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Cambridge EDITION YOUR MONTHLY FIX OF

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LOCAL LIFE

VA L E N T I N E ' S DINING IDEAS T W I L I G H T AT  T H E MU S E UM S TO P FA M I LY DAYS O U T C I T Y RO OT S F E S T I VA L T H E AT R E & G I GS

THE E-LUMINATE FESTIVAL OF LIGHT RETURNS, BIGGER & BRIGHTER THAN EVER BEFORE

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S I G N U P TO O U R W E E K LY D I G I TA L N E W S L E T T E R

Cambridge

EDI T

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W E LC O M E

Welcome. he arrival of February signals the hotting up of the Cambridge events calendar after the sleepy doldrums of January. It may be a short month but it’s promising to be a good one, with a bumper crop of great-looking goings-on to coax you out of your post-festive hibernation. Kettle’s Yard, a jewel in the crown of the city’s cultural scene, is set to reopen its doors this month after an almost three-year closure. Gifted to Cambridge University in the 60s by prolific art collector Jim Ede, the gallery and house has grown to become a visual arts mecca of international acclaim – we look back over its history and find out what’s in store for its next chapter over on page 19. Culture vultures will also be pleased to see the return of Twilight at the Museums, which is back for its annual instalment of after-dark adventures this February. Hunt for orchids by night in the glasshouses at the Botanic Gardens, meet Arctic explorers at the Polar Museum, and experience a ‘neon navigation’ at All Saints Church – we’ve got all the highlights on page 17. For more after-dark delights be sure to check out e-Luminate, which is poised to once again transform the city’s most iconic buildings through a series of dazzling light-art installations. The work of some of Europe’s leading artists, these mesmerising designs will be bathing Cambridge in colour from 9 to 14 February – offering an unmissable chance to see the city in a whole new light. Get the lowdown in our Arts section. There’s yet more fun to be had at City Roots, Cambridge’s nascent winter folk and roots music festival, which comes to us for the second year running from the team behind the legendary Cambridge Folk Festival. Spread across venues around the city, it’s bringing a line-up of blistering talent to Cambridge from 22 February to 6 March: read all about it on page 22. The rest of the local live music scene is gearing up for a huge month too, which Jordan’s got all the news on (page 31), plus there’s tasty new restaurant openings aplenty to add to your must-try list in our food and drink section (from page 33), and some stunningly gorgeous wedding inspiration on page 59. If you’re tying the knot any time soon, have a read for hot tips on venues and local suppliers. I hope you enjoy the issue, see you next month!

Nicola Foley

E D I TO R I A L

Editor in chief Nicola Foley 01223 499459 nicolafoley@bright-publishing.com Senior sub editor Lisa Clatworthy Sub editors Siobhan Godwood, Felicity Evans

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CAMBSEDITION .CO.UK CAMBRIDGE EDITION MAGAZINE • Bright Publishing Ltd, Bright House, 82 High Street, Sawston, Cambridgeshire CB22 3HJ, 01223 499450, cambsedition. co.uk • All rights reserved. Material contained in this publication may not be reproduced, in whole or in part, without prior permission of the publishers. • Views expressed in this magazine are not necessarily those of Cambridge Edition or Bright Publishing Ltd, which do not accept any liability for loss or damage. • Every effort has been made to ensure all information is correct. • Cambridge Edition is a free publication that is distributed in Cambridge and the surrounding area.

This month’s cover illustration was created by Flo Thomas. See more of Flo’s illustrations on Etsy at HeydayDesignsUK or at heydaydesigns.co.uk

Editor in chief

Author illustrations by Louisa Taylor louisataylorillustration.blogspot.co.uk

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Contents. 7 Arts & Culture.

45 5 of the Foodie Best.

17 Twilight at the Museums.

48 Recipes.

A roundup of arty, cultural events in the city, from exhibitions to theatre

Get set for a fun-packed after-dark adventure at Cambridge’s museums

19 A New Chapter.

We find out what’s in store at the newly reopened Kettle’s Yard

22 City Roots. The lowdown on our city’s winter folk and roots festival.

24 Local Lives. We chat to two local women embarking on an expedition to Antarctica

28 Nightlife. The live music, festivals and comedy shows you need to know about

31 Gig Guide.

Jordan Worland shares his top live music picks for February

35 Chef’s Column.

Alex Rushmer on how to level-up the humble cauliflower

36 Food News. The latest news and tidbits from Cambridge’s fizzing foodie circuit

40 The Food of Love. The top spots in the city for a romantic dinner

43 Drinks.

Elodie continues the romantic vibe with a round-up of the best wines for Valentine’s CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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A selection of sumptuous soups to warm your soul

A trio of goodness-filled recipes to warm the soul this winter

52 Review

The taste of tiffin comes to Regent Street

54 Listings. Your at-a-glance guide to the month’s top events

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57 Family.

Kid-friendly activities to keep your brood entertained this month

59 Weddings.

Your must-read guide to throwing a wedding in Cambridgeshire

69 Beauty.

News, advice and top buys from our beauty aficionado Daisy Dickinson

73 Open Day Essentials.

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We talk to the experts about getting the most out of attending school open days

83 Education Spotlight. Cambridge Coding Academy on the importance of being code literate

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87 Interiors.

Bring a burst of colour into your home, with a little help from interiors pro Angelina Villa-Clarke

98 Property News.

Cooke, Curtis & Co’s Sam Cooke on the thorny issue of estate agent fees

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Arts & Culture.

MORTAL VOICES.

EUROPEAN UNION CHAMBER ORCHESTRA. The European Union Chamber Orchestra is set to perform in the city this month as part of the Cambridge Classical Concert Series. Taking place on 20 February at the Corn Exchange, the show will be conducted by Hans-Peter Hofmann and feature BBC Young Musician of the Year Sheku Kanneh-Mason performing Haydn’s Cello Concerto No. 1 in C, as well as Delius’ Two Aquarelles and Mozart’s brilliant Symphony No. 29. Ahead of the 7.30pm concert, there is a pre-concert talk at 6pm at nearby Millers Music. Tickets start at £32. cornex.co.uk CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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Founded here in Cambridge in the 1970s, the Academy of Ancient Music presents a rich programme of concerts throughout the year. Now an internationally acclaimed period instrument orchestra, they perform using authentic traditional instruments, deep-diving into the context and history of early music to breathe an exhilarating new lease of life into sounds unheard for hundreds of years. This month, see them in action at West Road Concert Hall, when they present music by Pergolesi, Corelli and Handel in Mortal Voices on 16 February. From Pergolesi’s best-known work, the beautiful Stabat Mater, to Handel’s lesser-known cantata Ah! che troppo ineguali, the programme is sure to stir the heartstrings with its sublime showcase of early 18th century music. The show starts at 7.30pm, and tickets are £15-£33. cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

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SPRING. Ushering in the new season at Cambridge Junction is Spring: a vibrant new production that blends circus and contemporary dance to dazzling effect. With an original electronic score and colourful staging, the show features virtuoso jugglers and dancers, serving up a visually arresting and thoroughly original cross-arts performance. Takes place on 7 and 8 February, tickets are ÂŁ12.50. junction.co.uk

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E-LUMINATE.

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ee Cambridge in a whole new light as the e-Luminate festival returns with a kaleidoscope of dazzling colour from 9 to 14 February. Transforming the city’s landmarks and urban landscape with light installations created by leading artists, this breathtaking winter spectacle attracts thousands each year and has become one of the most popular events in the region. In addition to the impressive light displays, there’s plenty more to enjoy and explore, from wine tasting to light painting. Here’s a taster of some of the highlights.

U N M I S SA B L E I N S TA L L AT I O N S

SENATE HOUSE: The magisterial Senate House will be illuminated by projections by leading British artist, Ross Ashton. I See takes its inspiration from the philosophical ideas of medieval luminary, Robert Grosseteste. CAMBRIDGE GUILDHALL: The Guildhall façade will be graced by The Colour of Science, an LGBT themed design created by Lumineer Studio and switched on by the Mayor at the opening night launch. KING’S COLLEGE CHAPEL: One of Cambridge’s most iconic structures will be lit-up with Hammersmith Poem (Cambridge Poem) 2017, created by British conceptual artist Robert Montgomery, who uses laser cut aluminium and LED light to bring a poetic voice to the discourse of text, creating a large scale illuminated poem. FITZWILLIAM MUSEUM: Night at the Museum will see Ross Ashton map a series of images of artefacts from museums across the city onto the Fitzwilliam’s neo-classical façade. TRINITY HALL: Created to mark the 40th anniversary of the admission of female students and Fellows to Trinity

Hall, Women Writing History is a lighting piece that sets an invitation to participate in an imaginative exercise about women’s role in writing the past.

G LOW GA M E S

On 12 February, get down to the Guildhall for a sporting event with a twist! The Glow Games is a multi-sport event in the dark, illuminated by UV, featuring badminton, table tennis, netball, basketball and volleyball.

W I N E TA S T I N G

On 10 and 11 February, Hotel du Vin will host a wine tasting in the dark: taste and learn about different wines, discovering the fascinating effect different light has on the palate.

TRAIL OF LIGHT

Experience the beauty of the university college chapels with walking tours on 10 and 12 February, on which you’ll be given LED lights to create a moving light parade effect.

L I G H T PA I N T I N G W O R KS H O P

Join photographer Lucinda Price on 11 February as she shows you how to get creative using your camera to create beautiful light painting compositions.

TA L KS

On 9 February, join Giles Gasper for a talk on the Ordered Universe Project, presenting ideas and research and featuring an interactive exhibition and poster display. The talk on the festival’s theme, colour, by Guest Curator Dr James Fox on Saturday 10 February, also promises to be a highlight. Hosted at the Cambridge Union, Fox will be joined by an array of academics discussing their own unique area of research and its relation to the theme of colour. An amazing opportunity to unearth some of the fascinating discoveries being made behind the scenes. C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | F E B R U A R Y 2 018

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THE ART INSIDER.

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RUTHIE COLLINS, FOUNDER OF CA MBRIDGE ART SALON, GIVES HER ART Y PICKS OF THE MONTH

n times of revolution, mass change and war, it’s tempting to dismiss art as an irrelevance. Yet this is exactly when art can step into its own as a force for change. Kettle’s Yard reopens this month, with a transformed space, and Actions: the image of the world can be different. This new show explores the poetic, social and political value of art and looks set to be one of the city’s most groundbreaking exhibitions, showing (many iconic) works by 38 artists, including the likes of Barbara Hepworth, Mary Kelly and Richard Long. Go visit, think about what action you can add, to change the world – and enjoy the new café, too. With its strong links to satire and surrealist performance, Cambridge’s art scene has long been a hotbed for activists, where the crossover between art and politics has produced some internationally significant – and hilarious – results. We all loved Terrorbull’s political (banned!) board games, illustrated by Cambridge illustrator Tom Morgan-Jones (check terrorbullgames.co.uk). With this month being cause for mass celebration of one of the biggest victories that political activism has ever seen – the centenary of women winning the right to vote – it’s fabulous to see Cambridge artists Jill Eastland, Jane Hellings and Cathy Dunbar using art to remind us all of the need not just to celebrate but also to keep pushing for change, to keep pushing for equality. “We wanted to keep that political edge as part of the celebrations,” explains artist Jill Eastland, who’s one of the city’s most respected grassroots artists. “We are making textile bricks as a way for activists to come together. Our Sew Angry group meets fortnightly and is open to all.” The bricks are a timely reminder not just of the militant activism that won women our current freedoms, but also of how our freedom was once considered criminal. “Political activism is still strong,” comments Jill. Cambridge University Library is hosting an exhibition as part of the celebrations, Pictures and Politics: the Art of Suffrage Propaganda’, with a special talk on 3 February from author Elizabeth Crawford (whose books include Suffrage: a biographical dictionary of suffrage artists). The exhibition shows a range of suffragette posters that helped women win the vote. “Using art in activism is very powerful: it’s non-violent, people will look at it and it’s accessible,” explains Cathy

Dunbar, who is making a women’s suffrage banner for the celebrations, a three-panelled tryptic, exploring history, where women are at now, and what women want. “Art can be a positive way for people to get involved in politics. People can feel that they can’t do anything. But they can. A few years ago, in 2014, we made a piece You’ve got everything you might as well take the shirts off our back, in response to austerity politics. We made loads of shirts in response to austerity, embroidered with the slogan, to be left in a big pile outside Downing Street. We put a call out and people submitted their shirts, but the police confiscated them. It shows you the power of art. They don’t confiscate banners, do they?” The artists have also recently launched a Cambridge branch of the Artists Union, with regular meet ups, free legal advice and insurance for artists. “Artists are often seen as people who will do something for nothing, because we love art. Unless you are the likes of Damien Hirst, the ordinary artist can struggle: the union helps with that,” says Cathy. The Artists Union has been helping to address working conditions for artists, internships, plus issues of pay. Check out artistsunionengland.org.uk for details. Finally, in a world dominated by environmental catastrophe and divisive politics, it’s been inspirational to see Cambridge film maker James Murray White working on a film entitled Finding Blake, which draws fresh inspiration from William Blake. The film follows the work of acclaimed letter-carver and stonemason Linda Kindersley MBE, based in Cambridge, who’s been commissioned to create a new grave for the poet in Bunhill Fields, London. “From The Sex Pistols to Patti Smith, Blake’s influence and unique spiritual vision remains strong. Blake remained true to himself, to an inner vision that saw far and wide,” explains James. “We need vision and connection to our highest spiritual nature – and Blake was a master articulator of this.” Follow the progress of the film on sky-larking.co.uk. With light festival e-Luminate also returning to the city this month on the 9 February, themed around colour and guest curated by James Fox, there’s plenty to inspire us all into action, love and optimism. So, go for stroll after dark, to enjoy the light this month – have a fantastic February, all. n

With its strong links to satire and surrealist performance, Cambridge's art scene has long been a hotbed for activists

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NEW SEASON AT THE ARTS THEATRE. Showcasing world-class drama, dance and music, Cambridge Arts Theatre’s new spring programme offers something to satisfy theatregoers of all ages and tastes. Beginning the month is wartime thriller Pressure (1 to 10 February), which tells the remarkable real-life tale of two warring Allied meteorologists tasked with predicting the weather conditions for the D-Day landings. This House turns the clock back to 1974, serving up an engrossing insight into the machinations of the fraught halls of Westminster at the time. The Labour party is in-fighting, the government is hanging on by a thread and the country is deeply divided (sound familiar?) in James Graham’s critically-acclaimed play which runs at the Arts Theatre 13 to 17 March. Also taking us behind the scenes in crises-gripped corridors of power is Mary Stuart, which sees Juliet Stevenson (Truly Madly Deeply, Private Lives) and Lia Williams (The Homecoming, The Crown) in the roles of Elizabeth I and Mary Stuart. The actresses flip a coin each night to decide who plays which queen in each performance – but who’ll get heads and who’ll lose their head? Find out when this gripping historical masterpiece hits Cambridge 23 to 28 April. A little light relief is on offer courtesy of the everexcellent Footlights: Cambridge Uni’s world-famous student troupe. Counting alumni including John Cleese, Hugh Laurie and Stephen Fry, the group have been tickling funny bones with their trademark blend of sketches, skits and songs since way back in 1883. Catch them doing their thing on 4 or 11 March. For more hilarity, be sure to snap up tickets to The Importance of Being Earnest, the deliciously witty Oscar Wilde comedy getting a rework from The Original Theatre Company 9 to 14 April. Join Algernon, Jack, Gwendolen and Cecily for a wildly funny romantic romp in which town and country clash, identities are mistaken and alter egos exposed. Another classic makes an appearance in the shape of Strangers on a Train: the thrilling Patricia Highsmith

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novel made famous by Hitchcock’s iconic 1951 film. A fateful encounter between two men aboard a train sets in motion a chain of events which will change both of their lives forever in this edge-of-your-seat production which stars Chris Harper (Coronation Street’s Nathan Curtis) and John Middleton (26 February to 3 March). Also promising to send a shiver down the spine is modern classic The Weir, a play which comes to Cambridge as part of a UK tour to mark its twentieth anniversary. The whisky is flowing as locals at a pub exchange stories around a crackling fire one stormy night, but the arrival of a stranger with a dark tale to tell prompts a sudden, chilling change in atmosphere. A co-production between English Touring Theatre (French Without Tears, The Herbal Bed) and Mercury Theatre Colchester, this unsettling slice of theatre is at the Arts 6 to 10 March. There’s music too, with Il Tabarro and Gianni Schicchi, a double bill of one-act Puccini operas on 18 and 19 April. One is a moody romance with a grisly murder, the other a sparkling comedy about a family inheritance in Florence, but both demonstrate Puccini as a master of his art. Also bringing opera, of sorts, to the venue in April is Quartet, the charming story of four ageing opera singers residing in a rather magnificent retirement home in Kent. The arrival of Jean, a new resident, causes chaos as old rivalries resurface – but in true theatrical fashion the show must go on. Join Paul Nicholas (EastEnders), Wendi Peters (Coronation Street), Sue Holderness (Only Fools and Horses) and Jeff Rawle (Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire), for this bittersweet comedy from 3 to 7 April. There’s also fun for the family from 20 March, when a colourful new stage adaptation of The Jungle Book arrives at the theatre for a five-day run. See Rudyard Kipling’s classic coming-of-age tale brought to life by the team behind acclaimed recent productions of Goodnight Mister Tom and Michael Morpurgo’s Running Wild, adapted by the Olivier Award-winning Jessica Swale (Nell Gwynn), and with a live musical soundtrack.

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BANFF FILM FESTIVAL. Indulge your spirit of adventure with a visit to the Banff Mountain Film Festival World Tour, which stops by in Cambridge for two dates on 28 February and 20 April. Showcasing the world’s most intrepid explorers, exciting journeys and mind-blowing locations, the exhilarating selection of short films is selected from hundreds of entries into the prestigious Banff Mountain Film Festival, which is held each year in the Canadian Rockies. “This is the first time we’ve topped 100 shows in the UK and Ireland, which is really exciting!” says Tour Director Nell Teasdale. “We guarantee the tour will inspire viewers to start planning their own outdoor adventures too.” Programme highlights for the 2018 event include The Frozen Road, which tells the story of Yorkshireman Ben Page embarking on a solo cycling journey in the Canadian Arctic. Beginning with romantic visions of perfect solitude, the film tracks the highs and lows of his extreme adventure in -30°C temperatures, pushing him to the limits of physical and mental endurance. Into Twin Galaxies, meanwhile, follows three top adventurers on an extreme mission in Greenland. Venturing into the dazzling wilderness using kite skis, the trio tow their white-water kayaks 1,000km over the Greenland Ice Cap to reach the northernmost river ever paddled – and then the challenge gets even tougher. The screenings take place at the Corn Exchange, and tickets for both dates are £15.75 (different programmes shown at each date). banff-uk.com

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CHOUK BWA L I B È T E . A travelling season of concerts, Making Tracks bring exciting music from all corners of the globe to venues around the UK. This month at Cambridge Junction they present Chouk Bwa Libète: a traditional Haitian band whose uplifting music rises in waves of percussion, vocals and dance. Inspired by Mizik Rasin – Haitian roots music – the ensemble’s four drummers move freely between rhythms, delivering a powerfully celebratory sound which has wowed crowds at festivals including Roskilde and WOMAD. The show takes place on 24 February at 8pm and tickets are £11. junction.co.uk

WES ANDERSON SEASON . Cambridge’s Arts Picturehouse will be celebrating Wes Anderson this month and next, offering a chance to see some of the much-loved director’s most celebrated films. This special season kicks off with Bottle Rocket on 7 February, continuing with Rushmore on the 14th, The Royal Tenenbaums on the 21st, and The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou on the 28th. Then, next month, it’s the turn of The Darjeeling Limited (7 March), Fantastic Mr Fox (14 March), Moonrise Kingdom (21 March), and The Grand Budapest Hotel, rounding things off on 28 March. picturehouses.com CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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GRIM GRIMMS. Step into the darkly enchanting world of the Brothers Grimm this month, as the Junction welcomes an evening of storytelling and atmospheric music. Taking place on 3 February, Grim Grimms: Fairytales for Grown-ups, promising four “gothic, stark, beguiling and beautiful” lesser-known folkloric stories, performed by scintillating raconteur Ben Haggarty. Expect magical transformations, betrayal, comeuppance, and talking skulls… The show starts at 7.30pm and tickets are £13.50. junction.co.uk C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | F E B R U A R Y 2 018

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TWILIGHT HIGHLIGHTS.

Twilight at the Museums.

N E O N N AV I GAT I O N

ALL SAINTS CHURCH, JESUS LANE Find fluorescent figures using UV torches around the church, and make shapes with light boxes.

C A N YO U K E E P A S E C R E T ?

MUSEUM OF CAMBRIDGE WITH CAMBRIDGE MUSEUM OF TECHNOLOGY, CASTLE STREET Decipher codes that have been used to hide secrets and design a devilishly difficult cypher. Sessions at 4pm and 6pm.

WORDS CYRUS PUNDOLE

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o you have a child with a sense of wonder? A willingness to find out more? Then this halfterm head to Twilight at the Museums for a feast of the intriguing, inspiring and knowledge-nourishing. Once again, the team at University of Cambridge Museums and Botanic Garden have come up with a packed programme for the latest instalment of the family evening of exploration, which takes place on 13 February from 4.30pm to 7.30pm. There are several museums

AC T I O N S A L I G H T

and collections to visit after dark, in this free after-hours event. With the lights turned down at all venues, pack a torch and experience neon navigation at All Saints Church, meet Arctic explorers at the Polar Museum, set out on a scientific mission across the Whipple Museum and crack codes at the Museum of Technology. There are events at Denny Abbey, Wisbech, St Ives and Newmarket for you to explore. Twilight What’s On programmes will be available from all the museums taking part for you to plan ahead. Here’s a rundown of some of what you can see... n

KETTLE’S YARD, CASTLE STREET Pick up a Twilight Trail by illustrator Joe Lyward and explore the exhibition Actions: the Image of the World can be Different. Discover the new gallery after dark.

FA B U LO U S F O S S I L S A N D W H E R E TO F I N D T H E M

SEDGWICK MUSUEM OF EARTH SCIENCES, DOWNING STREET Search among the shadows to spot ice age wonders. From fabulous fossils to marvellous minerals, find your favourite.

ECLIPSE EXPEDITION

WHIPPLE MUSEUM In the gloom join historic explorers and gather vital equipment as you travel across distant lands to witness a strange a rare solar eclipse.

M E E T T H E E X P LO R E R S

THE POLAR MUSEUM, LENSFIELD ROAD Meet some of the characters that have made polar history. Meet Lady Jane Franklin, who spent years searching for her husband, lost in the arctic, plus Captain Scott and some modern polar explorers too.

O R C H I D A DV E N T U R E

BOTANIC GARDEN, BROOKSIDE Hunt for orchids after dark. Find out about the different parts of the plant, from spongy roots to clever water storage.

A KALEIDOSCOPE O F C O LO U R

FITZWILLIAM MUSEUM, TRUMPINGTON STREET How can colour change how you see things? Enjoy pigment demonstrations, musical performances, interactive play and dazzling projections.

R O C KS , F O S S I L S A N D M A P S

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY, WEST ROAD Find out how the world beneath our feet used to be imagined by our ancestors. As well as the rocks, fossils and maps, explore the exhibition Landscapes Below.

L I G H T FA N TA S T I C

CAMBRIDGE SCIENCE CENTRE Discover the mysteries of light and colour, with exhibits and mini-demos in the dark.

F E N L A N D I M P S A N D FA I R I E S

FARMLAND MUSEUM AND DENNY ABBEY Trails and crafts themed on magical beings of the Fens. Keep an eye on the Cambridge University Museums Facebook and Twitter pages for updates. CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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A new chapter. W I T H K E T T L E ’S YA R D, A J E W E L I N T H E C ROW N O F C A M B R I D G E ’S C U LT U R A L SCENE , SET TO REOPEN ITS DOORS THIS MONTH, RUTHIE COLLINS LOOKS B AC K AT I T S H I S T O RY A N D D I S C OV E R S W H AT ’S I N S T O R E F O R T H E F U T U R E

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ettle’s Yard, long a glittering jewel in Cambridge’s art circuit, reopens this month with extensively improved facilities and a keynote show, Actions: the image of the world can be different. Major supporters of the redevelopment include Arts Council England and Heritage Lottery Fund, plus Cambridge City Council and other donors, helping Kettle’s Yard to offer state-of-the-art galleries and education spaces to the public. “I hope Cambridge and its diverse communities will value Kettle’s Yard as a place for them, where they feel welcomed, can connect and engage in activities, and so shape who we are and what we do,” says director of Kettle’s Yard, Andrew Nairne. Delivered by architect Jamie Fobert, the new Kettle’s Yard is contemporary in feel, yet textured throughout with a homely, welcoming feel. The design itself also references the original architect, Leslie Martin, who was a master in bringing light in from above. Its skylights and high walls mirror details in the Kettle’s Yard House, creating an improved sense of space – with direct access from the gallery to the house, offering an Alice in Wonderland experience for the visitor who can now enjoy timed visits to both, on entrance. With an exhibition programme including the likes of Antony Gormley, 2018 looks set to be a packed year for the gallery and house, which has been part of Cambridge University’s museums portfolio since 1966, when it was gifted to them by art collector and benefactor, Jim Ede. Culture lovers and artists alike are actively encouraged to attend the wide range of talks, seminars and events as part of exhibition programmes. Actions: the image of the world can be different, with 38 artists, already looks set to be a game changer for the gallery, a vital reminder of the need for – and power of art to – transform our world, inspired by a quote from artist Naum Gabo (1890-1977), whose groundbreaking sculptures are usually seen in the Kettle’s Yard House. “Gabo believed that artists played an important role in society by offering images and objects which help us to see the world both differently and more clearly. This deeper perception could have an impact on our individual and collective actions for good,” explains Andrew. “I think we have the opportunity to play an even more dynamic role within Cambridge, as a cultural centre for everyone.” The opening show includes an impressive, diverse range of works, from Turner Prize-winning Richard Long, to Mary Kelly ‘mother of all feminist artists’ (The Guardian) – offering something for everyone. “The artists in Actions range from Ben Nicholson, Edmund de Waal and Cornelia Parker to the emerging talent of Khadija Saye, who so tragically died in the Grenfell Tower fire,” continues Andrew, who curated the show. The show also includes works by Cambridge artists CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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A RTS & C U LT U R E including Anna Brownsted, whose work, Diplomat, is a response to the US Presidential Election. ‘The show has the potential to act as a sort of remedy. It emphasises the significance of small, personal acts that have the potential to shift your sense of power,” comments Anna. Check annabrownsted.com/diplomat for more information. Also watch out for Cambridge-based Syrian artist Isaam Kourbaj, who will be taking a daily action throughout the show, inspired by the Syrian conflict. “I wanted to make a large, varied and thoughtprovoking exhibition to celebrate and launch our new galleries,” adds Andrew. “In fact, the exhibition spills out of the galleries and can also be found in the House, in North Cambridge (a temporary public mural in Arbury by the artist eL Seed), and even on T-shirts and in our new lift!” adds Andrew. Visitors can see the mural by French Tunisian artist eL Seed at the end wall of the council owned flats, in Arbury Court. Known for painting poetic messages of hope, using Arabic calligraphy, plus graffiti as influences, this marks his second ever eye-catching large scale mural in the area, after Kindness is always in season caused quite a stir in the local community on a co-op wall in North Cambridge.

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Left Woman in Room by John Akomfrah Above part of a mural by eL Seed

Creativity in all its forms has always offered an essential counterbalance to the negative forces which threaten to weaken communities Also causing a stir as part of the show are several large photo portraits of Bangladeshi women living in Cambridge, by Melanie Manchot, all taken in different locations in the city, including the Kings College Dining Hall. “We have supported around ten artists to make new artworks especially for the exhibition. I would highlight Rana Begum’s poetic installation in St. Peter’s Church (next to Kettle’s Yard) of over 1,000 baskets hand made in Bangladesh, the country of her birth,” says Andrew.

Improved facilities at Kettle’s Yard include a fabulous Clore Learning Studio, with kitchen facilities and a wonderful feel throughout; the Edlis-Neeson Research Space, which offers a boost to what can be displayed; plus there’s the Ede Room, a dry learning space also suitable for screenings. There’s also a café and shop, stocking Cambridge makers and artists. For Karen Thomas, Community Officer at Kettle’s Yard, the improved space is a chance to build on their valuable work in North Cambridge. “Kettle's Yard has been working in collaboration with our local community in North Cambridge for the past three years on our Open House programme,” she says. “Open House has engaged over 10,000 people and created astonishing new artworks by renowned contemporary artists with local people. We are really looking forward to welcoming everyone to the new Kettle’s Yard with our exciting programme of events and activities and we are delighted to be continuing our Open House activity, building on our experiences to date and using the opportunities that the new Education Wing at Kettle’s Yard affords for people locally.” With regular community days in the pipeline and increased partnership working with local groups, the new Kettle’s Yard looks set to offer an enriching experience for the Cambridge community. “My message to artists is that we need you,” concludes Andrew. “Creativity in all its forms has always offered an essential counterbalance to the negative forces which threaten to weaken and sometimes devastate communities and economies. Jim Ede, who created Kettle’s Yard, believed in the power of art to transform life.” Visitors can enjoy the improved Kettle’s Yard from the 10 February. Watch out for free talk, ‘What Can Art Do?’ on 20 February, exploring the possibilities art can offer. n

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City Roots Returns.

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eturning for its second outing, City Roots is back in Cambridge from 22 February until 6 March, promising a fantastic line-up of performances at venues across the city. The event is presented by Cambridge Folk Festival and Cambridge Live, and will once again bring a stellar selection of folk and roots artists to Cambridge, with a series of shows guaranteed to brighten up the last days of winter. From internationally acclaimed stars to newer acts on the cusp of greatness, there’s all sorts to enjoy at this multi-venue event, kicking off on the 22nd with a visit from Sona Jobarteh. An extraordinarily talented vocalist, multi-instrumentalist and composer, she’ll be bringing her sun-drenched Gambian sounds to the Corn Exchange, joined by Cameroonian blues and jazz artist Muntu Valdo. Another headline event to look out for is Rich Hall’s Hoedown on the 27th, in which the comedian-come-country singer offers up a withering dissection of Trump’s America that ends as a celebration of Americana. Chouk Bwa Libète, meanwhile, bring drums, poetry and trance from Haiti’s

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PROUD EDI P A R T NM ER. A voodoo heartland to the Junction’s J2 on the 24th, while at the same venue on the 27th catch Michael McGoldrick, John McCusker and John Doyle playing material from their latest album, The Wishing Tree. Masters of flute, fiddle, song and guitar, the trio have shared the stage with everyone from Bob Dylan to Paul Weller, and are a rare musical treat to be savoured. There’s also a gig from critically acclaimed English folk/ roots duo Megson at St Barnabus Church on 1 March; as well as British country girls Ward Thomas, who are joined at the Corn Exchange by the Americana-inspired outfit Wildwood Kin on the 4th. Local talent will be celebrated at a special gig hosted in conjunction with NMG: Cambridge’s ‘New Music Generator’, which nurtures aspiring artists in the area. At the Portland on the 1st, catch Cavetown, Matt Hammond and Fred’s House, winners of 2017’s Special Achievement Award – The Syd Barrett Pride of Cambridge Award. Elsewhere, The Den, which showcases the hottest emerging talent each year at Cambridge Folk Festival, has

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C I T Y R O OTS

The festival will once again bring a stellar selection of folk and roots artists to Cambridge, with shows guaranteed to brighten up the last days of winter put together a duo of unmissable gigs for City Roots. First up, on 23 February at the Boathouse pub, catch alt-country duo Ferris & Sylvester, plus the gorgeous harmonies and classical styling of August & After, an indie-folk trio who draw inspiration from the likes of Bon Iver and Kings of Convenience. Completing the bill are the Lozst (pronounced ‘lost’), who create soulful Americana tunes with sharp-witted lyrics. The second offering, taking place at Storey’s Field Centre at Eddington on 1 March, brings close harmony duo Ben Smith & Jimmy Brewer, together with the soul infused folk of Ethan Ash, and Sarah Munro, who’ll be serving a dose of jazzy style and lyrical mastery. The same venue will also play host to Folk Festival Club Tent sensation, Darren Eedens & The Slim Pickins, who have an uncanny knack of holding audiences spellbound, whether engrossed in a poignant ballad or jumping up and down to a stomping groove. Alongside the array of live music, there’s also a talks and workshops to check out, including what’s sure to be a fascinating chinwag with the charismatic Wilko Johnson. From founding legendary Canvey Island rockers Dr Feelgood to his recent battle with cancer, Johnson’s got some stories to tell – hear them at Cambridge Union on 24 February. Following on from the success of last year’s Creative Roots, the festival will host another professional development day, this year entitled Artist Entrepreneur Day and to be held at The Portland Arms. Gathering music industry professionals, it’s a great opportunity for those seeking music career advice to take part in workshops, talks and sessions, tapping into a wealth of experience. There are drop-in music sessions around the city too, including a special City Roots Family CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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Day with free attractions including crafting, face-painting, storytelling, plus a ukulele workshop and the chance to meet walkabout characters. Finally, other events to look out for include a mystery gig at a surprise venue (details to be announced), and music workshops with artists such as Muntu Valdo and folk heroes CC Smugglers. n cambridgelivetrust.co.uk/folk-festival/city-roots C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | F E B R U A R Y 2 018

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HOMEWARD

Bound. W O R D S C H A R LOT T E G R I F F I T H S

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E D I T I O N M E E T S T WO C A M B R I D G E WO M E N ABOUT TO EMBARK ON AN EXPEDITION TO A N TA RC T I C A

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oasting about the extreme cold of a Cambridge winter is one of its residents’ most-loved pastimes. And thanks to two scientists named Dr Cathy Sorbara and Hannah Laeverenz Schlogelhofer, you can now add an extra fact to your arsenal – in February, even Antarctica is warmer than our city. “It’s their summer,” Cathy explains over a cup of tea at Stickybeaks on a frosty winter morning. “Depending on the wind and the amount of sunlight, it could even be as warm as 15 degrees…” But why do they know this? Well, this month, Cathy and Hannah are taking part in the largest ever all-female expedition to the southern-most continent, as part of the final stage of Homeward Bound – a year-long programme designed to highlight the lack of women in leadership roles in STEMM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics and medicine) professions. A year of learning via video-calls and meetings is almost up, and the two scientists are now packing for the three-week-long sea voyage. Hannah explains what’s in store: “Every day there’ll be a component of learning on board our ship, leading to a ‘Symposium at Sea’ where we each give a talk on what we do, to put into practice the science communication skills that we’ve learned. And – of course – we’ll be going off the ship to explore the icebergs, visit penguins, and meet the scientists working at the research stations based along the Antarctic peninsula.” And the reason for the destination? “Antarctica has a very gendered history, a history of male heroism,” Hannah explains. “It’s the last continent, the last frontier – Antarctica is a symbol of the gender inequality that exists within science, engineering and exploration. It actually took over a century from when Antarctica was discovered for the first woman to work there.” “It wasn’t until the early 80s that the British Antarctic Survey allowed women to work at the station. It’s quite remarkable,” Cathy says, diplomatically. “We were such a distraction…” Another objective of Homeward Bound is to highlight climate change. The Antarctic peninsula is home to a number of scientists conducting research into the environmental impact caused by human activity, and regions of the continent are rapidly altering in response to climate change. Homeward Bound’s main slogan is: ‘Mother Nature Needs Her Daughters’, making the point that if humanity cared about the earth a fraction as much as most people care for their mothers, the ecological situation might be very different indeed. Additionally, Antarctica is possibly the perfect spot for an off-site meeting: the extreme habitat presents CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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LO C A L L I V E S a unique opportunity to focus on the issues without distraction. “Because it’s so isolated, it’s a catalyst for a transformative experience for all of us,” Hannah says. “Taking us away from our everyday lives means that we have to be present, in that moment, with each other.” Cathy laughs: “It just wouldn’t be the same if we had it in London!” Cathy and Hannah started their voyage to Antarctica over a year ago, when they were selected for the Homeward Bound initiative from a global pool of applicants. Though both women have lived in Cambridge for several years, they didn’t know each other before the programme began. The ambition for Homeward Bound is for it to run for a decade, with around one hundred women chosen each year, eventually creating a network of one thousand women who will lead and influence policy and decision-making regarding the future of the planet. The programme is designed to equip its candidates with skills and techniques to support their advancement in leadership roles. As the cohort is extremely international, this work is carried out via regular video meetings and smaller country-specific working groups, where the women share advice and guidance for making the most of the experience. “We’ve met about once a month to talk strategy, visibility, communication and behaviour skills – everything that encompasses being a leader, and building confidence,” Cathy explains. “It’s been really eye-opening.” Homeward Bound is not trying to recruit more women as leaders for the sake of it: the project recognises that minorities bring different perspectives to the leadership table, which is precisely why they can be so valuable. “We just need a change,” Cathy says. “The leadership that’s brought us to where we are today isn’t going to be able to get us to where we need to go – so why not get a whole bunch of different perspectives, different behaviours and different personalities to the table, and see what happens?” Aside from her Homeward Bound studies, Cathy, a Canadian neuroscientist who lives in Romsey, divides her days between her role as Chief Operations Officer of Cheeky Scientist, a start-up that helps academics transition into industry – and working as Chair of Cambridge AWiSE, a network for women in science, engineering and technology careers. It was through AWiSE that Cathy first discovered the programme: a Homeward Bound alumnus gave

Cathy and Hannah started their voyage to Antarctica over a year ago, when they were selected for an initiative from a global pool of applicants

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Homeward Bound's main slogan is 'Mother Nature Needs Her daughters' a talk on her experience to the network. “I was just blubbering in the front row,” Cathy says. “I thought she was amazing. I went to speak to her afterwards, and it turned out that the applications [for next year’s expedition] were closing in three days time – it was so serendipitous.” Hannah is a PhD student in the Physics and Plant Sciences Department of Cambridge University, and hopes to complete her studies in the next year. She also found Homeward Bound via someone who was on the first trip, proving that the network is already working well: “Someone I studied with at Cambridge was involved in 2016, and I watched her go through the experience thinking: ‘I need to be a part of this’.” The trip has not come cheap. “We have to raise $16,000 each for us to go, and that’s not including flights or insurance,” Cathy says. “Hannah and I have done a lot of fundraising: in October we put together an evening of Empowering Women with a wonderful panel of women – a photographer, a lecturer, a management consultant – who talked about their own leadership journeys. I also held a ‘Spinathon’ at my local gym in Cambridge, where we spun for five hours…” Upon their return to civilisation, the two scientists will become part of the Homeward Bound network – and with expedition dates set for the 2018 cohort and applications closed for 2019, it’s clear there’s no stemming the tide of applicants. What’s their advice for anyone considering applying? “Don’t think too much about it,” Cathy says. “Don’t think if your background is suitable, or if you have enough accomplishments. When I applied I saw all these women with climatology backgrounds, or that had some link to Antarctica, so I started doubting myself – but there is literally a passage on the application form that says: ‘We know women tend to not apply unless they’re 100% qualified, so we’re telling you – just apply.’ It was like the voice in my head was on the computer.” When Cathy and Hannah return, their day jobs will also be waiting for them – though they’re both hoping that such an experience will have a swift impact on their careers. “I’m at a crossroads, but I’m already inspired by the women that we’ve been collaborating with,” Cathy says. “The women from last year’s expedition said that you don’t really understand the difference that Homeward Bound makes until you’ve come back, and you’ve let it all digest. Just let it happen, and see where it takes you.” Hannah feels similarly: “I’m going to be finishing my PhD within a year or so, and I’ve had all this amazing education – I want to take it somewhere exciting, but I don’t know where. Being part of this network, where every single woman has an inspiring story, will really help me start to shape where I want to take my career. So my hope is that we continue the network – and that it doesn’t end.” n Learn more about Homeward Bound at homewardboundprojects.com.au Find Cathy and Hannah on Twitter / Instagram @cathysorbara @hannahscope CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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THE KNOWLEDGE. H OW LO N G H AV E YO U L I V E D I N CAMBRIDGE?

CATHY: I’ve been here over three years. HANNAH: I’ve been here for seven.

I F YO U W E R E B R I N G I N G N E W P E O P L E TO T H E C I T Y, W H E R E W O U L D YO U TA K E THEM?

C: I’d take them to a coffee shop: I live very close to Mill Road, and there are so many amazing coffee shops on that strip – it’s literally how I spend my Sunday mornings. H: Mill Road area is definitely a place where I like to take people – everyone knows the centre, but people who are new to the city might not find their way there. I also really love the Heong Gallery at Downing College – it’s a relatively new art gallery and they always have amazing exhibitions – they had an Ai Weiwei exhibition, they had Quentin Blake, Elizabeth Frink – it’s a really beautiful space.

W H E R E W O U L D YO U E AT O U T ?

C: I do like Charlie’s pizza. And Urban Larder’s toasties. H: The Salisbury Arms, which is right round the corner from me – they do amazing pizza – and I also really like the North African restaurant on Mill Road [Bedouin], and The Sea Tree. C: Did you know you can buy sushi-grade fish from The Sea Tree? It’s really lovely, it’s the best fish – tuna and salmon – it was a discovery I only made about three weeks ago.

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February nightlife. CHECK OUT LOCAL EVENTS ONLINE AT C A M B S E D I T I O N .C O.U K

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H AYS E E D D I X I E AT JUNCTION .

FEB.

The band that invented rockgrass (a combination of Hank Williams and AC/DC) support their 15th album with a date at Cambridge Junction on 17 February. Singing original songs and reinterpretations of R ’n’ B and soul classics, Hayseed Dixie ask important questions such as ‘Why do we believe there’s such a thing as ‘race’?’ and ‘Why does every song sound better with a banjo in the mix?’. Tickets are £21. junction.co.uk

JIMMY CARR.

TRANSATLANTIC SESSIONS. The Transatlantic Sessions collective of musicians return to the Corn Exchange on 7 February. Led by seasoned US and Scottish musical directors, Jerry Douglas, a 14-time Grammy-winning master of the dobro and Shetland fiddler Aly Bain, 2018’s line-up features first-timers and returning guests. From the US, country queen Suzy Bogguss and Muscle Shoals duo The Secret Sisters will dovetail the Celtic contingent that includes Dublin singer Daoirí Farrell and North Uist native Julie Fowlis. Double bass legend Danny Thompson is part of the house band backing the vocalists. Tickets are from £24. cornex.co.uk

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Have you just missed Jimmy Carr at the Corn Exchange? Don’t worry, the comic returns once again, seemingly a few weeks since his last date, on his Best of, Ultimate, Gold, Greatest Hits tour on 5 February. Tickets are £30.50. cornex.co.uk

E D BY R N E . One of the finest observational comics around, Ed Byrne returns to the Corn Exchange on 14 February, bringing his wry brand of humour to town. Is life that bad, have we good reason to complain? Watch as Byrne turns the question upside down and shakes it in every humorous way. Tickets are £26.75. cornex.co.uk CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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NIGHTLIFE

NOW BOOKING. BEL L E & SEBASTIA N

23 FRANZ FERDINAND.

FEB.

Indie rock royalty Franz Ferdinand return with their new album Always Ascending this month, stopping off at the Corn Exchange on 23 February. The new work was partly recorded in Paris with Philippe Zdar, who has worked with Cassius, Phoenix and The Beastie Boys. Expect an added groove to the FF sound. Tickets £30.50 cornex.co.uk

13 M A R C H , C O R N E X , £32 . 75

Indie pop heroes Belle & Sebastian are on the road again with songs old and new to share.

THE STR AN GL E RS

30 M A R C H , C O R N E X , F R O M £3 0 . 2 5

The Stranglers will perform hits from their back catalogue next month, including tracks like Golden Brown and Peaches.

BRITISH SEA P OW E R . From Cumbrian beginnings in 2001, to conquering Brighton, then Europe by 2004, British Sea Power have established themselves as one of Britain’s most noteworthy bands. Catch them at Cambridge Junction on 15 February. Tickets are £18 in advance. junction.co.uk

Following a three-year hiatus, The Vaccines are back with their highly anticipated fourth album Combat Sports, which will be released in March.

R I C H H A L L ’S H O E D OW N . Much-loved comedian Rich Hall melds stand-up with improvised ballads and cracking musicianship on 27 February in his ‘hoedown’, which begins with a scathing appraisal of Trump’s America. Best to get that out of the way first! Tickets cost £17. cornex.co.uk

THE SELECTER.

THE VACC I NE S

6 APRIL, CORN EX, £25. 50

SIR R ANUL P H F IEN NES

26 J U LY, C O R N E X , F R O M £2 8

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‘The world’s greatest living explorer’, according to the Guinness Book of Records, Ranulph Fiennes shares tales of his breathtaking expeditions.

FEB.

It’s hits galore with a double dose of British ska on 17 February, when The Selecter and The Beat featuring Ranking Roger play the Corn Exchange. Fronted by Pauline Black, The Selecter’s early 80s hits include On My Radio, Three Minute Hero and Missing Words, while The Beat’s top ten hits include Mirror in the Bathroom and Too Nice to Talk To. Tickets are £30.50. cornex.co.uk

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MUSIC

MUSIC BLOG.

J O R DA N WO R L A N D F RO M L O C A L M U S I C W E B S I T E S L AT E T H E D I S C O S E L E C T S H I S M U S T-S E E G I GS I N C A M B R I D G E T H I S M O N T H

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ebruary sees the live music scene in Cambridge really come alive, and we have a huge month of events to preview. We start at the Corn Exchange where two shows get bountiful recommendations from us. Firstly, there is the brilliance of Nils Frahm on the 19th. The Berlin-based pianist and composer makes a much-anticipated return to the live stage following 2017’s hiatus, playing brand-new material. Nils is one of the most talked-about musicians of his generation; at the vanguard of a new wave of composers and performers forging new paths through experimenting with instrumentation and technology. Blending classical composition with elements of electronica, his music takes influence as much from the percussive rhythms of the techno of his native Berlin as ambient music, post-rock and minimalism. Next up at the Corn Ex we have the exceptional Franz Ferdinand on the 23rd. The band release their new record, Always Ascending, on the 9th of this month – it’ll be their first album in five years, and their first since the departure of founding member Nick McCarthy. Although the line-up is different, early previews of the record all indicate another gem of an album filled with their unique slice of indie-disco. This month also sees us recommend a gig at the Storey’s Field Centre for the first time. The new venue is based on the new North West/Eddington Avenue development in Cambridge. The band in question playing the venue on the 22nd are fast-rising Manchester quartet Pale Waves. They pen glossy pop music with an 80s influenced goth centre and are hotly tipped for a breakout in 2018. A busy month in the more familiar surroundings of The Portland Arms on Chesterton Road starts with the Pixies-styled, riotous, anthemic and bristling pop music of Inheaven on the 1st. Our top Portland Arms tip in February though takes place on the 28th when The Xcerts are in town. The trio released their

fourth album Hold On To Your Heart last month and it is a cathartic listen, confirming that the band are pros at writing euphoric anthems about falling in love no matter how bleak the darkness gets. London four-piece Dead! released their debut LP last month, and they bring The Golden Age of Not Even Trying to the Portland on the 5th. Expect a set that straddles grunge, punk and indie. Fellow Londoners Orphan Colours – the supergroup featuring former members of Noah & The Whale, Ahab, and Danny & The Champions of the World – bring their alt-countycome-Americana to Cambridge on the 10th. Other Portland highlights include sonic pioneer Thomas Traux (15th), the infectious pumping brass driven funk of The Brass Funkeys (17th), alt-country of The Wandering Hearts (19th) and Will Hoge on the 26th. February is a busy month at the Cambridge Junction too, but our top pick is British Sea Power, taking place on the 15th. It had been four years since we last heard anything from British Sea Power, but tenth album Let The Dancers Inherit The Earth, released in March last year, is every bit the embodiment of empowered pop-rock perfection that its title suggests. The wide-ranging nature of their material has led critics to liken their sound to a variety of groups, from The Cure and Joy Division to the Pixies. Famed for their live shows they are a must-see this month. Yorkshire angular alt-rockers Marmozets are at the Junction on the 6th. The quintet released their sophomore album, Knowing What You Know Now, last month and it’s a belter and the perfect follow-on from their spiky, brilliant beast of a debut LP. Marmozets are fierier than ever, and 2018 looks set to solidify their place as one of the best rock bands in the country. The Amazons cemented themselves as one of 2017’s biggest success stories, with a self-titled debut album that hit number 8 in the official album chart back in May. They packed out tents when they played Reading and Leeds too, plus their last tour sold out far in advance. It looks like 2018 is not going to be any quieter for the quartet, kicking off with another tour and a stop at the Junction on the 8th. n

February is a busy month at Cambridge Junction, but our top pick is British Sea Power on the 15th… every bit the embodiment of empowered pop-rock perfection

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Food & drink.

G E T T H E I N S I D E T R AC K O N C A M B R I D G E ’S F O O D I E S C E N E W I T H E D I T I O N ’S M O N T H LY SUPPLEMENT

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VA L E N T I N E ’S DINING OUT IDEAS.

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T H E TA S T I E S T SOUPS IN TOW N .

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WA R M I N G WINTER RECIPES.

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F O OXDX & X XDXRXI N XX K

ON CAULIFLOWER. F RO M B O I L E D A N D B L A N D B R A S S I C A B O R E TO C E L E B R AT E D V E G E TA B L E D U J O U R , A L E X RU S H M E R O F F E R S A N O D E TO C AU L I F LOW E R

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think I might be ready to make a commitment. And a public one, at that. I’ve been toying with the idea for a while, but didn’t feel ready, until now, to fully admit it to the population at large. So here we go. Deep breaths. Cauliflower is my favourite vegetable. It is, in my view, the best vegetable on the entire planet. And I’m not just saying that because it can be locally and sustainably sourced and grows almost year round in Fenland soil. Or because, for the last two years it has been – very much – the vegetable du jour. Trendiness has nothing to do with it. I promise I’m not late to the cauli-party. I am, however, willing to admit that it took a while for me to get fully on board. Early memories of those poor white florets being boiled into oblivion stayed with me for a long time, the sulphurous pong lingering in the nostrils and sitting heavy like so many school dinners. Cauliflower collapsing under the weight of a spoon, leaching out a sad puddle of bland water, soaking across the plate and contaminating the rest of my meal. I thought that was me done forever, those gastronomic crimes creating memories too deep to allow forgiveness. Thankfully, I was wrong. My gateway dish came at some point in my early twenties. Inevitably, and unsurprisingly, it involved a Mornay sauce and some breadcrumbs. Despite these additions, there were still echoes of those terrifying puddles of cooking water, only now they were made slightly more palatable by the addition of cheap cheddar melted into a bland bechamel. But for the first time I saw a flicker of something important: I saw potential. Cauliflower cheese wasn’t something I grew up eating but I could just about see to making space for it in my future. From then on it was a steady slide into appreciation, fondness, admiration and, finally to where we are now: adoration. This path hasn’t always been an easy one but once I learned a fundamental lesson about CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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cauliflower – that this particular brassica has a near fatal aversion to water – things moved on at a bountiful and wonderful pace. I learned to roast, not boil, individual florets before covering them in a cheese sauce, spiked with mustard, nutmeg, cayenne, or even truffle and baking to comforting glory. I made velvety soups with little more than a splash of milk, a few spices and some chopped cauliflower slowly caramelised in brown butter. I cut it razor thin on a mandolin and dropped into sweetened cider vinegar and even turned it into vibrant yellow piccalilli, crunchy, sweet, sour and fragrant. I even adapted a recipe from Thug Kitchen (if you don’t know this book, you really should) and battered, fried then covered bite-sized pieces in hot sauce to make a vegan ‘buffalo wing’ good enough to satisfy even the most ardent carnivore. But my favourite method is one I took from a René Redzepi book. It is one I return to time and time again and is probably the easiest and most versatile: a whole cauliflower, divested of its leaves and with its base trimmed so it rests flat, is roasted in a covered casserole with whatever flavours you wish to pair it with (one of the most exciting things about cooking caulis is just how welcoming they are to whatever spices or herbs you care to throw at it – they are like the friend who you know you can invite to any dinner party). Woody herbs, garlic and warm spices work particularly well but feel free to be bold and adventurous – rose water and dark chocolate is a crazysounding but wonderful combination. Over two gentle hours (about 130 degrees) the base caramelises to a savoury, delicious brown and the rest of it steams and roasts at the same time until, in a deliciously ironic twist, it will collapse at the gentlest of touches: a fitting reminder of those school dinners of the past and just how far we’ve come since then. n C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | F E B R U A R Y 2 018

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Food news. THE BOOT, HISTON REOPENS. The Boot in Histon is set to reopen early this month under new ownership, following an extensive refurbishment. At the helm is The White Brasserie Company, Raymond Blanc’s pub group, which has put in place a menu of crowd-pleasing British classics which includes pies and gammon and eggs along with French brasserie favourites such as guinea fowl coq-au-vin and wild mushroom and black truffle risotto. “Our team has gone to great lengths to restore The Boot in Histon,” says Mark Derry, CEO of Brasserie Bar Co. “It’s a pub full of character with some stunning original period features and a brilliant new extension – we hope the people of Histon will love it when it opens in February. The food is all about ‘pub comfort’ with plenty of classics and a few surprises!” whitebrasserie.com

ELK CAFÉ OPENS. Burwell has recently welcomed a new arrival in the shape of Elk Café: a hip indie café on a mission to bring the village a buzzy new meeting place. “Elk is about harnessing community and great coffee,” explains manager Chloe. “Whether you’re in business looking for a quiet spot to send a few emails, or a parent meeting with friends after the school run, Elk is here to serve you – with excellent coffee that hits the spot!” A simple but stylish space, filled with natural light, the café offers seating for around 30 punters, serving up Colombian coffee and a choice of tasty handmade cakes. There’s also Powters sausage rolls, Scotch eggs and other light bites including pastries and sandwiches to enjoy with your drinks. elkcoffee.co.uk

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FOOD & DRINK

LOV E F O O D AT B U RWA S H MANOR. Burwash Manor in Barton will welcome back its annual celebration of gastronomic delights this month with Love Food, a foodie festival that’s fit to burst with delicious delicacies to try and buy from a range of great suppliers. Local faves making an appearance include coffee emporium Hot Numbers, sweet treat makers Gourmet Brownie and Yau’s – a Cambridgeshire based producer of Oriental sauces and noodle products. There will also be street food on offer from vendors including Steak & Honour, Wandering Yak and Holy Schnitzels. If you have got little people to entertain, The Larder at Burwash will also once again be running their half-term cookery classes for kids from 13 to 16 February. ‘Little Love Food’ will feature classes on healthy eating and nutrition and Italian cuisine, with morning and afternoon classes available. Love Food festival takes place on 10 and 11 February, 10am to 4pm and entry is free. Search Burwash Love Food Festival on Facebook for more information.

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© DAISY DICKINSON

Though not strictly a vegan café, Co Fifteen in Cherry Hinton is certainly well-loved for its plant-based approach, with plenty of mouthwatering dairy and meat-free offerings. In the spirit of Veganuary, which saw herds of inquisitive eaters across the country experimenting with a vegan lifestyle, we joined a small group of foodies last month for Co’s first in a series of vegan cookery classes. Promising to lend a helping hand to those not ready to let go of cheese quite yet, the Substitutions workshop was lead by head chef Emma Evans. We learned about tasty alternatives to meat and dairy – and then got hands-on creating three dishes ourselves. Using fresh and simple ingredients it quickly became apparent that vegan cooking is not as hard as many might expect – and the flavours, wow! Pesto that tasted as good as any Parmesan-packed offering, and jackfruit cooked in a hot and sticky mix of smoky BBQ flavours. If you’re salivating, worrying you’ve missed out on a great event, fear not – there are two more vegan cookery courses in the calendar: Italian Fare on Thursday 8 February, with spinach fettuccine Alfredo, gnocchi Pomodoro, and pumpkin filled ravioli on the menu, and then Make a Cake, on 22 Feb, where Emma will show attendees how to create a masterpiece of a bake including fondant, flower and sugar work. Courses run from 6pm to 9pm, and are £65 per person, or £55 if booking two courses together. kitchen@cofifteen.co.uk / 01223 778080

© DAISY DICKINSON

C O U R S E S AT C O .

CAMBSCUISINE TAKES ON THREE HORSESHOES. Local restaurant group Cambscuisine continue their impressive trajectory with yet another addition to their collection, this time in the shape of the much-lauded Three Horseshoes. Having taken the reins at the end of last month, Cambscuisine are looking to build on the sparkling culinary reputation of this Madingley favourite, but offering a more relaxed approach. The white tablecloths are coming off and the formerly fine-dining menu will be heading in a more traditional direction, offering comfort dishes like sausages and mash, together with some top-notch fish and vegetarian choices. They’ll be reinvigorating the pub offering with real ales and a wine list focused on the LanguedocRoussillon, and the new concept will also be more family friendly. cambscuisine.com/three-horseshoes

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FOOD & DRINK

STEAM DELI OPENS. Super-stylish station-area hotel The Tamburlaine has added another string to its bow with the opening of Steam: a new in-house deli and café. As well as some very cool neon and excellent tiling, this glamorous little eaterie offers hearty American-style sandwiches, luxury porridge with tasty toppings, colourful salads and homemade cakes. “We want to offer locals and commuters a restaurant quality lunch, but with the flexibility to grab it on the go,” explains Simon Drake, general manager at The Tamburlaine. “Steam Deli is providing something out of the ordinary which makes a nice change around the station.” thetamburlaine.co.uk

M O R E P I Z Z A , P OTS A N D P I N TS F O R C A M B R I D G E . The Carpenters Arms on Victoria Road will be opening at the end of next month with a new look, feel and menu. At the helm now is the Charles Wells brewery, who’ll be bringing its award-winning Pizza, Pots and Pints concept to the venue, following its success at sister restaurant-pub the Salisbury Arms on Tenison Road. Visitors can expect wood-fired pizzas, craft beer and bubbling pots of comfort food like mac and cheese, all served up in a cosy, communityminded pub. “Cambridge was home to our very first Pizza, Pots and Pints and has proven extremely popular, of course it made perfect sense to open another on the other side of what is our home city”, explains Operations Director, Benjamin Smith. “Our local community is very important to us. We host events and menu deals designed to suit our guests. Whether it’s 2-4-1 Mondays, live music on a Friday or Sunday roasts, there will always be something happening at the Carpenters Arms that locals can be a part of. Pizza, Pots and Pints is all about great food and drink that can be shared in a fun, friendly, and sometimes crazy place.” Find out more at facebook.com/carpentersPPP CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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SALT PIG. An elegant café-restaurant with a European feel, Salt Pig is tucked away on lovely Green street. Snuggle up on the comfy banquettes and feast on indulgent classics like pork belly with potato rosti, or creamy wild mushroom risotto. They’ve got a great dessert wine menu for an after dinner tipple – not to mention a cheese trolley teeming with spectacular artisan offerings.

The Food of LOVE. T H E M O S T RO M A N T I C S P O T S A RO U N D F O R A D I N N E R A D E UX

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BEDFORD LODGE Bedford Lodge Hotel is offering the ultimate romantic retreat this Valentine’s Day, with a package that includes a luxurious overnight stay, an exquisite three-course dinner, breakfast and use of the health and fitness club. The Valentine’s package is £249 (based on two people sharing), and is available on 9, 10, 14, 16 and 17 of February only.

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FOOD & DRINK

QUE RICO TA PA S . If you want to stay in with your beloved and enjoy a romantic feast without the hassle of cooking, Que Rico Tapas have got just the thing. They’re offering a beautiful, four-course menu that’s filled with Spanish delicacies and can be delivered to your home. Priced at £41.98 per person, the menu features authentic delights including Iberico ham, cured manchego and mahon cheese, filled piquillo peppers from La Rioja and beef cheeks cooked in ganache red wine. The price includes a bottle of cava, plus dessert in the shape of a poached pear in Moscatel. The offer is available from 14 to 17 February, bookings are limited and delivery is to postcodes CB1 to CB5 only. Tickets are available at Eventbrite, and you can find out more by emailing querico@quericotapas.com or on the website. quericotapas.com

VALENTINE’S PUNTING.

H OT E L DU VIN .

DE LUCA CUCINA.

If you don’t fancy a meal out, what could be more romantic and quintessentially Cambridge than enjoying a leisurely punt down the River Cam with your beloved? Local faves Scudamores are offering chauffeured tours along the beautiful Backs this Valentine’s Day for £100 per punt. The mood will be set with twinkly Chinese lanterns, blankets and hot water bottles to keep you toasty, plus you’ll be given a red rose for max wooing.

For a touch of old school glamour, it has to be Hotel du Vin on Trumpington Street. This handsome, historic hotel boasts a candlelit bistro worthy of Paris, and plenty of nooks and cubby holes in the subterranean cocktail bar for enjoying a nightcap with your SO. From 10 to 18 February, take advantage of their ‘Love at First Sight’ offer: which is £100 for two and includes a glass of champagne together with a slap-up three-course feast which ends in a gloriously oozy Knickerbocker Glory.

A stylish, skylit setting, great cocktails and a live pianist make this Regent Street favourite a perfect spot for a romantic dinner, and they’re getting in the spirit with a special Valentine’s menu. For £38 per person, you and your date can enjoy a three-course feast of what De Luca does best: indulgent, hearty Italian deliciousness. Once you’re done, pop up to the top floor piano bar, where they’ll be serving cocktails and playing live love songs. Awww.

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F O OXDX & X XDXRXI N XX K

THE BOOZE OF LOVE.

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T H I R S T Y’S E LO D I E C A M E RO N G I V E S H E R TO P T I P S F O R W H AT TO D R I N K W I T H YO U R PA R T N E R I N W I N E T H I S VA L E N T I N E ' S DAY

ove it or loathe it, Valentine’s Day is fast approaching and Cupid’s arrow will shortly be aimed at us all, striking many down with a deep desire... to buy overpriced cards and gifts. However, the real St Valentine had almost nothing to do with our romantic – not to mention commercialised – image of this amorous day. He appears to have been a Roman priest in around 270AD who performed secret Christian marriage ceremonies for couples, against the command of Emperor Claudius II. For this, Valentine was eventually tortured and decapitated on 14 February – thus proving, I suppose, that you can die because of love… Actually, I’m generally a total humbug when it comes to Valentine’s Day as you may have noticed, and find the traditional shows of affection pretty tedious. But having now discovered the ‘true’ story of this festival I’m finding myself far more drawn to the idea of celebrating it. The drama and intrigue deserves recognition, so this year I’m giving it print space. n

HERE ARE A FEW T H O U G H TS O N W H AT TO D R I N K :

1. Don’t go for anything with a romantic name – it’s just cheesy. 2. D  on’t drink anything you wouldn’t drink the rest of the year. 3. L  ove it or hate it, going out or staying in, single or coupled up: you’ve got to drink something. CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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FOR THE ROMANTIC:

Okay, I know some of you just love Valentine's Day and want to drink something with bubbles – especially if it’s pink. Just go with the flow and abandon yourself to the pink sparkler; it’s one of those treats we don’t indulge in every day, so go for it – whatever your budget, there are options to suit. BEAUMONT DES CRAYÈRES GRAND ROSÉ NV CHAMPAGNE (£31.50) This raspberry pink rosé champagne has salmon hues and fine bubbles, complex notes of raspberry, cherry and strawberry with citrus notes – what’s not to like? Pairs perfectly with langoustines if you really want to go to town. Fresh yet distinguished. BELSTAR, CUVÉE ROSÉ NV (£13.10) With top notch credentials, prosecco house Bisol has made wine for over five centuries and produces some of the region’s most highly regarded wines. Think strawberries and cream – the ripe fruit flavours and soft creamy mousse combine with a dry and crisp finish, giving exceptional balance.

I F YO U ’ R E N OT I N TO VA L E N T I N E ’S DAY:

It’s cold and dark outside so curl up on the sofa, preferably with someone you’d like to spend the evening with (which may make this a solo effort) and indulge in a

good bottle of red. I recommend ‘a mon seul désir’, Château de Montfrin (£18.20) Yes, the name of this wine translates as ‘my only desire’, thus fitting the bill perfectly. From the Costières de Nîmes in the South of France, this full-bodied wine delivers spicy syrah, smooth grenache and rich mouvèdre – like the perfect lover, this wine will caress you all evening.

T RY I N G TO I M P R E S S ?

Whether staying in or going out, cooking or ordering, for me, Japanese food is a great choice – and there is something quite sensual in the textures and flavours of those delicate morsels that invites us to feel romantic. Rieslings can vary greatly from dry to sweet, fruity to mineral, aromatic to austere, according to the terroir or vineyard from which it comes. Ideally, for Japanese food a fine dry riesling will offer a balance of ripeness and minerality, offering a delicate character for raw fish or shellfish. RIESLING KALKMERGEL RINGS (£15.70) Rieslings from the Pfalz in Germany have just the perfect balance for mixed sushi. This kalmergel from Rings is juicy and fresh, slightly off-dry (perfect for the delicate sweetness of sushi rice) but in addition has a lightly chalky minerality from the limestone soil, giving finesse and a well-balanced acidity. Sure to put you in favour…

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FOOD & DRINK

SOUP SPOTS IN CAMBRIDGE. W O R D S & I M AG E S C H A R LOT T E G R I F F I T H S

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he early months of a new year are filled with grand plans for living well while also counting pennies after a lavish winter season – and for many of us, this means a return to cost and health-conscious lunches of soul-warming soup. But this is a joyful reunion because soup is – quite simply – a splendid

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substance. As food writer and Cambridge resident Bee Wilson says: “Soup can nurture and nourish you like nothing else… it’s health food and comfort in a single bowl.” So with this in mind, we’ve sought out five of the most delicious soups our city offers – just in case you don’t want to spend your entire Sunday blitzing vegetables to make your own. C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | F E B R U A R Y 2 018

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CAMBRIDGE FA R M E R S ' O U T L E T, L E N S F I E L D R OA D . On the “busiest junction in Cambridge” you’ll find this little gem, tucked into a wonky beam-fronted building that’s about as close to the road as is possible, but which has still somehow managed to line the pavement with cheery pots of cyclamen or pesticide-free bouquets for passing travellers heading stationward. Along with produce from farmers throughout Cambridgeshire (including bread from Cob’s Bakery and game from Radwinter) you’ll find a single pot of soup bubbling happily away on the counter – a cup of which with a roll is just £1. Which is fairly astonishing, when you consider it’s made fresh every day using the same seasonal vegetables that the store sells. Worth the two-metre detour from the well-trodden path between the city centre and the station, the Farmers’ Outlet is open every day between 8am and 6pm – and the soup is available until it’s gone.

NOODLES PLUS. Two soups in one: if you’re a fan of noodley goodness (and who isn’t?) then you really do need to get yourself to Noodles Plus on the city end of Mill Road. In winter months the huge, condensation-covered windows conceal the interiors and give a mysterious air to the eatery, but venture in and your curiosity will be rewarded with freshly-made noodles, dumplings and steamed buns which take some beating. Soup aficionados should start their feast with Noodle Plus’s legendary xiao long bao, aka ‘soup dumplings’, which are perhaps the most superb of all wintery lunches – but their eating takes a certain amount of ceremony to avoid covering your chin in scalding soup. If you’re not au fait (and apparently I hadn’t got it right either) then the staff are more than happy to give technique pointers. If you prefer a bowl-based soup experience, the noodle-based broths served up here are all exceptionally tasty and will leave you just as satiated. Either way: you must go.

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T H E Q U E E N ’S H E A D , N E W TO N . No round-up of Cambridge soups would be complete without this pub’s legendary liquid offering. Nestled in the village of Newton since 1729, many believe this unique place represents the very pinnacle of pubs: small, but sprawling; festooned with curious taxidermy and in-joke engravings; and – most importantly – warm and welcoming. The food offering is limited, yet most of what you could hope to encounter in a country pub is here. There are sandwiches. There is toast – with dripping. And there is, famously, a brown soup, which changes flavour and shade every day, ranging from Dark Brown through to Greenish. At the bar you can find an elderly laminated colour chart to help you judge which soup you’ve been lucky enough to encounter: I tried Light to Yellowish Brown, which did indeed have “exotic ingredients” (spotted a few mushrooms) and “intriguing seasoning” as the chart promised. No specific ingredients are mentioned on the chart, save for the possibility that the Greenish Soup may contain peas. It should hopefully be pretty obvious that none of the shades are suitable for vegetarians. But if you’re not that way inclined, and enjoy a little mystery with your lunch, the Queen’s Head’s soup is not to be missed.

MICHAELHOUSE CAFE. This spot is quite definitely a Cambridge institution. Set almost as close to the heart of the city as it gets, the bustling cafe serves up simple but extremely delicious homemade food from a menu which changes daily, but which always guarantees a full spread of sandwiches, coffees, cakes and – most crucially, for this piece – soup in some form. On the day we dropped by the soup was a rich tomato and basil, which was piping hot, comforting and tasted of summer – very welcome indeed on a cold, wintery afternoon. The soup was served with an olive oil bread roll, but I couldn’t resist adding a cheese scone to the order – which turned out to be almost as good as the

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much-missed Thursday-only cheese scones at Afternoon Tease. Almost. As an extra bonus, after 3pm the cafe’s lunch counter food halves in price, which makes the soup crazily affordable – but as this isn’t a particularly well-kept secret you may have to get in line. It’s definitely worth it though. Grab your bowl and head up the spiral stairs to nestle into one of the loft’s secret sofas, where you can enjoy a quiet lunch with the vaulted ceilings of the Michaelhouse Centre for company, before heading out into the hustle and bustle of Trinity Street. Restorative for both body and mind.

L U L U ’S , C A M B R I D G E M A R K E T. If you’ve not visited Cambridge’s weekday market for a while, you may find yourself happily surprised by the bustling food scene which has sprung up in the southernmost stalls over the past few years, serving up a veritable panoply of portable feasts to either enjoy on the hoof or al desko. A huge variety of cuisines and tastes are now catered for – so it was always faintly surprising that no one had cottoned onto soup’s suitability for stall-based sales. Enter Lulu, AKA Lucy, who only started her market stall towards the end of 2017, but who is already making waves. She serves up three different soups every day, all of which are suitable for vegetarians (and can be made veganfriendly), and her recipes follow the seasons: visit in the winter months to enjoy soul-warming creations such as broccoli and horseradish, spiced carrot or a particularly delicious vegetarian minestrone. When we dropped by the lentil dhal with cavolo nero was selling fast – these golden bowlfuls were topped with cooling yoghurt raita and strewn with fried onions. A hunk of Lulu’s homemade soda bread was a crumbly, flavourful counterpart to the earthy lentils, and was perfectly sized for a quick lunch while perched on the old fountain at the heart of the market. CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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RECIPES.

MICHELLE ALSTON OF THE L AST FOOD B L O G S E RV E S U P T H R E E TA S T Y D I S H E S

VEGGIE NOODLE SALAD WITH PEANUT DRESSING. A C O LO U R F U L A N D G O O D N E S S - F I L L E D SA L A D G U A R A N T E E D TO B R I N G A L I T T L E S U N S H I N E TO A D R E A RY DAY

Ingredients

TIME S 30 MIN SERVES

6

• 100g noodles (dry weight) • 110g baby spinach • 60g red cabbage, finely chopped • 1 carrot, cut into ribbons • 50g radishes, sliced thinly • ½ (60g) a red bell pepper, thinly sliced • ½ (60g) a yellow bell pepper, thinly sliced • 110g sugar snap peas • 1 handful coriander, stalks removed • 2 tbsp spring onions (just the green part), sliced, plus more for garnish • 1 tbsp sesame seeds • 80g peanuts • 1 tbsp honey FOR THE DRESSING • 4 heaped tbsp smooth peanut butter (preferably a 100% natural sugar-free version) • 2 tbsp tamari or low sodium soy sauce • 2 tbsp sweet chilli sauce • ½ tbsp roasted sesame oil • 2 fat cloves of garlic • 1x 5cm piece of ginger, skin peeled off and finely grated • The juice of 1 lime • 1/2 tsp red chilli , finely chopped • 50ml water, more if you need it • Lime wedges to serve

Step-by-Step Guide 1. Cook the noodles according to the packet instructions, leave to cool. 2. Blanch the sugar snap peas in boiling water for two minutes, remove to an ice bath, then leave aside until you’re ready to add them to the salad. 3. Toast the peanuts in a frying pan over a medium heat, when they start to turn brown turn down the heat a little then add the honey, mix the honey and nuts together until they are golden brown. Transfer them to a small bowl to cool. When they have cooled you will need to break them up a bit. 4. To make the peanut dressing, add the peanut butter, garlic and ginger to a jug, add the tamari/soy sauce, lime juice and sesame oil then whisk everything together. Whisk in 50ml of water; you should have a smooth, slightly runny sauce. Add more water if it is too thick. 5. Place all the vegetables and the coriander in a large salad bowl, add the noodles and the sesame seeds then toss. 6. Pour ¾ of the peanut dressing into the salad and toss gently again. Keep the remaining sauce for your guests to add more if they wish. 7. Serve with the honey toasted nuts and lime wedges.

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RECIPES TIME S 45 MIN SERVES

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SPICED CARROT & CORIANDER SOUP. A C O M F O RT I N G S O U P TO WA R M YO U R C O C K L E S W H E N T H E R E ’S A CHILL IN THE AIR

Ingredients • 1 tbsp olive oil • 1 brown onion, diced • 1 stick of celery, diced • 450g carrots , peeled and sliced • A large bunch of fresh coriander, stems removed and leaves chopped • 1 medium potato, 100g, peeled and chopped into quarters • 1 fat clove of garlic , minced • 1 heaped tsp ground cumin • 1 level tsp ground coriander • ½ tsp smoked paprika • 1 level tsp dried coriander • 1 litre low sodium vegetable stock • A small pinch each of sea salt and cracked black pepper TO P P I N G S • Natural yogurt • Sunflower seeds • Coriander leaves • Red chilli flakes • Freshly cracked black pepper

Step-by-Step Guide 1. Heat the oil in a large saucepan, add the onion and cook over a medium heat for five minutes, stirring occasionally. 2. Add the celery and cook for another five minutes, then add the garlic, dried coriander and spices, cook for about a minute. 3. Now add the carrots, potatoes, salt, pepper and stock, stir and leave to simmer for 20-25 minutes until the carrots and potato are cooked. 4. When the vegetables are cooked blitz the soup with a hand-held blender. 5. Stir in the coriander then serve immediately with crusty bread. 6. Add the toppings: a dollop of yogurt, some sunflower seeds, a couple of coriander leaves and a sprinkle of red chilli flakes.

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RECIPES TIME S 0 4 MIN SERVES

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PRAWN CURRY WITH COCONUT D I TC H T H E TA K E AWAY AND MAKE THIS R I C H , D E E P LY S P I C E D C R OW D - P L E A S E R O F A C U R RY

Ingredients • 2 tbsp melted coconut oil • 1 medium brown onion, chopped • 1 thumb-sized piece of ginger peeled and finely grated • 2 fat cloves of garlic, minced • 1 medium green chilli pepper, seeds and pith removed then finely chopped • 1 heaped tsp cumin seeds • 1 heaped tsp medium curry powder • 2 tsp tamarind paste • 100g creamed coconut chopped • 1 x 400g can of chopped tomatoes • 100ml water • 1 medium green bell pepper, seeds removed then cut into large chunks • 1x 225g pack frozen jumbo king prawns, defrosted • 1 level tbsp good quality mango chutney • 1 handful fresh coriander, leaves only • Juice of half a lemon • ¼ tsp each of sea salt and cracked black pepper TO S E RV E • Rice • Toasted flaked almonds • Coriander leaves • Lemon wedges • Popadoms

Step-by-Step Guide This month’s recipes and photos are by Ely-based Michelle Alston, who writes The Last Food Blog. Michelle showcases dishes which prove that eating well needn’t mean timeconsuming and expensive recipes. A trained dietary coach, she launched her blog with a goal of sharing knowledge, helping people to make healthier food choices and encouraging the use of great-quality, local and seasonal ingredients. We love the gorgeous photography on her blog, and how achievable all the dishes seem! thelastfoodblog.com

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1. Heat the oil in a large sauté pan, add the onion and cook over a medium heat for about ten minutes, stirring often so it doesn’t burn. 2. Add the ginger, garlic and green chilli and cook for about two minutes. Then add the cumin seeds, curry powder and tamarind paste, cook until they release their aromas, about one minute. Then transfer to a food processor. 3. Add the creamed coconut, ¾ of the tinned tomatoes and blitz until you have a smooth paste. 4. Return the paste to the pan, add the green bell pepper and cook for two minutes. Then add the remaining tomatoes and 100ml of water. Leave to simmer over a low heat for ten minutes. 5. Turn up the heat to medium then add the prawns and coriander leaves and cook until the prawns are heated through and pink about five minutes. 6. Serve with basmati rice, popadoms and toasted almond flakes. CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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The Tiffin Truck. N I C O L A F O L E Y PAYS A V I S I T T O R E G E N T S T R E E T ’S L AT E S T R E S TAU R A N T

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t’s not often we review a restaurant so new that the paint on the walls is barely dry, but this particular eatery has been causing such a frisson on the local dining scene we had to investigate ASAP. And so we found ourselves escaping a thoroughly miserable, thoroughly drizzle-soaked January evening and being ushered into the colourful cosiness of The Tiffin Truck, mere days after it first opened its doors on Regent Street. It’s no surprise that people are excited: this new restaurant has a famous sibling in the city in the shape of Navadhanya, a local gastronomic gem with a nod in the Michelin Guide and a glittering reputation for its fine-dining Indian cuisine. This time around, owners Krishna Vijayakumar and Arun K Chandran are going for a more casual concept, with a laid-back setting and a menu focused on Indian street food and tiffin-style dishes. Manning the stoves is executive chef Kamaladasan, who trained at Michelin-starred London restaurant Tamarind and is keenly looking forward to bringing tiffin to the city and “making mealtimes more exciting” for Cambridge-ites.

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A legacy of the days of the British Raj – when the English custom of afternoon tea replaced the local tradition of taking a light meal at that time – tiffin has evolved into a stalwart of Indian cuisine. Any given lunchtime across India, from Mumbai to Bombay, hundreds of tiffin wallahs hurtle around the streets; their bikes and carts piled high with steel boxes filled with hot, home-cooked lunches destined for hungry workers. Traditionally, these dinky stacked tins would contain layers of rice, dal, curry, vegetables and chapatis – and a fresh, exciting spin on this is exactly what you can expect at The Tiffin Truck. On the menu, dishes are divvied up according to size – from nibbles to larger bites to the ‘main event’ curries and stews – leaving diners free to order up an eclectic tapas-style feast, which we happily did. Kicking off with the smaller plates, we tucked into an immaculate mini masala dosa, stuffed with creamy spiced potato and served with chutney and sambar on the side for mopping, along with a lip-smacking dish of chilli paneer, which fused Chinese and Indian flavours to sticky-sweet perfection. Another winner was the

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F O OXDX & X XDXRXI N XX K

Chicken 65, and while nobody can seem to agree on where these fiery bites got their intriguing name (was the dish first made in 1965? Or is it because of the original recipe’s 65 ingredients?), you won’t care about trivialities like that once you’ve sunk your teeth into these crunchy, juicy, deep-fried morsels that sing with flavour and spicy heat. An ideal partner for a cold pint of cold beer. My menu must-order, though, was the kale chaat, which proved to be an absolute revelation. I’ve always been unimpressed with kale and its oddly bitter flavour, and rather baffled by its ascent to hero ingredient. I accept that it might very well be loaded with vitamins, antioxidants and other gloriously health-giving properties, but let’s be honest: it doesn’t taste great, right? Wrong! It turns out, as I discovered during my visit to The Tiffin Truck, I’ve simply been doing kale all wrong. One bite into TT’s chaat, with its satisfyingly crisp, deep-fried layers of kale and potato, swaddled in yoghurt and with bursts of fresh pomegranate, I was hooked. Crunchy-soft-sweetspicy heaven in a bowl. We could have happily carried on with the snacks but the curry choices were far too tempting not to dip into, and so we soldiered on with a cute ‘bucket biryani’, loaded with tender chicken, perfectly spiced rice and cooling aubergine raitha. We also went for a Country Captain: a classic Anglo-Indian curry with a tomato base, that brought melty lamb and a mild and sweet flavour. It was a CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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total crowd-pleaser and a dreamy match for our pillowy naan drizzled in truffle oil. Polishing off our meal with a couple of spicy cocktails and a dinky chai brulee, we raved about the great menu and friendly, fast service. Eateries seem to come and go on Regent Street, but this one definitely deserves to be around for the long haul, and I have every confidence it will. n thetiffintruck.co.uk

Images The bright, casual interior of The Tiffin Truck and the original and delicious menu make it the perfect choice for a chilly February outing

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What’s on.

A RO U N D - U P O F E V E N T S I N A N D A RO U N D CAMBRIDGESHIRE THIS MONTH

31 J A N U A RY – 3 F E B R U A RY F O OT L I G H TS P R E S E N TS : P E N PA L S

The thrill of going through someone’s mail without any of the risk, Cambridge Footlights have come up with a sketch show about letters that get lost in the post. 11pm | ADC Theatre | £5-£8 | adctheatre.com

1- 10 F E B R U A RY PRESSURE

Three days before the D-Day landings, two weather experts give very different forecasts for the

conditions for Operation Overlord. The pressure is on to get it right. 7.45pm, 2.30pm Thursday and Saturdays, no show on 4th | Cambridge Arts Theatre | from £23 | cambridgeartstheatre.com

3-4 F E B R U A RY P E P PA P I G ’S A DV E N T U R E

Peppa Pig, George and their friends are back in a new live show, as Peppa is getting ready to go on a camping trip to the woods. 1pm & 4pm 3rd, 10am & 1pm 4th | Corn Exchange | from £10.75 | cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

7 F E B R U A RY W I N E TA S T I N G : TO U R O F S PA I N Take a guided tour around Spain’s sunny wine regions, courtesy of Cambridge Wine Academy. 7.30pm | Cambridge Wine Merchants | £22.50 | cambridgewine.com

7-10 F E B R U A RY THE SEVENTH SEAL

Based on the undisputed masterpiece that catapulted Ingmar Bergman to international fame, this updated, tongue-incheek adaptation retains the film-maker’s trademark caustic wit

as timeless issues, such as death’s inevitability, are tackled... 11pm | ADC Theatre | £5-£8 | adctheatre.com

10 F E B R U A RY ERASURE

Synth-pop masters Vince Clarke and Andy Bell can name A Little Respect and Sometimes among their numerous hits, and achieved five consecutive UK No 1 albums. 7.30pm | Corn Exchange | from £42.75 | cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

14- 24 F E B R U A RY A RT

Nigel Havers, Denis Lawson and

1 February Katherine Ryan: Glitter Room.

The Canadian British-based comic is the first woman from either country to have her own Netflix special. Katherine’s Glitter Room tour is the first since KathBum, which ended at Hammersmith Apollo. 8pm | Corn Exchange | from £22.75 | cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

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W H AT ' S O N Stephen Tompkinson return in the West End and Broadway hit that has won Olivier, Tony and every other major award out there. 7.45pm, 2.30pm Thursdays and Saturdays, no show on 18th | Cambridge Arts Theatre | from £25 | cambridgeartstheatre.com

15 F E B R U A RY B R I T I S H S E A P OW E R Expect soaring choruses and more from the group once described by The Sunday Times as “the best band in Britain”. 7pm | Cambridge Junction | £18 | junction.co.uk

17 F E B R U A RY THE SELECTER/ T H E B E AT F E AT. RANKING ROGER

The Selecter teamed up with The Beat featuring Ranking Roger last year and return for a fresh series of dates full of UK ska classics. 7.30pm | Corn Exchange | £30.50 | cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

17 F E B R U A RY E L L A 10 0: B B C BIG BAND & C L A I R E M A RT I N

Award-winning vocalist Claire Martin celebrates “the first-lady of song”, Ella Fitzgerald, 100 years after the legendary singer was born. 7.30pm | Saffron Hall | from £15 | saffronhall.com

17 F E B R U A RY RICHARD HERRING This tour, titled Oh Frig, I’m 50, considers the changes in Herring’s last decade, from single kidult to a married father halfway to his telegram from the Queen. 8pm | Cambridge Junction | £19.50 | junction.co.uk

18 F E B R U A RY MIRROR MIRROR

Join Snow White at her wedding and the story of a magic mirror, wicked stepmother, seven dwarfs and more will be revealed. 11.30am, 2.30pm | Cambridge Junction | £10 adult, £6 child | junction.co.uk

19 F E B R U A RY NILS FRAHM

A trailblazing pianist, whose unconventional approach to an age-old instrument played contemplatively and intimately has won him many fans. 7.30pm | Corn Exchange | from £12.50 | cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

2 0 F E B R U A RY EUROPEAN UNION CHAMBER ORCHESTRA CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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6 February Reginald D Hunter. Searingly honest material has garnered this American comic a big following during the 15 years he’s lived this side of the Atlantic. Expect a huge range of topics. 8pm | Saffron Walden Town Hall | £17 | cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

Sheku Kanneh-Mason, the 2016 BBC Young Musician of the Year, features in this performance of Haydn’s virtuoso first cello concerto, alongside the composer’s uplifting Water Music. 7.30pm | Corn Exchange | from £12.50 | cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

23 F E B R U A RY FRANZ FERDINAND

New album Always Ascending is out on 9 February and is being described as a rebirth, bursting with fresh ideas. It’s their first since 2015’s team-up with Sparks, known as FFS. 7.30pm | Corn Exchange | £30.50 | cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

25 F E B R U A RY YA N A A N D T H E YETI

Imagine being far, far from home, alone in a remote, snow-bound village, surrounded by dense forest and strange noises. So begins Yana’s story, featuring a cast of extraordinary puppets, aimed at audiences five and up. 2.30pm | Cambridge Junction | £10 adult, £6 child | junction.co.uk

26 F E B R U A RY G R A H A M F E L LOW S

Having performed for more than 25 years as John Shuttleworth, and had a 70s hit with Gordon is a Moron as

Jilted John, here Fellows plugs in his guitar to sing humourous, quirky and sometimes sad songs. 8pm | Cambridge Junction | £13.50 | junction.co.uk

28 F E B R U A RY B A N F F M O U N TA I N F I L M F E S T I VA L W O R L D TO U R

Experience an extraordinary collection of short films from the world’s most prestigious festival of its kind. Returns on 20 April to the venue for a second, different, night of films. 7.30pm | Corn Exchange | £15.75 | cambridgelivetrust.co.uk

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FA M I LY

YANA AND THE YETI. Alone, far from home and unable to understand anyone, Yana and the Yeti is an enchanting tale aimed at anyone aged five and up. Dark, funny and poignant, it's the story of a small child’s determination to be understood and her discovery that friends come in unexpected shapes and sizes. Tickets for the show on 25 February at the Junction are £6 for children, £10 for adults. junction.co.uk

FAMILY TOP 5.

SPY SCHOOL.

MIRROR MIRROR. Theatre company Red Earth bring a mischievous twist on the tale of Snow White to Cambridge Junction on 18 February. With shows at both 11.30am and 2.30pm, this new spin on the cherished fairytale joins Snow White at her wedding, and the whole story, magic mirror, wicked stepmother, seven dwarfs and all, will be revealed. Expect lovable puppets for children. junction.co.uk

Got a super sleuth on your hands? Pack them off to Spy School this half term at Audley End House, just outside Saffron Walden, from 12 to 16 February. Running from 11am to 4pm daily, it offers intrepid investigators a chance to sharpen their detective skills and crack fiendish clues. £6.50 per child. english-heritage.org.uk

P E P PA P I G ’S A DV E N T U R E . Peppa, George, Daddy and Mummy Pig return in Peppa Pig’s Adventure on 3 and 4 February. Pedro Pony, Suzy Sheep and Gerald Giraffe join Peppa and George with lunchboxes packed ready for a camping trip to remember, with Daddy Pig driving the bus. Will they be happy campers, or will it be in tents? With a little rain forecast inside the Corn Exchange, expect the odd muddy puddle too! Tickets are from £12.75, or £10.75 for children. cornex.co.uk

FAMILY BUSHCRAFT FUN. Fancy yourself as an outdoor type, or want to learn? Wandlebury Country Park hosts Family Bushcraft Fun on 24 February from 11am. Get stuck in to shelter making, cooking on an open fire, using camouflage, outdoor games and tracking around the park. £30 per family or small group. Children must be accompanied, booking essential. cambridgeppf.org

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WEDDINGS

Here comes the bride. S I O B H A N G O DWO O D RO U N D S U P T H E B E S T V E N U E S F O R YO U R C A M B R I D G E S H I R E W E D D I N G, A N D L O O K S AT T H E L AT E S T T R E N D S I N C AT E R I N G, F L OW E R S A N D C A K E S

© FIACRE MÜLLER AT SPOTLIGHT STORYTELLING

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eddings are a real indicator of the ebb and flow of style – who hasn’t looked at their parents’ or grandparents’ wedding photos and marvelled at how spectacularly 50s/70s/80s they look? And while of course we all want our big days to be stylish and beautiful, the real key is striking a balance between an on-trend vibe and an atmosphere that reflects you and your partner, your personalities and lifestyle. Luckily, if there’s one thing that really characterises weddings in 2018, it’s choice. The traditions that people love have stuck around – brides still generally go for showstopping dresses, and everyone loves flowers! – but there’s a lot more flexibility these days, and it’s unlikely that the mother of the groom will have heart failure if she finds out that there won’t necessarily be a sit-down, three course meal featuring salmon. If you’re planning your 2018 wedding in Cambridgeshire, you’ll be delighted and astounded by the choices on offer, whether it’s for your dream venue, favourite food or the coolest ever wedding cake. So use our guide to get an idea of what’s out there, then go out and plan your own completely individual, unique wedding day!

Floral arrangement by Bridget Davidson, owner of wedding and event florist Wild Rosamund. See page 64 for her tips for stunning wedding flowers in 2018

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The Perfect Venue. C A M B R I D G E S H I R E I S A N E XC I T I N G M I X O F T H E O L D A N D T H E N E W, A N D T H I S I S T R U E F O R T H E W E D D I N G V E N U E S AVA I L A B L E L O C A L LY, T O O. S O W H E T H E R YO U ’R E L O O K I N G F O R A C L A S S I C , T R A D I T I O N A L V E N U E F O R YO U R W E D D I N G O R A M O R E C O N T E M P O R A RY L O C AT I O N , T H E C I T Y A N D T H E S U R RO U N D I N G V I L L AG E S H AV E S O M E T H I N G T O S U I T E V E RYO N E

MADINGLEY HALL

TRADITIONAL MADINGLEY HALL

With a picturesque, historic setting – parts of the building and grounds date back to the 16th century – Madingley Hall and its gardens make a stunning wedding location for parties up to 110 guests. The team offer a range of wedding packages and the venue is fully licensed for civil ceremonies. Madingleyhall.co.uk

B E D F O R D LO D G E

BEDFORD LODGE

Bedford Lodge Hotel & Spa in Newmarket is fully licensed for civil ceremonies and has three self-contained banqueting suites, meaning it can accommodate any size of wedding party. This beautiful hotel features gorgeous white stucco buildings dating back to the 17th century, and stunning rose gardens that make an ideal spot for drinks and photographs after the ceremony. The hotel also has a fabulous spa, perfect for pre-wedding pampering and beauty treatments, or for your hen party. Bedfordlodgehotel.co.uk

JESUS COLLEGE.

JESUS COLLEGE

The buildings at Jesus College date back to Norman times, and are some of the oldest in Cambridge. The college has a hugely experienced team to help you plan your special day too, and offers three wedding packages to help you choose one that’s right for your budget. The beautiful grounds will form a fabulous backdrop for photographs and give your day a really special, quintessentially Cambridge feel. Jesus.cam.ac.uk/conferences/weddings

D OW N I N G C O L L E G E .

For the ultimate in Cambridge weddings, you can’t beat a beautiful, historic college. Downing College is available for weddings all through the long summer break, and the elegant grounds and lawns are the perfect location for gorgeous wedding photos and drinks. downing-conferences-cambridge.co.uk/weddings

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WEDDINGS

CONTEMPORARY

HOLIDAY INN

H O L I DAY I N N

Set in spacious grounds by a gorgeous lake, the Holiday Inn, Impington, features high ceilings, an open plan layout and is surrounded by mature trees and private grass fields. Kings Suite can seat 80 guests for a wedding breakfast and up to 120 for an evening reception, or The Darwin or Queens can hold up to 40 guests, ideal if you would like something more intimate. Hicambridgehotel.co.uk

N OV I

Novi is already a hugely popular venue for dinner, drinks or cocktail parties, and now they’re branching out to weddings. It’s the perfect modern, stylish city centre venue for smaller weddings; couples can have exclusive use of the middle and top floor plus the roof terrace, and packages are completely bespoke and unique to each couple. You can sit down with Novi’s fantastic chef to work out best options for you, whether you’re looking for canapés, a buffet or a BBQ on the terrace. Novi can cater for 40 for a sit-down meal, or 120 for a more informal buffet or canapés. Novicambridge.co.uk

NOVI

WILD WOOD

A welcome addition to 2017’s festival season was The Wild Wood Disco, set in a magical woodland location in Horseheath. The good news is that the team behind the festival are now hosting weddings at the same site. They work closely with suppliers of stretch tents and tipis, as well as the best food vans, catering companies, bands and djs, so they can create a unique, festival-style wedding that’s perfect for you, including boutique camping options to accommodate your guests overnight on site. Mylittlefestival.uk

WILD WOOD

M U R R AY E D WA R D S C O L L E G E

Having your wedding at a Cambridge college doesn’t mean it has to have an old-fashioned vibe: Murray Edwards is one of the more contemporary Cambridge Colleges, with the space and flexibility to create the day you want, and scope to use both indoor and outdoor spaces. There’s the space to cater for up to 270 in The Dome, or for more intimate gatherings, up to 70 in the Fellows’ Dining Room which has its own private garden. The college offers on-site car parking and is just a five-minute walk from Shire Hall Registry Office. Murrayedwardsevents.co.uk/fine-dining/ cambridge-wedding-venue

WYBOSTON LAKES

W Y B O S TO N L A K E S

With a huge range of venues in its extensive grounds, Wyboston Lakes in Bedfordshire offers everything to make your day run smoothly, from a dedicated wedding team to help you arrange every detail, to an on-site spa and accommodation for guests. The hotel has beautiful lakes in the grounds that will form the perfect backdrop for your photos, and beautiful enclosed courtyard gardens is ideal for drinks and canapés. Wybostonlakes.co.uk CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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WEDDINGS

The icing on the cake. G E M M A W H I T I N G F RO M T H E L I N T O N K I T C H E N H A S S E E N A L O T O F W E D D I N G C A K E T R E N D S C O M E A N D G O ; H E R E A R E H E R P R E D I C T I O N S F O R 2 018 These days, there’s a lot more to wedding cakes than three tiers and white icing. Gemma Whiting from The Linton Kitchen has been doing weddings for five years, and she’s talked a lot of cake in that time! “We’ve seen a definite move away from the tiered cake and the seemingly ever-popular naked or semi-naked cakes,” she says. “Couples now look to create a day that is truly unique – with increasingly unusual venues, informal catering and a much more free-spirited vibe. Exactly the sort of thing we love to work with – the more renegade the brief the better!” Here’s what Gemma thinks is in store for 2018.

CAKESCAPES

Weddings cost a fortune, and as much as we love desserts, who needs a sit down dessert course and cake? Many couples have us design, bake and style a cakescape. This set-up often includes a traditional cutting cake – to keep the parents happy – but also features towering brownie mountains, stacks of shortbread and oozing caramel bundts amongst other old favourites. We set these up as a prominent feature of the wedding reception; you cut the cake and then let your tipsy friends loose on the sweet stuff!

RETRO VIBES

Our new favourite thing to do is pipe kitsch designs onto our homemade cakes. A very new trend, this is set to soar. Think piped shells, swags and ruffles straight from the 70s, with a modern TLK twist – using our naturally coloured buttercreams, and topped with locally grown flowers to draw upon a 2017 trend that is still very much on point.

C A K E TA B L E S T Y L I N G

With Pinterest, Instagram and wedding hashtags, there are lots of photo opportunities at a wedding. At TLK we don’t just deliver a cake – we style it and place it in its setting. A lovely touch is our heirloom set-up: the couple chooses an item that’s special to them – for instance a grandmother’s dressing table or a family dinner service – and in collaboration with Anna’s Flower Farm we style the cakes in situ.

PIES

There doesn’t need to be any explanation for this one! Think bright colourful and seasonal pies for the ultimate anti-wedding wedding cake! Follow @TheLintonKitchen on Instagram to see 2018’s cake trends come to life. CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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Bridal blooms: the trends.

W H AT A R E T H E T R E N D S F O R W E D D I N G F L OW E R S I N 2 018? B R I D G E T DAV I D S O N , OW N E R O F W E D D I N G A N D E V E N T F L O R I S T, W I L D RO S A M U N D, G I V E S US HER TIPS FOR THE YEAR Every bride wants her wedding day to look different, so if you want to be ahead of the curve, here are our predictions for floral trends if you’re getting married this year.

PURPLE

Every year in December, Pantone, the global authority on colour, announces its Colour of the Year. The chosen colour is very influential, spreading across everything from fashion to interiors. Weddings are no different. The Pantone Colour of the Year for 2018 is Ultra Violet, a mid-tone warm purple. Expect to see shades of it everywhere, from pretty lilacs and elegant iris in spring, and majestic delphiniums and scented stocks in summer, to dramatic dahlias in autumn and jewel-like anemones and tulips in winter.

B R I T I S H B LO O M S

As concerns over global warming mount more brides are choosing to use local blooms on their big day. Flowers that are grown, not flown, have a lower carbon footprint, and are fresher than those transported across the globe. With more UK growers cottoning on to the trend, the choice of blooms is getting ever bigger, even in winter. At Wild Rosamund we only use British flowers. This has made us more creative in our designs, as we can’t fall back on old favourites such as roses for our winter weddings, so we’re forced to come up with inventive design ideas to create the look each bride wants with what is locally available. Annual events such as British Flowers Week (britishflowersweek.com) - 18 to 24 June this year – and organisations such as The British Flower Collective (thebritishflowercollective.com) mean there’s a wealth of information and inspiration for brides who want to make a more conscious choice about their wedding florals. And the best thing about buying British? Each year when you see those blooms reappearing, it will remind you of your special day.

D R I E D F LOW E R S

No, don’t throw away this magazine in disgust! These are not the stiff, dusty arrangements your gran had. Today’s dried florals are more likely to be included alongside fresh blooms as textural elements. Think seedheads, pods and twigs and the odd dried hydrangea or rose nestled among other flowers. The continued popularity of hanging floral chandeliers, which can be pricey, has given dried florals a boost too, as using them in large-scale pieces is an economical way to get drama without a dramatic price tag! Whichever trend you choose to follow – or ignore – be sure to pick a florist who understands your vision, but be open-minded about their ideas too, as they may just come up with something mindblowingly beautiful you’d never have thought of. Contact Wild Rosamund on 07939 953781 or at hello@wildrosamund.co.uk. wildrosamund.co.uk

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WEDDINGS A design by Wild Rosamund. Image © Bridget Davidson

Catering. W I T H W E D D I N GS B E C O M I N G I N C R E A S I N G LY L A I D - B AC K A N D I N F O R M A L , T H E P O P U L A R I T Y O F F O O D VA N S I S O N T H E R I S E . H E R E ’S O U R P I C K O F L O C A L C A M B R I D G E FAVO U R I T E S One of the biggest wedding trends for 2018 is couples moving away from the traditional, three-course wedding breakfast and instead picking the food they love, whether that be big sharing plates or fabulous pizza and burgers from food vans. Luckily for Cambridgeshire couples, the street food scene locally has been going from strength to strength in the local area, so there’s a huge choice for foodie brides and grooms who want to bring something a bit different to their special day.

PROVENANCE KITCHEN

P R OV E N A N C E K I TC H E N

Provenance Kitchen offers fresh, contemporary, restaurant-quality food served from their original Airstream. They pop up in a range of locations around Cambridge during the week, and cater weddings and events at the weekends. There’s a range of seasonal wedding menus, with options including miso baked Suffolk lamb and local asparagus and purple sprouting broccoli on the spring menu, or dry aged Hereford flank steak and wood fired summer squash on the summer menu. provenancekitchen.com

STEAK AND HONOUR

STEAK AND HONOUR

Frontrunners of the local street food scene, Steak & Honour are Cambridge-famous for very good reason. And, since everyone knows that a burger is the ideal accompaniment to a glass of champagne, why would you want anything else for your wedding breakfast? All the burgers are made of fresh, locally-sourced ingredients, and there’s brilliant veggie optionss, too. steakandhonour.co.uk

THE WANDERING YAK

T H E WA N D E R I N G YA K

The Wandering Yak specialises in fresh, vibrant, plant and grain-based street food packed with Indian and Middle Eastern flavours. They’ve won tons of awards for their amazing food, and their mezze platters in particular have become a Cambridge wordof-mouth phenomenon. They’re available for private hire, and are guaranteed to bring a bit of spice and colour to your wedding. wanderingyak.co.uk

RURAL COFFEE PROJECT

RURAL COFFEE PROJECT Coffee fiends won’t want to go without their favourite drink on their big day, and the Rural Coffee Project can offer the perfect additional touch for your wedding, with quality barista-style coffee from their rustic towbar and Rover for after the meal, personalised cups and decorations and even coffees with a little alcoholic extra for evening guests. ruralcoffeeproject.co.uk

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B E AU T Y

BEAUTY BLOG. W O R D S D A I SY D I C K I N S O N

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eauty trends come and go, and it’s so easy to be suckered into buying new product after new product, seduced by the shiny marketing messages and promises of better, faster, easier. I had a relatively low to no make-up festive period, and enjoyed giving my skin a little breather. It’s definitely inspired my beauty choices this year, and influenced which products I’m reaching for; favouring the extra time in bed, as well as a more natural approach. I’m all about the brows, but sculpting the perfect arch every morning with powders and pomades can be a pain! For a time-saving exercise, I’ve been smugly enjoying the benefits of having my brows tinted, and I’m going DIY! Pop to Boots and grab one of Eylure’s at-home kits, like the Permanent Tint for Brows (£9.95). Before you freak out over the name, it actually lasts up to six weeks, and is easy enough to apply to brows – but you do need a steady hand, and I’d recommend using a dedicated brow brush rather than the included tools, for precision. If you like this idea but six weeks sounds too much, opt for the Maybelline Tattoo Brow Long Lasting Tint (£12.99, Boots), available in three shades. The pre-mixed gel glides on like sticky tar and sits hilariously dark on your brows for just minutes before peeling off to reveal perfectly-polished slugs. The effect lasts about three days. Get your mates over for a group pamper sesh and enlist the most artistic of the bunch – or, if all else fails, head to your nearest, trusted salon and opt for a professional eyelash and brow tint. If the salon approach is more your thing, eyelash extensions are another time-saving way to feel fabulous and made-up with minimal daily effort. If you can’t face the hustle of town, head to Lash & Glo (Newmarket Road, lashandglobeauty.co.uk), where it’s easy to park and enjoy a range of treatments including lash extensions for £70, with infills costing £30 per hour, and recommended every two weeks. If you do visit, be sure to ask for Keely and book in for one of her ombré (or glitter ombré!) gel manicures (£30), a favourite of mine which has incredible staying power, lasting two weeks plus. A salon trip can feel like a big expense, and it’s easy to feel guilty about splashing out on pamper sessions, but I like to think of it as me time. Booking in, say, an hour a month, for a treatment where I get to stop, sit, relax and unwind – and more importantly, switch off and be looked after! It’s become an important part of my calendar, and I urge you to do the same. I’m thrilled to see central salon Finn Jordan (Sussex Street, finnjordan.co.uk) adopting this ethos and promoting well-being for not just your body, but your mind with a series of dedicated events. On 14 March the Minding Your Mental Health event will showcase Claire Finn’s recently published book, The Positive Planner (£23, thepositiveplanner. co.uk), a diary-style tool to help users manage their own mental health in a creative style. A psychotherapist will be on hand for informal chats in a relaxed setting, and you can choose from a range of treatments including head massages. On 2 May join the salon team for Style Confidence, when you can enjoy consultations with Boudoir Femme and Prohibidio Lingerie. n

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Education Edition.

OPEN D AY S P E C I AS L.

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OPEN DAY ESSENTIALS.

W I T H S C H O O L O P E N DAY S E A S O N U P O N U S , C H A R L O T T E P H I L L I P S TA K E S A L O O K AT T H E Q U E S T I O N S T O A S K , T H E S TAT S YO U N E E D, A N D T H E A R E A S WO R T H S E E I N G

W inter may still have us deep in its clutches, but schools are thinking well ahead – to the next academic year and beyond. They want every seat in the classroom filled and that means wowing prospective parents with tales of success, both in and out of the exam room. Their top (if not so secret) weapon? The open day. Cleverly designed by education experts at the top of their game, the aim is to ensure visiting families are wowed by a prettyas-a-picture presentation of school life. They’ll have a bevy of perfect pupils to show you round (the kind you can’t help hoping your child will grow into), while the head teacher will be at their jolliest, blending gravitas with just the hint of a twinkle in their eye when they make their speeches. It’s enough to make you want to sign up then and there (and some parents – overwhelmed by the 360° wonderfulness – do just that). And if you’re sure you’ve found your educational Mr, Ms or Mx Right – congratulations. For most families, though, it’s more a case of steady as she goes. Yes, schools in our area are notably good at what they do, so you’re unlikely to be disappointed. But there’s more to their educational offering than just open days – like what they get up to during the rest of the school year. How can you be certain that your child is going to be getting a top class educational experience on every day of term? What happens if it’s not plain sailing and there’s a problem? And how should parents be using the open day to find out? To help them see past the razzmatazz, we’ve talked to schools to get the low-down on what really matters when it comes to getting the most from open days: what to ask, what to look for – and what to do with the information once you’ve got it. CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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HOW, WHEN & WHY – KEY QUESTIONS TO ASK. THERE’S NO SUCH THING AS A ‘ WRONG ’ QUESTION

Ask anything you need to – if it matters to you, it’s important, stresses Victoria Robeson, head of marketing and admissions at CIS. Every child and every school is different. Only a parent is going to know their child’s interests, talents and motivators – they are bound to have different concerns about their education. “If you’ve got this question, it’s obviously important to you to get the answer, so don’t be shy of asking it, even if it’s different to everything the others are asking.” And if you’re not satisfied with the answer, keep asking, says Andrea Joyce, vice principal & COO at Cambridge Leadership College. “Don’t be afraid to qualify those questions and interrogate that information.”

I CAN’T AFFORD THE SCHOOL FEES – CAN THE SCHOOL HELP?

Cast British reserve aside and don’t be bashful about asking for financial assistance if you’d like your child to attend an independent school but don’t have the funds. Many schools will have a pot of money (often donated by former pupils) that’s put aside specifically to help deserving families of bright children with the fees. Some schools even offer help – usually through bursaries – that’s worth more than 100% of the fees to cover all the other costs, like uniform and school trips. “It provides the opportunities for those who would not have had the chance of an independent education,” says Paul Wellstead, marketing director at Culford School. “It’s usually means-tested but can make a huge difference in making fees more affordable.”

CAN YOU MAKE THE LOGISTICS WORK FOR YOUR FAMILY?

With more working parents juggling meetings and pickup times, it’s vital to know just how schools can help them reduce stress levels. “A school might tick every box you’ve got on

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your list but if you cannot physically get your children there, it’s never going to work,” says Victoria Robeson. Ask if they have a breakfast club and how long they can stay on at school at the end of the day. “If you know you have a conference call at half past three two afternoons a week, you need to know you can finish your call and then collect your children.”

WHAT’S THE GENDER MIX?

Year groups can vary dramatically when it comes to the split between boys and girls. One year, with a 50/50 mix, can be followed by another where boys, or girls, can dominate. “The mix of boys and girls in a class may determine how quickly or, moreover, how much your child will integrate into school life and make good friends,” says Paul Wellstead.

JUST HOW HARD DO PUPILS HAVE TO WORK?

It may sound obvious but successful schools that boast of success in every sphere – matches won, musicals staged and exams aced – don’t do it by magic. There may be rehearsals and team practice before and after school and at every break time. So just what will your child be expected to commit to on top of all those lessons – will they be able to cope and still get enough sleep? “Ask about the length of the school day,” urges Victoria Robeson. “What percentage of pupils will take part in lunchtime clubs and how many extracurricular activities do you expect my child to take?”

WHAT ABOUT TRIPS?

Trips are far from being an educational frippery, stresses Andrea Joyce. Instead, they’re an essential. “They can tell you a lot about how much emphasis is placed on the holistic part of learning.” In a trip organised by her college to the Netherlands, students enjoyed work experience at media giant Viacom. “It was hugely valuable,” she says. Yes, it took a whole week out of the curriculum but it was worthwhile. “We owe it to our students to give them these richer experiences as well,” she says.

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WHO IS YOUR LEADER?

If you’d assumed that every pupil will know their principal’s name, you may be in for a surprise, says Andrea Joyce. “I’d always ask ‘who is your principal and have you ever spoken to them?’ Even in a larger Sixth Form if the student doesn’t know the name of their principal it does say a lot about the leadership of that college.”

PAY ATTENTION TO… THE MOOD

“When visiting a school, you should be on the look out for happy children who are engaged and enthusiastic about being there,” stresses Richard Settle, head teacher of Sancton Wood School. “You also want to see informed teachers who know their subjects and their pupils well and an overall feeling of joy and excitement for learning. Listen to the head teacher speak as CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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It may sound obvious but successful schools that boast of success in every sphere –matches won, musicals staged and exams aced – don’t do it by magic. There may be rehearsals and team practice before and after school and at every break time. So just what will your child be expected to commit to on top of all those lessons – will they be able to cope and still get enough sleep? C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | F E B R U A R Y 2 018

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E D U C AT I O N they should impart the ethos and priorities of the school, speak to as many pupils and teachers as you can about their everyday experiences at the school and ask yourself is this the right place for my child? Ultimately that is the only question that matters, every child is different, and you need to find the school that fits with your child, their interests and personality. “Exam and inspection results are important,” he adds, “as are facilities and extracurricular opportunities, but so too is the feeling you get when you walk into a school, if you instantly feel at home, this might just be the school for your family.”

THE DINING HALL

A school that puts lots of care and thought into its menus will do the same in other areas, says Culford’s Paul Wellstead – and will show how seriously the school takes pupils’ health and well-being. “Providing a wide selection of food, showing where it is sourced and how nutritious the servings are will say much about the care and attention a school affords its students.”

THE LOOS

The state of the loos can tell you a lot about what a school really thinks about its pupils and visitors. They don’t have to have state-of-the -art hand dryers – but they must be clean. “In a restaurant if you don’t like the loos you won’t eat there,” points out Victoria Robeson of CIS. “It’s all about that impression you create and in any school that is customer focused, it is an important area.”

THE FACTS AND FIGURES THAT REALLY MATTER. WHAT’S THE PUPIL TO TEACHER RATIO – AND WHY IS IT IMP ORTANT?

As a rule, the smaller the class size, the better. But you also need to know how many pupils there are to every full-time teacher. It will help you understand how well resourced a school is overall. Classes may be large but with lots of the day spent working in smaller groups. And think about what’s going to suit your child, says Victoria Robeson. “If you have a very shy child that needs lots of encouragement in the classroom then you probably want smaller ratios. It means the teacher is going to notice your child and give them the encouragement to speak up.” With an outgoing, gregarious child, however, it can be a different story – they might thrive in a bigger environment.

NEVER MIND THE LEAGUE TABLES – SHOW ME THE ADDED VALUE

League tables, which rank schools by their exam success, are a mixed blessing. Parents love them – they’re (fairly) easy to understand and make it easy to see how well their child is likely to do in exams. But they’re a very blunt instrument. “[A school may be] brilliant, high up in the league tables but because it’s highly selective, you’ve got to be fairly academic to be accepted,” says Victoria Robeson. “That means it’s always going to be higher in an exam results table than a non-selective, more rounded type of school.” CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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League tables, which rank schools by their exam success, are a mixed blessing. Parents love them – they’re (fairly) easy to understand. But they’re a very blunt instrument C A M B R I D G E E D I T I O N | F E B R U A R Y 2 018

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E D U C AT I O N

So ask about the value the school adds to your child during their school career. If they arrive at school aged 11 on track to achieve C grades at GCSE (or their numerical equivalent), will the school’s approach help them do better than expected? When you’ve got the figures, make sure you’ve got an explanation of how they’ve been worked out.

RETENTION FIGURES

Not the most exciting sounding words – but ones that really matter. Basically, how good is a school at ensuring pupils make it through the academic year? “Retention data can tell you quite a bit about the support that’s in place,” says Andrea Joyce from Cambridge Leadership College. “If a student is having difficulties on their course, they’re not just told to leave. Instead, any halfway decent school puts a lot of support in place before any kind of decision is made about changing courses or leaving courses.” It also signals that schools are good at ensuring that students really understand the course before they sign up for it. Robust initial conversations are key, advises Andrea. “Schools should be asking pupils why they want to take courses, what they know about them already and what they think they’re about.” Get it right, and students are far more likely to – literally – last the course. n CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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WHAT ELSE? Before you get too caught up in the numbers, say David Rose, director at Brookes Cambridge, remember that they don’t always provide the best picture of a school. “How can you measure the confidence, motivation and perseverance of pupils and the way that teachers respond to them? If you don’t have time to visit a school to at least get a feel for the atmosphere, then try to talk to other parents, look at the website and the social media pages, find the inspection reports and get answers to the simple questions. “It’s also worth asking about the length of the school year, the school day, a lesson, and confirming what’s included in the school fees. Find out if you’ll have to pay for before and after school care; for activities, additional support, trips and visits etc so you don’t get any surprises. Also: ask where pupils go when they leave the school – college and university destinations, acceptances into other selective independent schools. Then ask yourself, does this school feel right for my child?”

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A DV E RT I S E M E NXTXFXE X ATXU XRXEX

CREATE THE FUTURE. CHOOSE CAMBRIDGE LEADERSHIP COLLEGE.

TODAY’S STUDENTS need to be prepared for entering a rapidly changing world of work. New jobs and technology are emerging all the time. The skills valued by employers ten years ago are not the ones required in today’s workplace. Companies are looking for employees who can talk to people and understand their needs. Business owners want to recruit people who learn new things quickly and can act on their own initiative, rather than waiting to be told how to do something. Students have to learn to be resilient and adaptable. They need to be leaders. Cambridge Leadership College combines rigorous academic standards with business acumen to prepare teenagers for the new economy. Students develop their own business ideas at the same time as studying for Cambridge International Examinations A levels. Principal Tom Cassidy said: “At Cambridge Leadership College, we use the best practices from Oxford and Cambridge universities to teach our A level students. We take a scientific approach. Our students are encouraged to learn for themselves, to experiment and find what works for them. We expect our students to achieve high standards. “We use accelerated learning techniques to enable our students to complete their academic work in less time, freeing them up to work on their own enterprises. They work alongside entrepreneurs and learn how to develop an idea, research the market and run a company.” Cambridge Leadership College is an international school for 16 to 18 year olds, founded by Cambridge Leadership Foundation. It takes advantage of its central Cambridge location to tap into the city’s business community as well as bringing in tutors who have been educated at Cambridge University. Students are regularly taken to business and networking events so they can meet, and learn from, other business owners.

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On a recent exchange trip to Nova College in the Netherlands, the students worked together on various projects for MTV and pitched to executives from Viacom who intend to incorporate some of the ideas into the redevelopment of their app. Andrea Joyce, Vice-Principal, said: “We’re regularly complimented on how well our students speak in public. We are proud of our students and treat them as individuals. They are free to learn however works for them, take the subjects they choose, develop businesses they believe in and pursue their passions. “We are not like any other school or college you are likely to have visited. Our day starts at 10am, which research shows is a better time of the day for teenagers to begin their learning. Our rolling admissions programme means students can start their studies in any month and with two possible exam windows, in May and November, there is ultimate flexibility for students to do things at a pace that suits their needs. “Come and see us for yourself to get a better idea of what it would be like to be a student here.” n

Cambridge Leadership College is currently accepting applications. Please email admissions2018@ cambridgeleadershipcollege.com or call 01223 952987 to arrange a visit at its campus in Brooklands Avenue, Cambridge. Scholarships are available. For more information, go to cambridgeleadershipcollege. com/admissions2018. html or open the website with this QR Code.

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Why everyone needs to code. DR. CHIH- CHUN CHEN, CEO AND CO -FOUNDER OF CAMBRIDGE C O D I N G AC A D E MY, O N T H E I M P O R TA N C E O F B E I N G C O D E - L I T E R AT E F O R T H E F U T U R E G E N E R AT I O N

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here is no escaping the fact that we live in a digital world, where computers touch every part of life: from communication to transport, entertainment, healthcare, medicine, business, finance and beyond. Indeed, today it is difficult to find an area of life that is not touched by the digital. However, at present, it is only a small minority who have the skills required to actively participate in and manipulate this digital world. In order to fully exploit the capabilities of the technologies available to us, we need to know how to give instructions to the computers behind these technologies. Being able to read and write computer code gives us the means to control the digital world we live in and tell our devices what to do to make our lives more efficient and enjoyable. By programming computers we are able to automate complicated and mundane tasks, share ideas and information, create media and games, and interact more effectively with each other. It is increasingly more certain that by the time today’s children enter the job market they will need to be code literate if they are to thrive in most occupations; it is no longer the case that coding is merely a specialist skill for software developers to possess. Even professionals such as lawyers are now embracing digital technologies; they already exist for analysing and managing contracts. It is inevitable that, in the future, responsible top lawyers will need to be able to understand the code behind such technologies. Importantly, being able to code allows people to bring their ideas to life and to share them with others. Ideas might range from simple operations for automating mundane tasks to fully fledged artificial intelligences that help us make better informed decisions. This is extremely empowering. While previously someone may simply have held an idea in their mind or speculated about its benefits, being able to code allows the person to quickly prototype and test the idea – and perhaps even fully develop it. As well as the practical and vocational benefits of learning to code, there are also important cognitive benefits due to the mode of thinking involved. “Computational thinking” refers to a particular form of problem-solving that involves analysing and decomposing the problem, identifying the essential elements of the problem and its similarities to other problems, evaluating and CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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filtering the data and information provided, and creating a logical and complete solution. You start by considering what the overall outcome of the program should be (eg make coffee when I wake up), then you break it down into its components or steps (eg detect me waking up, switch coffee machine on, add water and coffee beans…), and then you give instructions on each of these and put them in order. This approach to solving problems can be applied across all domains: science, technology, engineering, mathematics, literature, languages, art, music. In recent years, computer science and programming have begun to appear in the school curriculum. However, schools often struggle to find teachers who have the skills to teach coding confidently in an engaging way. It is important for young people and their parents to take matters into their own hands and seek out extracurricular coding programmes, holiday camps and online resources. The good news is that learning how to code is not difficult, if students are given the right tuition. At Cambridge Coding Academy, we manage to transform students from complete novices into fluent coders over the course of a week, all while building their own products (games, web apps, image filters, music). n

At Cambridge Coding Academy we manage to transform students from complete novices into fluent coders over the course of a week

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A DV E RT I S E M E N T F E AT U R E

A FRESH START AT TRUMPINGTON VISTA.

START THE year by moving into your dream home at Trumpington Vista, a collection of exquisite new homes with a fresh view on contemporary living located on Hauxton Road in Trumpington. The one- and two-bedroom apartments are in a prime position, overlooking the 148-acre Trumpington Meadows Country Park which leads to the River Cam. The stunning green open space will be on the doorstep of Vista residents, making it the perfect place to get a fresh start. With social, open-plan living spaces and balconies, the apartments offer modern living alongside the beautiful views. These fantastic apartments are also available to buy using the government-backed Help to Buy scheme, making it easier for first-time buyers and existing homeowners to purchase their dream home at Trumpington Vista. Under the scheme, homebuyers can purchase an apartment with just 5% deposit and 75% mortgage, with the remaining 20% coming from an equity loan from the government. Jason Colmer, Sales Director at Barratt Homes Eastern Counties said: “Trumpington Vista is the ideal destination for those looking for a contemporary new home in Cambridge with a unique and stunning outlook over the country park. “The Help to Buy scheme means the apartments are within reach and gives a boost to get on or up the property ladder.” Trumpington Vista is part of Trumpington Meadows, an exciting development of 1,200 new homes set alongside an 148 acre waterside country park. The development is in an ideal location with easy access to Cambridge city centre and the M11. Trumpington Park & Ride is next door, providing regular buses to key locations around the city.

There are currently two- and three-bedroom homes for sale at Trumpington Vista, with prices starting from £464,995. n

For more information please visit the sales centre, open Monday 12.30-5.30pm and Tuesday to Sunday 10am5.30pm. Alternatively call the sales information line on 0844 811 4888* or visit barratthomes.co.uk.

TERMS & CONDITIONS APPLY Limited offer available on selected plots only. See website for details, subject to contract and status. Prices correct at time of going to press if mentioned. Images include optional upgrades at additional cost. See barratthomes.co.uk for full details. BDW Trading Limited (number 03018173) whose registered office is at Barratt House, Cartwright Way, Forest Business Park, Bardon Hill, Coalville, Leicestershire LE67 1UF (“BDW”) is a subsidiary of Barratt Developments PLC. The Homes and Communities Agency (“HCA”) provides an equity loan for 20% of the purchase price of the property. The equity loan provided by the HCA is secured as second charge on your property. The amount you have to repay to the HCA. *Calls to our 0844 numbers cost 7 pence per minute plus your phone company’s access charge.

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COL OUR G I V E YO U R H O M E A N I N S TA N T U P DAT E BY REFERENCING SOME OF THE NEW COLOUR TRENDS F O R 2 018 . F RO M D R A M AT I C P U R P L E T O M U T E D N E U T R A L S , T H E R E ’S A S H A D E F O R E V E RYO N E

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A ccording to Dulux, the colours we should be using to decorate our homes should balance the complex challenges of everyday life. “As life gets faster, now is the time to press pause,” says Rebecca Williamson, senior colour and design expert. “Our homes need to be places where we can turn down the noise, shut the door on the outside world and step into a place that is uniquely ours. Our homes needs to be our sanctuaries… a welcome home.” The brand has taken this theme – of ‘A Welcome Home’ – to encapsulate its Colour of the Year, which is Heart Wood: a warm neutral with a hint of heather. As well as this harmonious palette, which includes cocoa and bolder tones of ink blue and purple, the brand is also forecasting white clay and blush pink tones in its ‘Comforting Home’ collection. There are cool shades of blue and sea-green in its ‘Inviting Home’ range, while the ‘Playful Home’ palette features hues inspired by nature – think: rich and yellowtoned greens working seamlessly alongside golden shades, which combine to create a serene environment. Talking of which, colourists at Benjamin Moore paints, which was founded in the USA in 1883, are also championing a range of colours that will bring grace and character to a home. “Whether complementing its surroundings or contrasting for a stand-out effect, a touch of colour can go a long way in bringing a space to life,” Helen Shaw, marketing director, says. “The calming coloured neutral hue of ‘Excalibur Gray’ is the ideal choice for a bedroom while the delicate yet standout ‘Texas Rose’ pink sits beautifully against the white sanitary-ware of the bathroom.” At Crown Paints, meanwhile, its ‘Bloom’ range of colours, inspired by the soft pinks and muted greens of spring-time, reflect the beauty of an English garden. “Bloom is the romantic token of nature at its most magnificent, with fresh floral tones on a long spectrum, from lively greens to deep-seated pinks and purples,” says Neville Knott, Crown colour consultant. “This collection of colours is a joyful acknowledgement of the promise of summer, where every colourful bloom is layered one over the other.” Argos’s new ‘Serenity’ range of homewares is also inspired by spring. “Serenity is all about capturing the soothing stillness of a spring morning,” says the brand. “Illustrative

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Previous page Dulux’s Heart Wood Home is the brand’s colour of the year Above Benjamin Moore’s Texas Pink and Pleasant Pink, from £20.50 for 0.94L, give subtle colour Below Amtico’s Spacia White Ash flooring adds a fresh touch Bottom Crown’s new metallic colours includes this Rose Gold emulsion, from £18.99 for 1.2L Opposite Furniture and accessories, from £11.99, from the Serenity Living range at Argos

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METALLIC MOOD. L I SA M I L L E R , F R O M T H E C R OW N DESIGN STUDIO, REVEALS THE NEW M E TA L L I C T R E N D

Metallics are a great way to add warmth to a room, reflecting natural daylight and the light of evening lamps. A block of metallic works well at right angles to a window where the natural light is most effective. Metallic emulsion works well next to a flat matt paint where the sheen is well highlighted.

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Condor bed, £239.99, and Alana shell back chair, £129.99, both from Argos

watercolours and light mirrored surfaces create a sanctuary from the rush of the modern world. Hushed pastel hues of rose and mint are accented with inky blues and metallic references. The tranquillity of nature is brought to your home through glazed ceramics, natural linens and marble tones, making an understated haven for relaxation.” Continuing the subtle approach to colour, look to the flooring in your home as a simple way of lifting a room’s scheme. Kelly Alders, senior product designer at Amtico, agrees: “We will be looking at lighter, fresher colour tones in 2018, driven by an increasing interest in well-being. We want healthier environments that make us happy and CAMBSEDITION.CO.UK

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We want healthier environments that make us happy and there’s a trend for softer, more muted colour palettes

there’s a trend for softer, more muted colour palettes, avoiding aggressive colours.” Meanwhile, channelling Pantone’s Colour of the Year for 2018 – which has been named as Ultra Violet – is heritage carpet brand Brintons. “For 2018, purple and the spectrum that Pantone’s ‘Ultra Violet’ encompasses will be a key theme,” says Natalie Littlehales, consumer marketing manager. “It is both a warm and cool tone, depending on the rest of your interior scheme. Pair with ochres and warm oranges for warmth, or with greys for a cooler décor.” From ‘eggplant’ velvet cushions to regal violet bedframes, there’s a whole host of pieces which reflect the purple trend at Furniture Village. Malcolm Walker, director of

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Although I love embracing dark walls, for me, matte black works particularly well when seen on individual products such as a lamp base, mirror or a statement shower screen buying, gives his take on the colour: “Carrying connotations of royalty and wealth, this rich and uplifting hue will brighten any room. For those who love to make a statement, this bold shade can be paired with other jewel tones to create an opulent scheme. If you’re looking to create something a little softer, try introducing complementary hues alongside it such as heather, lavender and aubergine.” While purple is the leading colour for 2018, when it comes to bolder schemes, other shades – such as bright teal, fiery red and matte black – are also emerging as modern hues to consider. Whether it is My Furniture’s mid-century inspired Ravello Dining Table, with its teal velvet chairs, or one of the stand-alone tubs from the Albion Bath Company, which are available in a range of colours – all you need is just one eye-catching piece to add a touch of drama. Rebecca Hughes, MD of Rebecca Hughes Interiors, a London-based luxury design

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studio, puts her money on inky blues or matte black – which is surprisingly more adaptable than many think: “Although I love embracing dark walls, for me, matte black works particularly well when seen on individual products such as a lamp base, mirror or even a statement Crittal shower screen. I particularly like the use of matteblack sanitary-ware, where taps or marble vanity tops become a strong feature. Mix the colour up with dusky pink tones, soft greys and copper accents so it doesn’t look too austere.” Wallpapers are also another creative way of incorporating a pop of colour to a room. Graham & Brown’s new collaboration with Hemingway Design includes the Terrazzo wallpaper, inspired by the luxury flooring of an Italian palazzo, and Dots wallpaper, a playful graphic pattern in complementary pastel shades, while 1838 Wallcoverings is predicting a lean towards the glorious shades

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Top Dots Wallpaper, £50 per roll, is by Hemingway Design for Graham & Brown Above Create a touch of drama with Albion Bath’s Etruscan Bath Opposite Gold and jewel tones create a glamourous bedroom, with furniture and accessories from Marks & Spencer

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S TO C K I S TS . 1838 Wallcoverings 01254 397631 1838wallcoverings.com

Benjamin Moore 01753 575756 benjaminmoorepaint.co.uk

Furniture Village 0800 804 8879 furniturevillage.co.uk

The Albion Bath Company 01255 831605 albionbathco.com

Brintons 0800 505 055, brintons.co.uk

Graham & Brown 0808 168 3795 grahambrown.com

Crown crownpaints.co.uk

Made.com 03442 571 888, made.com

DFS 0333 999 9777 dfs.co.uk

My Furniture 0845 309 6356 my-furniture.com

Dulux dulux.co.uk

Rebecca Hughes Interiors rebeccahughesinteriors.com

Amtico 0121 745 0800 amtico.com Argos 0345 640 2020 argos.co.uk

The Gower Armchair in Damson, £899, from DFS

of nature – think berry, invigorating green and earthy sand tones. Finally, at Made.com, it’s all about rich, earthy shades such as burnt orange and cactus, matched with vibrant hues such as peacock blue, tomato reds and ochre. They will “inject fun, wit and warmth”, which British designer, Steuart Padwick, one of Made.com’s first designers, sees as being a key component in 2018 design. Allegra Hicks, a Made.com designer recognised globally for her work creating beautifully vivid textiles and prints, explains that she is particularly excited about “the combination of different textures and cold and warm colours together, such as olive and turquoise.” n

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PURPLE LOVE. D F S D E S I G N D I R E C TO R P H I L I P WAT K I N C H O O S E S H I S TO P T H R E E P U R P L E - H U E D P R O D U C TS THE BAILEY WOOL ARMCHAIR IN LAVENDER, £999 Available in wool or velvet, this chair is traditionally inspired and elegantly styled with beautiful button detailing. THE GOWER ARMCHAIR IN DAMSON, £899 This classic design gets a dramatic purple velvet update to combine comfort with a touch of chic. THE LAZE LARGE SOFA IN HERRINGBONE PURPLE, £449 The DFS Laze from the Capsule Collection gives a curvy retro look that will work for years to come.

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DISTRESSED EDGE CUSHION

£25, marksandspencer.com

BERRY ILARIA PENDANT SHADE

£29, made.com

PINK AND SAGE GREEN ROSA PENDANT

from £96, urbancottageindustries.com

Edition loves.

DIZZY WONDERS CLOCK

£30, artwow.co

PHOEBE VELVET BEDROOM CHAIR

£230, sweetpeaandwillow.com PARISIENNE FILIPPE BROWN PORCELAIN TILE

£78 per m2, sacw.co.uk

CLARA ESPRESSO CUP

£8, oliverbonas.com

GREEN TICKING STRIPE VASE

£12, sainsburys.co.uk GIANT RECYCLED BOTTLE VASE

£75, furniturevillage.co.uk

DOUBLE CLOTH TASSEL THROW

£50, monsoon.co.uk

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P R O P E RT Y N E W S

HOW MUCH?

S

S A M C O O K E , PA R T N E R AT C O O K E C U R T I S & C O, TA L K S E S TAT E AG E N T F E E S

hopping is usually pretty straightforward. You decide you need a thing, find a place that sells that thing, decide if it looks affordable to you and if it does, you buy it. It’s fairly stress-free as processes go, and some people even enjoy it. If you get the thing home and realise it doesn’t actually enrich your life in the way you thought it would the law even allows you to just take it back. There are some specific industries that choose to make it a little bit less straightforward, though. I’ve not bought tons of kitchens in my life, but I find it a hateful process. The last time I did I got prices from three shops that varied from £8,000 to £32,000 for broadly the same thing. When I rang the £32,000 people up to try to make sense of the difference, it was my great fortune to discover that they were, for a very limited time and only for very special customers, offering 60% off. Bringing the price down to £12,800. How very lucky I was to have called them that day. I explained to them that this was great news but that it was still 50% more than the cost of the lowest price I’d had. They muttered something about softclose hinges and promptly reduced the price to £9,000. I hung up the phone unimpressed. The £9,000 seemed OK and soft-close hinges are fancy, but I had no confidence that I was getting a fair deal, it felt like they set their prices purely by how ruthless a negotiator the customer was. I couldn’t help but imagine a certain type of buyer, my mum for example, only getting one quote, being pleased with a 10% discount and paying £20,000 more than they could have. I ended up buying my kitchen from Ikea. Not because I liked their kitchens, but because their pricing was honest and transparent. Everything has a specific price and everyone pays the same. It’s fair. When I told the kitchen salespeople from the other shops this was my decision they warned me that my new Ikea kitchen was so cheaply made it would probably explode within the first year. I decided to take the risk. New kitchens aren’t the only product that works like this; double glazing is another, and

some classic car dealers list their stock as ‘price on application’ then attempt to judge the size of the customer’s wallet over the phone. Then, of course, there’s estate agents (you knew that was where I was heading, I expect). At estate agency school they teach you how to handle what they call a ‘fee enquiry’. The knack is, they say, to convert the enquiry to a valuation visit without actually quoting a fee. Like kitchens, there are certain differences between what different estate agents do so the idea of booking a valuation is so the agent can present their services to the customer so they can decide if they like what you do for your proposed fee, as well as the fee itself. Fair enough to a point, but the whole thing can still feel a bit murky and uncomfortable to some people. People like me. When we first opened Cooke Curtis & Co we talked about publishing our standard selling fees. Why not? Surely there were people out there like me that would appreciate the transparency. The fear is always that if our competitors know what we charge they’ll automatically just undercut us a bit. But so what? Volkswagen’s published prices are higher than Dacia’s and it doesn’t stop people buying Volkswagens. If people can see extra value in something they don’t mind paying a fair price for it, so why don’t estate agents just state our fees explicitly? We’re not a kitchen shop, we don’t do questionable 60% off sales, we charge a fair fee. One we can make a living from without overcharging people’s mums because we can get away with it. A bit more than some agents and a bit less than others. Despite all this logic though, we still don’t actually do it. Nowhere on our website will you find our sales fee quoted. We feel hamstrung by the convention, I suppose. When I started typing this piece it was going to end with me telling you what we usually charge. As I approach that sentence now I still have an odd reluctance to do so, but here goes: my name is Sam and my usual sole agency fee is 1% of the sale price of your house plus VAT. There, I said it. Pow! Take that industry conventions. I’m a renegade. A disruptor. The Ikea of estate agency but without the yellow polo shirts. Though it seems I still can’t bring myself to stop using little qualifiers like ‘standard’ and ‘usual’. n

Nowhere on our website will you find our sales fee quoted. We feel hamstrung by convention, I suppose

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Cambridge Edition February 2018  

Cambridge Edition February issue

Cambridge Edition February 2018  

Cambridge Edition February issue