible and easy to get to from London and elsewhere. “It’s a lovely part of the world,” continues Tom. “And it’s great for our clients that they can drive here so easily. Some of our serious collectors will visit and here we can take the time to talk to them, to spend some time and find out what they’re looking for, what they’re trying to do, and how we can help them. We can really do that here, as we have space, and it feels calm and not rushed, and it’s not full of tourists. It’s a destination business, really.” If you make a trip out to Burwash, you’ll get the opportunity to see work on display by a host of famous names from the 20th and 21st centuries. “I don’t think people are expecting it,” says Tom. “Visitors are very surprised and pleased when they come into the gallery. People often don’t realise that this kind of work is so accessible and often affordable; it doesn’t have to be really expensive to buy a fantastic print by Picasso with an excellent

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Images Nestled at Burwash Manor, The Art Hound Gallery sells artworks from just £10 into many thousands of pounds. And whether Damien Hirst or Picasso is more to your taste, it’s also a great destination for a browse, or to get something framed

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We are not here to be exclusive, we want to open up the art world to people, and for visitors to the gallery to feel welcome to come in and have a look provenance, and it can be a very good investment. There are a lot of misconceptions, I think, about the art world, and it’s nice to be able to clear some of those up. We are not here to be exclusive, we want to open up the art world to people, and for visitors to the gallery to feel welcome to come in and have a look, and hopefully see something that they like and perhaps haven’t seen before.” Tom and his team haven’t found it difficult to spread the word about the gallery’s work around the city, either. “What’s happened is that word of mouth has been very effective. People will come in and say, ‘I had no idea there was a Damien Hirst on the wall of this little gallery in Cambridge!’, and then they’ll tell their friends, and they’ll come in to have a look too. The local art scene is covered really well by other local galleries, and we’re doing something quite different that the area hasn’t necessarily had before.” The gallery also offers a bespoke framing service, and has a small selection of jewellery, featuring jewellers handpicked from around the country,

including Oh You Handsome Devil!, a range of jewellery made from Grayson Perry fabrics. “Crucially, all our jewellery is design-led or art related,” Tom explains. “All of those items are unique and special but also very accessible, so you can come into our gallery and spend anything from £10 to £10,000, depending on what you’re looking for.” Future plans for the gallery involve importing art from the States that is currently hard to get hold of in the UK. “We’re looking mainly at pop art,” explains Tom. “Obviously we already exhibit work by Peter Blake and Eduardo Paolozzi, but we’re going to get hold of a signed Warhol, as well as work by Roy Lichtenstein and Jim Dine, all those really famous American pop artists. We’ll be having some of those on display in the gallery, so those are some of the names for people to look out for at The Art Hound in the coming months.” n The Art Hound Gallery, Unit 12, Burwash Manor, Barton, Cambridge CB23 7EY | 01223 262033 | thearthoundgallery.com C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | J A N U A R Y 2 018

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WIN A MINIBREAK WORTH OVER £350!

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o celebrate being awarded two AA Rosettes for its David Ferguson at The Belmont restaurant and four AA stars, The Belmont Hotel, Leicester is offering readers the chance to win a weekend break for two; with an opportunity to explore the city’s King Richard III heritage! Situated in pretty New Walk, the hotel is minutes from Leicester train station, live shows at De Montfort Hall and the city’s best shopping. Enjoy Leicester’s history with a stroll to the old town, follow the Richard III trail or see the medieval Guildhall and the Great Hall of Leicester Castle. Our winner and their guest will enjoy an overnight stay with breakfast in one of the hotel’s beautifully refurbished en-suite guest rooms, a three-course contemporary fine dining meal with a bottle of wine in the vibrant David Ferguson at The Belmont restaurant and a traditional afternoon tea at Jamie’s Bar. The Hotel also offers free Wi-Fi and parking. Delve into Leicester’s rich heritage with complimentary tickets to the King Richard III Visitor Centre (kriii.com), on the site of the medieval friary of the Grey Friars, where the King’s remains were buried. n To win, head to cambsedition.co.uk and click on the Competition tab.

Ts & Cs Prize and offer for two adults sharing double/twin room, valid until 31/03/18, subject to availability. Prize includes three-course dinner with bottle of house wine and soft drinks. Reader offer includes breakfast and three-course dinner. Prize is non-transferable and no cash alternatives apply. Editor’s decision is final. CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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READER OFFER! Not selected as our lucky winner? You can still take advantage of a special offer at the Hotel: £62.50 for bed and breakfast (double bedroom, per person, per night) and dinner, including free bedroom upgrade. Call 0116 254 4773 and quote Cambridge Edition.

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January nightlife. CHECK OUT LOCAL EVENTS ONLINE AT C A M B S E D I T I O N .C O.U K

THIS IS THE KIT. Quirky folk act This is The Kit, aka singersongwriter Kate Stables and her band, play Cambridge Junction on 26 January. Sweet, earthy and eccentric, Stables’ music has been making ripples in the folk world since her debut release in 2008, championed heavily by peers including Guy Garvey, The National and Sharon Van Etten. This year’s Moonshine Freeze album was their most critically acclaimed yet, with The Guardian calling it “fascinating” and Drowned in Sound describing it as the “sound of a storyteller of a musician finding her niche. And it is a joy to behold.” Tickets are £18 in advance. junction.co.uk

T I C K E TS O N SA L E F O R C A M B R I D G E F O L K F E S T I VA L 2018

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Tickets are now on sale for this year’s Cambridge Folk Festival, taking place slightly later than usual on the weekend of 2-5 August at Cherry Hinton Hall. A huge celebration of folk of all kinds, the festival has been running for more than 50 years and prides itself on its eclectic line-up of breakthrough artists and legendary acts. Headliners confirmed so far for the 2018 event include double Grammy Award winner John Prine, iconic singer-songwriter Patti Smith and – in an exclusive UK festival appearance – Janis Ian. cambridgefolkfestival.co.uk

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NOW BOOKING.

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HAYSEED DIXIE 17 F E B , J U N C T I O N , £21

These Folk Festival favourites are back in town for a knees-up with their 15th album. Let your hair down to their own particular, energetic bluegrass and rock hybrid: ‘rockgrass’.

RICH HALL

27 F E B , C O R N E XC H A N G E , £17

THE CLASSIC ROCK SHOW. Imagine getting the biggest rock legends that ever lived all together for one night in a huge, face-meltingly rocking show? That’s the idea behind The Classic Rock Show, which hits Cambridge this month for a night of anthems on the 31st. Performed with note-for-note precision by a collection of accomplished musicians, it’s the ultimate rock jukebox, taking you on a foot-stomping journey of the genre’s best bits, from AC/DC and Aerosmith to Eric Clapton, The Eagles, ELO, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Meatloaf, Queen and everything in between. Dust down your leather trousers and get yourself down to the Corn Exchange. Tickets start at £26.25. cornex.co.uk

Gruff American funnyman Rich Hall brings his Hoedown show to Cambridge next month: expect a withering dissection of Trump’s America but also a celebration of Americana, with some cracking tunes.

THE VACCINES

C U S TA R D C O M E DY.

6 APRIL, CORN E XC H A N G E , £ 2 5 . 5 0

Bring a little laughter to your January with a trip to Comberton Sports & Arts for Custard Comedy on the 12th. Kicking off at 8.15pm, the line-up features English Comedian of the Year 2017 Nick Page as headliner, plus support acts Brennan Reece and Philip Simon. You’re guaranteed some rollicking storytelling from Page, who seems to have lived his life laughing from disaster to disaster, stockpiling outlandish anecdotes (including one about the time he got sacked from Escape to the Country for an incident involving a Russian call girl and an antique rocking horse…). Tickets start at £6.60, or head to cambsedition.co.uk where we’re giving away a pair (search under the Competitions tab). custardcomedy.co.uk

One of the most adored Brit bands of a generation, The Vaccines are back after a hiatus with their anticipated fourth album Combat Sports, to be released in March.

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T I C K E TS!

THE ST YLISTICS.

Synth-pop heroes The Human League visit our city next winter for a trip down memory lane with iconic tracks like Don’t You Want Me and Love Action.

A chance to see true soul royalty in Cambridge this month as The Stylistics – one of the bestselling groups in history – hit Cambridge for a night of smooth grooves on 25 January. Hailing from Philadelphia, the group rose to fame in the 1970s, turning out iconic hits including You Make Me Feel Brand New, You Are Everything, Betcha By Golly Wow and Stop, Look, Listen to your Heart. Still musically breathtaking and fabulously entertaining – you can catch them in action at the Corn Exchange. Tickets start at £22.75. cornex.co.uk CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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MUSIC

GIG GUIDE.

J O R DA N WO R L A N D F RO M L O C A L M U S I C W E B S I T E S L AT E T H E D I S C O S E L E C T S H I S M U S T-S E E G I GS I N C A M B R I D G E T H I S M O N T H

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appy New Year! There’s plenty going on in the Cambridge live music scene this month to encourage you out of that post-Christmas slump. Our top Cambridge Junction pick this month is The Cribs show on the 10th. Hailing from Wakefield, Yorkshire, The Cribs are twins Gary and Ryan Jarman and their younger brother, Ross. The trio began playing together at an early age, debuting at a family party in the late 80s when twins Gary and Ryan were nine years old and Ross was just five. The brothers grew up with similar musical tastes, blending quintessentially British influences like The Beatles, Sex Pistols and The Smiths with American indie rock like Beat Happening and Bobby Conn. They were subsequently joined by ex-The Smiths guitarist Johnny Marr, who joined the band for three years in 2008. 2017 saw The Cribs celebrating the ten-year anniversary of the band’s muchlauded third album Men’s Needs, Women’s Needs, Whatever, which saw them headline their largest show to date at Leeds First Direct Arena. Not ones to sit around and revel in nostalgia though, 2017 also saw The Cribs release their 24-7 Rock Star Shit album. The record marked a return to the band’s early roots with its raw, ‘rough around the edges’ approach and a good punch of sonic aggression. Over the last ten years and three albums, This Is The Kit – the musical project fronted by exceptional Paris-via-Bristol songwriter Kate Stables – have earned the adoration of peers including Guy Garvey, The National and Sharon Van Etten. Their fourth album, released in July last year through Rough Trade, was Moonshine Freeze: undoubtedly their most compelling and accomplished to date. Kate and co bring the mesmerising record to the Cambridge Junction on the 26th. The J2 venue at the Cambridge Junction has a couple of shows we reckon are well worth attending this month too. Firstly on the 20th is Martyn Joseph, a guitar player who has developed a unique percussive style and boasts a powerful showstopper of a voice that has led him to be dubbed ‘The Welsh Springsteen’. There are also shades of John Mayer, Bruce Cockburn and Dave Matthews in Joseph’s music but he stands in his own right, built on a reputation

for giving what thousands have described as the best live music experience of their lives. Secondly, on the 30th, is Martin Carr, the former songwriter, guitarist and creative force behind The Boo Radleys and Brave Captain. The Boo Radleys mastermind returned with a suave, sophisticated, rhythmically robust solo pop record in October, New Shapes of Life, his third solo output. After a period of writing songs for popstars, Carr was jolted into action after the death of David Bowie, realising how important it was to take his art seriously, resulting in a record that marks a new era for a wonderful songwriter. Fast-rising saucy warbler Isaac Gracie plays The Portland on the 27th. The 23-year-old London-raised singer-songwriter sent the music industry into a fever with his debut track Last Words — a song so finely wrought, so tenderly poetic, as to mark him out as one of Britain’s brightest young things. Since then Gracie has performed at both Glastonbury and Latitude, opened for Michael Kiwanuka on his tour last year and spent weeks last autumn nestled happily on the Radio 1 playlist. With a debut album firmly in the pipeline, the show on the 27th is a great chance to catch Gracie before he becomes a household name. In a massive, massive coup for the city, Green Mind Gigs have gone and snagged the booking of Hot Snakes, who play The Portland Arms on the 31st. Featuring Drive Like Jehu’s John Reis, this critically acclaimed post-hardcore band have released three full-length studio records, a live album and even a Peel session since their formation in 1999. The band return to the UK to exhibit their own blend of raucous garage punk for the first time in years. We end with a shout-out to a show happening on the 1 February, a show so good we don’t want you to miss out on booking a ticket. The feedbackstrafed, guitar-shredding INHEAVEN make Pixies styled, riotous, anthemic and bristling pop music. They released their debut album last year to a flurry of praise which cemented them as one of the most exciting emerging bands around. This Portland Arms gig will be their first headline appearance in Cambridge having previously opened for Circa Waves at Cambridge Junction last year. n

In a massive, massive coup for the city, Green Mind Gigs have gone and snagged the booking of Hot Snakes… exhibiting their own blend of raucous garage punk

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G E T T H E I N S I D E T R AC K O N C A M B R I D G E ’S F O O D I E S C E N E W I T H E D I T I O N ’S M O N T H LY SUPPLEMENT

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Food news.

GRAZIE CAMBRIDGE KITCHEN POP UP. Blow the new year diet in style with an evening of Italian wine, meat and cheese at Cambridge Wine Merchants’ University Centre bar. On 27 January, CWM will be joined by Le Raffinatezze, who’ll be providing delectable bites to pair perfectly with a deep and varied mix of bottles from all over Italy. The event, priced at £25 per person, will provide a brilliant opportunity to learn about world-class Italian wines, but also about the fundamentals of matching food and wine; how it’s done and why it works. cambridgewine.com

W I N T E R B E E R F E S T I VA L . More than 100 real ales, ciders and foreign beers, plus scrumptious food will be served up at the Cambridge Winter Ale Festival. The team behind the Cambridge Beer Festival are preparing for its slightly smaller sibling, from 17 to 20 January, at the University Social Club on Mill Lane. Expect boozy treats from some of the oldest family brewers and newest microbreweries. Evening and daytime sessions available. cambridgebeerfestival.com

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THE BEE’S KNEES. As more becomes known about the damaging environmental impact of plastic, a need for sustainable alternatives in all aspects of modern life is becoming a priority. The good news is that BeeBee Wraps, a newly-launched local social venture, is on hand to help. The company, launched by Kath Austin, creates biodegradable, washable, wax coated cotton wraps to preserve food as an alternative to single-use plastic. They’re made with organic cotton, beeswax, tree resin and jojoba oil, and you can throw them on your compost heap, returning them to nature without a trace after their year-long life. Their production process is also zero waste – in fact, all scrap fabric is turned into BeeBee Burners, amazingly effective firelighters that burn slowly like a candle and stay lit even in wet grass. The wraps are already a hit with eco-conscious businesses including Cambridge Cheese

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Company, who are incentivising their customers to go plastic-free by launching a loyalty scheme. Customers build up loyalty card stamps on every occasion they use a BeeBee Wrap to take home their cheese purchases, with a full card yielding a free block of English cheddar and the chance to win a luxury cheese bag. “I created BeeBee Wraps in response to the plastic crisis. The solution to this needs us all to take small but significant steps to effect change,” says Kath. “I am thrilled to see an established Cambridge business taking the decision to cut down on their plastic use and move towards less waste. This sets the bar high and opens up the conversation about our responsibilities as companies and individuals.” Wraps and packs are available to purchase at The Cambridge Cheese Company shop and online at BeeBeeWraps.com CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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FOOD & DRINK

RICE’S FILIPINO KITCHEN. If, like us, you’ve been sad to see the quietening down of Cambridge’s once vibrant supper club scene, then get your diary out and mark 27 January, which is when Rice’s Filipino Kitchen touches down for its debut event. Taking place at The Edge café on Mill Road, guests will be treated to a slap-up feast which celebrates the flavours of the Philippines. For those who have never tried Filipino cuisine before, prepare to have your taste buds set alight, and for those who know their adobo from their sinigang it will be a chance to enjoy a fresh take on your favourite dishes. Priced at £27 per person, the menu features mouthwatering sounding dishes including kare-kare croquettes (beef braised in peanut and annatto), 24-hour slow-cooked pork belly with lemongrass and garlic, and coconut leche flan with caramelised mango for dessert. “Filipino food is one cuisine that has been under the radar for a while now and so I wanted to bring the food of my heritage to people who had never tried it before,” explains Sarah Ventenilla,

founder of Rice’s Filipino Kitchen. “I grew up in the UK so these dishes are a strong connection to my family in the Philippines, and while there are some fantastic Filipino supper clubs in London at the moment, there is nothing here in Cambridge.” “Come along and you’ll get a chance to try some traditional Filipino dishes mixed with different cooking techniques,” she continues. “Filipino food is very centred around family and celebration so I hope to bring that vibe to the evening. If you have ever been curious about Filipino food or like to try new things then come along and bring your friends – I promise there will be no balut!” In keeping with The Edge’s philosophy of supporting people in recovery from drug and alcohol addition (ticket prices include a donation to its work), the event will be ‘dry’, but there will be some tasty non-alcoholic drinks on offer – plus, let’s face it, our livers could probably use a little rest after Christmas! For more information search Rice’s Filipino Kitchen on Facebook. Tickets are available via Brown Paper Tickets.

G E T S E T F O R E AT C A M B R I D G E 2018! After a year off in 2017, we’re delighted to report that Eat Cambridge will be returning to make our bellies happy once again this May. A huge showcase of the city’s flourishing independent food scene, Cambridge Edition is a proud media partner for this foodie extravaganza, which launched in 2013 and features a huge food and drink fair at The Guildhall (on 19 May), together with a busy line-up of fringe events across the city. Sneak previews will be available from the end of this month, with full details of the event and a programme arriving in March. “We are so excited about this year’s Eat Cambridge festival, and have had an incredible response from our city’s food and drink community,” says organiser Heidi White. “The festival is shaping up to be a great mix of our steadfast foodie favourites and some newbies to discover too.” Check the website for more information. eat-cambridge.co.uk CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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BURNS NIGHT FUN & FEASTING. Och aye the noo! Burns Night, a celebration of Scotland’s great poet Robert Burns, takes place on Thursday 25 January. We may be a long way from the Highlands, but if you want to enjoy the food and fun that this annual knees-up brings, there are a few solid options nearby to check out. The Senate, on St Mary’s Passage in the city centre, hosted a delightful Burns Night feast last year and they’re back for more this time around, serving up an elegant take on the traditional fare on the 25th. This cosy and sophisticated little bistro serves up truly splendid food, great cocktails and a fine dram of whisky, making it a wonderful spot for a Burns Night celebration. The Holiday Inn, Cambridge, over in Impington, is also having a Burns Night Supper, offering a themed menu plus promotions on Scottish drinks throughout the night on 25 January. Kicking off at 6.30pm, guests will be treated to a slap-up Highland feast which features Scotch broth, haggis and roast rib of Highland beef with root veg, stovies and blue cheese sauce. To book, call 01223 582 419. Maybe you fancy really throwing the, err, caber out? In which case we’ve got a brilliant idea for a Burns Night minibreak. The Grove, a gorgeous hotel on the coast in Cromer, will be serving up a menu of fine food which includes highland rumbledethumps (that’s mashed potato, CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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cabbage and onions to you and me), plus traditional haggis with clapshot, roast baby turnips and whiskey jus, as well as a steaming scotch beef stew with tattie scones, carrot and swede mash and ruby jus. Entertainment will be provided by traditional piping from Peter McFarlane, formally of the Royal Scots Guard, as well as readings of Burns poetry. Finish your meal with a hot toddie and a very traditional, very calorific deep-fried mars bar served with Drambuie ice cream and chocolate soil – best loosen your kilt! The meal is priced at £25 for three courses, but it would be a shame not to make a night of it at this lovely hotel, which you can do for £150 (dinner, bed and breakfast) – that way you can complete your trip with a hearty brunch and a stroll along the beach. Back in Cambridge, and St Giles’ Church will be hosting a lively Ceilidh organised by the Whitworth Trust on the 26th. All proceeds will go towards helping the valuable work of the Trust, which is a charity for homeless and vulnerable women in Cambridge, with the impressive Gothic surrounds of St Giles’ promising to provide an atmospheric backdrop for the evening’s music and dancing. The Cambridge University Ceilidh Band will be leading the charge, accompanied by caller Bob Ridout, and all ages are welcome. Tickets are £10 for adults, £5 for concessions and under 12s go free. C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | J A N U A R Y 2 018

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THRIFTY EATS. T H E R E A R E L O T S O F G R E AT D I N I N G - O U T D E A L S T O B E H A D D U R I N G JA N UA RY A RO U N D C A M B R I D G E : H E R E A R E S O M E O F T H E B E S T !

PAY W H AT I T ’S W O RT H AT D ’A R RY ’S . King Street restaurant d’Arry’s is taking a unique approach to dining out this January, offering a “pay what you think it’s worth” deal on their new lunch menu. Throughout the month, diners will be able to feast on indulgent dishes like crispy chicken and cheese fondue, French onion soup with warm focaccia and triple-stacked burgers. “We’re so proud of the new menu that we want as many people as possible to try it out,” explains general manager Ben Harker. “These days too many people work through lunch, so we hope this will be a good way to get them to leave their desks and have a great meal. By allowing people to pay what they think the food is worth they have nothing to lose! Hopefully they will then think about trying us again.” The offer will be running in both the restaurant downstairs and the Liquor Loft upstairs. To take advantage of it, simply pre-book your table. darrys.co.uk

AN ITALIAN FEAST AT THE THREE HORSESHOES. A long-standing favourite on the Cambridgeshire dining scene, The Three Horseshoes at Madingley is bringing a little Italian indulgence to the rather gloomy month of January. From 3 to 20 January, diners will be able to enjoy a sumptuous Italian-themed set menu priced at £18.50 for two courses or £24 for three (both lunch and dinnertime, excluding only Saturday night and Sunday lunch). The offer includes a glass of top-quality Italian fizz, and features dishes like beetroot and thyme risotto, spinach, ricotta and pecorino cake with chicory and walnuts, and panna cotta with blood orange for dessert. Sounds good to us! threehorseshoesmadingley.co.uk

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FOOD & DRINK

2-4-1 AT LAS IGUANAS. Infuse your new year with a hearty dose of Latin American flavour at Las Iguanas this January, where they’re laying on some purse-friendly special offers. Sign up to their mailing list to get two for the price of one on mains for the whole month, leaving you free to feast on delicious dishes like loaded nachos, melty quesadillas, scrummy empanadas and more. Best of all, Las Iguanas runs a near-constant happy hour - what better antidote to the January blues? Vegans or those trying out Veganuary can enjoy two for one on all vegan dishes throughout January too: vegetable chillis, fiery salads, luscious veggie-packed curries and more. Both offers are available Sunday to Thursday at the Cambridge branch which is located on Quayside. iguanas.co.uk

2 - 4 - 1 AT T H A I K H U N . Make your January extra tasty with a trip to Quayside favourite Thaikhun, which is offering two for the price of one on main courses from 3 January to 31 January (Sundays to Thursdays). Diners can feast on discounted deliciousness from the Thai street foodinspired menu which features curries, dumplings, stir fries and authentic Thai salads. With its colourful cocktails and fun Bangkok-themed look, a trip to Thaikhun is sure to brighten the bluest of January blues, and with awesome value like this we think it’s a no-brainer for a new year feast. To take advantage of the offer, book online quoting TKPASS. thaikhun.co.uk

T W O M A I N S F O R £ 10 AT S TAT I O N TAV E R N . Nestled in the gleaming square outside our newly revamped train station, Station Tavern will be offering a hard-to-beat bargain of two main courses for just £10 during the month of January. Expect hearty pub grub like beer-battered cod and triple cooked chips, pies, steaks and burgers – priced at just £5 a piece when you take along a similarly thrifty friend. They’ve got board games, comfy seats and tasty beers and wines, too, making it a perfect place for idling away a rainy afternoon. thestationtavern.co.uk CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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ON THE PULSE. A L E X RU S H M E R O N W H Y B E A N S A N D P U L S E S A R E G O O D F O R O U R H E A LT H , O U R P U R S E S A N D O U R P L A N E T

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or as long as I’ve had my own kitchen, there has been a shelf dedicated to jars of dried pulses and beans. Some are easily recognisable and are used with great regularity: the red lentils need to be replenished once every couple of weeks, for example, as do the chickpeas. Others might sit in their glass prisons for months, just waiting for their chance to shine: I’m not sure the jar of adzuki beans has ever been refilled; the same could be said for the container of tiny greenybeige mung beans. A brief glance at the bean shelf reveals at least a dozen varieties. The reason for this is threefold: firstly, pulses pop up in various world cuisines with amazing regularity and my desire to learn to cook foods from all over the world knows no bounds. A complex Indian feast might require urad daal, toor dal and mung dal whereas a mexican dinner would be incomplete without pinto beans and black-eyed peas. I need cannellini (or maybe flageolet) beans to cook with rosemary and garlic and serve with roast lamb and it would be impossible to make an authentic cassoulet without a stash of tarbet or haricot beans. And let’s not forget the yellow split peas that are an essential element of any good old English soup, along with some deliciously salty pork. The second reason for an increasingly overloaded shelf is cost. Dried beans are cheap, really cheap. A kilo of red lentils – enough to make tarka daal for a small army – costs in the region of two pounds. Even a relatively luxurious pulse, like a creamy butterbean, can be purchased CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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for around a fiver for the same amount. It’s silly to buy in quantities smaller than this as evidenced by the third reason I have built up quite a collection: namely shelf life. Given the fact that they are dried, there is no reason why these happy little pulses can’t sit in the cupboard for years, which is part of their inherent genius and appeal. And in an age when we are becoming increasingly aware and conscious of food waste, what can be better than having a cupboard full of foods that will, in all likelihood, outlast us? Of course, this level of survivability does have a downside: pulses and beans aren’t the most instantaneous of foods. The contents of most of the jars need to be soaked overnight before then being cooked, which itself can sometimes take hours (I once had to top up a pan of kidney beans with fresh water at least four times because they took so long) but a little organisation is a small price to pay for such a nutrient dense and delicious foodstuff. Having said that, some are far more receptive to quick cooking than others. Lentils, red lentils in particular, can be turned into daal in around half an hour. Puy lentils take a little longer but neither need soaking thus removing one level of required organisation entirely. The other alternative is to invest in a pressure cooker which has, in the past, enabled me to get from bullet-hard chickpea to hummus in little over an hour. Now, that’s what I call having a finger on the pulse. n C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | J A N U A R Y 2 018

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VEGAN EATS. JA N UA RY I S A C H A N C E F O R U S A L L T O R E S E T O U R E AT I N G H A B I T S – S O I F YO U ’R E K E E N T O E AT YO U R G R E E N S T H I S M O N T H , W E ’R E S H OWC A S I N G S O M E P L AC E S W H I C H S E RV E U P E XC E P T I O N A L P L A N T- P OW E R E D D I S H E S W O R D S & I M AG E S C H A R LOT T E G R I F F I T H S

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ambridge now boasts several exclusively vegan eateries, so for January – a month traditionally focused on healthier feasts – I wanted to highlight some slightly lesser-known destinations where those eschewing animal products can tuck into delicious feasts alongside those more carnivorously-inclined. It was meant to be easy. It wasn’t. It felt as though some of the mainlymeat places were simply conducting a box-ticking exercise to ensure they had a “vegan” dish on the menu. Others had clearly put in a bit of effort and thought creatively about their offering, but hadn’t bothered with the basics: all too often the plant-based dishes were woefully under-seasoned or – in one particularly memorable experience – bland to the point of inedible, leaving me to wonder if the brains behind the menus had actually taken the time to sit down and try the food they’d dreamed up. At first I was disappointed, but then: I got angry. It’s 2018. The Internet is full to the point of bursting with inspiration for vegan dishes and exciting flavour combinations designed for those who prefer not to consume animal byproducts. If you do want to cater to vegans, there’s no excuse for mediocrity. And if you have come up with something clever, make sure it tastes delicious before it hits your customers’ tables! Don’t think that this micro rant means the five I’ve found aren’t any good: this couldn’t be further from the truth. Whether you’re exclusively eating vegan or just trying to cut back on meat, this list of exceptional eateries is designed to showcase some less-obvious places serving plant-powered feasts – which are all very much worth a visit.

T H E WA N D E R I N G YA K . If you were lucky enough to sneak a seat at the Wandering Yak’s Mexican night at the Blue Moon before Christmas, you’ll know how astonishingly talented this pair is when creating plantbased dishes. It feels as though the duo see avoiding animal products as an exciting challenge, rather than a limitation, and the Middle-Eastern-inspired offerings served out of their food truck during the week are guaranteed to delight even the most committed of carnivores. As their menu changes all the time you won’t quite know what you’re getting until you arrive at the serving hatch, but regular stars of their mezze box include Turkish bulgar salad with pomegranate, smoked paprika potatoes, crunchy Egyptian falafel, butternut squash fritters with herb and chilli pesto and roasted spiced cauliflower with tahini, lemon and agave sauce – all vegan, and all delicious. The Yak wanders as part of the street food collective foodPark, and can be found across Cambridge throughout the week: as with most trucks, the best way to track them down on any given day is to check social media. Keep an eye out for any future special event evenings catered by the Yak: we recommend you snap up tickets as soon as you see them.

B A N A N A L E A F.

One approach to accommodating vegan eaters is to head for one of the many Indianinspired restaurants found across Cambridge – so this felt like the perfect opportunity to throw a spotlight on Chesterton’s much-loved Banana Leaf. This Sri Lankan and South Indian restaurant is always splendid whether you’re eating meat or not, and proved extremely accommodating of plant-based diets: a quick chat with the waiter helped guide our choices towards several suitable dishes including a smoky dhal, a soul-warmingly-spicy vegetable curry and a small plate of lentil-based fried vadai. Two vegan dishes stood out in particular – one was an enormous wafer-thin masala dosa, at least a foot long and a little like being presented with an edible kite, which was packed with perfectly-spiced potato and served alongside fresh coconut chutney and a tangy sambar. The other was Gobi 65, deep-fried nuggets of cauliflower coated in masala spices and accompanied by another bowl of coconut chutney. And if that’s not enough to tempt you, it’s all remarkably reasonably priced. Ignore the fact that their website seems to be permanently offline and either settle into a seat in their Milton Road restaurant, or order your feast to go and enjoy it on the comfort of your own sofa. CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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CO FIFTEEN. Further out of town on the other side of the city is Co Fifteen, an eatery which deserves to be busier. Its calming, leafy interior is an ideal place to hide out from the stressors of modern life, and provides plant-powered brunch-like dishes that are inventively packed with flavour. Smoky carrot lox makes a clever stand-in for salmon, and their in-house fermented kimchi will wake sleepy minds just as effectively as a double shot espresso. It’s their take on a “Life-Changing Loaf” that I’d like to spotlight: two densely-packed slices of flavourful seed and nut goodness, lightly charred at the edges and served alongside gloriously slatherable hazelnut butter. The number of nuts involved means a full loaf of the stuff would be ruinously expensive (as I discovered when I asked about buying one – there’s a reason Co sells it as slices!) but as a weekend treat, it’s hard to beat. Grab one of their excellent coffees – available with soya or oat milk if you’re going full vegan – tuck in, and let your cares drift away.

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CAFE ABANTU. The phrase “hidden gem” is thrown around a lot, but it is correctly applied to this delightful cafe situated alongside Wysing Arts Centre in Bourn. Head just a few miles out from Cambridge and you’ll be treated to a range of delicious-sounding light lunches and a counter that’s heaving with sweet treats, which always include both a vegan option and a gluten-free cake, and the occasional item supplied by local chef Paola Davies-Romano. When I visited the café, I chose a slice of their homemade vegan toffee fudge and raspberry cake, which was sticky, sweet and everything you could hope for on a blustery winter’s day. The light-drenched cafe was busy (clearly this place isn’t that well-kept a secret), but the staff were very cheerful, and happy to chat between preparing orders. There’s plenty of parking available and – if you feel the need to burn off your cake after feasting – head out to enjoy the outdoor sculptures located around the centre.

LA LATINA BUSTAURANT. Eagle-eyed visitors to Cambridge Retail Park in the pre-Christmas maelstrom will have spotted this cheerful double-decker parked up next to Homebase, providing knackered shoppers with respite and delicious eats inspired by South American dishes and flavours. The bustaurant is exactly as you’re imagining – an old two-storey coach that’s been beautifully renovated, with a small but perfectlyformed kitchen downstairs and a light and airy set of tables and chairs upstairs, upholstered with old coffee sacks and adorned with colourful bunting. You even have to climb the bus’s original stairs to access the dining space. Owners Catalina and Nelson offer a neat menu, all of which is customisable to vegan appetites: the tostones – double-fried green plantain served with spicy tomato, bean and veg toppings – is a particularly effective winter warmer, or try a small pile (you can’t just have one) of the vegan empanada for a finger-lickingly delicious lunch. CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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‘TRY’ JANUARY.

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I N T H E M O N T H O F A B S T I N E N C E , T H I R S T Y ' S E LO D I E C A M E RO N S U G G E S T S T RY I N G S O M E T H I N G N E W I N S T E A D

It’s that time of year when we have overindulged and feel the need to brush away the cobwebs and start afresh – hence our desire to start the year full of good intentions and a pocket full of New Year’s resolutions. Most of us wake up on 1 January either hungover or carrying a couple of unnecessary Christmas kilos and we immediately feel the need to hit the road running with some type of drastic action. Unfortunately we set ourselves up for failure all too easily at this time of year; unused gym memberships spring to mind, abandoned early morning runs, failed diets, giving up alcohol… This year how about we forget Dry January and go for Try January instead! Yes, new year is an obvious time for renewal and a new fresh outlook but rather than cutting out the things we love, how about simply giving them a new perspective? I love to indulge in Try January. It encourages us to rethink making changes to our lives, and of course I think this is equally applicable to wine. Don’t give it up; you will end up spending too much time thinking about what you can’t have and ultimately fail in your initially positive endeavours. Use January as a time to promise yourself to try something new each week: how much more fun (and positive) is that! Buy a bottle of something you wouldn’t usually select and move out of your comfort zone, especially if you are prone to choosing the same wine over and over. Most importantly ask for advice and discover something new. This is a great time to support independent retailers – the people who go the extra mile to find you something interesting and different. n CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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FOUR WINES TO TRY THIS JANUARY Here are four suggestions to keep you going this month. These wines are all new to Thirsty and have been chosen for their individuality and style.

P I N OT G R I G I O , V I L L A LO C AT E L L I £13.4 0

This is definitely PG with a difference, richer and fuller bodied than you would expect, so set aside your preconceptions and give it a go. Subtle fruit aromas of apricot and peach and a hint of melon. Great to try with simple fish dishes.

O U E S T C OA S T B L A N C L E F I E F N O I R £19.9 0

This Chenin Blanc is born out of a philosophy of two winemakers in the Loire, Dominique and Alexis, passionate about the dark schist soils of their vineyards. They want the world to know about the power and complexity this gives to their wines. The purity of this wine is immediate; not only does it show citrus and fresh pineapple notes, there is also minerality in abundance.

O N D E RY T H M I Q U E , D E S PAG N E , B O R D E AU X £17.9 0

To simply say this is a Bordeaux Blend is to do a disservice to this wine. There is a sense of time and place here, where the winemaker knows his ‘terroir’ and respects the rhythms of nature. The result is evident a fresh, fragrant Cabernet Franc coupled with juicy Merlot and a hint of pepper.

POGGIO ALL A GUARDIA, M A R E M M A TO S C A N A £19.9 0

This is just too moreish; plums, chocolate, herbs and spice. As this wine is unoaked the blueberry and blackberry fruit and mineral notes shine through but don’t be fooled: this is a full-bodied wine that stands up well to hearty Italian food. Dive in…

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RECIPES. T H R E E F E E L- G O O D D I S H E S T O B L A S T AWAY T H E JA N UA RY B L U E S

This zingy salad is packed with goodness I N G R E D I E N TS

400g large raw tiger prawns 1 tbsp The Groovy Food Company Virgin Coconut Oil 100g dried vermicelli rice noodles 1 red pepper, deseeded and sliced 1 green pepper, deseeded and sliced 1 red onion, sliced thinly 1 large carrot, julienned 100g sugar snap peas, sliced lengthways 1 slightly under-ripe mango, peeled and julienned 1 red chilli, deseeded and sliced Fresh coriander to garnish

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Dressing: 1 tbsp The Groovy Food Company Agave Nectar Rich and Dark 1 tbsp soy sauce 2 tbsp The Groovy Food Company High Five Oil ½ clove garlic crushed Juice of 1 lime

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Cook the noodles by placing into a bowl and pouring over boiling water; leave to stand for 5 minutes then drain and leave to cool. Meanwhile prepare the vegetables and set aside in a large bowl. Preheat a frying pan then add in the coconut oil, fry the prawns for two to three minutes per side, until pink and cooked through. Meanwhile whisk together the dressing for the salad. Finally dress the noodles, peppers, carrot, red onion beansprouts, sugar snaps, mango and chilli. Serve topped with the hot prawns then garnish with the coriander.

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Serves

1-2 A delicious guilt-free, grain-free pizza with a hint of coconut I N G R E D I E N TS

Base: 1 large plantain, very ripe with black skin, peeled and mashed 1 large egg, beaten 30g The Groovy Food Company Organic Coconut Flour ½ tsp garlic granules (to taste) Sea salt Sauce: 2 tbsp tomato puree 2 tsp sundried tomato paste 2 tbsp water 1 tsp The Groovy Food Company Agave Nectar Light Amber & Mild Sea salt Black pepper Topping: 50g Shitake mushrooms (take off the stalks), thinly sliced 75g mozzarella, ripped Olive oil Mixed herbs Sea salt Garnish: 2 Basil sprigs

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Preheat the oven to 425°F/ 220°C/200°C fan/ gas mark 7 Put the plantain in a bowl and mash with the back of a fork until completely smooth. Add the egg and beat in with the plantain, blend until mixed together and then season with sea salt and garlic granules. Add the coconut flour and combine together until a thick paste. Then shape into a ball. On a baking tray pre-lined with baking parchment or a silicone baking mat, pat your plantain mixture evenly onto the baking mat in a round shape, 23cm diameter, ½cm thickness. Smooth it out so there are no bumps at the top. Place it in the oven for 14 to 15 minutes. Depending on your oven, you may need to turn the tray

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round halfway to make sure it’s evenly cooked. Whilst the pizza base is in the oven, make the tomato sauce. In a bowl mix together the tomato puree with water, until it’s a smooth consistency. Add the sundried tomato paste, agave nectar, sea salt and black pepper and mix together. Slice the mushrooms and set aside. Once the base is cooked, take it out of the oven and carefully flip it over. Smooth the tomato sauce over the base and top with the mushrooms and ripped mozzarella strands. Drizzle with a touch of olive oil and season lightly with sea salt and mixed herbs. Place back in the oven for a further nine to ten minutes. Once cooked take out and garnish with basil leaves.

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A great midweek meal: take everything to the table and let the family dive in and build their own tacos I N G R E D I E N TS

2 tbsp The Groovy Food Company Organic Virgin Coconut Oil 650g butternut squash or pumpkin, peeled, deseeded and cut into 2cm chunks 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped 2 tsp ground cumin 1 tsp sweet smoked paprika 1 x 400g tin black beans, rinsed and drained 1 tsp The Groovy Food Company Organic Agave Nectar, Light Amber & Mild For the guacamole 2 ripe avocados 150g frozen peas, defrosted ½ small bunch mint, leaves roughly chopped 1 small bunch coriander, leaves roughly chopped Zest of 1 lime; juice of half of it To serve 100g feta, roughly crumbled 2 baby gem lettuces, shredded 1 lime, cut into wedges 8-12 small soft flour tortillas

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Heat oven to 400°F/200°C/180°C fan/gas mark 6. Spoon the coconut oil into a large roasting tray and heat in the oven. Add the squash to the tray along with the cumin, smoked paprika, garlic and plenty of seasoning. Mix well and roast for 20 minutes. Tip in the black beans, drizzle over the agave, then toss everything together and roast for another 15 minutes. Meanwhile make the guacamole. Mash the avocado, peas, lime zest and juice in a bowl, then stir through most of the herbs and some seasoning. This month’s recipes are from the The Groovy Food Company, which makes healthy, natural alternatives for everyday essentials, offering a range which includes coconut oil and agave nectar. groovyfood.co.uk

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Wrap the tortillas in foil and pop in the oven with the squash for the last five minutes, to heat through. Let everyone dig in and make their own tacos - spread a generous spoonful of guacamole over a tortilla, then top with lettuce, 1-2 tbsp of the black bean mix, a crumbling of feta, a sprinkling of herbs and a squeeze of lime. C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | J A N U A R Y 2 018

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What’s on.

A RO U N D - U P O F E V E N T S I N A N D A RO U N D CAMBRIDGESHIRE THIS MONTH

U N T I L 8 J A N U A RY N O RT H P O L E ICE RINK

One last chance to get your skates on before the temporary rink leaves Parker’s Piece for ten months. Fairground rides nearby include a 32-metre high big wheel. 12pm to 9pm | Parker’s Piece | £11.50, children £9.50 | thenorthpolecambridge.co.uk

2- 7 J A N U A RY J AC K A N D T H E B E A N S TA L K

Liza Goddard, Tony Christie, Stephen Beckett, Holly Easterbrook and Cambridge’s number one dame Matt Crosby star in the Arts Theatre’s sparkly panto. Catch it during the final week. 7.30pm (2.30pm on 18 and 20) | Arts Theatre | From £17 | cambridgeartstheatre.com

5 & 6; 12 &13; 19 & 20; 26 & 27 JA N U A RY WHALE HALL

Can’t wait until the Museum of Zoology reopens on 27 March? The Whale Hall, a small but impressive part of the museum, is already open for a few hours on Fridays and Saturdays. It’s at the entrance to the refurbished museum. 12pm to 4pm | Museum of Zoology | Free | museum.zoo.cam.ac.uk

6, 13, 20 & 27 JA N U A RY CAMBRIDGE CODEBREAKERS: THE LAST SECRET

A high-energy codebreaking adventure across four University of Cambridge Museums, from Fire Hazard Games. Features a

live leaderboard, cryptic clues and surprise challenges. Designed for adults, but accompanied children over ten can attend. 10.30am | Various | £15 | museums.cam.ac.uk

10 J A N U A RY THE CRIBS

From toilet-paper-factory beginnings in Wakefield to three top ten albums and touring the world, The Cribs once featured Johnny Marr in their ranks. Catch their antihipster anthems at The Junction. 7pm | Cambridge Junction | £22.50 | junction.co.uk

12 J A N U A RY THE SCUMMY M U M M I E S S H OW

An evening of laughs for less-thanperfect parents, comedians Helen Thorn and Ellie Gibson cover a wide

range of parenting topics, from pelvic floors and play dates to farting and fish fingers. 8pm | Cambridge Junction | £17 | junction.co.uk

13 JA N U A RY CAMBRIDGE PHILHARMONIC FA M I LY C O N C E RT

An old chest full of mysterious objects takes conductor Tim Redmond and his brother Tom (the presenter) on musical adventures, featuring works by Mozart, Wagner and John Williams. 2pm and 4pm | West Road Concert Hall | £12 | westroad.org

17 JA N U A RY ENDELLION STRING Q U A RT E T

Highly-popular quartet return with works by Beethoven and Mozart, plus Webern’s astonishing Six Bagatelles that lasts just three-and-a-half minutes and Tchaikovsky’s luxurious third and final quartet. 7.30pm | West Road Concert Hall | £27 | westroad.org

17-20 JA N U A RY CAMBRIDGE WINTER ALE F E S T I VA L

The 22nd year of the event run by CAMRA and the Cambridge Beer Festival team, this has an emphasis on the darker, richer beers associated with the cold months. 12pm to 3pm, 5pm to 10.30pm, all day Saturday | University Social Club, Mill Lane | £3 entry evenings and Saturday | cambridgebeerfestival.com

30 December – 1 January St Petersburg Classical Ballet.

This acclaimed company returns to Cambridge with three performances of The Nutcracker on 30 and 31 December and two of Swan Lake on 1 January, complete with full orchestra. Various times | Corn Exchange | from £17.75 | cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

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17-20 JA N U A RY SW E E N E Y TO D D

The Demon Barber of Fleet Street sets out his stall in Cambridge Operatic Society’s production, as Todd’s bloody revenge is a dish served hot by lovestruck pie shop owner Mrs Lovett. 7.30pm (2.30pm on 18 and 20) | Arts Theatre | from £18 | cambridgeartstheatre.com CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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W X XHXAT XX ' SXO XN X

1 January New Year’s Day Guided Walk. Welcome in the new year with a revitalising, social walk through Coton’s reserve, learning about its history and current management as a wildlife-friendly farm. 11am to 1pm | Coton Countryside Reserve | Free, donations welcome | cambridgeppf.org

24 JA N U A RY CLASSIC ROCK S H OW

A world-class band powers through rock’s finest moments, from AC/DC to ZZ Top, via Eric Clapton, The Eagles, ELO, Led Zeppelin, Queen, The Who and many more. 7.30pm | Corn Exchange | From £26.25 | cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

24 JA N U A RY W I N E TA S T I N G : NEW YEAR NEW WINES

returns to the Arts Theatre with this reinvention of Shakespeare’s most passionate drama, with flamenco sounds on the streets as a knife glints in the hot sun. 7.30pm (2.30pm on 18 and 20) | Arts Theatre | From £18 | cambridgeartstheatre.com

2 5 J A N U A RY BURNS NIGHT CEILIDH

What will top the wine charts in 2018? Discover what trends, tastes, styles and grape varieties will be hitting the back of your throat this year. 7.15pm for 7.30pm start | Cambridge Wine Merchants, Cherry Hinton Road | £22.50 | cambridgewine.com

A lively night of music and dancing in the gothic surrounds of St Giles’ Church, led by the Cambridge University Ceilidh Band and caller Bob Ridout. Step out in the spirit of Robert Burns; an all-ages event with bar. 8pm | St Giles’ Church, Castle Street | £10, under 12s free | adcticketing.com

24-27 JA N U A RY ROMEO AND JULIET

2 5 J A N U A RY THE STYLISTICS

The Marlowe Society, Cambridge University’s leading drama society, CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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Known for their Grammynominated You Make Me

Feel Brand New, plus You Are Everything and Betcha By Golly Wow, this bestselling group remains the real deal. 7.30pm | Corn Exchange | From £22.75 | cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

2 6 J A N U A RY THIS IS THE KIT

The group, with songwriter Kate Stables to the fore, have earned praise from Guy Garvey and The National and their latest album Moonshine Freeze has been produced by long-time PJ Harvey collaborator John Parish. 7pm | Cambridge Junction | £18 | junction.co.uk

2 6 J A N U A RY AHIR SHAH: CONTROL

Ahir’s last show enjoyed packed runs at the Edinburgh Fringe and a national tour. This one promises to discuss freedom,

fascism, history, hope and… milk. 8pm | Cambridge Junction | £13.50 | junction.co.uk

27 J A N U A RY I SA AC G R AC I E

Singer-songwriter from London whose pastoral and folky songs recall, according to the NME, “everybody from Jeff Buckley to Ryan Adams”. 7pm | Portland Arms | £8.80 | theportlandarms.co.uk

2 9 J A N U A RY CIRCUS OF HORRORS

A show very much not for children, this circus can trace its beginnings to the 1995 Glastonbury Festival and has gone on to appear at several more of the biggest rock festivals, plus The X Factor and The One Show. 7.30pm | Corn Exchange | From £24.75 | cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

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ZOOLOGY MUSEUM. The University of Cambridge’s Museum of Zoology has been closed for redevelopment long enough that many children in the area will never have seen its largest specimen, the 70ft-long finback whale skeleton. The museum is set to reopen on 27 March, but every Friday and Saturday there’s now a chance to have a proper peek at the Whale Hall, which is the entrance to the museum. It’s open 12pm to 4pm. Once open properly, there will be new displays, a café and shop; but for now, take a look at the great whale. museum.zoo.cam.ac.uk

FAMILY JAM – PERCUSSION. Make some noise in a hands-on percussion workshop led by Colin Currie, who just happens to be known as “the world’s most daring percussionist”. Be ready to make sounds tiny and massive at Saffron Hall on 21 January. You can shake, rattle, bash, crash and jangle at 11am or 2pm. Children must be accompanied by adults; suitable for ages eight and up. Tickets are £10. saffronhall.com

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FA M I LY

C H R I S T M A S PA S T ( N O RT H P O L E , PA N TO A N D C O R N E X B A L L E T ) . Looking to make your way out on to the ice, but haven’t got round to it yet? Got a season ticket that’s been underused a little? Well time’s running out so get your skates on for the winter wonderland that is North Pole, as the Parker’s Piece ice rink and neighbouring fun fair close on 8 January. There’s even less time if you want to catch world-class ballet and haven’t booked so far. St Petersburg Classical Ballet are at the Corn Exchange performing The Nutcracker on 30 and 31 December and Swan Lake on 1 January. Tickets start at £17.75. And, with 11 months till the next Arts Theatre panto, make sure you don’t miss this year’s treat, Jack and the Beanstalk, which ends on 7 January. It stars Tony Christie and Liza Goddard, and tickets start at £17.

T I M A N D TO M ’S SYM P H O N I C A DV E N T U R E .

WANDLEBURY WALKS. Make Thursday mornings a time to step out in nature, and join one of Wandlebury’s weekly Walking for Health guided walks. Meet at the Stable Room; 10am for the longer option or 10.30am for a shorter stroll. Both walks end at 11am, when it’s time for tea or coffee. Everyone is welcome and it’s suitable for different abilities. It’s free and there’s no need to pre-book but arrive ten minutes early to register. cambridgeppf.org CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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Classical music takes a fun turn at this year’s Cambridge Philharmonic Family Concert on 13 January. Conductor Tim Redmond is joined on stage by his brother Tom, who helps to narrate what happens when they find an old chest full of mysterious objects which take them on unexpected musical adventures. Works include pieces by Mozart, Wagner and John Williams in an action-packed hour of orchestral music for all the family. Tickets for this 2pm performance are £12. westroad.org

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A DV E RT I S E M E NXTXFXEX AT XU XRXEX

EAST OF ENGLAND CO-OP FUNERAL SERVICES IN CAMBRIDGE. E A S T O F E N G L A N D C O - O P F U N E R A L S E RV I C E S H A S E X T E N D E D I T S CARE AND SUPPORT TO THE EAST ANGLIAN COMMUNIT Y WITH THE OPENING OF ITS FIRST FUNER AL BR ANCH IN CAMBRIDGE The new branch will be managed by David Downes and his experienced team, including Funeral Arranger Ben Seward, a funeral director and team of pallbearers. David, who has been a member of the East of England Co-op Funeral Services team for four years, said: “Cambridge is a diverse community and our new branch and team are well equipped to meet the needs of different faiths and cultural backgrounds. Everybody is an individual and each funeral is different. We provide all our clients with a day that is respectful, unique and reflects their wishes. “Providing assurance and support to families during emotionally difficult times is a privilege and a responsibility we take very seriously. Compassion is at the forefront of every conversation and integral to everything we do. It is a real honour to open Cambridge’s first East of England Co-op Funeral Services branch and to bring the East of England Co-op’s renowned levels of service, care and professionalism to the Cambridge community.” Members of the local community are invited to drop in to meet David and Ben and see the new welcoming branch first-hand. It has a welcoming reception area, multifaith facilities, a private arranging room and a Chapel of Rest where families can spend time with their loved ones in a private, peaceful and comfortable space.

ABOUT THE EAST OF ENGLAND CO-OP FUNERAL SERVICES

Above Funeral Arranger Ben Seward and Funeral Manager David Downes outside the new East of England Co-op Funeral branch on Histon Road

East of England Co-op Funeral Services is a part of the East of England Co-op, the largest independent retailer in East Anglia with businesses across Norfolk, Suffolk, Essex and Cambridgeshire. East of England Co-op Funeral Services has been taking care of all aspects of funeral planning and arrangements for more than 90 years, earning a reputation for its unrivalled levels of support for the community, including a free 24-hour care line. As a local, independent co-operative they only have branches in the eastern region and are owned directly by their members. Because they are a local co-op, they work hard to support the community by helping local groups and initiatives as well as partnering with good causes and charities, such as local hospices.

focus on their clients’ needs and wishes, discreetly and sensitively. Every client is treated as an individual by professional, kind people, all of whom live and have mostly grown up in the East of England. They are proud to be part of the East of England Co-op and offer a local service to local families. When a loved one passes away, all arrangements are taken care of so families can concentrate on saying goodbye. For those who feel planning ahead for their own funeral would give peace of mind, David and Ben can also provide advice on the East of England Co-op Funeral Service’s pre-paid funeral plans. They will be with you every step of the way, taking care of the important decisions and helping with every detail so the day can be just how you pictured it.

I T ’S T H E L I T T L E T H I N G S T H AT C O U N T

East of England Co-op Funeral Services’ branch and Chapel of Rest on Histon Road in Cambridge is open Monday to Friday, from 9.30am to 4.30pm. To arrange a meeting, please visit the branch or call the team directly on 01223 851686.

David, Ben and their colleagues at East of England Co-op Funeral Services believe everyone should be remembered in a way that is as individual as they were, and they know it’s the little things that make a funeral special. They

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Cambridge’s WELLBEING WONDERS.

H E A LT H & W E L L B E I N G

F E E L- G O O D F O O D, F U N F I T N E S S A N D B L I S S F U L PA M P E R I N G : W E RO U N D UP THE TOP LOCAL WELLNESS B O O S T I N G S P O T S T O H E L P YO U S TA R T 2 018 T H E R I G H T WAY

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If the old adage ‘you are what you eat’ is true, most of us are currently composed of some unholy combination of Twiglets, sparkling wine and novelty chocolates. As such, seeking out a few green things to eat to redress the balance mightn’t be a bad idea. If you are on a bit of a new year nutrition kick, the good news is that Cambridge now has loads of eateries which proudly serve health-conscious dishes that don’t skimp on tastiness. An excellent first port of call is CO FIFTEEN: a blissfully chilled-out café over in Cherry Hinton that serves lunches and brunches filled with goodness. Cosy up with red quinoa porridge, tuck into veggiepacked Balance Bowls and – our top tip – sample the Life-changing Loaf, which is loaded with nuts and seeds, making for perfect morning fuel. Elsewhere, NOVI on Regent Street is big on thoughtful food, offering colourful seasonal salads, tofu scramble, smoothies, vegan treats and more – plus, their leafy roof terrace is a perfect zen zone for reading the papers and relaxing. For an uber-instagrammable dish of glow-giving goodness, the Rainbow Bowl at ESPRESSO LIBRARY is hard to beat with its cornucopia of fresh veggies and grains, but if you can’t resist a burger, check out EL’s ‘Tummy Loving’ patty of smokey tempeh and grilled Portobello mushroom slathered with pistachio pesto. Pioneering Mill Road indie ARJUNA has been bringing the people of Cambridge wholefoods and vegan treats since the 1970s – making it the first shop of its kind in the city. From cashews to cacao, aduki beans to quinoa, it’s a one-stop shop for all your wholefood needs, plus you can pick up superfood salads, vegan curries and more at the takeaway counter. Want to learn how to create your own feel-good feasts at home? CAMBRIDGE COOKERY SCHOOL has a hands-on Food for Wellbeing class on 7 February which focuses on plant-based and dairy-free recipes. The day begins with a welcome bowl of Swedish rye porridge and will take you through creating vibrant veggie-friendly dishes including roast parsnip salad with pomegranate and za’atar, sweet potato hummus with dukkah and potato and chickpea based spicy burgers. The class finishes with a communal lunch with wine, and you’ll be sent on your way with a full recipe pack to keep you inspired.

© DAISY DICKINSON

HEALTHY EATING HOTSPOTS.

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© DAISY DICKINSON

H E A LT H & W E L L B E I N G

© DAISY DICKINSON

Clockwise from top left Healthy delights at Co Fifteen Above Novi has a fantastic range of thoughtful, inventive dishes Below Co Fifteen's colourful Kati Roll; more delights from Novi's nutritious but indulgent menu; Espresso Library serves up great brunches like this avocado and poached eggs number, plus goodness-filled Rainbow Bowl salads

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YOUR FITNESS QUESTIONS ANSWERED. JA M E S R U M B E L OW, M AT T J E N K I N S A N D J O RG E L U C A S , A K A C H E S T E R T O N S P O R T S C E N T R E ’S F I T N E S S T E A M A N D P E R S O N A L T R A I N E R S , A N S W E R YO U R B U R N I N G E X E RC I S E Q U E S T I O N S

HOW MUCH EXERCISE SHOULD I BE DOING PER WEEK? We should all aspire to do some form of physical activity on a regular basis. We recommend completing at least 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous aerobic activity per week. One way you could achieve this is by doing 30 minutes of exercise, five times a week. Examples of vigorous aerobic activity include running and using the Ski Erg machine at the gym, fitness classes including HIIT, Early Burn and Boxercise, plus sports including badminton. It’s also important to include some form of strength training in your routine to help you with all daily movements, build and maintain strong bones, regulate blood sugar and blood pressure, and maintain a healthy weight. Strength workouts can also increase your calorific burn, even at rest, for up to 72 hours after you leave the gym. Activities that include strength training and so will contribute to this aspect of your routine include using resistance machines and dumbbells as well as doing yoga and pilates. WHAT SHOULD I EAT BEFORE A WORKOUT? In order to fuel your workout, we would recommend a light snack of carbohydrates an hour and a half to two hours before you start exercise. An example snack could be a homemade cereal bar and a banana, but if you are trying to reduce your carbohydrate intake then you could limit your snack to one of these items. HOW LONG SHOULD I REST BETWEEN WORKOUTS? If you are doing moderate aerobic exercise only, it is possible to do a daily workout without a rest day. However, you may require a day’s rest after vigorous aerobic activity or strength training to allow for adequate muscle recovery. Most importantly: listen to your body, it knows when CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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it needs to rest and when it’s capable of doing more. For example if your legs are aching but your upper body is good to go, don’t be afraid to exercise more regularly and focus on specific areas or muscle groups allowing the rest of your body to recover. HOW QUICKLY WILL I START SEEING RESULTS? It can take six to eight weeks to start seeing results so don’t get disappointed if you don’t have an overnight transformation! Remember you see yourself in the mirror every day and are your own toughest critic; be patient and the results will be worth the wait. Stop looking at the scales, and instead concentrate on the changes in the way your clothes fit, as well as your body fat percentage and muscle mass, both of which you can find out by following the Fitness Journey at Chesterton Sports Centre. Using our InBody machine we can give 20 detailed body measurement readings and provide you with realistic and achievable goals in just a couple of minutes. WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF USING A PERSONAL TRAINER? A personal trainer can help you to stay on track and achieve your goals. We are there to provide you with the framework and the knowledge to get your body to where you want it to be and to keep you motivated when both the sessions get tough and when you hit plateaus in your progress. We also make sure that every movement you do is done with correct form and technique so that you are at a lower risk of sustaining an injury that would prevent you from achieving your fitness goals. Always remember that a Personal Trainer’s goals are your goals and we are striving for your success. n Learn more about Chesterton Sports Centre's classes and PT services at chestertonsportscentre.org.uk C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | J A N U A R Y 2 018

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FIND YOUR FITNESS MATCH. C A M B R I D G E B O OTC A M P S . WHAT IS IT? Female-only fitness bootcamps which consist of a 45-minute full-body, outdoor workout. Sessions take inspiration from Tabata training (EPOC), CrossFit and Kettlebells. WHERE IS IT? Histon Road recreation ground, Parker’s Piece and Cherry Hinton Hall park, with sessions every day in the early morning and evening. IS IT FOR ME? If you want a positive, supportive environment to realise your fitness goals – even if you can’t remember the last time you worked out – this could be for you. Cambridge Bootcamps’ six-week transformation programme ‘Evolve’ is currently on offer with a 20% discount. It’s the perfect programme to get fit, tone up and lose weight, and includes unlimited weekly sessions, coaching and support, plus a nutrition programme and guaranteed results or your money back. cambridgebootcamps.com

(( B O U N C E )) B O DY F I T.

4TH DIMENSION & FLEXITONE®. WHAT IS IT? High-quality dance training for adults in various styles including Commercial, Hip Hop, Jazz and Contemporary. WHERE IS IT? Classes are run all over Cambridgeshire with brand new venues opening this year. IS IT FOR ME? If you want to learn challenging choreography in a welcoming, friendly environment, then yes! Enjoyable for all abilities, these classes are designed to push advanced dancers whilst never leaving behind the beginners in the room and can be a great way to improve your fitness and confidence while listening to some of your favourite tunes. Also keep an eye out for brand new Flexitone® classes opening this month in and around Cambridge, focusing largely on flexibility, whilst toning the whole body. A unique exercise class, featuring elements of yoga, dance, barre and Pilates in an upbeat setting. 4d-dance.co.uk

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WHAT IS IT? A workout performed on a mini trampoline. WHERE IS IT? Cambridge Dance Studio (at Madingley Windmill). Classes every day, times vary. IS IT FOR ME? Bounce your way to fitness at these fun-packed sessions which feature warm-up, cardio and body conditioning sections and are designed for all ages to enjoy. There’s oodles of scientific research to support the benefits of trampoline-based workouts, in fact NASA even called it “the most effective exercise yet devised by man,” due to the extra gravitational force that the trampoline pad adds. Benefits include firming and toning of muscles, increased metabolism, strengthening of the heart, increased oxygen capacity, weight loss, improved balance, and increased energy. The sessions last one hour and focus on simple moves which can be made easier by bopping along, or tougher by jumping harder! Expect tunes blasting out, excitable and friendly instructors and a whole lot of fun. bouncefitbody.com

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CLUBBERCISE. WHAT IS IT? Bringing a night out to your workout, Clubbercise is a dance-based fitness class using easy-to-follow routines. WHERE IS IT? Cambourne Fitness & Sports Centre, Wednesdays at 8.10pm. IS IT FOR ME? Glow sticks, disco lights and party anthems – this is the perfect workout for you if you love cutting some shapes

and traditional gym workouts and aerobics classes bore you. It’s set in a dark room so you can dance like nobody’s watching while getting yourself a tip-top workout that blends simple aerobics, toning and club/street dance moves with high and low impact options to suit all abilities. clubbercise.com

R O L L E R D E R BY.

© BENJAMIN VALSLER

WHAT IS IT? A fast-growing sport, roller derby is a full-contact game played on quad roller skates. Our local team is the Cambridge Rollerbillies. WHERE IS IT? The team train at Kelsey Kerridge (Sundays), Cambourne Fitness & Sports Centre (Tuesdays and Wednesdays), and Chesterton Sports Centre (Fridays). IS IT FOR ME? If you want to become a whizz on roller skates – even if you’re currently like Bambi on ice – meet a diverse group of people and get aggressive on wheels, this is your dream sport! As well as being seriously good fun, roller derby has great cardiovascular benefits and helps to develop balance, coordination, strength and power, serving as an efficient full body workout. The Cambridge Rollerbillies are hosting a meet and greet on 21 January at Kelsey Kerridge sports centre, offering a chance to find out more about the sport, watch the team practice and ask any questions ahead of their next beginners course. Find out more by searching Cambridge Rollerbillies on Facebook. CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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Clockwise from above The hydroptherapy pool with running water at the Spa at Bedford Lodge; a relaxing spa day at Wyboston Lakes Y Spa; the outdoor hydrotherapy pool, also at Y Spa; the exterior of the Spa at Bedford Lodge in Newmarket

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THE ART OF RELAXATION. With all of its merrymaking and running about, Christmas can leave you feeling pretty wiped – so January is a great time for a little self-care and pampering. The award-winning Spa at BEDFORD LODGE, located in Newmarket, is an ideal place for just that, with top-of-the-range facilities and a host of luxurious treatments and experiences on offer. Get your year off to a blissed-out start with the Relax & Renew Day (available 1 January to 28 February), a package designed to revitalise your body and restore your inner calm. You’ll feel all your tensions and stresses ebb away as you enjoy an intensely relaxing foot ritual and full body polish for top-to-toe pampering that will leave you glowing with radiance, as well as drifting into a state of deep relaxation with a 30-minute dry flotation experience. You’ll also have access to the spa’s luxury heat and hydrotherapy facilities, from the calming ambience and tranquility of the thermal suite, complete with unique Hamman table and luxury steam room and sauna, to the spacious hydrotherapy pool which offers five different water experiences and experiential showers. For an invigorating dose of crisp, clean country air, venture outdoors and lie back and relax in the warm, bubbling waters of the rooftop hot tub. The Relax & Renew Spa Day, priced at £120 per person, also includes an indulgent afternoon tea, served with a glass of champagne. Also offering a haven of relaxation and zen is the Y Spa at WYBOSTON LAKES, located between Cambridge and Milton Keynes at the Waterfront Hotel. Try the Neom treatments, which have been developed to help with four key areas: sleep, stress, energy levels and mood. The treatments begin with a scent therapy test to help discover which of the treatments will benefit you the most, then go on to use meditation, shiatsu, cranio, Thai massage, trigger point and reflexology. Lasting 70 minutes, it’s priced at £85. The rest of the stylish Y Spa is well worth a look too, offering thermal spa experiences including an outdoor hydrotherapy pool, glacier showers and Kelo sauna, along with relaxation areas. n

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B E AU T Y

Beauty Blog. W O R D S DA I SY D I C K I N S O N

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f you’re already tired of the ‘new year, new you’ chants and don’t quite fancy ditching the vino and chocolates quite yet, then you’re not alone. While a healthier regime is always encouraged, it doesn’t have to be the only way to change your appearance. Getting a fresh new cut or changing up your hairdo can rapidly transform the way you feel, and look – so get ready to up your style game for 2018. If you’re ready to go for it, a hot new cut will give your style an instant shake up, and there are plenty of great salons across Cambridge to pick from. Make sure you settle on a hairdresser you feel comfortable with, who is prepared to listen to what you want, while also making suggestions and drawing on their own experience. Catwalk trends for SS18 include updos that look like pixie crops, centre partings, candyfloss topknots and super-short fringes. I go to Urban on Burleigh Street where Julie keeps my fringe sharp and edgy about every four weeks, with a full cut around every six to eight weeks – which is recommended for healthier, stronger locks. If you’re not ready for the chop though, colour is a fun way to try something new, and the good news is that semi-permanent and temporary dyes have made a huge comeback thanks to festival fashions. L’Oreal Paris Colorista Washout (£6, Superdrug) is a semi-permanent colour carried in a hair mask base. It fades gradually over one to two weeks so you can switch and change your hair colour whenever you want. Pastel shades are available for blonde or prelightened hair, and vivid shades for all hair types. With a little practice, and a bunch of patience, anyone can have a go at some creative heat styles and the Lee Stafford Rainbow Waver (£29.99, Argos) looks like a little slice of unicorn heaven. With a quirky barrel design, this is the ultimate tool to create a tousled, boho look. And for creating added oomph, Colab Dry Shampoo + Extreme Volume (£4.49, feelunique. com) contains plumping powders for instant backcombed body. The combination of cold weather and heat styling can leave hair damaged and weak so a mask is a wonderfully pampering way to treat your locks to some much-needed hydration. I just love Lush’s new Hot Oil Treatment (£6.50). This spicy red product packs jojoba and olive oils to hydrate and nourish, with nettle and rosemary absolutes for a happy scalp. Another favourite of mine is the Tiana Argan Fresh Coconut TLC Intensive Hair Treatment (£12.99, Holland & Barrett) which unusually combines both argan and coconut oil for a double-hit of goodness. With added nutrients including lauric, capric and caprylic acids, this all-natural treatment is perfect for dry, stressed hair. For an exotic boost, try the Philip Kingsley Coconut Breeze Elasticizer (£33, philipkingsley.co.uk) where the smell alone transports you to some kind of tropical island bliss, and the performance is just as good. Delivering a hit of moisture into the hair’s cuticle, this luxurious pre-shampoo conditioning treatment leaves hair weightless and shiny. For giving hair a slick of shine and hydration, Lee Stafford Coco Loco Hair Oil (£7.99, Boots) is perfect to finish through ends, and I love to take the mini shampoo and conditioner (£1.99 each, Boots) from the same range with me when I’m travelling; the smell is incredible. And finally, a product which Instagram fans may already be familiar with, Hair Burst Heathy Hair Vitamins (£24.99, hairburst.com) contain a cocktail of goodies including zinc, biotin and MSM for promoting stronger, longer hair. After a few weeks of taking these I noticed my hair seemed stronger, with fewer split ends or breakages, and my nails were more rapidly growing out my manicures, without breaking along the way. The shampoo and conditioner (£24.99) also makes my hair lovely and soft, and keeps it cleaner for longer between washes. n

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Life’s work.

P H I L I P PA M I L L S , P R I N C I PA L AT C A M B R I D G E I N T E R N AT I O N A L S C H O O L , C O N S I D E R S W H AT T H E F U T U R E M I G H T H O L D F O R T H E N E X T G E N E R AT I O N

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few days ago, my nine-year-old daughter asked me what career she should choose. She had initiated the conversation by asking, “How old will I be when you and Daddy ask me to leave home?”, and for a moment, I was lost for words. Because the truth is that the next generation faces challenges that those of us born back in the 20th century could not have imagined. Back in the halcyon days of the eighties, we passed seamlessly from O levels to A levels (aided by copious quantities of Duran Duran), and then there was a natural progression from school onto university, which in those days was fully funded by Local Authorities. Student loans had yet to be invented and we survived, more or less, on student grants. Back then we were confident that we would walk straight into the career of our choice, and this I did, equipped with little more than a decent degree in Modern Languages, a PGCE and a month’s touch-typing course. 25 years later I am still in my chosen profession and have little reason to suppose that I will do anything very different before one day I put my feet up in front of the fire, cat on my lap and my teacher’s pension safely in the bank. But life is going to be very different for our children. Apart from the lucky ones who are called from an early age into CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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vocational careers such as law or medicine, the concept of a job for life for most of them will be unthinkable. Many of the jobs that they will perform have yet to be invented and the majority of them will struggle to get onto the housing ladder, without a generous handout from the Bank of Mum and Dad. So, what advice do I have for the teenagers currently passing through our school? Hold your nerve in the face of uncertainty and concentrate your efforts on pursuing things that genuinely interest you. Your degree subjects will soon become your every working minute and there is nothing more depressing than sitting down to write a 10,000-word essay on something that bores you rigid. There is little chance that you will finish your working days in the same career path that you began in your twenties, so remain flexible and open-minded to change. Be prepared to be made redundant several times in your life, take it on the chin without taking it personally and ensure that you are able to take with you a range of transferable skills. Fluency in a modern language or two would be hugely helpful, as would the proven ability to work as part of a team and to be able to undertake project work responsibly and autonomously. Make sure that you look after the planet and try to leave your children a legacy of excitement and stimulation. After all, we do not inherit the earth, we simply look after it for the next generation. n C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | J A N U A R Y 2 018

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COURSE! I

t’s a cliché, but January really is the perfect time to start something new. So, if you’ve long dreamed of learning a language, indulging your creative side, or picking up new skills to boost your career or take it in a different direction – why not seize that fresh-start feeling the new year brings and make 2018 the year that you enrol on a course or evening class? There’s a veritable banquet of options here in Cambridge. Our city is a world-famous seat of learning with a rich tradition of education – but that extends far beyond the rarefied world of the ancient university. In fact, there is a cornucopia of adult educational opportunities available, ranging

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from the artsy to the academic, from the esoteric to the eminently practical. Take an evening class in forensic science, shimmy your way through a ballroom dancing session or two or master bicycle maintenance: every imaginable learning yen is catered for across the city’s varied adult learning institutions. The benefits can be life-changing too, reaching far beyond simply relieving boredom or passing the time. Studies have shown adult learning to boost confidence, well-being and feelings of fulfilment and happiness, providing students with a new zest for life – that’s before we even get to the potential social, physical and professional benefits. Here’s a taster of what’s on offer.

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CAMBRIDGE C O O K E RY SCHOOL. Invest in your culinary skills and you’ll be reaping the delicious rewards for years to come. Based just off Hills Road, Cambridge Cookery School offers a packed schedule of classes from their modern and spacious kitchens, with something on offer for all ages and abilities. On 25 January, Embrace Cooking! will help total kitchen newbies gain key skills and confidence in home cooking, covering eggs (perfect scrambling and foolproof poaching), baking a sponge cake, Thai curry and more. There’s also a lesson in knife skills, sourdough masterclasses, plus classes on the cuisines of Mexico, South East Asia, Italy, Japan and more over the next couple of months alone. All classes include a good feast at the end and a recipe pack to take home. cambridgecookeryschool.com

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SAWSTON ADULT EDUCATION. From Indian dance to an Introduction to Writing Fiction, there’s all sorts on offer at the Adult Learning Centre at Sawston Village College. Get creative at courses on pottery, dressmaking and watercolours, learn a language, cook up a storm in a variety of culinary classes and boost your tech nous with lessons in staying safe online and getting to know your iPad. There’s also a whole crop of fitness and well-being sessions that are ideal for getting you active this new year. Starting in January there’s fitness yoga (Tuesdays 8pm), Indian dance (Wednesdays 7pm), Pilates (Wednesdays, improvers 7pm and mixed ability 8pm), t’ai chi (Mondays, improvers 6.30pm and beginners at 8pm) and tap dance (Mondays 7pm). sawstonadulted.org

A D U LT L E A R N I N G AND SKILLS CENTRE. Whether you’re keen to boost your employment prospects, get career advice, support your children in their learning or simply learn something new for the fun of it, Cambridgeshire County Council’s Adult Learning and Skills service can help. The centre, based in Cambridge Central Library, offers a range of qualifications and support including maths, English, IT functional skills and employability skills, as well as courses for adults with learning difficulties and disabilities. They also work in local schools and children’s centres in the city and surrounding areas providing family learning programmes. “On top of gaining new skills and qualifications,” says Susannah Lewis, operations and performance manager for the Adult Learning and Skills Centre, “our learners say their courses helped to increase their confidence and independence, benefitted their health and well-being, developed their social life and friendships and helped them to find future learning and work – 92% of learners say they would recommend our provision to friends and family.” For details on what’s available, visit cambsals.co.uk CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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A D U LT L E A R N & T R A I N AT PA R KS I D E F E D E R AT I O N AC A D E M I E S At venues across the city, Adult Learn and Train offer a huge array of subjects taught by a team of knowledgeable and enthusiastic tutors. With 148 courses to choose from, you’re sure to find something which sparks your interest, be it in arts and crafts, modern foreign languages, computing and photography, mind and body, cookery or career progression. There are plenty of new courses for 2018, and the offerings are nothing if not varied, ranging from forensic science to make-up skills and vegan cooking. Courses run during the daytime and in the evening as well as across some weekends. The spring term starts on Monday 8 January and the next weekend courses are on 3 and 4 February. adult-education.parksidefederation.org.uk

MADINGLEY HALL, INSTITUTE OF CONTINUING EDUCATION. Madingley Hall’s Institute of Continuing Education makes a Cambridge University education available to all, offering a dynamic programme of courses for mature students in an inspirational setting. Whether you opt for a short-term course or longer-term qualification, you’re taught by leading academics in your chosen field, and given a high level of support throughout your studies. The range of subjects on offer is delightfully varied, with short courses in everything from codebreaking to reading classical Greek. There are also options for part-time undergraduate, master’s and postgraduate qualifications. The next open day is on 17 March. ice.cam.ac.uk

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V EN UE? W O R D S C H A R LOT T E P H I L L I P S

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arge and very grand, small but perfectly formed, day only or with an overnight stay (often required if there’s a celebratory dinner as part of the proceedings) and increasingly green, corporate get-togethers in our area are as diverse as they come. They’re also enduringly popular, counter-intuitively perhaps. After all, this is the era of the ‘work anywhere’ culture. A laptop, access to the Internet and the world’s our oyster – or at least, our marketplace and meeting room. That’s the theory, at any rate. However, though dial-in meetings may be a necessity, it’s rare you’ll find anyone actively relishing the prospect. In contrast, venues in our area confirm that people enjoy the opportunity of getting together IRL (in real life) as much as ever they did. Advance bookings – often for months ahead – are a feature for many businesses. “A lot of people book their meetings in January for the whole year,” says Claudia Galelli, conference and events coordinator at Holiday Inn Cambridge, where around 50% of bookings from a range of industries are repeat business. It’s the same story elsewhere. At Granta Centre, a stunning purpose-built venue, “people use the phrase, ‘we like you so we come back to you’ – which is always nice to hear,” says events coordinator Joanna Nowosad. Madingley Hall, whose charms date back to the 16th century, gets glowing praise from the customers it works with, including health and university-related organisations. “We have a lot of return clients and many recommendations are by word of mouth,” says conference and events coordinator Cecile Antoni. What makes companies come back time after time? “Everything from the wonderful

grounds and venue to the freshness of the food and the service we give,” she says. Another treat for the historically minded delegate is Hinchingbrooke House, dating back to Tudor times though built around a 13th century nunnery. Although associated with numerous famous names including Henry VIII and Oliver Cromwell, the most pertinent for delegates is possibly John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich, who invented the eponymous snack. But regardless of vintage or beauty, every venue still has to earn the confidence of its clients. And the way to secure a place in any corporate heart comes through first-class facilities and organisation, coupled with the nous to pull out all the stops when necessary. Take the Holiday Inn, Cambridge. In addition to offering free car parking with a lavish 200 spaces – music to the ears of many companies – it boasts a 15-acre events field (ideal for outdoor team-building events), a health club and beauty treatment rooms, as well as ten flexible meeting spaces with a full complement of supporting technology. With areas ranging from syndicate rooms to a large conference space that can be partitioned for extra flexibility, it can comfortably host meetings for between two and 120 delegates. And with 161 well-equipped bedrooms, there’s no need for late-night cross-city treks to separate accommodation. Granta Centre, meanwhile, winner of several prestigious design awards, prides itself on its bright, airy, interconnecting spaces. For large-scale events, the two lecture rooms can be combined into a single space for an audience of up to 250. Organisations thinking on an even grander scale – up to 450 delegates – can book the whole place and make use of the house videoconferencing ➥

ALLIA FUTURE BUSINESS CENTRE. From its vibrant, inspiring green building to its support for new startups, the Allia Future Business Centre, which is the home of Cambridge’s impact entrepreneurs, is a meeting venue with a difference. Holding up to 77 delegates, its meeting rooms can be booked for as little as an hour and it boasts an on-site café, car parking and free charging points for electrical vehicles. The Centre also hosts popular free businessrelated events covering everything from accounting to PR. The Centre is run by Allia, an independent not-for-profit with a social mission, dedicated to helping impact organisations and initiatives to grow through inspiring workspace, effective support and innovative social finance. It offers an inspiring, flexible space to host an event with impact. futurebusinesscentre.co.uk

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connection to link all the different rooms. But it’s ideal for more intimate events as well, courtesy of the Duxford and Linton rooms that hold up to ten guests – ideal for interviews, boardroom-style meetings or corporate entertaining with high-end technology including wallmounted plasma screens and conference phone facilities. And while Madingley Hall may be blessed with wow factors in abundance, courtesy of its stunning buildings and grounds, it doesn’t stint on home comforts, from its 64 en-suite bedrooms to the seasonal menus and its up-to-date technology. Key to helping conference organisers to feel their event is in safe hands is having the same contact all the way through, from initial phone call to the event itself, so that there’s effective liaison between the client and the venue team. “We’re here every day so we are around to greet the client and work with them if there are any changes on the day,” says Madingley’s Cecile Antoni. She’s not alone in stressing the importance of good communications. Ensuring that conferences run smoothly is about more than just a venue’s appearance or room size. Corporate clients at Hinchingbrooke House, which can cater for between 20 and 70 to 80 delegates, have exclusive

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use of the four-area suite that includes a grand entrance lobby and inner hall for breakout sessions and refreshments as well as the wonderful grounds and woodland. With just one corporate event booked in at a time, every client gets a completely bespoke conference, as well as the exclusive attention of general manager Craig Bradley and his team, who between them have over 120 years’ experience in making sure that events run like clockwork. At Granta Centre, which attracts bookings from many nearby firms, including pharmaceutical companies, interaction is crucial. “We ask how their day is expected to run and what we can do to make their event amazing,” says Joanna Nowosad. Little fazes them. They’ve even transformed a meeting space into a chilled-out venue with a homely ambience for a company launching new gamingrelated software. The message for conference organisers is simple: just ask, says Joanna Nowosad. “Come and have a wander around, look at the facility and walk in the customer’s footsteps so you will experience what they experience.” Cecile Antoni at Madingley Hall also stresses the importance of being open-minded. “We encourage clients to visualise everything and describe how the rooms ➥ CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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HINCHINGBROOKE HOUSE. For some blue-sky thinking in a breathtaking rural setting, Hinchingbrooke House is hard to beat as a venue for meetings and seminars, offering a choice of rooms for both small business meetings and larger-scale conferences. The ground floor of the House can accommodate up to 120 delegates. hhpac.co.uk

G R A N TA C E N T R E . Modern, spacious and illuminated by lots of natural daylight, the Granta Centre has a lot going for it, not least its spectacular location to the south of our city, overlooking the cricket pitch of Granta Park, easily reached from London and the east and with plenty of free parking. A purposebuilt conference and events centre, it offers flexible meeting rooms and breakout areas, plus catering that ranges from breakfast to fine dining. grantacentre.co.uk

MADINGLEY HALL. A conference venue with wow factor, Madingley Hall combines historical charm with modern convenience and first-class catering facilities. The venue offers 14 conference and syndicate rooms, all with their own unique feel and character ranging from the intimate Porch room to the majestic Saloon. Madingley Hall can cater for a group of five to 100 delegates. madingleyhall.co.uk CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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HOLIDAY INN, CAMBRIDGE.

will be set up down to every last detail,” she says. Visiting is ideal but if it’s not possible, she and her colleagues will send detailed pictures and layouts and talk through them on the phone to ensure a clear idea of how the event will look and run. At Holiday Inn, Cambridge, minor miracles are worked on a daily basis. Conference and events staff take it in their stride when there’s a change of speaker at the last minute or room layouts need a quick transformation – and take considerable pride in their ability to spruce up a meeting room with clean cups and refills of tea and coffee in just a few minutes. “The main thing is to stay in constant touch with the venue, keep them updated and ask them for advice,” says Claudia Galelli. “Companies can have different requirements that might be slightly out of the ordinary but because we know in advance, we can support them.” It’s all about anticipating issues before they happen, agrees Craig Bradley at Hinchingbrooke House. “We offer a very high service level, do all the signage for clients on arrival and generally try to think what would make their life easier. It’s something we’re very proud of.” It’s also reassuring to hear that, with sustainability a growing concern, care for the environment – as well as clients – is becoming a major preoccupation. A range of green and ethical practices are in place, from the low wattage lighting that comes as standard at Hinchingbrooke House to a commitment to cutting down on plastic bottles with Madingley Hall one of many venues to use – and recycle – glass instead. At the Granta Centre, too, there’s a big focus on recycling, with clearly labelled bins to make it easy for both guests and staff to do the right thing. Holiday Inn,

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Set in spacious grounds just outside the city in Impington, Holiday Inn, Cambridge has ten meeting rooms (the largest holds 120 people) in a purpose-built academy, plus a 15-acre field for receptions and team-building. A cost-effective business events venue (starting at £30 Day Delegate Rate in January and February), there’s inclusive Wi-Fi throughout and ample free parking, plus all mod cons including projectors and plasma televisions. There’s also an in-house restaurant, gym and pool for delegates to relax and recharge in. hicambridgehotel.co.uk

Cambridge, meanwhile, is currently working towards a Green Tourism award, a highly coveted endorsement that examines every aspect of how a business functions, from its use of low energy lighting through to its work with ethnical producers. Nothing is left to chance. Waste left in guest room bins is sorted and recycled where possible and staff keep a constant eye on energy consumption – and take action where necessary. “As a large hotel with a lot of bedrooms, any savings we can make really do help,” says Claudia Galelli. Of course, regardless of the sustainable dimension, nothing is going to replace conference must-haves, from space to know-how and service. “It’s all about what clients want and their expectations about how the day is going to run, getting it right for them and transforming what we can offer so it’s in keeping with what suits them best,” says Granta Centre’s Joanna Nowosad. n CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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K I TC H E N S & B AT H R O O M S

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comforts. CREATURE

© PAINTED FURNITURE COMPANY

I N T H E B L E A K M I DW I N T E R , T H E R E ’S N O T H I N G B E T T E R T H A N B AT T E N I N G D OW N T H E H AT C H E S A N D C O S Y I N G U P. F RO M S I N K I N G I N T O A S U M P T U O U S S O FA T O WA R M I N G U P BY A F I R E , H E R E ’S H OW T O C R E AT E T H E U LT I M AT E I N V I T I N G H O M E

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ne of life’s true pleasures is opening the door to a warm and welcoming home and in the winter months, there’s something extra special about getting cosy in front of a flickering fire. If you haven’t got a ‘real’ open fire, then a multi-fuel stove is a good all-rounder. Local company Cambridge Stoves can advise on both traditional and contemporary models, while nationwide company ACR Stoves offers a wide range of designs, which will enhance all styles of living space. Not only are stoves environmentally friendly, with up to 90% less emissions than an open fire, but they also create a wonderful focal point within a home as well as supplementing the central heating system. MorsØ’s modern collection of stoves also give a design twist to a room’s scheme, and, says Declan Walsh, managing director of MorsØ UK, “they build upon the concept of hygge – that feeling of contentment and comfort that comes from sitting down in front of a wood burning stove.” Ben Upham, creative designer of Focal Point Fires, agrees: “The Danish term hygge is an all-encompassing term for the feeling of warmth and cosiness in our lives. It’s a state of mind as well as now being a point of design.”

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Clockwise from above The Dalvik Flueless Gas Stove, £794, from Focal Point Fires, available from B&Q; Wall-mounted NEO 3W multi-fuel stove, £1,545 from ACR Stoves; MorsØ’s 1000 Swift Stove, £599

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That feeling of contentment and comfort that comes from sitting down in front of a wood-burning stove

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Castrads offers a range of custommade cast-iron radiators, prices vary

Also giving warmth – as well as being a stylish addition to your home – are traditional-style radiators. Castrads, based in Manchester, makes a range of elegant cast-iron models, which are a throwback to another era, yet are a chic option for today’s modern homes. Jayson Branch, creative director, says: “Making sure your room is kept at a warm temperature during the winter months can help you relax and escape the elements. Picking the size of your radiator depends on the size of the room it is intended to heat, how well insulated the space is and what the room is used for. Living rooms and bathrooms should be warmer than hallways and kitchens, for example.” Adding statement rugs or thick carpets also increase the warmth-factor. Brintons’ premium wool carpets, for instance, are wonderfully soft underfoot and, new for this year, the brand has collaborated with Laura Ashley to create a spring-inspired collection of pared-back yet pretty shades. Natalie Littlehales, Brintons’ consumer marketing manager, gives her view: “A soft woven wool carpet, layered with accessories in cashmere, mohair and linen will all work to soften the overall look.” Curling up on the sofa is our modern-day way of hibernating. Sofas & Stuff’s aptly named Big Softie Modular Sofa is ideal for all the family, while the glamorous Haresfield Sofa, upholstered in Designers

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HOT TIPS. J AYS O N B R A N C H , C R E AT I V E D I R E C TO R O F C A S T R A D S G I V E S T H R E E T I P S F O R C O SY R O O M S Opt for ‘broken plan’ living – where rooms are defined into separate areas, giving an element of privacy and cosiness. When buying a cast-iron radiator, the easiest way to calculate your heat requirement is to use a heat calculator (we have one on our website) or ask a professional plumber. New carpet in a soft hue will add a welcome layer of insulation.

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This page From the Laura Ashley Collection by Brintons, Rydale in soft truffle, from £74.98 per m2. Large velvet sofa, £799, from Harveys Furniture’s Edit Collection by Ashley Manor

Guild Varese Viridian Green velvet, is just the thing for sophisticated nights à deux. Devised for smaller rooms or apartment living is Harveys’ new Edit range of sofas and chairs, which includes compact chaises and modern hexagonal footstools, and is a collaboration with heritage furniture company Ashley Manor. Offering a range of bespoke sofas and statement chairs, Delcor is renowned for its classic designs. Managing director Rick Petini says: “If you’re considering new furniture, wool is a great choice, keeping you warm in winter and cool in summer. Winter is also the perfect time to add a few more soft furnishings. Cushions and throws layered up on armchairs and sofas help to create a cosy retreat from the winter chill.” Of course, when it comes to cocooning, there’s nothing better than early nights tucked up in bed. With its deep-buttoned headboard, in a range of plush velvets, the Emilia Wing Bed from And So To Bed is the ultimate luxurious place to rest your head (check out the Bury St Edmunds showroom), while the timeless Oxford Bedroom range from The Painted Furniture Company is a modern interpretation of classic British design. Whatever look you go for, the cosy-factor comes from layering up with soft bed linens, cushions, thick bedspreads and throws to make it extra warming. Texture is key, so mix and match luxurious textiles – such as cashmere, wool and faux fur. For the budget conscious, Morrisons has launched a new range of homewares, including affordable yet chic bed linens, which channel

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SACRED SANCTUARIES. ARIANNA BRISSI, CO-FOUNDER O F H O M E WA R E S TO R E B R I S S I , GIVES HER DESIGN TIPS

Play with texture, as there’s nothing better than curling up in front of a roaring fire with fur throws and velvet cushions. Lighting is key. Fairy lights will give a warm glow, while table lamps will create small pools of light to make an intimate space. Incorporate rich colours to your home decor that will bring warmth and comfort to a room.

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This page Add a touch of glamour with And So To Bed’s Emilia Wing bed, from £3,150

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This image Delcor’s Petite Small sofa, £1,567, and footstool in Ralph Lauren Pigalle Batik Ink, £658, chair £1,305 Below Sheridan Australia’s Jarret bed set, from £99

Cushions and throws layered up on armchairs help to create a cosy retreat from the winter chill

S TO C K I S TS .

a boutique hotel style, while Sheridan Australia’s new collection for spring/summer 18 includes contemporary linens in a range of muted patterns for a casual-luxury aesthetic. Jo Jaggs, Sheridan’s general manager of design adds: “With so many fabric variations to choose from, finding your perfect sheet is dependent on personal preference. For example, cotton is light and effortless, flannelette is warm and cosy, and sateen is silky and indulgent.” Of course, it’s the personal details we choose to adorn our spaces that reflect true homeliness. From scented candles to storage baskets, cosy throws to velvet cushions – look to St Ives-based The English Listed and Cambridge-based Angela Reed for a wide variety of accessories. Dim the lights, lock the doors and enjoy your own space – created just for you. n CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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ACR Stoves 0121 706 8266, acrheatproducts.com

Focal Point Fires 01202 499330, focalpointfires.co.uk

And So To Bed 0808 144 4343 andsotobed.co.uk

Harveys 0344 847 2626, harveysfurniture.co.uk

Angela Reed 01223 510301 angelareed.co.uk

Morrisons morrisons.com

Brintons 01562 635665, brintons.net Brissi 01225 319058, brissi.com Cambridge Stoves 01223 703184 cambridgestoves.co.uk Castrads 0161 439 9350, castrads.com Delcor 0191 237 1303, delcor.co.uk

MorsØ morso.dk Sheridan Australia 01925 453410 sheridanaustralia.co.uk Sofas & Stuff 0808 1783211, sofasandstuff.com The English Listed 01480 301600, englishlisted.com The Painted Furniture Company 01285 656041, paintedfurnitureco.co.uk

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INTERIORS SMALL HEX STOOL IN SUNDANCE TEAL

£89, harveysfurniture.co.uk

MARILYN THROW

£49.50, shimu.co.uk

VINTAGE TUAREG RUG

£2,200, nushka.co.uk

Edition loves.

NEON YELLOW TASSEL STORAGE BASKET

£29, the-nursery-edit.com

MOROCCAN LILAC LEATHER POUFFE

£125, rajtentclub.com

JOHN LEWIS DIPTYQUE CANDLE PHOENIX

£28, johnlewis.com

OPAL PINK HAND QUILTED VELVET BEDSPREAD

£250, raggedrose.com

LYMINSTER SILVER ROUND VELVET CUSHION

£25, moodcollections.co.uk

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Cambridge Kitchens & Bathrooms. WORDS ANGELINA VILL A-CL ARKE

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uying a new kitchen is one of the biggest decisions a homeowner can make, with a new bathroom coming a close second. With more choice than ever before on cabinets, fittings and design options, it sometimes takes an expert eye to help guide you in the decision process. “There are a lot of decisions to be made when redesigning either room,” says Sarah Wade-Gledhill, director at Cambridge Kitchens & Bathrooms. “Whether you want a traditional or modern look, what surfaces work best for you, how to best maximise your space, what storage options would work in the long term, and so on… There is a lot to think about, but that is where we come in.” The family-run company is the longest-established independent kitchen and bathroom company in the area, having started in 1978. As well as having built up a strong reputation, it is also renowned for its excellent relationships with some of the finest suppliers in the industry – so customers are promised excellent value for money. Sarah agrees: “One thing that stands us apart from our competitors is our price and service guarantee – we will beat any ‘like for like’ quote. Offering value for money is important for us. We also do the whole project from start to finish, including building works if required – it takes away a lot of hassle for the customer.” The company is also a member of the Kitchen, Bathroom and Bedroom Specialists Association (KBSA) – the only professional body of independent kitchen specialists in the UK. “Not all kitchen and bathroom companies are members,” elaborates Sarah. “So this is a real bonus as it means that our customers know they will receive the highest levels of quality and service, and that their rights are protected. A key benefit of this is the guaranteed completion of your kitchen to the terms of your agreed contract, or a deposit refund of up to 25% of the purchase price.” Having seen numerous projects come through the doors, Sarah also reveals there are three pieces of advice she would give to anyone looking to redesign either kitchen or bathroom: “Get a professional designer. Invest in the best quality your budget will allow and don’t ignore importance of quality installation.” She continues: “You can rest assured that the quality of our design and installation will be second to none, some of our installation team have been with us for over 30 years.” While taking note of new trends is important, Sarah also reveals that whatever style you choose needs to have longevity. “We offer both traditional and modern styles. At the moment, key trends for kitchens include open shelving, natural finishes and statement lighting. We find that clients prefer to spend their budget on quality cabinetry, with the latest storage which works hard to maximise space. Solid surfaces for worktops are also popular. “For bathrooms, it’s all about mood lighting and large format tiles,” she continues. “Over the 40 years we have been in business, there has been a shift from both rooms being merely functional spaces to homeowners wanting a ‘lifestyle experience’ in the way that they are designed. If you use professionals, who can guide CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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At the moment, key trends for kitchens include open shelving, natural finishes and statement lighting you and know how to get you the best result for your budget, you’ll achieve something you will love for years to come.” As well as three showrooms (in Cambridge, Newmarket and Bishops Stortford), the company’s Experience Centre in the Potton Self Build Show Centre in St Neots is the perfect first ‘port of call’ for any potential customer. Showcased are real-sized show homes, so clients get a real sense of how the company’s kitchens and bathrooms can work for them and what is achievable in reality. The Centre also holds regular events to inspire and educate potential clients. As well as numerous kitchen and bathroom projects in the local area, the company also recently designed the new Cambridge Cookery School and Café (cambridgecookery.com) and later this year will be working with Cambridge Building Society in redesigning its new head office. “A great kitchen or bathroom is more than just good design,” says Sarah. “It is the culmination of a well thought out layout, excellent project management and attention to detail in the installation. It’s about bringing your vision to life.” n Cambridge Kitchens & Bathrooms, 297 Mill Road, Cambridge CB1 3DF, 01223 213266, cambridgekitchens.co.uk C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | J A N U A R Y 2 018

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Cambridge Edition January 2018  

Cambridge Edition January issue

Cambridge Edition January 2018  

Cambridge Edition January issue