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Serving Bridgton and the surrounding towns of Western Maine since 1870. Vol. 147, No. 28

32 PAGES - 4 Sections

Bridgton, Maine

July 14, 2016

(USPS 065-020 )

Pub owner okayed to start deck, but there’s a catch

As superintendent, Kidder will look at how to allocate that excess after considering the engineer’s data as to the effect on existing disposal fields. Holmes is presently approved for 39 “internal” customers (a sewage allotment of 350 gallons), and has requested additional gallons for 40-42 “external” patrons using the outside dining area (a needed increase between 200 to 300 gallons, Holmes suspects). Code Enforcement Officer Robbie Baker informed planners at their July 5 meeting that it could be weeks before Kidder receives those figures. At press time, no data had been filed with the town. Holmes was visibly disappointed that the planning board was unwilling to give the 40-person request “conditional” approval, enabling him to open the deck area as soon as possible, thus getting the chance to capitalize on the area’s busiest — and most profitable time — of the year. He noted that Gastropub uses paper products to serve food, thus additional patronage will not require more water (for dishwashing). Lucia Terry, who served on the Waste Water Committee, also failed to understand planners unwillingness to allow the pub to open the deck and then adjust the number of customers it can allow there from 40 downward, if figures given to Kidder require a reduction, especially since Holmes is “first in line” to receive additional allocation. Melinda Holmes, Will’s sister, impressed upon planners that every day that goes by and the deck is unusable, profit is lost. “People here don’t make it through the winter if they are not open in July,” said Melinda Holmes, noting the financial commitment her brother has made trying to operate a business in his hometown. Planning Board chairman Steve Collins called the wait “unfortunate,” but felt the board would be going “way beyond our authority” if it granted permission for 40 without Kidder’s decision. The board’s approval did give Holmes the green light to start construction (a stop order had been issued last month because final planning board approval had not been given, and discussion was tabled due to improper notification to property owners within the required 100-foot radius of Holmes’ establishment), yet some financial risk will hang over the pub owner’s head if the 40 figure is slightly or significantly DECK, Page 5A

GOOFING AROUND WITH GOOFY — Youngsters greeted Goofy with big hugs during Saturday’s Old Home Days Parade in Harrison. More photos on Page 8B (Rivet Photo)

Little budge on Sebago proposal By Wayne E. Rivet Staff Writer As one of two longest tenured members on the SAD 61 School Board, Janice Barter is quite familiar with the district’s stance regarding where elementary school children will be taught. For the past 17 years — Barter’s stay on the school board — SAD 61 has pushed

One on One with...

Rev. Joyce Long

By Dawn De Busk Staff Writer CASCO — Rev. Joyce Long had reason to ponder the season-to-season occurrences of the past decade and a half at the Casco Village United Church of Christ. After all, the congregation had a special worship planned — a celebration of Joyce’s 15 years as pastor of the church. She stepped into that role in July 2001. Coincidentally, this year marks the 175th year that the Casco Village Church has been in existence. The 15-year anniversary on Sunday included some fun activities like Pastor Joyce Jeopardy and a delightful brunch during fellowship time. Earlier, in the sanctuary, some of the celebration came in the form of songs. Additionally, a slide show brought to life the years’ past and brought back memories for many. “Three of the things that were triggered this Sunday: The people I have buried, the people I have married and the people I have baptized,” Joyce said. “I have buried a lot of people. It is hard because they become part of you. Doing services for people you love and who are like your own family — it’s hard. And, you miss them,” she said. “That is the best part of being a woman minister — you can cry in public,” she half-joked, wiping away the genuine tears but not the memories. In the coming week, Joyce will lead the Celebration of Life services for a woman who died last year. That woman had dedicated a stained glass window to her husband in 1999. In the coming week, Joyce will baptize a child with proud parents participating in that milestone of Christianity. On Tuesday afternoon, Joyce had just finished meeting with a weekly Bible study group when she sat down to answer some questions for The Bridgton News. BN: What church were you affiliated with while you

www.bridgton.com

SEVENTY-FIVE CENTS

Road work raises talk of conflict

Waiting on number By Wayne E. Rivet Staff Writer When voters approved a change in how Bridgton figures downtown sewage flow, Will Holmes was a happy man. Owner of Standard Gastropub, Holmes is first in line when it comes to increasing the sewage allotment for his Main Street business. With more and more restaurants and pubs in the Lake Region offering outdoor dining options, Holmes wants to jump on the bandwagon. “We currently have long waits for our customers during the busy months of the summer season and this addition will give them another option and enable us to serve more patrons without overcrowding or going above our full-service, year-round seating capacity,” Holmes said in his application. “These additional patrons will place orders at the counter for take-away and will be able to seat themselves at an outdoor table to enjoy their food. Full-table service will not be offered.” Holmes noted that customers using the outdoor space would be monitored by Gastropub staff and asked for proper ID as they enter. The outdoor space is accessible through the pub’s interior, as well as through an outdoor entrance during peak hours, which will be staffed whenever offered, the application says. Wooden fencing surrounds the outdoor dining area. Bridgton Police Chief Richard Stillman had no objections to the outdoor seating, “as long as access is limited so minors cannot gain access to alcohol.” Holmes recently received tentative approval from the Bridgton Planning Board to construct a deck to the backside of his Gastropub, where customers can take their food to dine and enjoy summertime. He also gained approval to offer live entertainment, which will likely include acoustic music and standup comedy. There is just one catch. Holmes will be unable to open the deck area until Sewage Superintendent Jim Kidder receives data from an engineer, who is looking at capacity at the town’s two sewage disposal beds servicing the downtown area and determining gallons freed up under the town’s newly-approved Sewage Ordinance. One figure is an additional 7,000 gallons, but Baker noted that other businesses have inquired about tapping into that availability.

Weather . . . . . . . . . . . 5D

PASTOR JOYCE LONG AND CONGREGATION ARE A CARING PAIRING — The Casco Village Church of Christ is preparing for its 175th year. (De Busk Photo) were growing up? Joyce: The First Congregational Church in South Portland United Church of Christ. The church on top of the hill. Meetinghouse Hill — that is where the church is located. I grew up in Cape Elizabeth. My parents sang in the choir. As a family, we were very faithful churchgoREV. JOYCE LONG, Page 7A

to educate its youngest children in their hometowns. But, there is no guarantee that approach will be taken five, 10 or 20 years from now. Finances change. Situations develop. So, Barter and members of the SAD 61 Withdrawal Committee Tuesday night reaffirmed the district’s position to do its best to keep elementary children in their hometowns, but refused to enter an agreement with the Town of Sebago to guarantee its school will remain open for 20 years (or some type of variation, such as fiveyear intervals with a review whether to continue to proceed, which was suggested at the last withdrawal meeting). Members publicly reviewed a Sebago Withdrawal Committee counteroffer, and offered comments regarding the last negotiating session. Casco Director Stan Buchanan felt the prior proposal was “dictating” in nature, and added that as a “district,” the board needs to act in the best interest of “all children” and “all four towns,” not just one community. Bridgton Director Karla Swanson-Murphy felt SAD 61 could head down a “slippery slope” if it entertains some of the ideas put forth by the Sebago Withdrawal Committee. She feels if Sebago remains in the SAD 61 fold, it should adhere to the present model — K-5 (add Pre-K if the district takes on the program) at the BUDGE, Page 2A

By Dawn De Busk Staff Writer NAPLES — One resident was pretty steamed when he saw the father of the Naples town manager operating heavy equipment — doing the ditch work on Edes Falls Road. The equipment was owned by another contractor. But, what most upset the person who saw this was the fact that it had been publicly promised that Earth Solutions, owned by Rick Paraschak, would no longer get work from the Town of Naples. That statement was made sometime after Rick’s son, Ephrem, became town manager. The person, who wished to remain anonymous, brought his concerns to Jim Turpin, a Naples Budget Committee member. “He said, ‘I thought you said Rick Paraschak wasn’t going to get any work from the town.’ He told me that the truck had Chris Pond’s company name on it,” Turpin said. “If Rick Paraschak is seen behind the wheel of a machine on a town project, people will ask questions,” Turpin said. The ditch work job, which took place in early July, was discussed briefly during a Naples Board of Selectmen meeting on Monday. During public participation time, Turpin asked on behalf of the unnamed Naples resident if Rick Paraschak had been paid for the job. Turpin also asked how the project was budgeted and why the job did not go out to bid. Naples Town Manager Ephrem Paraschak said, “There are no funds going to Earth Solutions.” He explained that smaller jobs — costing less than $10,000 are not required to go through the bidding process. The town staff solicits area contractors, asking for competitive prices. The ditching job on Cooks Mills and Edes Fall Road was several thousand dollars for a few hundred feet of work, Ephrem said. The project was given to C. Pond Plowing and the work has been finished in preparation for paving in August, he said. Chairman Bob Caron II explained that Ephrem also acts as the Naples road commissioner, and there are policies in place dictating how he goes about soliciting work for town-owned roads. On Tuesday morning, Rick Paraschak explained why he had been operating the equipment that was being used for a town job. “I occasionally help Chris Pond and Chris Pond helps me. When I work for Chris, he doesn’t pay me and in return he works for me and I don’t pay him,” Rick said. “There is no money exchanged. It is kind of like a barter thing.” “That project was given to Chris Pond, or C. Pond CONFLICT, Page 3A

The Bridgton News Established 1870

P.O. Box 244, 118 Main St. Bridgton, ME 04009 207-647-2851 Fax: 207-647-5001 bnews@roadrunner.com


Area news

Page 2A, The Bridgton News, July 14, 2016

SAD 61 budges little on offer

COME LAUGH WITH US! — Actors and directors — Dona Forke, Jan Goldsberry, Lee Goldsberry, Brian Grennan, Penny Morris, Stan Struzynski and Allene Westleigh — are happy to announce that they will be producing their 23rd Mainestage Readers Theatre show, THIS IS IT! on Wednesday, July 20 (dress rehearsal performance); Thursday, July 21, and Friday, July 22, at 7:30 p.m. each night, at the Denmark Arts Center, 50 West Main Street, Denmark. THIS IS IT! is done in Readers Theatre style, and is read and acted skits with “adult humor for your summer laughs.” The show is a little over an hour with no intermission. The hall is air-conditioned for your comfort. A donation of $10 (or more!) will benefit the Denmark Arts Center. For more information call 452-2412 or go online to www. denmarkarts.com

(Continued from Page 1A) elementary level, grades 6-8 at the middle school. Directors again emphasized that legal counsel has recommended against agreeing to stipulations that could bind future school boards, such as the 20-year no SES closure clause or a specific enrollment number (40 was suggested by Sebago reps), which would trigger closure discussions. Superintendent of Schools Al Smith feels Sebago could experience “real educational losses” if the town decides to withdraw and operate a K-8 school on its own. Because of costs, Smith said Sebago would be hard-pressed to offer programs such as Industrial Arts, Consumer Science and foreign languages (LRMS currently offers two foreign language programs) to middle-school age students. Smith also later clarified that if Sebago decides to operate its own school, the current teaching staff there would remain part of that school, and would no longer be under contract with SAD

61. The teachers there would automatically have their own union, and would then negotiate a contract with the new school system. Smith pointed out that the school would also need to hire a superintendent (likely a part-timer) and other staff. Special education services, Smith said, could also become burdensome on a smaller school unit. “Services can be astronomical, in the range of $75,000 to $100,000 a year,” he said. In the present proposal, the Sebago Withdrawal Committee is looking for SAD 61 to turn over three buses. Casco Director Phil Shane noted that two buses currently serve Sebago, and wondered if the requested third was a “spare?” A key element in the proposal is if Sebago decides to withdraw, the town would not be responsible for any additional locally-funded projects. “Since they would not be liable for that debt, there is no longer a reason for them (Sebago voters) to vote against the project,” Smith

Now, the elected officials of both towns have signed the agreement. Going forward, the operations will appear as one on paper, making it easier and less costly when reviewed by auditors. For residents, the services provided will remain the same.

Likewise, the layout of the property will be status quo. “We are equal owners in the facility,” Naples Town Manager Ephrem Paraschak said. He added that the Town of Casco owns the land off Leach Hill Road but the towns CONTRACT, Page 5A

Naples signs transfer site pact By Dawn De Busk Staff Writer NAPLES — Before signing the renewal of a 20-year agreement for the transfer station shared with the Town of Casco, Naples selectmen talked about the ins and outs of the agreement and the history

of the service. People still refer to it as the dump. Officially, the operation has two areas, each with a separate entrance. The proper names of the areas are the Casco-Naples Transfer Site and the CascoNaples Bulky Waste Facility.

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said. However, if a project is presented before Sebago withdraws, voters there could still participate in the voting process. If at the 11th hour Sebago residents have a change of heart, decide against withdrawing and remain with SAD 61, then the town is liable for 14% of the project cost. The “project” is Crooked River. SAD 61 will certainly revisit how to repurpose the Route 11 building in Casco, and thus bring back educating elementary school children in their hometown. The last plan looked to create a grade three, four and five school. To address the immediate problem of overcrowding at Songo Locks, the district will add a four-classroom portable there for this fall. The new portable, along with a twoclassroom portable located to the school’s left side, will cost the district $160,000 per year. Smith said the district entered into a three-year lease for the new portable, but can “get out of the lease” in two years. Swanson-Murphy pointed out that lease price tag is just slightly below what SAD 61 taxpayers were facing if they had approved the last Crooked River project proposal. Noting Casco is presently the only town that has no elementary school, Buchanan wondered whether Casco residents truly feel about the current arrangement. “I know some people are upset, feeling like one town is trying to tell other towns what to do,” he said. “I don’t really know if people are upset or not that we don’t have an

elementary school. I’d like to know.” When asked, “what’s next?” Smith said if the district and the Sebago Withdrawal Committee is unable to come to an agreement and continues the withdrawal process, the two sides will then go to mediation — for which each side incurs their own costs. While mediation can “drag on,” Smith pointed out that the withdrawal process does have a defined timeline and indicates points when Maine’s Department of Education commissioner enters the picture. Bridgton Director Karen Elder, who was a member of the audience inside the LRHS library, wondered whether most Sebago residents realize the path the town is on. “When I talked with a number of people there, they were told that for Sebago to have conversations with the district regarding closure of their school, they needed to enter the withdrawal process. That’s simply not true,” Smith said. “We could have formed a small committee to discuss it. Ultimately, it will be up to Sebago as to what they want to do.” One resident wondered if Sebago remains in the SAD 61 fold would dysfunction continue to exist? “That’s a hard question, one I don’t have an answer for,” Smith said. “I would hope that if Sebago stays, the town would be supportive of what we need to have educationally for all our children.” The Sebago Withdrawal Committee’s next meeting is scheduled for July 21.

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July 14, 2016, The Bridgton News, Page 3A

Naples road work raises citizen talk of conflict (Continued from Page 1A) Plowing. Chris asked me to help him because he was shorthanded,” he said. “No money exchanged hands,” Rick said, confirming that he did not get a single cent from the town job. “Chris Pond helps me, and he gets repaid by me helping him. We do that back and forth,” he said. Rick Paraschak added that his own business receives plenty of work. “Obviously, someone is saying there is collusion between my son and myself. There is none,” Rick said. The word collusion means

“a secret agreement, especially for fraudulent or treacherous purposes; a conspiracy,” according to dictionary.com. “Earth Solutions has not done work for the town for more than two years,” Rick said. “People think there is some collusion going on. They’re wrong,” Rick said. “My son, in his position, tries to be fair with local contractors, some of which do not call him back. He has work to be done,” he said. According to Ephrem, the public outcry by a few people could have been predicted. “I almost expected as soon

as he (Chris Pond) parked his excavator at the end of my driveway, that people would comment,” Ephrem said. “In all honesty, I thought it might cause a problem with some residents.” He explained that Rick filled in for Pond because Pond, who is the Naples Fire Chief, was battling a fire on an island on Sebago Lake. That same week, Pond had a deadline to finish the ditch work. “He needed to get it done,” Ephrem said. “In the future, Rick won’t be able to help out Chris. It is unfortunate because people find issue with it. I have gotten complaints before when he donated his time at the maintenance building” off Route 11, he said. There are no policies prohibiting the town from giving

paid work to an employee like the fire chief. “There is no conflict of interest. He is doing it as a contractor, offering a competitive price,” Ephrem said, adding that he tries to rotate the use of contractor in the area. However, during the road construction season, it becomes difficult to get small jobs done on short notice. Many contractors never returned his phone calls, Ephrem said. “I believe you can be an employee of the town and get work that the town pays for. You cannot give yourself the business,” he said. “A conflict of interest is defined as a monetary conflict of interest. If you directly benefit financially from it or if a family member does — that is conflict of interest,” Ephrem

said. This is not the first time that Naples residents have shared with Turpin their concerns about what they perceive as a conflict of interest. “Basically, local contractors asked about it when Earth Solutions was doing work for the town on the books,” Turpin said. “The individual I talked to claimed he called the town to ask if jobs were available. He was told that he need not apply,” he said. During Monday’s meeting, Ephrem said that contractors must prove that they have done jobs for municipalities. Soliciting work is a much faster way to get shortterm projects done than going through the referral for bids (RFP) process. According to Turpin,

Naples residents have concerns about fairness when jobs are contracted out instead of being publically advertised and bidded out. “Folks born in this town or who have lived here for decades have more clout in how the town is run. That is understood. Townies are entitled to more clout. But clarity is in order,” Turpin said. “As a nation, we have lost expectations of clarity in Washington, D.C, and in Augusta. But in our town, where we still have town meetings, an expectation of clarity is part of the quality of place,” he said.

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Police news

Page 4A, The Bridgton News, July 14, 2016

Bridgton blotter These items appeared on the Bridgton Police Department blotter (this is a partial listing): Sunday, July 3 8:11 a.m. A caller asked an officer a question regarding a current protection from abuse order. He had “accidentally” crossed paths with the protected party at a local bank. Police told the caller that as long as he did not address her, he did not violate the order. Monday, July 4 6:58 p.m. A woman reported that her daughter was “out of control” and allegedly assaulted her. Police spoke with the daughter. Neither party wanted to press charges. The daughter left the residence to stay with a friend. 8:19 p.m. Police responded to a “fight in progress” near the Skate Park off Frances Bell Drive. There was no fight, but instead a verbal argument over porta-potty use. 10:01 p.m. Police responded to a three-vehicle accident on Portland Road near the drive-in. No injuries were reported. 10:16 p.m. A subject prepaid $10 for gasoline at a local store, but gave the attendant the wrong pump number. The subject allegedly pumped $21.05 worth of gasoline, and later refused to pay the difference. Police were unable to locate the vehicle. 11:48 p.m. Police received a complaint about fireworks on Sleigh Bell Lane. Police informed the caller it is legal to ignite fireworks until midnight on holiday weekends. 11:16 p.m. Police and fire personnel responded to a

BAD START TO A DAY — The driver of the red pickup truck, hauling a large trailer containing pigs, lost control of his vehicle and struck another pickup truck — unoccupied and parked in front of the FairPoint relay building on Harrison Road — early Tuesday morning, according to Bridgton Chief of Police Richard Stillman. The impact sent both trucks into the antique shop, located at the corner of Iredale report of a boating accident in Long Lake, off of Plummer’s Landing Road. Six people were on the “ruptured pontoon” boat, and all escaped injury. Tuesday, July 5 12:49 a.m. Police found a subject, who appeared to be “extremely intoxicated” walking on Harrison Road. Police gave the subject a ride to a Holden Hills residence without incident. 10:42 a.m. Two vehicles — a Jeep and a Nissan — collided in the construction zone on North High Street. One vehicle had stopped for directions from a construction flagman, while the second operator did not notice the flagger and bumped the stopped vehicle. 11:37 a.m. Two vehicles were involved in a crash at the intersection of Sandy Creek

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Road and Portland Road. No injuries were reported. 2 p.m. Someone really caught a good deal at a North High Street yard sale. A subject reportedly stole a carpet cleaner. The officer contacted a suspect, who agreed to pay for the cleaner. 2:37 p.m. A caller informed police that threatening messages had been sent through Facebook. Police reviewed the messages and felt they were “mutual combatants.” Police suggested the caller block the other party from her Facebook page. 2:59 p.m. A motorist claimed his/her car was struck in the Rite-Aid parking lot the previous night, causing more than $1,000 damage. 4:51 p.m. A chainsaw was stolen off a front porch on Conforte Hill Road. Wednesday, July 6 6:16 p.m. A woman asked police to remove several people, who were fishing, from a Plummer’s Landing Road property. The caller said the people did not have permission to be there. Police asked the subjects to leave, and warned them about trespassing. 10:17 p.m. Police received a report of a small fire on land near the Causeway in West Bridgton. The officer found about 20 people around a fire; some were drinking alcohol (those that were consuming liquor were over age 21). Police asked the subjects to move along without incident. Thursday, July 7 6:19 p.m. Police respond-

Street and Harrison Road, causing major damage to the structure.  The operator of the red truck was Stephen Holtby of Lebanon, who was cited for speeding and failing to control his vehicle. There were no injuries requiring medical attention. Both trucks were removed from the scene by wreckers. Below, damage to the antique shop’s exterior wall.

ed to a report of a female panhandling on Willett Road, near Hannaford. The subject claimed she was from Portland, and was hungry. She has enough gas for her and a friend to return to Portland. The officer helped the pair to get something to eat and asked them to leave the area. 8:05 p.m. Police responded to a call regarding a male subject who had passed out on a floor and was unresponsive in a bathroom. The subject became conscious, but was very impaired. Drug paraphernalia was found nearby. Friday, July 8 12:53 a.m. Police were

Stephanie Butterfield is

intersection of Kansas Road and Herbeth Lane. One subject complained of arm pain. The car sustained damage to the passenger side, while the motorcycle had damage to the left side. Saturday, July 9 10:31 a.m. A back wheel of a school bus, turning right from the Community Center parking lot on Depot Street, struck another vehicle as it entered the lot. Sunday, July 10 12:53 a.m. A subject contacted police to tell officers he was thankful they serve and protect the community, in wake of the shootings in Dallas involving law enforcement.

THE BRIDGTON NEWS

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general email: bnews@roadrunner.com editor email: bnewseditor@roadrunner.com display advertising email: bnewsads@roadrunner.com website: bridgton.com Publisher & Editor.............................................Wayne E. Rivet Staff Writers.......................................................Dawn De Busk Advertising ..........................Eric C. Gulbrandsen, Ken Murphy Circulation & Classified.........................Elaine Rioux, Manager Production......................................Sonja Millett, Brad Hooper ...........................................................................Lorena Plourd The Bridgton News (USPS 065-020) is published Thursdays at 118 Main Street, Bridgton, Maine. Periodicals class postage at Bridgton, Maine. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Bridgton News, P.O. Box 244, Bridgton, ME 04009

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sent to Willis Park Road, where a woman was reportedly in the roadway and screaming. Police checked the area and found a parked vehicle with its parking lights on in a driveway. A woman denied screaming, and said she wasn’t feeling well. United Ambulance responded, checked the woman, and no medical treatment was needed. 11:53 a.m. A resident complained that subjects on two or three boats on a Long Lake sandbar near Power House Road were playing loud music. The caller was told to contact the Warden Service. 6:39 p.m. A vehicle and motorcycle collided at the

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Police & area news

July 14, 2016, The Bridgton News, Page 5A

Pub owner okayed to start deck, but there’s a catch (Continued from Page 1A) reduced. Construction was underway Tuesday. The property is owned by H.A. Mapes Inc. of Springvale. Once Kidder determines “a figure,” it will be inserted into the planning board’s approval document. Holmes told planners that

“low-level” string lights will illuminate the outdoor dining area and will not emit light beyond the property. As for music, Holmes said there would be “no rock concerts,” but he hopes to bring in small acoustic bands. Planner Dee Miller expressed concerns about noise levels that come with

“electric” instruments. Planner Brian Thomas asked that speakers be “aimed away from (nearby) house lots.” Holmes pointed out that fencing used behind the Gastropub is designed to act as a noise “barrier.” The fencing ranges in height from five to seven feet. “I’m all for music, but

people living nearby have reasonable expectations,” Miller said. Neighbor Sue Hatch questioned how noise complaints would be handled. The code officer would likely respond to noise infractions. Acceptable sound levels (based on time of day) are outlined in the town’s

(Continued from Page 2A) have equal ownership in the buildings and equipment. Entering into the agree-

ment had already been approved by residents at town meetings in Naples and in Casco.

These items appeared on the Fryeburg Police Department log: Monday, July 4 3:14 p.m. Police investigated a report of suspicious activity on Bog Pond Road. 4:34 p.m. Police responded to a complaint at Weston Beach Bridge. 7:45 p.m. Police assisted with a river rescue at Lovewell Pond Landing. Tuesday, July 5 5:47 a.m. A criminal mischief complaint was investigated at a Portland Street residence. 2:35 p.m. Police were sent to a Charles Street residence for a domestic disturbance. 4:05 p.m. A burglary occurred at the Town of Fryeburg transfer station. Wednesday, July 6 1:27 p.m. Police were unable to locate an intoxicated subject on Maple Street. 4:09 p.m. Four subjects were charged with illegal consumption of liquor by a minor at Canal Bridge Landing. The subjects were: Alyssa M. Libby, 18, of Buxton; Erica S. Hazelton, 20, of Auburn; Marissa M. Gould, 19, of Holden; and Danielle B. McClure, 18, of Buxton. 8:10 p.m. Police assisted rescue personnel with a call at a North Fryeburg Road residence. 9:10 p.m. A nonreportable crash occurred in front of Indian Acres, on Main Street. Thursday, July 7 12:50 p.m. Police were sent to Kenerson Drive regarding an unwanted subject. 1:01 p.m. Police took a harassment complaint on Dearborn Drive. 2:10 p.m. Police dealt with a civil issue on Smith Street. 9:32 p.m. A fireworks complaint (on Warren Street) was

filed.

On Monday, the Naples Board of Selectmen talked for a while about the withdrawal clause. According to Paraschak, although the agreement has a 20-year lifespan, there is a clause that allows either town to withdraw on a year-to-year basis. It should be noted that town officials are not considering getting out of transfer station agreement, but that it was discussed because residents had heard that other options had been explored. “I had inquiries from business owners,” Selectman Christine Powers said. Paraschak explained. “Last year, a company on Songo School Road approached us,” he said, adding that the company had offered its facility and its employees. The company located in Naples is called Think Green Songo Locks. It never panned out, Paraschak said. “Every couple years, we review it. Sometimes, sometimes, we have asked for people to take over the operation but it never worked

out,” Selectman Dana Watson said. Watson has been involved with the Casco-Naples Transfer Station Council since it began 20 years ago. The council has representation from both towns. Typically, the price being offered is not lower than the cost of running the jointlyowned transfer station. Powers expressed concerns about the future of ecomaine. Watson said that the CascoNaples operation could opt to have the household trash and recycling transported to another waste-disposal facility. Chairman Bob Caron II asked if there would be an expense to the Town of Naples to pull out of the agreement. “The town of Naples is not locked in for 20 years by any means,” Paraschak said. Caron repeated he just wanted to know how expensive it might be to withdraw from the agreement. Powers responded to Paraschak’s comment, asking “Why is it a 20-year contract,

ordinance. Holmes emphasized, “I’m happy to address concerns with neighbors and address it.” Planners Mike Figoli and Deb Brusini searched for options to allow Holmes to open the outdoor area before

all sewage data is in, but in the end, the board felt it was prudent to delay the final approval until Kidder’s ruling has been reached. “It’s unfortunate, but there are limits we have,” Figoli said. “I don’t agree with it.”

Naples signs transfer site pact

Friday, July 8 9:03 p.m. Responding to an alleged disturbance at a Lovell Road campground, police charged Mitchell Bolduc, 20, of Holden, Mass., with domestic violence assault. 10:19 p.m. A motor vehicle crashed on Bridgton Road. Saturday, July 9 10:52 a.m. A fish & game incident occurred on Swan Falls Road. 8:01 p.m. Following a motor vehicle stop on Lovell Road, police charged Ryan Hutchings, 22, of Silver Lake, N.H., with speeding (30-plus mph over the posted limit) and operating a motor vehicle while under the influence (alcohol). 10:10 p.m. Ronald K. Bartlett, 44, of Fryeburg, was charged with violating conditions of his release. Sunday, July 10 12:20 a.m. Responding to a drug complaint at a Lovell Road campground, police charged Allen R. Mannheim, 22, of Wellesley, Mass., with unlawful possession of a scheduled drug. 2 p.m. A motor vehicle crash occurred on Main Street, near Indian Acres. 3:44 p.m. A motor vehicle crash occurred at the intersection of Bridgton Road and Wilton Warren Road.

if we can get out of it anytime?” Her question was not immediately or directly answered. According to Paraschak, the cost would involve lawyer fees. He did not comment on whether or not the agreement had any sort of fine or fee

connected to a withdrawal. Earlier in the discussion, before the motion to sign the document was on the floor, Watson had said the first agreement was for a 20-year period and so the towns were following precedence by signing the agreement renewal for the same number of years.

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LUCKY DUCK — First place prize of $500 was awarded to Trevor Hinkle at the 17th Annual Duck Race sponsored by the Rotary Club of Bridgton Lake Region. Pictured are Trevor’s family who bought him a ticket. The second place winner received $250 and the third place winner received $100.  

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Area news

Page 6A, The Bridgton News, July 14, 2016

Short takes around area Old Pequawket Day July 23

games for children.  You must sign up prior to July 23.  Rain date is Saturday, July 30. If you want to do both a tour on the horse car and the luncheon, the total donation will be $30. Please send your check made out to the Fryeburg Historical Society and indicate your reservation and mail to: 83 Portland Street, Fryeburg, ME 04037 or stop by the Osgood House on Tuesdays, Wednesday and Thursdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.  For more information, please contact Diane Jones at 256-7468 or e-mail ewjones@roadrunner.com Tours of the house museum and research library will be offered free of charge.

FRYEBURG — The Fryeburg Historical Society will be hosting summertime events at the Col. Samuel Osgood House at 83 Portland Street on Saturday, July 23.  Bring your family and friends for a day of fun and bring a comfortable chair! Two tours of the village on the replica of the Fryeburg Horse Railroad: Tour 1 will begin at 9 a.m. and end at approximately 11 a.m. Tour 1 will end in time for those who have signed up for the luncheon. Tour 2 will begin at 1 p.m. and end at approximately 3 p.m. The tours will be narrated by Diane Jones. Donation for the tour is $20 per person. Each tour will leave from the Osgood House. There will be a summertime luncheon from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the lawn of the Osgood House. Donation for the luncheon is $10 per person. There will also be

Allies for Autism benefit ride

NORTH WATERFORD — The 5th Annual ATV Poker Run to benefit Allies for Autism will be held on Saturday, Aug. 13 at Pumpkin Patch Park in North

Waterford. The event is sponsored by Pulpit Rock Trail Blazahs. A cookout and music will follow the ride. Registration is from 8 to 10 a.m. $5 per hand, as many hands as individuals want. Return by 1 p.m. for the drawing. There will be cash prizes, raffle tickets and other prizes. For more information, contact Linda at 776-9090.

Fiber Crafters Invited

HARRISON — Scribner’s Mill Preservation will be hosting a Fiber Crafters Day on Saturday, Aug. 6 and are inviting those who work with any type of fiber art to attend.  This promises to be a fun day where crafters will be able to demonstrate, swap, sell, buy or just socialize.  Visitors to this event will have the opportunity to become immersed in the activities of the day. The use of fiber can include a wide variety of materials as well as

WIN THIS QUILT — Barbara Thorndell, Marlene Thombs, Marian Rabe, Gail Mitchell, Briar Rose and Cyndi Cross, Caitlyn Cross, Billy Loubier, Nathaniel Roy, Ellen Carey, Rayden Thorndell and Bob Carey gather around the gorgeous horse quilt created by the Chickadee Quilters, which will be used as a fundraising raffle item for Equine Journeys at Ring Farm in Bridgton. Equine Journeys offers therapeutic riding and driving for individuals with disabilities and veterans. Gail and Marlene represent the members of the Chickadee Quilters, a group of local quilters with a purpose — every year the Chickadees choose a local nonprofit organization and create a raffle quilt designed especially for the group. Tickets for the horse quilt raffle are available at Ring Farm and will be sold at various events until the 2017 Annual Family Farm Fun Day at Ring Farm. For more information, call 647-8475. wood fiber products such as basketry, papermaking, etc.   To be included in this event, please call Marilyn at 583-6455 or Sue at 647-8272. 

Fiber Crafters Day is from noon to 4 p.m. and will be held at the Scribner’s Mill homestead on Scribner’s Mills Road in Harrison.

There is no registration fee required. Bring a picnic lunch if you wish, beverages are free and ice cream sundaes will be available for sale.   

Fountain of You springs for classes during open house On Monday, she started her morning with a Pulse Barre class and then led a lively group of senior citizens in her Zumba Gold class. Later that afternoon, Toole showed up for another instructor’s class, the Yamuna body rolling class, which is being offered for four weeks as a test run of its popularity. According to Toole, you can actually measure and confirm that

Liane Muller, D.O.

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prize giveaways. Toole said she is humbled by the response of people who utilize the fitness studio. “So many people tell me how grateful they are that Fountain of You is there. The summer residents say that they used to go to Westbrook or North Conway for classes. People say that daily during the summer,” she said. From year-round residents, “I hear so many amazing stories. How they were (Continued from Page 8A) isolated. They did not have local, state, regional and national competitions, and dona- a place to work out. They tions to scouting groups. The Naples Lions Club holds a number of annual fundraising events including three summer cruises on the Songo River Queen. There are two remaining cruises this summer. One features a live rock ‘n’ roll band on July 30 with an Oldies theme (50s, 60s and 70s). The other features a rock ‘n’ roll DJ on Sept. 3 with a Classic Rock theme (60s, 70s and 80s). For more information, please visit the websites of the Naples Lions Club or the Songo River Queen.

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came here, they found fitness and they made friends,” Toole said. Those friendships are encouraged by monthly gettogethers that incorporate workouts with socializing. Fountain of You’s calendar is jam-packed with a variety of fitness classes. “I have seen the most progress in my fitness routine when I shake it up, mix it up with a variety of classes,” Toole said. For more information or to see a schedule, check out www.fountainofyoufitness. com

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Back Pain Neck Pain

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By Dawn De Busk Staff Writer NAPLES — Vicki Toole is convinced she has her ‘dream job.’ She snickers when she tells her husband that she has to go to work, saying the word work as though it were in air quotes. It’s not really work — although it can be a workout. That’s because Toole’s office is a fitness studio.

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Area news

July 14, 2016, The Bridgton News, Page 7A

One on One with...

Rev. Joyce Long

GEARING UP for Sip & Shop! Firefly owner, Jessica Jones (left) and Barbara Bloomgren, (right) owner of Towanda’s Specialty Food & Deli and T’s Pantry, toast in anticipation of the first annual Summer Celebration of Women. Dianne Scammon (center) pledged to spread the word about the July 28, 5 to 7 p.m. event at 103 Main Street, Bridgton. (Photo by Ellia Manners)

Refreshing way to shop Sip & Shop!

By Ellia Manners Sip & Shop! — Bridgton’s first Summer Celebration of Women — is the brainstorm of Jessica Jones, owner of Firefly Boutique and Barbara Bloomgren, owner of Towanda’s Specialty Food & Deli and T’s Pantry. On Thursday, July 28, 103 Main Street in Bridgton will overflow with complimentary jewelry gifts, wine and beer tastings, and a variety of surprises from 5 to 7 p.m. “As we create this event for our customers, we have so much to be grateful for,” Jones said. “Since moving across the street in March to 103 Main, we have been cheered by our patrons. It is thrilling to have our community of women (and some men!) supporting our changes and growth.” “The difference between the two locations is remarkable,” Jones added. “In our new space, we have a larger inventory, a bigger selection and seven gorgeous display windows, which showcase

our ever-changing clothing and jewelry lines. And the natural light brings the shop to life, even on gray days!” Bloomgren feels equally excited. “Towanda’s, having opened in April, already has quite a following. Now, with the addition of our liquor license, we are in a perfect position to host the wine and beer tastings for Sip & Shop! And our kitchen is working on a few secrets that will be debuted at our event!,” Bloomgren said. In addition, Bloomgren is opening T-s Pantry, in the brightly-painted space at the back of 103 Main Street, attached to Firefly Boutique. T’s Pantry offers specialty meats and charcuterie, imported Italian pasta, a wide variety of cheeses, Mainemade chocolates, olive oil from Tuscany and Provence, aromatized olives, plus fullflavored and affordable wines and a local selection of craft beer. Sassy & Blue, a part of Firefly Boutique, has expanded its line of unique handcrafted clothing for infants

and girls in the new location. Made from repurposed fabric, Sassy & Blue speaks to those who appreciate colorful upcycled clothing with flare. Baby girl “Onesiedresses.” “Make Me Pretty” design-your-own skirts, and” “Flounce and Bounce” dresses will be showcased. Denim “Twirl” coats will be on sale! The “Summer Celebration of Women” offers more than sipping and shopping! Carolyn Rhoads, keyboard player of the local jazz band, Skylark, will provide her engaging repertoire of blues and soft jazz. Carolyn has played the keyboard for 20 years, performing at festivals, fairs and private events all over Maine. She has recently started composing her own tunes and will play many of them at Sip & Shop! Sip & Shop! offers a time and place for customers to relax, chat with friends and acquaintances, and meet other women. A couple hours of “ME” time is what many women desire. This event offers two hours of R & R… for all of us!

(Continued from Page 1A) ers. In fact, my parents met each other at Woodford’s Congregational Church. BN: Was there a defining moment in your life that made you decide to pursue theology as a career? Joyce: Oh yeah, definitely. It is called ordained ministry. I was 100 percent called by God to be an ordained minister. I had no intention of becoming a minister. God really came and got me. I had three little boys and I was going through a divorce. I thought, “Oh my gosh, now I have to apply to seminary.” At the time, I was working as the Christian education director in Irvine, Calif. BN: Where did you go to seminary? Joyce: The seminary was called the Claremont School of Theology, CST, in Claremont, Calif. BN: Were there any challenges to overcome while entering a job field typically held by men? Or, is that just not true? Joyce: Oh, yeah, there was. It might have changed since 1999 when I was ordained. But, when I attended seminary, it was very much more strictly a man’s profession. It was harder when my sister was in seminary two decades earlier. For some reason, men are still given authority whereas women still have to earn authority. That is hard. There are pluses and minuses. Men and women do ministry very differently. It used to be that churches did not call women. Mostly, churches just called men, and it took a long time for women to break into the ministry. There are still some denominations that don’t allow women to be pastors: Southern Baptist, the Lutheran Church/Missouri Synod (LCMS), the Independent Evangelical-Lutheran Church in Germany and the Catholic Church. That was not the case of this church. Out in the rural country, there have been women ministers. Other churches thought we were evil for having female pastors throughout the history of this church. BN: What jobs did you have before coming to Casco Village Church 15 years ago? Joyce: I was the associate minister at the Community Congregational, United Church of Christ in Los Alamitos, Calif. That church ordained me. A pastor is ordained by the body of Christ, which is the congregation in the church. BN: Someone at a past Casco Town Meeting commented that after 35 years of living in Casco, he had finally been accepted as a resident by community members. Was there any period of time that you had to earn the congregation’s trust or was it just a matter of getting to know you? Joyce: You know what? Them as a

congregation, me as a pastor – we were so meant to be. I don’t remember it taking any time at all for me to become one of them. Part of that is the United Church of Christ’s process for finding a minister. I didn’t get placed here. The prospective pastor sends their profile to the church; and they respond if they like it. It is kind of like a cross interview. The Casco Village Church had a search committee made up of nine people. Rich Merk, who worked for Hancock Lumber, was chair of the committee. It became a passionate exchange of information between me and the search committee. Another part of the process is the Neutral Pulpit, in which you preach at another church and the search committee sits in the pews and listens. Then, the Service of Call is doing a week’s worth of activities with the church members. What was really different about my appointment is that I had my Neutral Pulpit and Service of Call within a week. So, I spent a week doing church activities with people in the congregation. The very next Sunday, the whole congregation heard me and then they voted. I had a week to find a house, and then I moved from California to Casco in July 2001. It was a whirlwind, which is my favorite word. It was a whirlwind of spiritual energy. I don’t remember it taking any time for them to accept me. But, in our hearts we were so sure and had already invested ourselves in one another. BN: How would you describe the congregation in Casco? Joyce: This congregation: it is such an active church. We are not a big church, but the output and activity is big. Some church congregations slow down during the summer, but not us. We just come alive because we are in the Lakes Region. We had our annual flea market on Saturday, and on Sunday, we celebrated my 15 years as pastor. We have Casco Days at the end of the month, and our church is really involved in Casco Days. We helped pay to send all these kids and adults to camp, at Pilgrim Lodge in West Gardiner. Also, during the week, we operate the Casco Food Pantry and the Clothes Closet. To add to that, we have 8:30 a.m. services at the Raymond Chapel. Then, I drive really fast to get to the 10 o’clock service in Casco. This church never stops; we are a constant ball of energy. BN: Tell me a little bit about this past Sunday, when tribute was paid to your 15 years as the church’s reverend? What happened and did it trigger any fond memories? Joyce: One of the parts of the celebraONE ON ONE, Page 8A

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Making a Difference I

know I am not alone in how I think about making a difference in this world.�What can I do that would help someone?� What can I do that would feel like I am making a difference, not just in my workplace, but in my community, the people around me? How do I do that? I don’t have the time or money or energy?

Sometimes we defeat the thought before we even try, because we limit our thinking on what we can do. Today, I ask you to open up the possibilities of what you can do in your community — Bridgton, Maine. On Eagles Wings In Bridgton, Maine is a 501c3 nonprofit center that provides free services of reflexology and massage to those going through cancer treatment. This wellness center provides these services to the public for a very reasonable charge that is a win-win. It allows the public to receive two full hours of relaxation and massage with combined reflexology and massage for only $75.

We also have a new art center that is open to public for a fee for classes and at no cost for cancer patients. See our ad for art programs. I am going to post some needed help that is simple yet something you could do to provide help for those in need. The following will give you some simple but great ideas. Thanks and we are going to be expanding our services in the coming months. — Ann Ruel

55+ Community

234 South High St., Bridgton, Maine

New Homes For Sale

So, here are some simple needs at our wellness center:

1. Providing water for our patients and customers. If someone would be willing to spend $3.00$5.00 every other week to bring in bottled water for our center. Simple and not expensive. 2. Slipper lady. If you can make hand-knit slippers such as the ones posted, that would be excellent. We send our patients home with free slippers after visiting. 3. Quilts, we have beautiful quilts being made by Bridgton Alliance Church and they are such a gift. If any one else wants to provide comfy blankets or quilts we are appreciative of that. 4. Circles of Hope. If you want to volunteer to make a dinner, babysit children, provide rides, do cleaning or have other talents to help our cancer families during a difficult time, Circles of Hope is volunteer work outside our wellness center. 5. FUNDRAISING. Have a paint night and help raise money for our center. Our art director will help you organize one at our wellness center or at another location. Or a walk-a-thon, bike-a-thon — be creative as we can always use the funding for our facility to continue.

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You can make a difference, just stop limiting your thinking One Eagles Wings: 207-803-8025 | Ann Ruel, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR: 207-415-9166 www.oneagleswings2.com | infooneagleswings@gmail.com |

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207-647-3883

www.BridgtonLiving.com


Continuations

Page 8A, The Bridgton News, July 14, 2016

One on One...

Lions pitch in

PITCH IN, Page 6A

DONATION TO LEAGUE — Gary Flick, treasurer of the Naples Lions Club (left), Isaac Holland, P/1B Babe Ruth team, and David Gerrish, president of the Naples Lions Club.

Ham Complex to host state tourney

The Ham Complex in Bridgton will host the 2016 11U Maine Cal Ripken State baseball tournament. The eight-team double-elimination tourney is being hosted by Sebago-Long Lake Cal Ripken League. The schedule is as follows: Saturday, July 16 Game 1, 10 a.m., Field 1, Brunswick at Ararat Game 2, 12:30 p.m., Field 1, Gorham at River Valley Game 3, 3:30 p.m., Field 2, Sebago-Long Lake at Andy Valley Game 4, 5:30 p.m., Field 2, Auburn at Skowhegan Sunday, July 17 Game 5, 10 a.m., Field 2, G2 winner vs. G1 winner Game 6, 12:30 p.m., Field 2, G4 winner vs. G3 winner Game 7, 3:30 p.m., Field 2, G2 loser vs. G1 loser

Game 8, 5:30 p.m., Field 2, G4 loser vs. G3 loser Monday, July 18 Game 9, 3:30 p.m., Field 2 G7 winner vs. G6 loser Game 10, 5:30 p.m., Field 1 G8 winner vs. G5 loser Game 11, 5:30 p.m., Field 1, G6 winner vs. G5 winner Tuesday, July 19 Game 12, 3:30 p.m., Field 1, G10 winner vs. G9 winner Game 13, 5:30 p.m., Field 2 G12 winner vs. G11 loser Wednesday, July 20 Game 14, 3:30 p.m., Field 2 G13 winner vs. G11 winner Game 15, 5:30 p.m., Field 2 G14 loser vs. G14 winner The Ham Complex can be accessed off Route 302 (traveling east, before Lampron’s) on BRAG Way.

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NAPLES — Although primarily noted for its role as “Knights of the Blind,” part of the mission of Lions Clubs is to support youth activities. Consistent with that objective, the Naples Lions Club recently presented a check in the amount of $500 to the Naples Baseball/Softball League to help support operating expenses of the five teams. This past season, the league fielded five teams based on age and skill level: T-ball, rookies, minors, majors and Babe Ruth. The donation was prompted by a letter sent to the Naples Lions Club by one of the team members during the league’s fundraising activities. Isaac Holland, a pitcher/ first baseman on the Majors team, wrote a letter requesting financial assistance for his team. The club was so impressed with the young man’s letter that they decided to donate $100 for each of the five league teams. The club raised the funds for this donation at a recent annual auction that dedicated the proceeds to local youth activities. Other youth activities supported by the Naples Lions Club include the Student of the Month awards for Lake Region High School seniors, Life Skills USA, donations to various school groups to defray expenses for

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(Continued from Page 7A) tion I liked best was being part of the choir. We sang five pieces. When I am in the choir, I am part of them, not the pastor. I sing soprano. For that moment in time, I am part of the choir. The music in the church is a huge part of our worship. Another thing on Sunday was a slide show of my 15 years and all the confirmation classes since I’ve been here. I’ve had seven confirmation classes, and 41 high school kids have gone through confirmation classes since I have been here. Beforehand, I sent personal invitations to all those kids, and a lot of them came here on Sunday. In the slide show, there were lots of playful pictures of me with the kids during Bible Camp: some years with umbrellas and rubber boots, other years wearing silly hats on our heads. Vacation Bible Camp is the time I get to play with the kids and invite God along. BN: What role does the church and its congregation play in the town? Joyce: One important thing about the community is that the sconce lights stay on in the sanctuary so that the church is a beacon of light for the community. The other thing is that we set a good example. We are an open and affirming church meaning that we accept and love all people. We are unique in that way. Each church decides to be that. I always preach open and affirming, especially gay, lesbian, and transgender. BN: The church has a motto of “open and affirming.” How did people respond to the shooting at the night club in Florida? Joyce: We prayed. We certainly do not go to a place of judging who is doing what. We are not against Islam (the people) or Muslim (the religion). Absolutely not. It is one of the world religions. We pray. It is a blessing that we are able to put it in God’s hands, and not be judgmental. BN: How about the police versus public clashes that have resulted in deaths in the U.S.? Joyce: Oh, that is hard. I think that our church would not be in a position of judging the police. These incidences are small compared to the number of police who protect us. It certainly seems that things are out of hand. What we prayed is that people need to stop shooting people. Loving each other – that can start with us. We can be out in the community, and be the peacemakers. We believe that we can make a difference even in small Casco Village. BN: Do these or other national happenings surface during your sermon or doing prayer concerns? Joyce: Yes. BN: What are the church’s concerns going forward the next 15 years? Joyce: It is the same as most Christian churches: That families and children come to church. That families invest their Sunday mornings as a time to go to church. As a teenager, we always went to youth group. On Sundays, we didn’t sleep in or skip it. Going to church was part of life. We hope that people will make church the center of their lives instead of a side order. BN: It must be really exciting to take part in the 125-year celebration of the Raymond Chapel in 2015, and the 175-year celebration of the Casco Village Church this year. Please tell me about that. Joyce: It is absolutely wonderful to be part of 175-year celebration of the church. My life energies are right here in this church and in these people and in this community. The generations before are in these walls. We prayed for 175 years more that this church will be a place for people to worship, belong, and be loved.


Summer Scene The Bridgton News

July 14, 2016, The Bridgton News, Page 1B

Cruise Night this Friday at Sebago Days SEBAGO — Sebago Days celebrates its 38th year on Friday, July 15 and Saturday, July 16. Events begin on Friday at 5 p.m. with the second annual cruise night. Last year’s cruise night featured over 50 vintage automobiles and this summer even more are expected. Are you a motorcycle fan? Sebago Days is collaborating with the American Legion Riders Chapter 155 in Naples to present its first Open Bike Show on Saturday at 2 p.m. Come show off your bike and take a look at all types of bikes including two wheelers, three wheelers and bikes with sidecars. What about music? There are lots of bands for your listening pleasure. On Friday night at 8 p.m., the Wicked

Good Band will perform. On Saturday at 2 p.m., you will find Walt Bannon and the Celtic Moose on the stage. By the way, the stage is under a tent so you will be able to relax in the shade while you enjoy the music. Mainely Country Band takes the stage at 5:30 p.m. followed by the Half Moon Jug Band at 8 p.m. Other special events include the amazing Talent Show at 6 p.m. on Friday, and on Saturday the very popular two-mile Family Run/Walk at 8 a.m., the annual parade at 10 a.m., antique engines at 11 a.m., and horse-drawn wagon rides from Still Brook Farms at 5:30 p.m. A midway of games, food booths and vendors is open throughout both days plus raffles for more than 100

VINTAGE CARS will be on full display during Cruise Night at this year’s Sebago Days festivities. prizes are held every hour. the best fireworks display on the grounds behind Sebago 11. For more information call The celebration concludes at the lake! Elementary School at the 787-3732 or check out the 9:30 p.m. on Saturday with Sebago Days is located on junction of Routes 114 and Facebook page.

SLL Music Festival continues by two unusual trios, the cheerful and jazzy Milhaud Suite with clarinet and the beautiful impressionistic trio by Gaubert with flute. The powerful conclusion to this program will be Faure’s colorful second piano quartet. This should send everyone off with a full heart. Program: All Things French POULENC: Sonata for Flute and Piano MILHAUD: Suite for Clarinet, Violin, and Piano GAUBERT: Trois Aquarelles (Three Watercolors) for Flute, Cello, and Piano FAURÉ: Piano Quartet No. 2 in G Minor, Op. 45 Performers: Performing

Area Events Annual Doll Tea Party

HARRISON — The Doll Tea Party, a fundraiser for Harrison Village Library, will be held at the library on Saturday, July 23, from 2:30 to 4 p.m. Dress to the nines and bring your favorite doll or stuffie for the social event of the season! We’ll partake of tea party treats and do doll-sized crafts before raffling off door prizes. Seating is limited; reservations are requested by July 21. Tickets are $5 per person and are available at the library. For more information, please contact the library at 583-2970.

Mid-Summer Party

FRYEBURG — The public is invited to attend the Mid-Summer Party celebrating the 2016 Collaborative Summer Library Program on Wellness, Fitness and Sports this Saturday, July 16, from 10 to 11:30 a.m. at the Fryeburg Public Library. Children: On you mark, get set, read. Teens: Get in the game, read! Adults: Exercise your mind, read! There will be books to browse, stories to hear, crafts to make and snacks for all. The event is sponsored by the Friends of the Fryeburg Public Library.

nights starting at 6:45 p.m. Reserved tickets must be picked up by 7:15 p.m. COMMUNITY CONCERTS 2016 Community outreach programs are offered in Bridgton, Norway, Portland, and Chebeague Island. Discover the Joys of Classical Music: an hourlong fun and informative free concert in an intimate setting for listeners of all ages. Sunday, July 24, 7 p.m. at St. Peter’s Church in Bridgton. Chebeague Concert: Free concert on Saturday, July 30, 7:30 p.m. at United Methodist Church on Chebeague Island. Healing through Music: a new program designed to bring healing power of music to nearby medical facilities for patients, staff and volunteers. For more information including ticket purchases and artists bios, please visit the website: www.sebagomusicfestival.org

207-647-2122

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Real Books for Real People

Meet the Author Book Signing

Saturday, July 16 • 1 - 3 p.m. Bob Wilkinson will be at the bookstore from 1 to 3 p.m. to sign copies and tell stories about his new memoir The Black Cloak.

Summer Reading Starts Here! Hours:

Mon. & Tues., Thurs.–Sat. 9:30 to 7 Wed. 9:30-6:30 Sun. 10 to 6

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FLUTIST Susan Rotholz will perform in works by Poulenc and Gaubert in an all-French program at Tuesday’s Sebago-Long Lake Music Festival at Deertrees Theatre in Harrison.

140 MAIN STREET BRIDGTON, MAINE

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Tour the Mill

HARRISON — Scribner’s Mill will be open for tours of the mill and homestead on Saturday, July 16 from 1 to 4 EVENTS, Page 2B

artists will include flutist Susan Rotholz and cellist Eliot Bailen, co-founders of the Sherman Chamber Ensemble; Carmelo Galante, principal clarinetist of the Omaha Symphony; Gerry Itzkoff, violinist of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra; Laurie Kennedy, principal violist of the Portland Symphony; Stephen Manes, professor emeritus of piano at Buffalo SUNY; Mihae Lee, pianist and the new music director of the SLLMF. Remaining concerts are on Tuesday evenings, July 19, 26 and Aug. 2 and 9, at 7:30 p.m. at Deertrees Theatre in Harrison, Maine. Tickets: Individual tickets are $25; five-concerts subscriptions are $100; free for anyone 21 and under. Tickets available online: www.sllmf. org/tickets or 781-3202. All tickets are for open seating and will be held at the front entrance box office. Tickets are available concert

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HARRISON — The Sebago-Long Lake Music Festival’s 44th and Music Director Mihae Lee’s inaugural season continues on Tuesday, July 19, at 7:30 p.m. at the Deertrees Theatre in Harrison. The chamber music series runs for four more Tuesday evenings through Aug. 9. Don’t miss this fabulous French program performed by the Festival’s extraordinary musicians! All Things French offers works that are delightful, lively, and passionate — very French and perfect for a warm summer evening. This enchanting program opens with Poulenc’s charming Flute Sonata followed


The Bridgton News

Summer Scene

Page 2B, The Bridgton News, July 14, 2016

Beach Boy tribute tonight Area Events the magic and essence of the 60s on the California beaches. The “Beach Party,” the cars, the sun, the endless summer… This is what The Beach Boys music is all about. Arts Jubilee kicks off the summer series with music made popular over five decades ago — creating fond memories of beach parties, surfin’ and endless summer! Headliners take the stage at 7 p.m., but the audience is encouraged to come early and enjoy a picnic supper while listening to the music of local musicians, who contribute their time and talent for the love of entertaining. Kicking off the season’s early concerts at 6 p.m. will be the dedicated musicians of the Mt. Washington Valley Band under the baton of Russell Gage. The series continues on July 21 when Arts Jubilee hosts “Old Friends” as they remember Simon & Garfunkel’s 1981 concert in Central Park — one of the largest and most beloved concerts of all time. Arts Jubilee’s outdoor festival concerts are found at

A Country Flavor Opening Tuesday, June 21 • 10-4 Baked Goods ~ Jams ~ Pickles Used Delightful Items & Treasures Homemade Maine Crafts ~ Field-grown Daylilies and Other Perennials and Herbs, Flowers and Bouquets. Route 35 N, 2 miles outside of Harrison Village Visit us at Bridgton Farmers Market on Saturdays 8-1 Open Tuesday – Saturday 10-4 • 329-4598

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(Continued from Page 1B) p.m. Tours of the mill includes a demonstration of the 19th century machinery to manufacture parts for dry (slack) barrels at 2:30 p.m.  Dry barrels were manufactured at the mill from 1896 to 1938 for the local apple industry. In 1938, New England experienced a deep freeze that froze and destroyed apple trees ending the production of barrels at the mill. Adult admission is $5. Check the website at scribnersmill.org for more information. Scribner’s Mill is found south of Bolsters Mills from the Jesse Mill Road. Crossing over the Crooked River Bridge into the Town of Harrison, the mill is on the left. From Harrison, follow the Maine State Directional Signs found traveling North on Route 35 at Carsley Road or Maple Ridge Road from Route 117 to the mill.

World’s Fair this weekend

WATERFORD — The Waterford World’s Fair is this Friday through Sunday, July 15-17 at the Waterford Fairgrounds, located on Irving Green Road in Waterford. A family oriented agricultural fair, featuring local vendors, entertainment and livestock. Old MacDonald’s Barn full of animals to touch, outside stage with local talent, demonstrations and livestock exhibits. Major Events: Live music, 4-H events and exhibits, horse and ox pulling and shows. Website: www.waterfordworldsfair.org

ID Mystery Photos

A TRIBUTE TO THE BEACH BOYS wit The Beach Bums kicks off the Arts Jubilee five-week concert series at Cranmore Mountain in North Conway, N.H. tonight, July 14 at 7 p.m. the base of the North Slope at Cranmore Mountain in North Conway, N.H.  Beverages and food available on the Deck at Zip’s Pub with a full view of the stage. Picnic suppers are permitted, but no alcohol, please. Provide your own seating with a blanket or lawn chairs. Admission is family friendly: adults are $10, seniors $8, students are $5 and kids 12 and under are free.  Arts Jubilee is a non-

profit organization with support from area corporate sponsors, private donations, and grants. The host sponsor, Cranmore Mountain, provides ample free parking, indoor restrooms, and beautiful mountain views in a natural amphitheater setting.  For additional information and a view of the entire five-week season, as well as music samples of each headline act, go to MWVEvents. com

LEA benefit concert July 18

HARRISON — The annual Camp Encore/Coda Concert to benefit Lakes Environmental Association will be held on Monday, July 18 at 7:30 p.m. at Deertrees Theatre in Harrison. Each year, the brilliant campers and counselors from Camp Encore/Coda in Sweden donate their time and talent to this fun concert. All tickets are $15. To purchase tickets visit brownpapertickets.com. Tickets can also be purchased through Deertrees Theatre by calling 583-6747 or at the door.

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McSherry’s 603-447-5442

1.5 miles west of ME state line

www.mcsherrysnursery.com

Wicked Wednesdays

POLAND — The Poland Spring Preservation Society presents Wicked Wednesdays! Back for another year, Lenny Brooks from Sabbathday Shaker Village in New Gloucester, will be presenting “The Shakers and The Rickers of Poland Spring: A Scrapbook History.” This illustrated talk will tell the story of an association that began in the 1700s and continues today — the association is between America’s longest-lived religious communal society and one of this country’s most noted resort/entrepreneurial families. The individuals involved are as fascinating as the events engendered by the friendship. What caused this seemingly unlikely association and what helped sustain it all in rural Maine and over 200 years ago?  The $6 donation at the door will be split between both nonprofits, Poland Spring Preservation Society and Sabbathday Shaker Village.

MollyOckett Day Festival

BETHEL — MollyOckett Day, Bethel’s largest and much-loved classic summer festival, is set for Saturday, July 16. Always the third Saturday in July, MollyOckett Day has served as a homecoming event for Bethel for nearly 60 years. The town common will be bustling with vendors including food, art, crafts and local nonprofits from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Entertainment on the town common will include the North American Wildlife Encounter live animal show at 12:15, a frog-jumping contest at 1 p.m., and live music with Jim McLaughlin from 2 to 4 p.m. Local rock band Crime Scene will perform from 6 to 9 p.m., leading into the fireworks. A parade with the theme of “Your Favorite Thing to do in Bethel” will start at 11 a.m. and proceed from the parking lot at The Gem Theater, up Main Street, and to the town common. Schedule details, parade entry forms, and race registration are available at www.mollyockettday.com

Marketing Series

Nursery & Garden Center Route 302, Center Conway, NH

WINDHAM — The Windham Historical Society hopes to identify some century old photographs taken in the South Windham village area including the Little Falls neighborhood on Monday, July 18. The public and especially anyone who lived in that area is invited to help in this detective work!  A brief business meeting is slated for 7 p.m., and it’s expected that the mystery photo project will begin around 7:30 p.m. at the Society headquarters and museum on Windham Center Road. The public is invited to attend. Call 650-7484 or e-mail info@windhamhistorical.com for more information.

NORWAY — Who doesn’t need marketing? Oxford Hills SCORE and the Oxford Hills Chamber of Commerce are sponsoring a hands-on, eight-part marketing series because we believe that every business, large or small, needs to continually market its products and services to flourish. Please join others for the sixth session in the series: The Role of Social Media on Thursday, July 28 at the Norway Town Office, 19 Danforth Street in Norway. For more information contact: gerry.nelson@scorevolunteer. org or call 743-0499

Open Dail y Mon.-Sat. 9-5 Sun. 10-4

Into the Woods

ALBANY — The July presentation in the Mahoosuc Land Trust’s “Into the Woods” speaker series will focus on the management of deer yards. Chuck Hulsey, biologist with the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife, will speak at the Albany Town House at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, July 20. Chuck will also lead a guided walk around the Land Trust deer yard at the Valentine Conservation Center, 162 North Road, Bethel, starting at 4 p.m.

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Save The Date!

THE BEST KEPT SECRET IN BRIDGTON

Make Us Your Favorite Greenhouse/Nursery

Artists Reception Sat., Aug. 6 • 6-8 p.m.

Bring in a picture of your space and let our PLANT GEEK – PETER, help you with design

So many plants blooming!

PERENNIALS • SHRUBS & TREES WEEKLY DRAWING Come see if you are a winner!

Pond Flora, oil on panel, 12” x 24”. Photo credit: Jay York.

Gallery Hours: Open Daily 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Sun. 10 a.m-5 p.m.

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1544 Roosevelt Trail (Rte. 302) Raymond, ME 04071• 207-655-4952 email: jlmastro@maine.rr.com www.holeinthewallstudioworks.com

SEE US AT THE BRIDGTON FARMERS MARKET SATURDAYS

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NORTH CONWAY — Entering its 34th season, Arts Jubilee is staging a five-week summer concert series, which runs weekly on Thursday nights from July 14 through Aug. 11, hosted at Cranmore Mountain, North Conway, N.H.   Performances this season will pay tribute to many famous groups, including the music of the Beach Boys (July 14) and the music of Simon & Garfunkel (July 21). Music of the 60s will be highlighted on July 28, with Roots, Rock & Soul taking the stage on Aug. 4. The series will culminate with the traditional Pops Concert including fireworks on Aug. 11.   This Thursday, the Beach Boys tribute will be presented by The Beach Bums, a Canadian-based band whose sole purpose is to bring back those memorable Beach Boy sounds. During the summer of ’98 six artists grabbed their instruments and talent to put together “The Ultimate tribute to The Beach Boys” and named themselves “The Beach Bums.” The goal of the show is to recreate


Summer scene

July 14, 2016, The Bridgton News, Page 3B

Twin virtuoso saxophonists at Mountain Top NORTH CONWAY — Mountain Top Music welcomes clarinet and saxophone virtuosos Peter and Will Anderson and guitarist Alex Wintz to an indoor/ outdoor mountaintop home concert just off Hurricane Mountain Road on Sunday, July 17, at 4 p.m. The concert is open to the public and weather permitting, will be held outside with seating on the lawn so that attendees may enjoy the spectacular mountain views of Cranmore and the Moats from this unique venue. Called “remarkable” by The Wall Street Journal and “delightful, dazzling and infectious” by Backstage magazine, Peter and Will,

identical twin brothers, are known for their exciting arrangements of jazz classics and fresh original music. Hailing from Washington, D.C. when their talents were recognized internationally as teenagers, they attended Juilliard in New York City where they currently reside. They have headlined at The Blue Note and Jazz at Lincoln Center there, and with an extensive touring schedule, have also appeared at The Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., the New Orleans Jazz Festival, the Sarasota Florida Jazz Festival, and many other important musical venues. Their trio ensemble has performed in over 35 U.S. states,

toured Japan, and been featured four times in NYC’s famed “Highlights in Jazz” series. This concert benefits the 400-plus students of Mountain Top Music by helping to keep local musical lesson costs at affordable rates. Come for the music and enjoy the reception and fun afterward with the musicians, friends, and refreshments. Tickets are $35 (children are free) and advance reservations are requested. To reserve and receive directions to this beautiful home, call Mountain Top Music at 603-447-4737 or visit www. mountaintopmusic.org for more information.

Greatest Gift Gospel

NAPLES — The Greatest Gift Gospel Band will present a concert at the Naples United Methodist Church (1000 Roosevelt Trail) in Naples on Saturday, July 16, at 6:30 p.m. The group recently participated in a worship service. The Greatest Gift is an evangelistic team, whose mis-

sion is to bring a message of hope through music to a troubled world. Some of their accomplishments include: 2015-16 Gospel Band of the Year; Pine Tree State Country Music Association; Downeast Country Music Association in Pigeon Forge, Tenn.; Northeast Invitation

Country Showdown; and they have been nominated for a Grammy Award for a song written by Wayne Patterson, one of the performers. A love offering will be taken. Desserts will be served following the concert. Come enjoy the music and fellow- TWIN BROTHERS Peter and Will Anderson will perform a home concert this Sunday, ship!! July 17 for Mountain Top Music.

‘Beatles For Sale’ return to Deertrees Theatre

BEATLES FOR SALE, a New England Beatles tribute band, has announced it will return to perform at the Deertrees Theatre on Saturday, Aug. 6 at 7:30 p.m. BEATLES FOR SALE is a

five-member New Englandbased Beatles tribute band from Massachusetts that is committed to recreating the sounds of the Beatles live in concert. They were voted in 2015 as the Best Tribute Band in New England by

Limelight Magazine. This band delivers a fun and energetic performance complete with original instrumentation and vocal harmonies that are as accurate as possible to the original Beatles record-

ings. There are no offstage performers or pre-recorded tracks — everything is performed completely live. Deertrees Theatre is

located at 156 Deertrees Road in Harrison. Tickets are $25 (over age 15), or $15 (under age 15) available at the Deertrees box office or

online at www.brownpapertickets.com/event/2553539 More information on the band can be found at www. beatlesforsale.net

HARRISON — 2016 – the 80th Anniversary season at Deertrees Theatre — is not only open, it is well underway! So much so, the first production in their theatrical offerings for this season closed last Saturday night and its four-night “run” was deemed a resounding success. “Audiences loved the quirky, fast-paced production

of Around the World in 80 Days — it was a great play to open the season with,” said Andrew Harris, the executive and artistic director of the theatre. This year will be the largest program in the theatre’s history and with 42 different evenings of performances, the pace on stage, in the wings, the rehearsal space and workshop

is break-neck! “We have something to match the taste of everyone each week. This week sees the return of the Sebago Long Lake Music Festival, a night of opera, the premiere of a brand new play, Underfoot in Show Business (which even includes a scene that happened at the theatre in 1940-41 when UPDATE, Page 4B

An update on the theatre

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BEATLES FOR SALE members include (left to right) Dan Kirouac, Steve Caisse, Mike “Ming” Christian, Dennis Cummins and Joe Budroe. 10T26-(5T26x)

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Country living

Page 4B, The Bridgton News, July 14, 2016

69th reunion for Class of ’47

NEXT GENERATION OF VOLUNTEER WAITRESS — Kate Long, granddaughter of Kay and Peter Leslie, serves up breakfast at the Wilkins Community House in Waterford.

Last two breakfasts

WATERFORD — The third in a series of four summer breakfasts will take place from 7:30 to 10 a.m. on Wednesday, July 27 at the Wilkins Community House at the foot of Plummer Hill Road, next to the Waterford Congregational Church.  In its 63rd year, the breakfast offers a menu of freshly baked muffins, scrambled eggs, pancakes, real Maine maple syrup, bacon, sausage, donuts, coffee and orange juice. The price for each breakfast is $8 for adults, $4 for child-sized portions, and free for children under 5 years of age.  The proceeds from the breakfasts contribute to the maintenance of the Wilkins Community House. The Wilkins House Basement Yard Sale is also held from 7:30 to 11 a.m. New items appear at each of the sales.  This summer’s final breakfast will be on Wednesday, Aug. 10. The Wilkins House team had the kitchen stove refurbished last fall. Unfortunately, it stopped working several times during the Fourth of July breakfast and called on the innovation of the entire kitchen crew. But be assured, it is back in working order and a super breakfast will be had by all without the waits of the Fourth of July breakfast. So join in, they all look forward to welcoming you. If you’d like to volunteer or learn more about the summer breakfasts, contact Ginny at 583-2729.

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The 69th reunion of Bridgton High School, Class of 1947, was held in Bridgton on Saturday, June 25, 2016, at Tom’s Homestead. The following members were present: Gordon S. Durfee of Enfield, Conn., Wilma Ridlon Irish of Naples, Carleen Libby Nelson of Clinton, Rubie Haughn Sandus of Bridgton, and Carlo I. Viitala of Harrison. Rachel Howard Bacon ’49 of Naples, Carolyn Nelson Corey of Albion, Betty Moynihan Cross ’50 of Bridgton, E. Maurice Edwards ’48 of Naples, Diana A. Nelson of Clinton, Diane Durfee Senez of Enfield, Conn., and Glenys Viitala of Harrison were guests of the Class of 1947. Greeting cards, signed by everyone present at the reunion, were sent to Rev. Ronald A. Murch of Lewiston and Claudia Moynihan Shapiro of Waterford, Conn., who had planned to attend the reunion, but were unable to do so due to illness. In the absence of the president, Rev. Murch, and there being no vice president, the secretary, Carleen Libby Nelson, conducted a brief business meeting and gave her secretary and treasurer’s reports. Mrs. Nelson reported that a donation had been sent from the class to Special Olympics Maine in memory of a dear member, Beverly Rand Koenig, a former class treasurer, who passed away on Jan. 6, 2016. Mrs. Nelson represented the Class of 1947 at the memorial service that was held in Durham for Beverly. A prize, to the person who traveled the longest distance to attend the reunion, was given to Gordon S. Durfee, who came from Enfield, Conn. to Bridgton, along with his daughter, Diane Durfee Senez. Maurice Edwards, a retired pastor, offered Grace before lunch. After the meal, which was enjoyed by all, Diane Durfee Senez entertained by reading Interesting Facts from 1947, which were quite amazing, and sometimes amusing,

ALUMNI OF THE CLASS OF 1947 of Bridgton High School (front, left to right) Diana Nelson, Carleen Nelson and Carolyn Corey; (back row) Rachel Bacon, Betty Cross, Wilma Irish, Gordon Dursee, Rubie Sandus, Carlo Viitala, Glenys Viitala and Maurice Edwards.  compared with the life and economy in 2016. The social time following Diane’s reading allowed for renewing acquaintances, updating information about families and friends, and sharing old school memories. Other members of the class who were unable to be present,

An update from Deertrees Theatre (Continued from Page 3B) Helene Hanff, the writer, worked in the box office) and on Saturday the concert will be Piano Men with the music

of Billy Joel and Elton John,” Harris noted. “Saturday is going to be a very special evening, along with all the other offering this week!”

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Please come in and browse, it’s good therapy! ~ Pam Rathmell

Rufus Porter Museum Now on Main Street Preview Exhibit & Gift Shop

PERFORMANCES THIS WEEK “Maine’s most enchanting playhouse”

Tickets online: www.brownpapertickets.com www.deertrees-theatre.org tel: 207.583.6747 156 Deertrees Rd, Harrison, ME

For our 2016 Season

Open Now thru September 5 Thursday - Saturday • Noon - 4 p.m. Rufus Porter Museum Is On the Move! 1T28ss

Fri., July 15 – 7:30 p.m. Theatre: “Underfoot in Show Business” Sat., July 16 – 7:30 p.m. Concert: Piano Men Mon., July 18 – 7:30 p.m. Concert: LEA & Camp Encore/CODA Tues., July 19 – 7:30 p.m. Concert: Sebago/Long Lake Music Festival Wed., July 20 – 7:30 p.m. Concert: Celtic Concert: Makem & Spain

Hatch, Winnifred Hilton Perkins, Lee C. Moynihan, Ellis Nason, Dean K. Perham, Doris Packard Zwolenski, Everett C. Robbins, Alice Wentworth Harmon, and Richard “Dick” York. Next year’s reunion (the 70th!) will be held on June 24, the location to be announced.

ART IN THE PARK — On Saturday, July 16, Shorey Park off Main Street in downtown Bridgton will be filled with beauty as more than 50 artists gather to sell their work. The Bridgton Art Guild’s annual Art In The Park, which attracts thousands of visitors and has become one of Bridgton’s premier summer events, will take place from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., with a rain date of July 17. There is no charge to attend Art In The Park, though you may be inspired to purchase some nice artwork for your home or to give as gifts. Many kinds of artwork will be available, from paintings and prints, to pottery and jewelry, photography, glass, wood, textiles, and more. St. Peter’s Episcopal Church provides a booth next to the lake with food and drinks. Live music from local musicians will add a nice vibe to a lovely summer day in the park.

Check out our selection of

Rt. 302 across from Campfire Grille, Bridgton, ME 04009

due to distance or illness, who were missed, include Gertrude DeWitt Holladay, Marion Linscott Littlefield and Victor R. Stevens. Deceased members of the class include: Maxine Ayer Hiscock, Lewis E. Barker, Melvin “Mickey” Boutilier, Horace Cockburn, Gerald

Donations to On the Move go toward a challenge matching grant from the Ham Charitable Foundation. To find out more please visit our website: www.rufusportermuseum.org

121 Main Street ~ PO Box 544 Bridgton, ME 04009 ~ 207.647.2828

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The building has seen more renovations this year, with the original ventilation being reinstated and with other subtle changes to the grounds and inside the theatre — “Maine’s Most Enchanting Playhouse” is certainly not showing her age — in fact she is looking and sounding younger than ever. The young student theatre staff working there this season bring an energy and talent beyond their years and they are joined by many familiar faces from past theatrical production; along with a plethora of new and returning talented musicians — many of whom local and some from as far away as Scotland! The theatre will stage a Gala Night on Sunday, July 31 to celebrate its 80th birthday and it has been hinted that the audience will experience all the magic of the organization’s rich past including acts that opened the theatre in 1936. “We have a vision for the theatre, which with luck, will give this exceptional venue a significant place in development of the region well beyond the next 80 years and see the

activity coming out of the organization expand beyond the traditional July and August season,” Harris said. “We hope those who have never visited will make time this year to do so and those loyal and regular patrons will visit more frequently.” Andrew Harris’s enthusiasm for his job, his artists and the region is infectious and when he shares the fact that he and his wife now reside in Harrison, he positively “lights up” — as does the whole enterprise that is Deertrees Theatre. This year, programming runs through to Aug. 19. The website, www.dertrees-theatre.org, has all the information on each event. Tickets for any event can be purchased online at http:// www.brownpapertickets.com/ or from the on-site box office and if you simply happen to only be “passing through” the region, the building alone is worth a visit and you will usually find an enthusiastic wannabee theatre practitioner more than happy to show you around the place and regale you with tales of the Hollywood greats!

Items sought for Waterford silent auction

WATERFORD — Back by popular demand, the Waterford Library is hosting a Silent Auction on Saturday, Aug. 13. The Gala, which met with great success four years ago, will be under the stars behind the library. The Trustees are heavy into the planning of the optional-black tie event, lining up food, drink and items to auction off. Anyone who has an item they feel would spark interest in an eclectic audience should drop it off at the library by July 4. The proceeds of the auction will go toward matching grant money for improvements to the apartment and produce preservation from the Community Garden. The Trustees are very excited about this “happening.” There was wonderful support from the town and surrounding area for the last event, and Trustees hope to repeat the financial success again this summer. Tickets for the event can be purchased at the library, and are $3 for a single ticket and $5 for two.


Country living

by Ethel Gilmore-Hurst Lovell Correspondent 925-3226 ehurst3@yahoo.com There will be a table for those who would like to sign up for the Dave Mason Golf Tournament, set for the first weekend in August. This year’s Parade Grand Marshals are Linda and Ed Dunlea. Since moving to Lovell from Reading, Mass. with their two daughters, Sheryl and Lori, they have played a big part in the Lovell community. Both have served on many committees and just recently Linda retired from her position as school secretary at New Suncook School. The couple worked together and now that Linda has retired you might see her out on the tractor with Eddie mowing hay. Children’s Theater performance 2 p.m. If you’d like to sit down and just relax after a busy day, the Brick Church Children’s Theaters Camp will be putting on a performance at 2 p.m. at the Brick Church. They will be showing off all the interesting forms of acting, singing and being a part of the theater, Yard Sale: The Charlotte Hobbs Memorial Library is holding a Community Yard Sale on the library grounds from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. There is still space available for anyone interested. For more information, you can call Lynn Hurd at 925-1101. Hewnoaks Special Readings, Tuesday, July

19: The Charlotte Hobbs Memorial Library and the Greater Lovell Land Trust are holding a special event at Hewnoaks. The purpose of this event is to see the natural world though stories and poetry. Led by Judy Steinberg, the readings should give a pure image of nature through the words of the author. It all begins at 9:30 a.m. to noon. Greater Lovell Land Trust Talk, Wednesday, July 20: This cosponsored event by GLLT and the Sweden Historical Society, features a talk by Dr. Robert Sanford about how to read trees, plants and cellar holes, all that is part of the landscape around us. He will point out how the landscape can change because of the people living in the area. Starting time is 7:30 p.m. at the Charlotte Hobbs Memorial Library. Greater Lovell Land Trust Walk, Thursday, July 21: The Land Trust walk will be a continuation of the talk on the changing landscape with Dr. Robert Stanford. Those taking part will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the Flat Hill Parking lot on Heald Pond Road in Lovell. Charlotte Hobbs Memorial Library Special Program, Chewonki’s Animal Fitness, Friday July 21 at 1 p.m.: The Charlotte Hobbs Memorial Library will

have a special children’s program on Friday, July 22 at 1 p.m. Chewonki’s program is the most popular children’s program around. Geared specially to keep the kids’ interest with participation the library continues to keep them in the summer programming. This program will deal with keeping fit by exercise and nutrition. There will be three animals for the children to meet and have fun. Bring the kids and the adults might find topics of interest too. Lovell Fire Department Sign: For those passing the fire station, they can see that the sign has been completed with the painting of the post around the sign. The bright red color makes Rod Blood’s spectacular wrought ironwork stand out. The sign was completed in time for the Maine Western Firemen Association dinner hosted by the Lovell Fire Department. Good job to all. Great Grandbaby: I have to brag about the birth of my fifth great-granddaughter, Lillianna Forand, born June 28 to my granddaughter, Shannon and her husband, Justin, at Memorial Hospital in North Conway, N.H. Her grandmother is my daughter, Robin Jensen. Lillianna was a bit early, but still weighed in at 7 pounds 10 ounces. She’s a real cutie.

9 Depot St., Bridgton, Maine

July 14th – July 21st THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS (PG)

FINDING DORY (PG)

INDEPENDENCE DAY: RESURGENCE (PG13)

Rufus Porter mystery tour

ADVANCED SCREENING July 14th – 7:00 & 9:45

GHOSTBUSTERS (PG13)

The Rufus Porter Museum RPM will reveal five hiswill present a Mystery History toric sites in Bridgton on July Tour on Saturday, July 23 23. There will be a map with from noon to 4 p.m. the locations of each site.

Visitors will get to each site and have an insider’s tour. Most of these sites are privately owned and not typically open to the public. So it’s defi- 4 - 8 Mon. - Thurs • Fri. & Sat. noon - 9 nitely a behind the scenes tour. Sun. noon - 8 Tickets: $20 in advance, Wed., July 13 & 27th – 6 p.m. $25 at the door. Tickets sold at FAMILY-FRIENDLY MOVIES the Rufus Porter Museum or Call ahead for details, 647-9326 after 12:30 SEBAGO — Wanted: Crafters for the Christmas Craft and call 647-2828 or go to www. 647-9326 or visit us on the web at Bake Sale set for Nov. 12 from 9 a.m. To 2 p.m. At the North rufusportermuseum.org www.magiclanternmovies.com Sebago United Methodist Church. Please call Mabel at 7872530 for more information. Casco/Naples/Raymond American Legion Post #155 Check theatre for show times

Sebago crafters

Fish Fry Mon., July 18th

Open Pool 6:30 p.m.

Summer Dart Season

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Sat., July 16th 7:00 p.m.

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Couples Dart Shoot

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Thursday, July 14 Loon Echo Land Trust’s famous Acoustic Sunset Concert Series on top of Hacker’s Hill Preserve on Quaker Ridger Road in Casco returns for the fifth season. Opening concert features folk singer/songwriters Bennett & Perkins with harmonies and guitar work from 6 - 8 p.m., with a suggested donation of $10 for adults and $5 for a child to benefit the ongoing stewardship efforts of Hacker’s Hill. A stunning, intoxicating extravaganza of jazz, folk and blues with Heather Masse and Jed Wilson at The Brick Church in Lovell at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are available at the door for $20, refreshments will be served at intermission. For more information or for reservations, call 925-1500. The event is to help support The Brick Church. The Arts Jubilee 34th Summer Concert Season begins with A Tribute to the Beach Boys at the base of Mount Cranmore in North Conway. Headline concerts begin at 7 p.m. with an early concert performance by some of the area’s best musicians at 6 p.m. Admission is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors, $5 for students and free for kids 12 and under. Saturday, July 16 A live concert with Emmy-nominated “The Greatest Gift Gospel Band” will be held at the Naples United Methodist Church, 1000 Roosevelt Trail, Naples at 6:30 p.m. Following the concert desserts will be served and a love offering will be taken to benefit the band and the Church Restoration Fund Drive. FMI: Call Cathy at 6936854.” Sunday, July 17 Twin brothers Peter and Will Anderson will perform a home concert at 4 p.m. for Mountain Top Music. The location is just off Hurricane Mountain Road in North Conway. Tickets are $35, children are free and advanced reservations are requested. Call 603-447-4737 or visit www.mountaintopmusic.org for more information. The Summer Concert Series continues on the Village Green in Naples from 6 to 7 p.m. (inside Naples Methodist Church, if rain). This week’s concert will feature Gloria Jean & Bobbi Lee, country music. Monday, July 18 The Poland Spring Preservation Society’s annual summer concert series is held at the All Soul’s Chapel, Poland with doors opening at 6:30 p.m. and program starts at 7 p.m. Tickets are $6 in advance at Maine State Building or $7.50 at the door. FMI: 207-998-4142. Camp Encore/Coda Annual Concert will take place at 7:30 p.m. at Deertrees Theatre in Harrison to benefit Lakes Environmental Association. All tickets are $15. To purchase tickets visit brownpapertickets.com or purchase through Deertrees by calling 583-6747 or at the door. Tuesday, July 19 The Sebago-Long Lake Music Festival presents All Things French, at 7:30 p.m. at Deertrees Theatre, Harrison. Call 781-3202 for information on tickets or purchase online at www.sebagomusicfestival.org/tickets Thursday, July 21 Arts Jubilee Summer Concert Season continues with Old Friends: Remembering Simon & Garfunkel at the base of Mount Cranmore in North Conway. Headline concerts begin at 7 p.m. with an early concert performance by some of the area’s best musicians at 6 p.m. Admission is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors, $5 for students and free for kids 12 and under. Sunday, July 24 The Summer Concert Series continues on the Village Green in Naples from 6 - 7 p.m. (inside Naples Methodist Church, if rain). This week’s concert will feature Brian Curtis Johnson. Sebago-Long Lake Music Festival community outreach program presents Discover the Joys of Classical Music, an hour-long fun and informative free concert in an intimate setting for listeners of all ages at St. Peter’s Church, Sweden Road in Bridgton at 7 p.m. Monday, July 25 The Poland Springs Preservation Society’s annual summer concert series is held at the All Soul’s Chapel, Poland with doors opening at 6:30 p.m. and program starts at 7 p.m. Tickets are $6 in advance at Maine State Building or $7.50 at the door. FMI: 998-4142. Tuesday, July 26 The Sebago-Long Lake Music Festival presents, Stringfest, at 7:30 p.m. at Deertrees Theatre, Harrison. Call 781-3202 for information on tickets or purchase online at www.sebagomusicfestival.org/tickets

Lovell

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Entertainment & Concerts

Old Home Days: Old Home Days seems to come around really fast these days, but July 16 is this Saturday. The festivities start off with a hearty breakfast at the Masonic Hall from 7 to 10 a.m. Then, the 5K race starts at 9:45 a.m. warming up the crowd for the Old Home Day Parade, which follows from the Wicked Good Store at 10 a.m. The Lovell Athletic Field is both groups’ destination, where all the fun and food is waiting. The Kezar Lake and the Greater Lovell Land Trust Associations of Lovell will have booths with information regarding the work they do. The Lions Club, as always, will keep the hot dogs, hamburgers, French fries flowing. Other goodies will be ice cream and strawberry shortcake. There are games like the Dunk Tank, Lollipop Youth Race, Jell-O Eating Contest, Mini Golf and face painting for the kids to have fun. The Lovell Fire Department will have a display, all to keep folks up-to-date with the department. Another featured attraction is the Classic Boat Show featuring boats made of different materials like wood, aluminum and fiberglass from the early 1930s up to the 1970s. The event is sponsored by the Lovell Invasive Plant Prevention Committee. At the gazebo, there will be music from the Milltown Road Show to keep folks humming along. At noon, Cow Chip bingo will take place, if things go right. The event is sponsored by the Lovell Rec Department so don’t forget to get your number.

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Friday – Sunday, July 15 - 17 The Originals present Agatha Christie’s The Unexpected Guest at the Saco River Theatre, 29 Salmon Point Road in Buxton. Show times are Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday at 2:30 p.m. For ticket information and reservations call 929-5412 or order online at www.sacorivertheatre.org/events. Friday, July 15 Ameranouche, an up and coming choreographer will perform at Denmark Arts Center at 7:30 p.m. The suggested donation is $15. Saturday, July 16 Choreographer Lily Bo Shapiro will perform at 7:30 p.m. at the Denmark Arts Center. The suggested donation is $15. Celebration Barn Theater presents Magician Peter Bole with mind-blowing illusions with lots of laughs at 8 p.m. For tickets call 743-8452 or www.CelebrationBarn.com. Wednesday – Friday, July 20 - 22 Come laugh with others as Denmark Arts Center presents the 23rd Maine Stage Readers Theatre Show. This show is “adult humor for your summer laughs.” A donation of $10 (or more) will benefit the Denmark Arts Center. Wednesday show is the dress rehearsal performance. All shows at 7:30 p.m. located at 50 West Main Street, Denmark. FMI: call 452-2412. Thursday – Saturday, 21 - 23 The Originals present Agatha Christie’s The Unexpected Guest at the Saco River Theatre, 29 Salmon Point Road in Buxton. Show times are Thursday, Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $20/adults, students and seniors $18: July 21, pay what you can. Reservations are advised, call 929-5412 or order online at www.sacorivertheatre.org/events Saturday, July 23 Celebration Barn Theater presents, The Big Barn Family Show an action-packed variety and spectacle for young audiences at 2 p.m. Then at 8 p.m. the Big Barn Spectacular will be held. It is the biggest variety show of the year with guests from across the United States. For tickets call 7438452 or www.CelebrationBarn.com

‘Old Home Days’ Saturday

Maine Lobster Express FRESH LOBSTER Live or Cooked FRESH FISH • SHELLFISH

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Flower Bouquets

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Theatre

July 14, 2016, The Bridgton News, Page 5B

7 MAIN STREET, BRIDGTON, MAINE

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Page 6B, The Bridgton News, July 14, 2016

Summer scene

Harvest Gold reception and open house CENTER LOVELL — Harvest Gold Gallery is excited to announce its annual Artists’ Reception and Open House, exhibiting the painted and carved works of Thomas Merriam, along with many others! A Maine native, Merriam

began carving at the age of 12, and worked in the family business carving log benches. He graduated from the New England Conservatory of Music as a piano technician, and began working as a piano repairman and tuner. Carving in his spare time,

Merriam created commissioned carvings. Merriam turned to carve full-time in 1982, when he went to work for a sign company in North Conway, and won six national awards for Dimensional Sign Design. A self-taught watercolor-

ist, Merriam went on to study under George Carpenter. Carpenter was the last surviving member of the Whiskey Watercolor Association, and he passed many of his techniques on to Merriam. Often beginning his work plein air (working outside, painting

Jim Gallant at All Souls Chapel

POLAND — Jim Gallant will perform on Monday, July 18 as the Poland Spring Preservation Society presents the Monday Summer Concert Series.  Whether performing at a coffeehouse, college concert or an outdoor festival, Jim’s music has never failed to capture the hearts and feet of his audience. His uptempo guitar style, mix of catchy originals and masterful interpretations of contemporary music leaves his audience feeling fully satisfied. From Dylan and The Beatles to Bach and blues slide guitar, his performances are filled with lots of fun and excitement.  His performance at the All Souls Chapel will feature many older and contemporary blues styles done on six-

string and slide guitar.  The Poland Spring Preservation Society, a 501(c)3 nonprofit, is dedicated to the restoration and preservation of the Nationally Registered Historic Landmarks: All Souls Chapel and the Maine State Building. Poland Spring Preservation Society celebrates the long history of Poland Spring by educating visitors through the museum, collections, and community-driven events.   Advanced tickets are sold at $6 located at the Maine State Building until 5 p.m. on Monday. Tickets at the door will be $7.50 at the All Souls Chapel. Doors open at 6:30 p.m.  For more information, call 998-4142 or e-mail polandspringpreservation@ gmail.com

Ice cream train

PORTLAND — The popular Ice Cream Train returns to the Maine Narrow Gauge Railroad Co & Museum this Friday!  Ice Cream Trains run select Friday evenings during the summer including July 15, July 29, Aug. 19 and Aug. 26. The museum will be open from 4 to 8 p.m. with train rides on the hour at 5, 6 and 7 p.m.  Visitors can enjoy an ice cream treat from Shain’s of Maine, ride the train and explore the museum for a special rate of only $7.50 per adult and $5 per child. This is a great way to experience the beauty of summer along Casco Bay while enjoying all that the railroad museum has to offer! Founded in 1992, the Maine Narrow Gauge Railroad Company & Museum is a nonprofit museum with a mission to educate the public and preserve historic equipment related to Maine’s two-foot gauge railways.  The museum is open daily from early May through late October and seasonally for events. The railroad is located at 58 Fore Street in Portland, on the waterfront, just a short walk from the Old Port. Directions and more information about the museum can be found on the museum’s website at www.mainenarrowgauge.org or by calling 828-0814.

Raymond’s Frozen Custard

Made Fre s Onsite D h aily

what is seen in that moment), Merriam starts by painting small, quick studies of his subject matter. In these studies, he captures variables that swiftly change in the outdoors: the wind, light, and movement of a scene. He then returns to his studio in Portsmouth, N.H. to complete a larger final piece based off of the study. Along with painting and carving, Merriam is an accomplished poet, storyteller and musician. Merriam has published several children’s books that he wrote and illustrated himself — all of which will be on display during this year’s annual Gallery Open

House! The Artists’ Reception and Open House will be Friday, July 15, from 3 to 6 p.m. at Harvest Gold Gallery. Stop by the gallery and enjoy wine and hors d’oeuvres while perusing the art and chatting with some of the local artists. It is sure to be a fun and relaxed gathering that everyone will enjoy. Harvest Gold Gallery is located at 1082 Main Street in Center Lovell, just past the Center Lovell Market. For more information on Merriam, the reception, or the gallery in general, call 9256503 or check online at www. harvestgoldgallery.com

Suppers & breakfasts

Jim Gallant

Naples Library events in July NAPLES — What’s happening at the Naples Public Library this month: July 19, 6 p.m., Build Fairy Furniture July 20, 2 p.m., “Let’s Talk About It” book discussion July 20, 6 p.m., Kevin Hancock, author talk and book signing, Not For Sale: Finding Center in the Land of Crazy Horse July 21, 6 p.m., Mad Science “Olympic Madness” July 23-24, Volunteers wanted for porch project. Contact Jim Koran at 693-4292 July 26, 4 p.m., Family Movie July 28, 6 p.m., Cynthia Grimm, author talk and book signing, Snuggie Bear Goes to the Maine Wildlife Park July 30 (Rain date July 31), Naples for the Arts, visit the library’s booth, local, handmade items • Tuesdays in July, 9 a.m., free Tai Ji with John Cuadrado • Wednesdays, July 14 to Aug. 24, Yoga with Deb Goldstein, adults 8:30 a.m., $10; children, 2 p.m., free • Storytimes: Tuesday at 10:30 a.m.; Thursday at 10:30 a.m.; Thursday at 4:30 p.m., Read to Bear; Thursday at 6 p.m. • Scrabble, the second and fourth Wednesday at 7 p.m. • Mah Jongg, Thursday, games begin at 10 a.m. For more information, call the library at 693-6841 or go to www.naples.lib.me.us

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Saturday, July 16 Public Breakfast in conjunction with Lovell Old Home Days at Delta Masonic Lodge, intersection of Route 5 and 93, from 7 to 10 a.m. The menu includes: eggs, sausage, home fries and pancakes (plain or blueberry). The cost is $7 for adults and $4 for children. Bolsters Mills United Methodist Famous Chicken Pie Suppers continue this week with seatings at 5 p.m. and 6 p.m. and an additional one at 7 if needed. $10 for adults and $5 for children under 12. Supper includes: chicken pie, mashed potatoes, gravy, vegetable, homemade dessert and beverages. Reservations can be made Saturday morning only between 9 a.m. and noon at 583-9024. Public Baked Bean Supper at the East Baldwin Church Parish Hall, 4:30 to 6 p.m. Adults at $8 and children are $3.50. Come and enjoy. Thursday, July 17 A Public Supper at the South Bridgton Congregational Church will be held at 5 p.m. The menu includes beans, brown bread, casseroles, salads, desserts and beverages. Enjoy the music that follows. For reservations call Sandy at 647-2800. Tuesday, July 19 A Public Supper at the North Waterford Congregational Church will be held from 5 to 6:30 p.m. The menu includes baked beans, casseroles, salads, brown bread, rolls, beverages and strawberry shortcake. Served buffetstyle, all you can eat for adults $9 and children under 12 $4.50. Wednesday, July 20 Otisfield Community Lunch at the Community Hall on Route 121 will be held from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. The menu is: meatloaf, hash browns, salads, assorted desserts, juice, coffee and ice tea. No charge, donations accepted. Saturday, July 23 The Bridgton Fire Department will be holding a Public Baked Bean Supper at Central Station on 7 Gibbs Avenue, Bridgton from 5 - 7 p.m. The menu includes: beans, hot dogs, macaroni and cheese, coleslaw, rolls, brown bread, drinks and dessert. Adults are $8 with children 6 to 12 years $4. and children 5 and under are free. For more information call 693-3681. The North Sebago Methodist Church will be holding a Baked Bean Supper from 5 to 6:30 p.m. The church is located on Route 114. The 9th annual Sam Norftle/Charlie Micklon Baked Bean Supper is being held from 5 to 6:30 p.m. at Delta Masonic Lodge, intersection of Routes 5 and 93 in Lovell. Menu of homemade baked beans, hot dogs, coleslaw, brown bread, corn bread and homemade desserts. The cost is $7 for adults and $4 for children and proceeds to benefit the upkeep of the building. Wednesday, July 27 The third of four Waterford Summer Breakfasts at the Wilkins Community House at the foot of Plummer Hill Rd. from 7:30 to 10 a.m. A breakfast of freshly baked muffins, eggs, pancakes, bacon, sausage, donuts, coffee, tea, and orange juice and real Maine Maple Syrup will be served from 7:30 to 10 a.m. The price is $8 for adults, $4 for children ages 5-10, and free for children under 5 years of age.


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Summer scene

July 14, 2016, The Bridgton News, Page 7B

This week at the Denmark Arts Center

DENMARK — “Ameranouche” and up­ and­ coming choreographer and recent Bowdoin graduate Lily Bo Shapiro take center stage at the Denmark Arts Center this weekend. Ameranouche comes to the Denmark Arts Center this Friday, July 15 at 7:30 p.m. from Boston. The award winning Ameranouche (pro­ nounced uh­Mare­uh­noosh) plays a passionate style of music they call “Gypsy Flamenco Swing.” The name is derived from two words: American and Manouche, the gypsy tribe of guitarist Django Reinhardt. The rip­-roaring ensemble made up of Richard Shepard, Michael Harrist and Jack Soref is a super force of hot acoustic Gypsy-­ inspired music mix­ ing flamenco, bebop and jazz swing influences. Played on traditional French jazz gui­ tars, the music is rhythmic, vigorous, and elegant. Whether they’re playing a musette waltz from 1930 or an Andalusian-inspired original tune, Ameranouche’s Gypsy flamenco swing-style is a fresh and highly enjoyable

new sound for the 21st cen­ human processes of reading more about what Lily Bo Saturday, July 16. Tickets online ticketing source, avail­ tury. Gypsy flamenco swing and recognizing. Shapiro is all about, stop are $15 suggested donation able on the DAC website cal­ is about coming together and If you want to find out by the DAC at 7:30 p.m. on and can be purchased via our endar. celebrating our shared human­ ity. Ameranouche is com­ mitted to connecting deeply with its audience and sharing joy and peace through its live shows and recorded albums. To come share in this exu­ berant celebration, stop by the DAC at 7:30 p.m. on Friday, July 15. Tickets are $15 sug­ gested donation and can be purchased via online ticketing source, available on the DAC website calendar. Head over to www.denmarkarts.org/cal­ endar/, click on the event you wish to attend, and reserve your tickets ahead of time. For more information, call 452­2412 or e-mail info@den­ markarts.org Lily Bo Shaprio: This Saturday, July 16, at 7:30 p.m., up-­and-­coming chore­ ographer and recent Bowdoin graduate Lily Bo Shapiro comes to Denmark for a weeklong residency this July. Lily’s original perfor­ mance work deconstructs dis­ play and spectatorship in per­ formance, using movement and stillness to play with the AMERANOUCHE performs at the Denmark Arts Center this Friday at 7:30 p.m.

Hawthorne House art sale

CHOREOGRAPHER Lily Bo Shapiro appears at the Denmark Arts Center on Saturday night.

Photos wanted The 12th Images of Sebago Lake Calendar will be pub­ lished in December of 2016. Producers are looking for shots that celebrate the natural beauty of Sebago Lake, taken by amateur or hobbyist photographers. Unique this year, producers are also soliciting photos of Sebago Lake’s tributaries, like the Crooked River. Digital photos are preferred, and must be high resolution for printing purposes (minimum size of 1 MB). Photos will be accepted through Aug. 7. Calendars will be available around Thanksgiving. Photographers will receive a complimentary calendar! Please forward the photo along with the following infor­ mation to the address below. Please note: The Portland Water District e-mail system permits e-mail attachments of up to 10 MB. If you are sending several photos, please e-mail them in batches so the maximum attachment size is not exceeded. Send to: Sebago Lake Calendar, Portland Water District, 225 Douglass Street, PO Box 3553, Portland, ME 04104, e-mail to sebagolake@pwd.org Information needed: Your name and age (if under 21), mailing address (for December), e-mail address and location and season/date of photo. By providing photos, you agree to allow PWD to use them in the calendar and other materials.

and refreshments, a raffle and souvenirs. This promises to be an event that will draw many people from Raymond, Windham and surrounding towns. Come and browse around!  If you have not previ­ ously visited the Hawthorne House, located at the cor­ ner of Cape and Hawthorne Roads in Raymond (40

Fairs & Festivals

Friday – Saturday, July 15 – 16 Sebago Days celebrates its 38th year. Events begin on Friday at 5 p.m. with the second annual cruise night. For motorcycle enthusiasts there will be the first Open Bike Show on Saturday at 2 p.m. Lots of music can be heard on both days. A talent show on Friday at 6. Visit the midway for games, food booths and vendors. Celebration concludes at 9:30 p.m. on Saturday. The event is located on the grounds behind Sebago Elementary School at the junc­ tion of Routes 114 and 11. For more information call 7873732. Friday – Sunday, July 15 – 17 The Waterford World’s Fair is located on (Irving) Green Road off Route 35, North Waterford, across from Melby’s Market. Admission is $6, children 5 and under are free. On Friday Senior Citizens are $3. There will be a Conservation & Agriculture Event on Friday from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Pig scrambles each day. Saddle Horse Games on Friday at 2:30 p.m. Fiddler’s Contest is on Sunday starting at 10:30 a.m. There will also be entertainment on the stage each day. Check out the full schedule at www.waterford­ worldsfair.org for all the fun. Saturday, July 16 The Twelfth Annual Lovell Old Home Days parade will be at 10 a.m. on Route 5 through the center of town to Smarts Hill Road ending at the athletic field. Following the parade there will be food, crafts and exhibits and the Cow Chip sponsored by Lovell Recreation Department.

Hawthorne Road for your GPS), this would be a good opportunity, since the house is rarely open to the public. Famed 19th century author Nathaniel Hawthorne lived here from the age of 9 until he began attending Bowdoin College in 1821. The house was later used as a tavern and a place of worship (not at the same time!), then fell into disrepair until the Hawthorne Community Association was formed in 1921 with the mis­ sion of preserving the historic home.  Ten percent of art sales will go directly to upkeep of

the Hawthorne House.  Information on other events and lots of historical information is available at www.hawthorneassoc.com

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RAYMOND — The Hawthorne Community Association is hosting a firstever art sale on Friday and Saturday, July 15 and 16. Hours will be from 4 to 8:30 p.m. both evenings. There is no admission charge.  The sale will be feature a collection of original works by several local artists along with complimentary snacks

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Harrison Old Home Days Parade

Page 8B, The Bridgton News, July 14, 2016

New Owners — The Balabanis Family

Rain or Shine 1T28

Lobster Rolls • Fried Clams

30+ Flavors of Ice Cream

Live Entertainment

56 Portland Road, Bridgton

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Mon.-Thurs. 11 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. Fri., Sat., Sun., 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.

Friday, July 15

Saturday, July 16

11:30 a.m. Wanda Plummer’s Dancers 6 p.m. Talent Show 8 p.m. The Wicked Good Band 2 p.m. Walt Bannon and the Celtic Moose Band 5:30 p.m. Mainely Country Band Come join the Fun! 8 p.m. Half Moon Jug Band

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RESERVATIONS REQUIRED 17 Tarry A While Road • Bridgton, Maine

10T24 10T23


Regional Sports

July 14, 2016, The Bridgton News, Page 1C

Short takes

SUMMMER CAMPS The Lake Region Boys Summer Soccer Camp — for boys grades 5-8 — will take place Monday through Thursday, July 25-28 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at Lake Region High School. The camp will be run by Lake Region varsity soccer coach Michael Chaine and members of the Laker soccer team. Focus will be on development of skills and team play, promote mentorship between older and younger generations of Lake Region boys soccer players, and provide a fun, positive learning environment for all skill levels. Cost is $25 per student if registered by July 18; or $35 if registered after July 18. Registration forms can be e-mailed to: mchaine@auburnmaine. gov Registration form: Include player’s name, grade, address, phone number, emergency contact person and phone number. Payment will be due the first day of camp. Checks should be made payable to: Michael Chaine/LRHS Soccer Coach. All remaining money goes toward the varsity/junior varsity boys’ soccer teams. Lake Region Girls Soccer Camp: July 25-28, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Grades 5-8 (in Fall of 2016). Fee: $25. Contact: Pete Webb at peterwebb1964@gmail.com Field Hockey camp (always the last week in July): July 25-29, 8 to 11 a.m. Grades 7-12; 11:1512:45 for Grades 1-6. Laker Football Camp: Laker Foundations Youth Football Camp 2016, July 26-28, 5:30-7:30 p.m. at Lake Region H.S. for grades entering 2-8. Contact: Brian Jahna at brian.jahna@lakeregionschools.org TRAVEL SOCCER CLUB To register for Lake Region Soccer Club Travel Soccer Fall 2016 go to http://lakeregion. gotsport.com For more information, see the Soccer Club’s Facebook page. There are still openings on some teams. Register today! RAIDER FIELD HOCKEY Fryeburg Academy Head Coach Dede Frost runs a youth field hockey camp the first week of preseason each year. This year, it will be the week of Aug. 15 — Monday through Friday from 9 to 11:30 a.m. daily. The cost is $50. Ages K-8 are welcome. The camp will be held at the Fryeburg Recreation Fields. Registration forms will be posted on the Fryeburg Recreation web page. Call Coach Frost for more information at 935-3344. BRIDGTON HIGHLANDS LADIES GOLF The tournament for the week was a Scramble/String Game. The winning team consisted of JoAnne Diller, Linda Munger and Diane Stillman. Second place went to Carolyn Stanhope, Peg MacDonald, Lynn Gillen and Dottie Dexter. The pot was won by Diane Stillman for being closest to the pin on Hole 10 at nine feet, and Gail Ramage for closest to the pin on Hole 13 at 20-feet 4-inches.  

LET’S GO! — Carlos Martinez, #44, of Camp Takajo points the way at the start of last Wednesday’s Harrison Rec 5K Run by the Lakes. (Rivet Photos)

Teen sets the pace at 5K Run by the Lakes

NICE RUN — Ralph Perfetto (right) gives Trevor Smith a pat on the back as the pair approach the finish line in the Harrison Post Office parking lot.

OVER THERE IS THE FINISH LINE — Amy Milo of Havertown, Pa. directs Lauren Milo, age 8, to the finish line.

HARRISON REC 5K RUN BY THE LAKES 1. Nicholas Hoch, 15, Newton, MA, 18:26 2. Eric Martin, 36, Naples,19:18 3. Gardner Waldeier, 34, Waterford, 19:33 4. Timothy Cushing, 30, Bridgton, 19:47 5. Zach Hoexter, 15, 19:58 6. Brian Ladd, 55, Harrison, 20:05 7. Arno Bommer, 56, Houston, TX, 20:09 8. Noah Currier, 14, Harrison, 20:22 9. Dimitri Dibiase, 18, Harrison, 20:32 10. Tom Wright, 22, 20:41 11. Matt Burke, 35, South Paris, 21:10 12. Joe Brooks, 34, Santa Monica, CA, 21:36 13. Bear Brooks, 11, Santa Monica, CA, 21:38 14. Phil O’Brien, 16, Fair Haven, NJ, 22:00 15. Sarah Keener, 35, Waterford, 22:09 16. Sara Bradley, 36, Waterford, 22:19 17. David Brooks, 49, Santa Monica, CA, 22:33 18. Mark Hogan, 38, Raymond, 22:40 19. Sahtia Ellison, 14, 22:51 20. Amelia Bommer, 10, 22:55 21. Drew Morris, 15, 23:07 22. Eric Malinowski, 41, Waterford, 23:33 23. Noah Dierinio, 14, Harrison, 23:42 24. Connor Reese, 16, Harrison, 23:52 25. Shannon LeVangie, 14, Hanover, MA, 24:02 26. Onx Matong, 28, 24:08 27. Tracie Mason, 46, West Paris, 24:33 28. Ryan Pohly, 14, 24:35 29. Harmony Locke, 35, Norway, 24:37 30. Ralph Perfetto, 54, 25:02 31. Trevor Smith, 30, 25:04 32. Sean Greatorex, 16, Scarborough, 25:12 33. Brenda Cauoette, 46, Raymond, 25:14 34. Dylan Kern, 13, 25:16 35. Jarrod Pine, 14, 25:17 36. Joseph Norena, 23, Raymond, 25:23 37. Morgan Raye, 17, Harrison, 25:25 38. Spencer McGowan, 14, 25:28 39. Andy Hartman, 15, 25:35 40. Pam Ashby, 37, Mechanic Falls, 25:37 41. Chip Tuomi, 63, Harrison, 25:41 42. Tobie Feigenbaum, 41, Harrison, 25:44 43. Alyssa Bommer, 13, 25:49 44. Carmel Collins, 53, Bridgton, 25:54 45. Brandon Crandall, 21, Harrison, 25:57 46. Liam McHugh, 46, Naples, 26:01 47. Kate Brooks, 49, Santa Monica, CA, 26:12 48. Jamie Hudson, 38, Harrison, 26:32 49. Javari Ellison, 11, 26:34 50. Brett Weiner, 14, 26:37 51. Jaclin Mozzicato, 28, Harrison, 26:40 52. Cooper Cohen, 13, 26:46 53. Caleb Lamb, 25, Auburn, 26:50 54. Brett Breseti, 25, Auburn, 26:56 55. Catrina Wilson, 14, Harrison, 27:01 56. Haydn Cragg, 23, 27:05 57. Justin Wachtel, 15, 27:15 58. Ryan Horlick, 15, 27:30 59. Ray White, 47, Fryeburg, 27:47 60. Jessica Hodgman, 55, Cornish Flat, NH, 27:51 61. John Micavich, 73, Westboro, MA, 27:57

SEBAGO DAYS FAMILY FUN WALK/RUN The annual Sebago Days two-mile Family Fun Walk/Run will be held on Saturday, July 16 at 8 a.m. The out-and-back course is on Route 11, located across the street from Sebago Elementary School. Registration is from 7 to 7:45 a.m. at the corner of Routes 114 and 11. Entry fee is $10. T-shirts to the first 75 preregistered entrants. To preregister, e-mail Race Director Jeff Cutting at cutfam5@roadrunner.com or call 787-3819 or stop by Jordan’s Store for an entry form. There will be a “free” 50-yard dash for toddlers at 7:55 a.m. Medals will be awarded in eight age categories (to both males and females). LOVELL OLD HOME DAYS 5K This year’s 12th annual run is on Saturday, July 16 at 9:45 a.m.  Only the first 100 registered runners are guaranteed a t-shirt, so please sign up early. Applications are available in local stores or by contacting

62. Tim Ellison, 61, Bridgton, NH, 28:00 63. Leah McLaughlin, 48, Poteau, OK, 28:07 64. Bridget Parker, 37, 28:13 65. Robert Vallerschamp, 11, Downingtown, PA, 28:16 66. Michael Murrin, 50, 28:18 67. Marcus Fox, 52, North Lovell, 28:19 68. Bill Wood, 63, Harrison, 28:21 69. Emily Baker, 36, Harrison, 28:23 70. Matthew Kruse, 9, Fairfax, VA, 28:30 71. David Kruse, 47, Fairfax, VA, 28:32 72. Kevin O’Brien, 57, Savannah, GA, 28:38 73. Colton Dover, 13, Murrysville, PA, 28:41 74. Ben Hoexter, 13, 28:46 75. Celinda Crandall, 52, Harrison, 28:48 76. Hudson Malsch, 14, 28:50 77. Steph Cramer, 28, Tabernacle, NJ, 28:52 78. Kristin Davis, 44, Naples, 29:04 79. Tony Campbell, 47, Harrison, 29:09 80. Hannah Chadwick, 16, Sebago, 29:16 81. Rachel Barker, 35, Harrison, 29:22 82. Theresa Wilson, 17, Harrison, 29:44 83. Jessica Priola, 35, North Bridgton, 29:47 84. Steve Jones, 63, Harrison, 30:01 85. James Plante, 16, 30:10 86. Kim Kasenow, 56, Newburgh, IN, 30:34 87. Katherine Smith, 27, 30:40 88. Arthur McDougall, 44, Bridgton, 30:45 89. Patricia Perfetto, 53, Harrison, 31:03 90. Theresa Ellison, 14, 31:04 91. Andy Whitney, 60, Seoul, S. Korea, 31:11 92. Kate Flynn, 9, Harrison, 31:13 93. Carl Taylor, 20, 31:30 94. Jay Milo, 51, Harrison, 31:48 95. Sky Worster, 10, 32:05 96. Cedar Worster, 7, 32:07 97. Marianne Strickland, 55, Harrison, 32:17 98. Quintessa Dibiase, 11, Harrison, 32:24 99. Jason Perfetto, 24, 32:30 100. Bre Worster, 37, Harrison, 32:35 101. Katharine Fortuna, 25, Laconia, NH, 33:13 102. John Wait, 72, Waterford, 33:26 103. Ashley Martin, 34, Naples, 33:28 104. Sandy Geddry, 66, Norway, 33:33 105. Rebecca Tracy, 61, Raymond, 33:44 106. Michael Riseman, 14, Harrison, 33:56 107. Kylah Aker, 37, Bridgton, 34:05 108. Paul Kasenow, 56, 34:23 109. Deborah Menezes, 51, Harrison, 34:32 110. Kaile Tsapis, 53, Harrison, 35:31 111. Amy Keene, 55, Bridgton, 36:06 112. Bobbi Burke, 31, South Paris, 36:30 113. Sarah Pierini, 14, Harrison, 36:33 114. Lily Flynn, 11, Harrison, 36:36 115. Ezra Tsapis, 7, 36:55 116. Alex Flynn, 12, Harrison, 36:58 117. Brian McLaughlin, 55, 37:04 118. Terry Farrin, 50, Harrison, 37:47 119. Phaedra Dibiase, 6, Harrison, 38:35 120. Jessica Dibiase, 36, Harrison, 38:38 121. Clayton Farrin, 53, Harrison, 38:45 122. Kristin Humphrey, 44, Harrison, 39:02 123. Laura Varney, 32, Bridgton, 39:09 124. Bethany Rehmert, 38, Harrison, 39:18 HARRISON 5K, Page 3C

race director Stan Tupaj at stan@fairpoint.net or 207-925-1500.  Registration is also available online at www.Running4Free.com.  Visit www.lovell5k.com for more information, photos and past records. The 5K run precedes the Old Home Days Parade and begins the day’s festivities. Family members are encouraged to cheer the runners along the route, enjoy the parade and participate in all of the activities at the Lovell Athletic Field, including the popular (and free) Lollipop Run for children. MOLLYOCKETT DAY CLASSIC The five-mile run, a one-mile adult run and one-mile kids’ run is set for Saturday, July 16 at 8:15 (kids) and 9 a.m. in Bethel. Online registration now open (http://www.mollyockettdays.com/races.html). Fees: $18 for adult races and $12 for kids’ race by July 10, $25/$15 after. Registration and check-in 7 to 8:45 a.m. at The Bethel Inn Resort’s front lawn on Broad Street. Start/finish here. Course description on website. CASCO DAYS COUNTRY RUN The 38th annual Casco Days Country Run takes place on Saturday July 30, at 9:30 a.m. The race is sponsored by Hancock Lumber Company. RACE INFO, Page 2C


Page 2C, The Bridgton News, July 14, 2016

(Continued from Page 1C) Preregistration is strongly encouraged. Day of race registration will be accepted starting at 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. at the Casco Community Center on Route 121 in Casco Village. All contestants are required to check in at registration prior to the start of the race even if they are pre-registered. The first 300 preregistrants will receive a Casco Days Road Race t-shirt. Please note that you must register before July 22 in order to receive a t-shirt. Entry donation to the Casco Fire Association:
 $18 until July 22
 and $25 July 23 through race day Register online at the Casco Days website: www.cascodays.com 5K TROT FOR AUTISM The Margaret Murphy Center 5K Trot for Autism will be held on Saturday, July 30 at 9 a.m. at the Geiger Elementary School in Lewiston. Register at http://www. firstgiving.com or www.running4free.com Registration opens at 8 a.m. Entry fee: $20 before July 25, $25 day of the race. WALKING TOWARD A PAIN-FREE FUTURE The Fourth Annual Walking Toward a Pain-Free Future, to raise awareness for Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy/Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, will be held on Saturday, Aug. 6 at 11:15, starting from the Bridgton Community Center. A bake sale starts at 9 a.m. in front of Oberg Agency (Main Street) followed by a raffle drawing at 10:45 and a butterfly release at the Bob Dunning Memorial Bridge in Pondicherry Park at 11 a.m. To register, go to http://goo.gl/forms/ ZB0WRHa9HO9UDXnD3 For more information, contact Rosemary Wiser at rosemary.wiser@gmail.com or 207-756-9464 MAINE STATE TRIATHLON BETHEL – For the first time at any Maine triathlon, no single-use plastic bottles will be used at the 25th Annual Maine State Triathlon, scheduled for Sunday, Aug. 7 in Bethel. Athletes competing in the event, presented by Oxford Networks, will receive a reusable, BPA-free water bottle compliments of event sponsor Androscoggin Valley Hospital. The bottles will be filled with clear Maine water.  “The Bethel Area Chamber’s efforts at making our events more sustainable include increased composting of food waste and recycling efforts to keep as much waste out of landfills as possible,” stated Robin Zinchuk, executive director. “By eliminating disposable bottles from our triathlon we are potentially keeping 500-plus plastic bottles out of the waste stream.” For complete information and to register for this sprint distance tri, 750-meter swim, a 24-kilometer bike, 5.8-kilometer run, visit www.mainestatetriathlon.com. TOUR DE LOVELL The 11th annual Tour de Lovell bicycle race will be held on Saturday, Aug. 13, at 8 a.m. starting at the New Suncook School, located on Route 5. The road (performance racing bicycles) and touring (mountain-comfort bicycles) compete in a 21.6-mile course. Registration is $30 before Aug. 5, and $35 after. The Kids’ Tour (under age of 14, all bicycles) is a five-mile race, starting immediately after the Tour pack leaves. Cost is $5, and $10 after Aug. 5. Register online at: www. bikereg.com/11th-annualtour-de-lovell First 50 Tour & Road registrants receive a Tour de Lovell t-shirt.  
 Tour de Lovell is a fundraising event for Lovell Recreation Department programs, equipment and facilities.  This not-for-profit organization serves the western Maine towns of Lovell, Stoneham, Sweden, Stow, Fryeburg and Chatham, N.H.

 The 21.6-mile course starts at the New Suncook School and travels north on Route 5 and turns right onto Route 5A for a scenic climb with breathtaking views of the White Mountains. Cyclists return to Route 5 at Center Lovell (approximately five miles into the Tour) and will then be challenged by four long winding hills in the rural forested farmland of North Lovell. The turnaround is near the Stoneham town line and cyclists return on Route 5 through Center Lovell and over Christian Hill to the finish at the New Suncook School. GREAT ADVENTURE CHALLENGE The ninth annual Great Adventure Challenge takes place on Saturday, Aug. 20 beginning at 9 a.m. (registration at Shawnee Peak Ski resort closes at 8:30 a.m.) The Great Adventure Challenge is a one of a kind triathlon event that combines kayaking (2.5 miles on Moose Pond), mountain biking (16+ miles) and concludes with a two-mile dash/hike up and down Pleasant Mountain This event is to benefit individuals with intellectual disabilities 
 in Western Maine. All proceeds go to support Morrison Center Fundraising Committee for the purpose of providing opportunities to adults with mental retardation and Autism. The Challenge can be done by either individuals or MORE RACES, Page 7C

Regional sports

GETTING A LITTLE HELP COOLING OFF NEAR THE FINISH LINE from fellow Camp Takajo campers is Carlos Martinez. (Rivet Photos)

WINNER Nicholas Hoch, 15, of Newton, Mass., com- TOP FEMALE was Sarah Keener, 35, of Waterford, who pleted the 5K in 18:26, a pace of 5:57. crossed the finish line in 22:09, a 7:09 pace.

BRANDON CRANDALL, 21, of Harrison finished in CATRINA WILSON, 14, of Harrison turned in a time of 25:57, good for 45th overall, at a 8:22 clip. 27:01 to finish at 55th, at a 8:43 pace.


Regional sports

July 14, 2016, The Bridgton News, Page 3C

Harrison 5K results (Continued from Page 1C) 125. Samantha Wormwood, 19, Norway, 39:48 126. Jan Monteiro, 57, Harrison, 40:53 127. Lauren Milo, 8, 41:20 128. Amy Milo, 41, Havertown, PA, 41:21 129. Bettina Reid, 76, 41:29 130. Angela Maddocks, 33, Harrison, 41:45 131. Jessica Meserve, 36, Harrison, 41:48 132. Dawn Letourneau, 43, W. Paris, 41:54 133. Matthew Appleby, 30, Goode, VA, 42:15 134. Katie Appleby, 28, 42:17 135. Lucy Mustard, 77, Harrison, 43:40 136. Dawn Canales, 59, Harrison, 44:37 137. Boomer Bradley, 16, Birmingham, MI, 45:46 138. Mickey Feeney, 16, Raymond, 45:51 139. William Klatcho, 16, Annville, PA, 45:53 140. Walter Backman, 16, Raymond, 46:02 141. Dianne Morse-Leonard, 58, Waterford, 46:20 142. Eddie Zuckerbrot, 14, 46:58 143. Carlos Martinez, 15, 46:59 144. Maureen Mustard, 43, Harrison, 48:08 145. Laura Mustard, 14, Harrison, 48:09 146. Angie Milo, 48, 50:54 147. Trish Murrin, 49, Harrison, 50:58 148. Gail Gile, 69, Harrison, 53:40 Age Category Winners Female, 6-12 Amelia Bommer, 10, 22:55 Kate Flynn, 9, Harrison, 31:13 Sky Worster, 10, 32:05 Male, 6-12 Bear Brooks, 11, Santa Monica, CA, 21;38 Javari Ellison, 11, 26:34 Robert Vallerschamp, 11, Downingtown, PA, 28:16 Female, 13-19 Sahtia Ellison, 14, 22:51 Shannon LeVangie, 14, Hanover, MA, 24:02 Alyssa Bommer, 13, 25:49 Male, 13-19 Zach Hoexter, 15, 19:58 Noah Currier, 14, Harrison, 20:22 Dimitri Dibiase, 18, Harrison, 20:32 Female, 20-29 Jaclin Mozzicato, 28, Harrison, 26:40 Steph Cramer, 28, Tabernacle, NJ, 28:52 Katherine Smith, 27, 30:40 Male, 20-29

Tom Wright, 22, 20:41 Onx Matong, 28, 24:08 Joseph Norena, 23, Raymond, 25:23 Female, 30-39 Sara Bradley, 36, Waterford, 22:19 Harmony Locke, 35, Norway, 24:37 Jamie Hudson, 38, Harrison, 26:32 Male, 30-39 Eric Martin, 36, Naples, 19:18 Gardner Waldeier, 34, Waterford, 19:33 Timothy Cushing, 30, Bridgton, 19:47 Female, 40-49 Tracie Mason, 46, West Paris, 24:33 Brenda Cauoette, 46, Raymond, 25:14 Tobie Feigenbaum, 41, Harrison, 25:44 Male, 40-49 David Brooks, 49, Santa Monica, CA, 22:33 Eric Malinowski, 41, Waterford, 23:33 Liam McHugh, 46, Naples, 26:01 Female, 50-59 Carmel Collins, 53, Bridgton, 25:54 Jessica Hodgman, 55, Cornish Flat, NH, 27:51 Celinda Crandall, 52, Harrison, 28:48 Male, 50-59 Brian Ladd, 55, Harrison, 20:05 Arno Bommer, 56, Houston, TX, 20:09 Ralph Perfetto, 54, 25:02 Female, 60-69 Sandy Geddry, 66, Norway, 33:33 Rebecca Tracy, 61, Raymond, 33:44 Gail Gile, 69, Harrison, 53:40 Male, 60-69 Chip Tuomi, 63, Harrison, 25:41 Tim Ellison, 61, Bridgton, NH, 28:00 Bill Wood, 63, Harrison, 28:21 Female, 70-79 Bettina Reid, 76, 41:29 Lucy Mustard, 77, Harrison, 43:40 Male, 70-79 John Micavich, 73, Westboro, MA, 27:57 John Wait, 72, Waterford, 33:26

A FINAL PUSH — Chip Tuomi, 63, of Harrison heads toward the finish line, finishing in 25:41. Rebecca Tracy, 61, of Raymond checked in at 33:44. (Rivet Photos)

Land Trust upcoming events LOVELL — The Greater Lovell Land Trust has a variety of events planned for this week. Look for the GLLT table at the Lovell Old Home Days celebration on Saturday, July 16, and take part in these explorations of the natural world.  Tuesday, July 19, 10 a.m. to noon, Connect To Our Natural World Through Poems And Short Prose: A Writing Workshop with Judy Steinbergh, co-sponsored by GLLT and Charlotte Hobbs Memorial Library Please join GLLT at Hewnoaks Artist Colony to explore and reflect on our con-

LAKES REGION PROPERTIES

nections to the landscape, elements, seasons and wildlife. With inspiration from our surroundings, and short pieces by poets and naturalists, we will draft our writing and share with the group. Adults and teens welcome. Please sign up at the Charlotte Hobbs Memorial

NT RFRO ! WATE REDUCED – N I B A C

692 Roosevelt Trail, Naples, ME 04055

CLASSIC MAINE LOG CABIN

e-mail: info@lakesproperties.com

DENMARK – Here is your classic Maine log cabin getaway in the woods! 90 ft. of frontage on Long Pond. Hike, bike, ski from here. Open concept living room and kitchen. Kitchen has custom cabinets, gas stove. Wood stove in the living room makes for a cozy winter evening! 2 bedrooms and 1 full bath. The bath comes with a claw foot tub! Metal roof. Wonderful porch to enjoy. Full basement. $174,900

www.lakesproperties.com 207-693-7000

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Bridgton – Enjoy stunning views of Long Lake from every room in this well-cared-for home. Large deck overlooks the lake. Private 2.3acre lot, sunny yard. $138,500. Kamal Perkins-Bridge, 630-3031456 (MLS 1271306)

Naples – Privacy and proximity. This unique property affords much privacy with over 3.5 acres of land and 313 ft. on Brandy Pond. 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, inground pool. $695,000. Nancy Hanson, 207-838-8301 (MLS 1254401)

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LOG HOME 2 ACRES OTISFIELD – Move right into this very well-maintained newer log home. Open concept living area with full bath and 2 bedrooms, large deck on the front. This home offers expansion in the basement. 2 rooms are finished off for family rooms, office, etc. There is a newer detached 2-car garage with loads of storage for your cars, boats and toys. The setting of this home offers privacy galore. $165,000

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Naples – A little piece of Maine lakefront with 94 ft. on East Shore of Long Lake. Great value with year-round cottage-style home, guest cottage, extensive dock system and more. $699,000. Connie Eldridge, 207-831-0890 (MLS 1273957)

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Naples – Popular “Sebago Unit” with master bedroom on the top floor. Ready for your immediate occupancy. Most furniture included with condo. Brandy Pond ROW! $229,900. Nancy Hanson, 207-8388301 (MLS 1273398)

Library. Ms. Steinbergh has led poetry workshops with adults and students for over 40 years, and authored three poetry-writing texts and five books of poetry. Wednesday, July 20, 7:30 p.m. at the Charlotte Hobbs GLLT EVENTS, Page 5C

BRIDGTON – 1930s Cape Cod style home in wonderful intown location. Located in the heart of downtown yet on a quiet, private street. 3 bedrooms, updated kitchen, large living room, dining room/office. Master bedroom on 1st floor. 3-season sunroom, could be made to year-round easily. Attached shed off the back. Detached 1-car garage, paved driveway. Many upgrades include new windows and shingles. Lovely gardens. $159,000

MOOSE POND GREAT LOCATION BRIDGTON – Looking for an expanded chalet in updated condition? Here it is. Enjoy this 3-bedroom, 2-bath charmer with a large family room addition plus a 3-season, enclosed porch on the front. Open concept, living, dining, kitchen area, new bath fixtures. Laundry room in the 2nd floor full bath. This is on the road to the beach. Prime Knights Hill amenities, swimming pool, tennis courts, sandy beach and more. $169,900

RICE! CED P U D E R Naples – 190 ft. of Long Lake waterfront! Enjoy a day of boating from Long Lake to Sebago Lake. 4 bedrooms, 1.5 baths. Great room and master bedroom with fireplaces. $709,999. Marcia Stewart, 2027-595-2984 (MLS 1263768)

Naples – Spacious 3-bedroom, 3.5-bath Contemporary with guest cottage on East Shore Long Lake! Enjoy that open concept living with cathedral ceilings, lots of glass and 1st floor master bedroom. $949,500. Ray Austin, 207-232-0500 (MLS 1266756)

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MT. WASHINGTON VIEWS

Naples - Beautiful New Subdivision of wooded lots with soil test completed and underground wiring. Short drive to Naples Causeway. Major road access to Portland and Conway, N.H. Lots price from $39,900 to $49,900. Sally Goodwill, 207-595-4014 (MLS 1261938)

Naples – Beautiful 3-bedroom log home with deeded beach rights on Sebago with possible building lot for cottage or bunkhouse for extended family visits. $209,500. Kate Loverin, 207-776-8589 (MLS 1269129)

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Otisfield – Stunningly beautiful 3-bedroom, 3-bath Ward Cedar Log home with 300 ft. on Crooked River. 3.3-acre lot, granite fireplace, hickory cabinets, granite counters. Finished walkout basement. $424,900. Jocelyn O’Rourke-Shane, 207-838-5555 (MLS 1264610)

Sweden – Quality-built Contemporary on 8.5 acres with stunning views of Mt. Washington. Close to all amenities. $579,000. Lauri Kinser, 207-310-3565 (MLS 1268848)

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Waterford – Charming, beautiful home. Living room with fireplace, full porch overlooking woods and garden., 2-car garage with workshop and additional garage with carport. $149,900. Sally Goodwill, 207-595-4014 (MLS 1265903)

Windham – Lake living at its best! Well-appointed, meticulouslymaintained home with 4 bedrooms, 4 baths, gourmet kitchen, home gym and lovely landscaping. ROW to Sebago Lake. $499,900. Jocelyn O’Rourke-Shane, 207-838-5555 (MLS 1270780)

Call us for more Home, Land and Waterfront Listings or visit: www.lakesproperties.com

Independently Owned & Operated

BRIDGTON – Outstanding views of Mt. Washington, the White Mtns. and Kezar Lake. Views from every room. This is the perfect retreat you’ve been looking for. Open concept living with 2 bedrooms, 2 full baths, oversized 2-car garage. Includes a screened porch for those summer nights. Gleaming wood floors. Master bedroom has a master bath with a full tub, towel warmer, too. Just imagine relaxing at this 4season delight. $275,000

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! GROW

NEW ENGLAND CHARMER BRIDGTON – Great 2-story New England classic. Lots of room here. Wood floors, glassed-in extra office area. Dining room with built-ins. Updated kitchen. Large laundry/pantry/half bath area off the kitchen. 3+ bedrooms upstairs. Full bath with a claw foot tub. All new windows, wiring, insulated doors. Living room has a fireplace with a wood stove. Nice intown lot with lovely gardens. Highland Lake is just steps away. 1car garage. $137,000 Call 647-5551 or 1-888-400-9858

UPDATED RANCH BRIDGTON – Updated ranch with room to spare. Enjoy the farmer’s porch. 2 bedrooms. Master bedroom has built-in storage, large attached bath with laundry, 2 closets. Ample 2nd bedroom plus additional full bath. Spacious cook’s kitchen with eat-in area. Sunny and bright! Wood floors. Extra sunroom has many possibilities. New septic and drilled well installed in 2011. Oversized 2-car garage with additional workshop area and a 2nd floor for more storage. Walkout bsmt. has room to grow. $170,000

RICE! CED P U D E R

PRICED TO SELL BRIDGTON – Cute bungalow-style intown home, wood floors throughout, enclosed front porch, fireplace in the living room, 2 bedrooms, 1 bath. Detached 2-car garage, workshop area. Attic storage in the garage. Paved driveway, town water, close to all downtown amenities and lakes. Swim and ski is close by. $89,900

FIND OUT WHAT YOUR HOME IS WORTH IN TODAY’S MARKET! Call us for an accurate, confidential, indepth Comparative Market Analysis at no charge. Call 647-5551 or 1-888-400-9858

www.obergrealestate.com


Regional sports

Page 4C, The Bridgton News, July 14, 2016

More Bridgton times 1522 Ariel Moss 13 Sweden ME 51:08 1523 Justin West 29 Sweden ME 51:09 MA 51:09 1524 Gary Bonnell 49 Haverhill 1525 Charlie Siems 10 Harrison ME 51:09 1526 Rachel Pickus 67 Sebago ME 51:10 ME 51:11 1527 Sheila Deringis 52 OOB 1528 Sarah Hajjar 36 Westford MA 51:11 1529 Bruce Wyllie 61 Ewhurst Green Surre 51:14 1530 Payton Ahola 14 Sweden ME 51:15 ME 51:15 1531 Nicole Kagan 14 Sweden 51:22 1532 Talia Diegnan 39 Cambridge MA 1533 Megan Linquiti 22 Washington DC 51:23 44 Denmark ME 51:28 1534 Debbie Brill 1535 Vinnie Troisi 51 Shrewsbury MA 51:28 1536 Emily Anastos 16 Harrison ME 51:34 ME 51:35 1537 Kristine Triglione 54 Bridgton 1538 Rian Benoit 12 Dracut MA 51:37 ME 51:40 1539 Claire Sampson 13 Harrison 1540 Kealani Pasefika 13 Harrison ME 51:40 1541 Kelsey Hale 18 Pepperell MA 51:41 ME 51:43 1542 Grace St. George 16 Harrison 1543 Kimberly Hoffman 49 Naples ME 51:49 ME 51:49 1544 Danielle Bernstein 14 Denmark 1545 Eliana Martini 13 Denmark ME 51:49 1546 Matthew Hoffman 49 Naples ME 51:49 Potter 54 Chelmsford MA 51:52 1547 Jim 1548 Sophie Silbert 12 Sweden ME 51:53 1549 Maria Brown 54 Southborough MA 51:56 1550 Pude Ricker 62 Falmouth ME 51:57 51:57 1551 Julian Reigneau-Hawke 9 Harrison ME 1552 Diane Bilotta 65 Grantham NH 51:59 1553 Simony Allen 48 Harrison ME 52:05 ME 52:07 1554 Jack Becker 66 Bridgton 1555 Laura Varney 32 Bridgton ME 52:07 Turtel 11 Sweden ME 52:09 HARRISON 5K Run By The Lakes finishers (left) Ezra Tsapis, 7, in 36:55 and Kylah 1556 Miki 1557 Jakie Raimo 13 N. Reading MA 52:10 Aker, 37, of Bridgton in 34:05. (Rivet Photos) 1558 Joseph Donahue 26 Bridgton ME 52:11 1559 Deb Pierini 57 Harrison ME 52:12 ME 53:54 1641 James Wolf 62 Naples ME 55:20 1560 William O’Connor 44 Bridgton ME 52:18 1598 Alex Lehman 15 Harrison 15 Harrison ME 53:55 1642 Linette Rao 46 Orlando FL 55:23 ME 52:19 1599 Allie Platt 1561 Elsie Moche 15 Denmark ME 54:00 1643 Gavin Cohen 13 Waterford ME 55:24 1562 Erica Chute 42 Kents Hill ME 52:20 1600 Bridget Newick 19 Harrison Wood 57 Fryeburg ME 54:06 1644 Odin Palmer 10 Waterford ME 55:26 1563 Daniel Chute 42 Kents Hill ME 52:20 1601 Jim 54:10 1645 Sarah Depoian 66 Chelmsford MA 55:27 52:20 1602 Tatyana Markovich 16 Hopkinton MA 1564 Katie Stelmach 39 North Grafton MA ME 54:11 1646 Patricia Hamilton 63 Chelmsford MA 55:27 1565 George Vooris 57 Naples ME 52:22 1603 Cole Kleiman 12 Fryeburg ME 54:12 1647 Zach Whitchurch 8 Harrison ME 55:29 MA 52:23 1604 Lauren Burrent 21 Harrison 1566 Sam Sparks 9 Sudbury ME 54:13 1648 Dwayne Varney 36 Bridgton ME 55:30 1567 Betsy Shreve 62 Amesbury MA 52:23 1605 Nick Payne 12 Fryeburg Frank 15 Denmark ME 54:16 1649 Hallie Sternberg 15 Denmark ME 55:32 1568 Gayle Potter 55 Pelham NY 52:31 1606 Ava ME 54:17 1650 Max Frank 13 Fryeburg ME 55:35 ME 52:32 1607 Sydney Kirsch 15 Denmark 1569 Marjorie Stockford 59 Portland 15 Denmark ME 54:17 1651 Grace Johnson 65 Yorktown Heights NY 55:35 1570 Sean Blaney 32 Hamden CT 52:35 1608 Kate Nova MA 54:20 1652 Patti Irwin 63 Windham NH 55:36 ME 52:35 1609 Kathy Hayes 63 Peabody 1571 Lola Nordlinger 12 Sweden ME 54:21 1653 Marsha Wood 61 Harrison ME 55:39 1572 Hannah Gallin 12 Sweden ME 52:36 1610 Richard Geswell 65 Bridgton 54:22 1654 Eric MacCarthy 26 Cohasset 55:41 MA 1573 Kyle Grigg 14 Bridgton ME 52:36 1611 Mariel Brown 30 Somerville MA ME 54:27 1655 Katie Elkins 18 Harrison ME 55:45 ME 52:36 1612 Jessica McAllister 34 Waterford 1574 Hortense Cristofari 16 Fryeburg MA 54:35 1656 Leah Janover 19 Harrison ME 55:45 1575 Jennifer O’Connor 41 Bridgton ME 52:43 1613 Donna Shilale 46 Mendon ME 54:43 1657 Dash Martin 13 Brooklyn NY 55:47 TX 52:49 1614 Trish Dubrule 58 Bridgton 1576 Janet Densmore 62 Austin 11 Harrison ME 54:49 1658 Stella Holt 12 Los Angeles CA 55:47 1577 Zippy Yellin 12 Sweden ME 52:56 1615 Austin Cox 42 Portland ME 54:50 1659 Mallory Muse 10 Rumford ME 55:49 1578 Tucker Williams 11 Cumberland ME 52:59 1616 Lyle Aker Griffith 67 Bridgton ME 54:50 1660 Jordan Feinzig 12 Waterford ME 55:50 1579 Katherine Stoss 11 Sweden ME 53:01 1617 Bill Doran 58 Halifax MA 54:58 1661 Melissa Newman 25 Fryeburg ME 55:54 1580 Julie Blanchard 39 Townsend MA 53:08 1618 Jim MA 54:58 1662 Clare Bunce 8 Harrison ME 55:55 1581 Jeff Glover 45 Centerville OH 53:08 1619 Greg McLaughlin 48 Plymouth MA 54:59 1663 Nancy Seymour 66 Nokomis 55:56 FL 1582 Deanna Glover 44 Centerville OH 53:09 1620 Kathy McLaughlin 46 Plymouth 64 Pelham NY 54:59 1664 Kathleen Blanchard 67 Nokomis 55:56 FL 1583 Daria James 54 Uxbridge MA 53:15 1621 Everett Potter MA 55:01 1665 Emma Swoap 10 Harrison ME 55:57 1584 Mary Shorey 63 Bridgton ME 53:16 1622 Kathryn Becker 33 Kingston 71 Falmouth ME 55:01 1666 Anna Sampson 15 Harrison ME 55:58 1585 Jon Dupee 36 Auburn ME 53:17 1623 Peggy Ryan Becker 8 Kingston MA 55:02 1667 Katya Markovich 13 Hopkinton MA 55:59 1586 Carolyn Dupee 36 Auburn ME 53:18 1624 Eva ME 55:02 1668 Amy Markovich 45 Hopkinton MA 56:00 1587 Paul Yeager 14 Harrison ME 53:18 1625 Mae Fleischmann 15 Denmark 48 Sweden ME 55:05 1669 Glenn Ambusk 64 Hinesburg VT 56:00 1588 Matthew Dupee 6 Auburn ME 53:19 1626 Carol Kizer MA 55:05 1670 Caleigh Dirks 56:08 14 Danvers MA 1589 Helen Crawford 23 N. Bridgton ME 53:20 1627 Sarah Palmgren 15 Princeton 41 Holden MA 55:06 1671 Courtney Sanne 23 Harrison ME 56:11 ME 53:22 1628 Christi Lucia 1590 Leah Haney 33 Harrison 76 N. Bridgton ME 55:07 1672 Charolotte Chambers 22 Harrison ME 56:11 1591 Clay Johnson 72 San Antonio TX 53:27 1629 Joanne Diller ME 55:08 1673 Aubrey Hawke 14 Harrison ME 56:12 1592 Dennis Johnson 67 Yorktown Heights NY 53:36 1630 Bradley Kaplan 17 Waterford 55:10 1674 Lori 56:12 Anthony 53 North Waterboro 1593 Josh Cohan 13 Fryeburg ME 53:39 1631 Alisha Blanchard 21 West Townsend MA 55:12 1675 Shelby Sullivan 8 Attleboro 56:13 MA 1594 Emi Brown 21 1632 Leah Blanchard 46 West Townsend MA 55:13 1676 Abigail Dirks 56:18 17 Danvers MA Uxbridge MA 53:39 1633 Scott Blanchard 48 West Townsend MA ME 55:13 1677 Lauren Rockwell 14 Sweden ME 56:22 1595 Jennie Ryan 40 1634 Katharine Tilson 14 Denmark ME 55:14 1678 Lucille Kisnter 11 Chevy Chase MD 56:27 North Attleborough MA 53:39 1635 Hallie Hayne 14 Denmark 55:14 1679 Molly Hogan 8 Plymouth MA 56:28 1596 P.P. Parr 48 1636 Brittany Barthelmess 16 Harrison ME 1637 Jackie Morin 45 Waterford ME 55:14 1680 Alice O’Connor 10 Bridgton ME 56:28 Gorham ME 53:44 GA 55:16 1681 William Resnick 46 Milton 56:29 MA 1597 Tatyana Bommer 12 1638 Cole Preiditsch 10 Palmetto 1639 Georgia Preiditsch 7 Palmetto GA 55:18 1682 Dennis Hogan 39 Plymouth MA 56:29 Beverly MA 53:49 1640 Madeline Twombly-Wiser 13 Denmark ME 55:18 BRIDGTON RACE, Page 6C Harrison – Reduced – $190,000.

(EDITOR’S NOTE: These are the remaining finishers of the Bridgton 4 On The Fourth road race, whose names did not appear in last week’s edition) 1453 CarolLeibovitz 62 No Billerica MA 49:20 1454 Helen Brooks 37 Pacific Palisades CA 49:21 1455 Zoe Thorpe 20 Sweden ME 49:21 ME 49:23 1456 Jeanne Sweeney 19 Sweden 1457 Bryan Leonard 27 Westbrook ME 49:27 1458 Nicol Rosen 26 Westbrook ME 49:27 1459 Julie Poulin 52 No Monmouth ME 49:30 1460 Sandy Utterstrom 72 Falmouth ME 49:32 ME 49:35 1461 Caileigh Crowe 12 Lovell 1462 Dawn Crowe 48 Lovell ME 49:35 1463 Jennie Webster 21 Harrison ME 49:38 ME 49:40 1464 Joshua Gough 10 Harrison 1465 Allie Schaffer 14 Sweden ME 49:40 49:41 1466 Jill McGilvray 41 So Weymouth MA 1467 Amanda Perry 12 San Mateo CA 49:43 1468 Emily Proulx 15 Pepperell MA 49:45 13 ”Waterford ME 49:46 1469 Danny Stein 1470 Barry Dechtman 13 ”Waterford ME 49:46 ME 49:47 1471 Katharine Rosa 12 Harrison 1472 Kali Flaherty 17 No Falmouth MA 49:47 1473 Kerrie Revaz 46 New Boston NH 49:50 ME 49:53 1474 John Brooks 79 Falmouth 1475 Mary Tworog 58 Bridgton ME 49:56 NJ 49:57 1476 Nevila Kondili 35 Hoboken 1477 Samuel Youngblood 13 Harrison ME 49:58 1478 Bradley Muse 7 Rumford ME 50:02 Williams 9 Cumberland ME 50:05 1479 Eva 1480 Daphne Raskin 13 Sweden ME 50:05 ME 50:05 1481 Rose Buchdahl 11 Sweden 1482 Meg Kutz 45 Hummelstown PA 50:05 1483 Ashley Wurth 30 So Burlington VT 50:06 50:07 1484 Kyle Ambusk 29 Burlington VT 1485 Pam Talbot 64 Mattapoisett MA 50:10 1486 Jenna Giguere 13 Scarborough ME 50:15 Perry 53 San Mateo CA 50:16 1487 Liz 1488 Kerri Eng 46 Waterford ME 50:22 13 Sebago ME 50:23 1489 Everett Beals 1490 James Cassidy 18 Westwood MA 50:24 1491 Kendall Cardenas 44 Frisco TX 50:24 VA 50:25 1492 Noelle Conforti 48 Oakton 1493 Amanda Thayer 18 N Gloucester ME 50:27 50:28 1494 Nichole Lowell 19 N Gloucester ME 1495 Liv Steinhardt 11 Sweden ME 50:29 1496 Paige Hornbeck 13 Littleton MA 50:31 MA 50:31 1497 Trish Hornbeck 52 Littleton 1498 Carrie Reynolds 38 Bridgton ME 50:33 ME 50:39 1499 Alma Mitchell 11 Harrison 1500 Hadyn Youngblood 7 Mooresville NC 50:40 1501 Tara Youngblood 43 Mooresville NC 50:41 50:44 1502 Neave Revaz 8 New Boston NH 1503 Ellie Miles 16 Harrison ME 50:47 MA 50:47 1504 Roseann Glaser 57 Sudbury 1505 Elizabeth Charette 16 Harrison ME 50:47 1506 Laney Cooper 9 Plymouth MA 50:48 1507 William Kelley 72 Franklin MA 50:50 1508 David Croteau 77 Bridgton ME 50:51 1509 Richard A. King 72 Bridgton ME 50:51 1510 Kirsten Proulx 17 Pepperell MA 50:53 1511 Tess Revaz 11 New Boston NH 50:54 1512 Liz Manz 60 Underhill VT 50:54 1513 Steve Landry 35 Westbrook ME 50:54 1514 Alicia Horton 20 Hanover MA 50:54 1515 Rhonda Giguere 47 Scarborough ME 50:56 1516 Karen Travers Lynch 53 Intervale NH 50:56 1517 Jaimie Giguere 16 Scarborough ME 50:57 1518 Rebecca Thorne 23 Milton MA 50:58 1519 Nancy Thurston 57 Bridgton ME 51:04 1520 Trevor Chute 10 Kents Hill ME 51:06 1521 Addison McNamara 14 Fremont NH 51:08

Only 1/2 mile to Woods Pond. Home is totally-renovated, hardwood floors, granite countertops, new cabinets, stainless appliances. A MUST SEE.

GOT SALMON? New Englander with 160 ft. on Crooked River, best salmon fishing around, 12 rooms, 3 bedrooms+, 2 baths, farmer’s porch, attached barn, 0.92 acres, swim, kayak, canoe, ice skate from home. COME TAKE A LOOK!

Keller Williams Realty 50 Sewall St., 2nd Flr., Portland, ME 04102

207-743-1193 hrobillard@kw.com www.helenrobillard.com

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Call Helen Robillard

CUSTOM WATERFRONT RETREAT 137 Trickey Pond Rd., Naples

A custom waterfront retreat for all seasons. Built in 2001, this very special 2600+ sq. ft. home boasts 4 bedrooms, 2 baths, a home office and unobstructed water views from both floors. With 100 feet of exceptional water frontage, the 4-season 10’x30’ sunroom will become your favorite spot to watch the sun rise. Conveniently located 1 hour from Sunday River, the White Mountains and the vibrant city of Portland. $595,000.

Jim Duplissie

207-939-1252 www.vitalius.com jim@vitalius.com 306 Congress St., Ste. 3, Portland, ME 04101 3T28

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Custom-built Lakefront or View Lot Homes Energy-Efficient — Green-style Stick-built • New Construction Custom-built Homes • Frame to Finish Turnkey Packages

Your land or Our Land Justin Gibbons Bridgton 207-671-1228 hilltoplanddevelopment@gmail.com

Richard Lewis & Son BUILDING CONTRACTOR Serving Maine Since 1968

CUSTOM HOMES & GARAGES ALL REPAIRS KITCHEN/BATH REMODELING REPLACEMENT WINDOWS VINYL SIDING BLOWN INSULATION ROOFING: METAL & ASPHALT INTERIOR/EXTERIOR PAINTING Call Today for a Free Estimate:

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 7/17/16 • 12 noon to 3 p.m.

TF5

Bridgton – Reduced For Quick Sale $129,900

207-415-4476

Come look — be surprised! Brandy Pond Lake Rights

Totally Remodeled! You really should see this pristine, like-new home as it is now. Features oak floors, bright main living area, 2 bedrooms (plus spare room), each with private bath, new whirlpool, central air, heated 2-car garage, newly-appointed downstairs bar and 2nd living room—and Brandy Pond Views in the windows, beach and dock rights. Walk to shopping and all Naples Village amenities…and free golf cart & wide screen TV with purchase of home.…… $239,000 Charles Fox – Broker The Maine Real Estate Network

592-1388 • cfoxera@hotmail.com Home Page: www.mylakefrontmaine.com


Fun & games

July 14, 2016, The Bridgton News, Page 5C

This week’s puzzle theme:

Healthy Lifestyle

ACROSS 1. Hacienda brick 6. World’s oldest broadcasting company 9. Weary walk 13. For getting around, especially in city 14. Ostrich of Australia 15. Because of 16. It’s plucked to foretell love 17. Adam’s famous part 18. Modern day letter 19. *”No ____!” 21. *Mind/body/soul goal? 23. 7th letter of Greek alphabet 24. Eight bits 25. Experienced or consumed 28. ____-and-go-seek 30. Socrates’ concern 35. Toward the lee 37. *Body sufferings 39. Art class support 40. Cash cache 41. Passed out cards 43. A small island 44. Full of emotion, in slang 46. Alpine lift 47. Guitar forerunner 48. Not digital 50. Crude group 52. Sixth sense 53. Movie-____ 55. Anne Boleyn, a.k.a. ____ Bullen 57. *Calcium or magnesium 61. *Stress-related glands 65. Muse of love poetry 66. Cause annoyance 68. Prepare for winter takeoff 69. Red Cross supply 70. Bard’s “before” 71. Runs in neutral 72. Fungal spore sacs 73. Jack Kerouac’s Paradise 74. Deed hearings

DOWN 1. Current unit, pl. 2. Hold as a conviction 3. “The Simpsons” palindrome 4. Emergency pedal 5. Kind of fossil 6. Mountain in Germany 7. *Weight divided by height squared 8. Small secluded room 9. The largest of the small cats 10. *Meat quality 11. Like ear infection 12. Pineapple producer 15. “Get rid of” button 20. Water nymph 22. Had a meal 24. Verbally attack 25. *Type of yoga 26. Mork from Ork, e.g. 27. Major U.S. airline 29. *Selection of foods 31. Hard precipitation 32. Supplied equipment 33. Picts and Gauls 34. *Nightly necessity 36. Twelfth month of Jewish calendar 38. Prelude to a duel 42. Popular taste at a given time 45. Anti-Jewish riot 49. India’s smallest state 51. *Exercise of the heart 54. North Pole workers 56. Attention-seeking 57. Arizona city 58. Wraths 59. Narcotics agent 60. Evening purse 61. Skater’s jump 62. Cairo’s waterway 63. Maple, to a botanist 64. *____ stress 67. Baseball stat

Solutions on Page 7C

GLLT walks & talks (Continued from Page 3C) Memorial Library, Reading the Rural Landscape with Dr. Robert Sanford. Common landscape features ranging from plants and trees to stonewalls, cellar holes, and other altered landforms show the dynamics of human-influenced change in the countryside. As a society, we know a great deal about famous peo-

ple of the past, great historical architecture and important events of the past, but we are surrounded by common, everyday places that also represent history. Yet these ordinary things are in danger of becoming forgotten. What are some common clues to the past? How do we read them? What can we find in our own backyards? We will focus on some typical features and techniques for inter-

preting them as we process the “language” of the land in rural Maine. Participants are invited to share their own insights and experiences with local landscapes. GLLT and Sweden Historical Society host; admission is free. Thursday, July 21, 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Reading the Rural Landscape: An exploration of foundations, stonewalls and mystery stones accompanied by Dr. Sanford, author of Reading the Rural Landscape In the company of university

professor, author and registered professional archeologist, Dr. Robert Sanford, we’ll explore the foundation, stonewalls and mystery stones from the Flat Hill parking lot to Amos Mountain. If time allows, we’ll climb up the mountain and take a look at some of the stonewalls on its southern side. This walk will require us to hike on some uneven terrain so dress appropriately, bring plenty of water and a snack or lunch.  Trailhead: Flat Hill parking lot, Heald Pond Road, Lovell GLLT, Page 7C

At Beaverwood Creek Estates, why wait for one to be built when you can start enjoying the Summer NOW? Finished cottage For Sale! 12 Nature‛s Way, in Bridgton — Check out this ready-to-roll four-season log-sided home, MLS# 1258782. 2 BR, 1 ba & sleeping loft. Relax on the screened porch and just feel the ‘nestled in the woods‛ setting of this natural, 1.88-ac. lot. Short walk to 1200‛ of shared frontage on private Beaver Pond. Lots priced at $32,900. Lots w/build Package $165,000.

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PRICE REDUCED! List Price: $175,000 Now $170,000

Creating relationships for Life

Contact: Jeff Perron 207-647-5081 jperron@tmren.biz

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. 11T27

147 North High St., Bridgton

100 Main Street Bridgton, ME 04009 (207) 647-3311 (800) 660-3315 (Maine) or (800) 486-3312 (outside Maine)

Extremely rare new construction on Highland Lake. 3-bedroom, 2 full and 2 half bath home with attached 2-car garage on a spectacular 2.5-acre lot with sandy, walk-in frontage. Lower level is framed for 4th bedroom and game room. Super energyefficient home with maintenance-free exterior. In addition, there is a completely remodeled 200 sq. ft. lakeside cottage that could be used as a sleeping cottage, picnic house or artist studio. No detail has been overlooked. This exceptional property is scheduled for completion in early August. Brokers protected. $774,900.

NEW LISTING

Lovell – Kezar Lake boat slip comes with this stunning farmhouse! Multiple living spaces, fplc., wood stove, built-in bookcases, 6BR, 4BA, wide pine floors, gourmet kit., great rm., outdoor stone shower, att. 2-car gar. $699,000

Bridgton – Highland Lake’s Highland Pines shared waterfront community! 2BR, 1BA, open concept, mud rm., deck, 2-car gar., privacy, paved driveway, full bsmt. $195,000

Bridgton – Highland Lake home w/150 ft. priv. PLUS 100 ft. shared waterfront! 3BR, 2.5BA, wood floors, tiled baths, cath. ceiling, porch, deck, walkout bsmt., dock & much more. $559,000

Call Mark — 603-479-9095

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NEW LISTING

Bridgton – Cozy & warm log home w/farmer’s porch, 3BR, fin. bsmt., open liv./kit./din. area. Lots of sunshine, 6+ ac. of total privacy, close to town, but tucked away. $229,000

Bridgton – 5+ ac., 3BR, 2.5BA, 1st floor master BR with BA, liv. rm., w/wood stove & brick hearth. Many amenities, incl. oversized heated gar., generator & much more. $335,000

Waterford – Quaint & sunny Bed & Breakfast set in the center of Waterford with restaurant/bar. 9BR, 7.5BA, priv. living quarters, a retail shop and more. Walk to Keoka beach. $275,000

Denmark – Beautiful 5-ac. bldg. lot, selectively cleared, driveway in. Potential views from the upper back end of the lot. Property is just off the beaten path but just a short drive to Shawnee Peak & Bridgton town amenities. $38,000

Bridgton – Immaculate and elegant custom-built exec. home w/Long Lake views. 4500 sq. ft., in-law apt., 4BR, 3.5BA. 3 levels of superb living space, stunninglybeautiful, a must see! $625,000

Bridgton – Beautiful 1.25-ac. lot on the corner of Highland Rd. and Muirfield Drive. Harvesting on the lot has been completed and a shared leach field is in place. Great location abutting Bridgton Highlands Golf course, just minutes to Highland Lake, Bridgton Hospital, all the town’s amenities and 5 mi. to Shawnee Peak. Great lot in wonderful location. $49,500 Stoneham – 400 ft. private waterfront on Keewaydin Lake with 2.4 acres. $189,900

For Lease: 1500’ of prime space next to McDonald’s at a traffic light. Highest traffic count in town! Great location for retail or professional use. Plenty of parking at a price that is less than downtown rents!

Call Mark — 603-479-9095 3T26x


Page 6C, The Bridgton News, July 14, 2016

Regional sports

Bridgton 4 on Fourth 1683 Helena Sheldrick 7 Sebago ME MA 1684 Elaine Camelio 71 Attleboro 1685 Liz Lemieux 13 Denmark ME 1686 Shawn Flaherty 46 Bridgewater MA TX 1687 Erin Dietsch 47 Houston 1688 Luca Sonne 12 Denmark ME ME 1689 Shoshana Ronen 14 Sweden 1690 Jennifer Green 24 Avon CT 1691 Brie Woodworth 30 Danville NH 12 ”Waterford ME 1692 Mack Harris 1693 Maggie Goldman 13 Denmark ME CA 1694 Dick Ramage 73 Arcadia 1695 Sofia Noceda 12 Sweden ME 1696 Brian Kelleher 46 Bridgewater MA ME 1697 Carlota Hildago 10 Sweden 1698 Lila Dupont 13 Denmark ME ME 1699 Campbell Arnone 12 Denmark 1700 Judith Siemen 70 Cambridge MA 1701 Rachel Peters 19 Cape Neddick ME Swain Sr. 58 Saco ME 1702 Jim 1703 Charlie Canto 14 Harrison ME ME 1704 Grace Yannelli 7 Bridgton 1705 David Sweet 55 Saunderstown RI 1706 Anna Wolf 15 Harrison ME ME 1707 Arden Weilheimer 15 Harrison 1708 Pamela White 53 Norway ME 1709 Anita Chadbourne Field 40 Sebago ME 1710 Timothy Becker 40 Boston MA 1711 Kannon Gill 14 Harrison ME 14 Harrison ME 1712 Laura Rein 1713 Caroline Burnham 14 Denmark ME ME 1714 Madeleine Edwards 14 Denmark 1715 Matthew Howell 38 York ME 1716 Michele Mullen 44 Portland ME ME 1717 Norah Howell 7 York 1718 Katherine Epstein 37 Dover NH 14 Denmark ME 1719 Tabitha Burke 1720 Lauren Raved 14 Denmark ME 1721 Merry Preiditsch 47 Palmetto GA ME 1722 Olivia Friedland 14 Denmark 1723 Timothy Lipsey 7 Harrison ME MA 1724 Katelyn Dehey 32 Mendon 1725 Stephen Picardo 63 Medfield MA 1726 Kylie Blitzer 14 Denmark ME ME 1727 Levi Pelton 13 Harrison 31 Bridgton ME 1728 Amy Millar ME 1729 Delia Fontana 9 Naples 1730 Lynn Stockford 61 West Palm Beach FL 1731 Tom Sacco 18 Fryeburg ME ME 1732 Michael Durkin 25 Fryeburg 1733 Cynthia Fontana 45 Naples ME ME 1734 Noah Young 9 Harrison 1735 Christine Curtis 78 Seattle WA 1736 Lyle Aker 68 Billerica MA ME 1737 MacKenzie Dvorak 23 Bridgton 1738 Viviane De Castro 16 Harrison ME 1739 Anna Bradshaw 16 Palmer AK 1740 Moe Bailey 49 Harrison ME 1741 Scott Medeiros 38 Palmer AK 1742 Jeanne Gluck 54 Harrison ME 1743 Linda Porcelli 54 West Newbury MA 1744 Brittany Detlefsen 27 Harrison ME ME 1745 Camilla Hirano 11 Sweden 1746 Cassia Hawke 12 Harrison ME 1747 Katherine Rein 13 Harrison ME 1748 Richard Quinn 51 Danvers FL 1749 Jennifer Quinn 49 Danvers MA 1750 Jessica Miller 37 South Paris ME 1751 Ashlee Griffith 10 South Easton MA 1752 Christine Wu 54 Newton MA 1753 Maeve Sousa 14 Georgetown MA 1754 Maura Sousa 48 Georgetown MA 1755 Brian Griffith 40 South Easton MA 1756 Kelly Rockwell 35 Bridgton ME 1757 Bob Snyder 76 Bridgton ME 1758 Ann MacOne 65 Natick MA 1759 Beth Griffith 39 South Easton MA 1760 Lilly Griffith 8 South Easton MA 1761 William Warren 79 Gorham ME 1762 Jordan Smith 10 Sweden ME 1763 Jennifer Larrabee 40 Bridgton ME 1764 Jennilee Sirois 33 Bridgton ME 1765 Waverly Sumner 12 Sweden ME 1766 Maveon Cohen 10 Sweden ME 1767 Emily Richman 12 Sweden ME 1768 Jamie Kleinbord 12 Sweden ME 1769 Abby Kanter 12 Sweden ME Ziter 51 Castle Rock CO 1770 Jill 1771 Craig Smith 43 Sweden ME 1772 Kristy Kowalczyk 57 Louisville CO

56:30 56:31 56:34 56:36 56:36 56:37 56:38 56:39 56:39 56:43 56:46 56:47 56:48 56:51 56:51 56:56 56:57 56:57 56:59 57:02 57:10 57:11 57:14 57:24 57:24 57:25 57:32 57:39 57:39 57:39 57:40 57:40 57:49 57:49 57:50 57:57 58:00 58:03 58:03 58:04 58:05 58:09 58:10 58:10 58:15 58:16 58:17 58:20 58:21 58:22 58:32 58:32 58:35 58:35 58:41 58:43 58:58 58:59 58:59 59:01 59:03 59:06 59:10 59:15 59:16 59:16 59:18 59:19 59:20 59:25 59:26 59:27 59:27 59:36 59:36 59:38 59:47 59:52 1:00:03 1:00:11 1:00:12 1:00:15 1:00:15 1:00:15 1:00:16 1:00:16 1:00:18 1:00:20 1:00:20 1:00:22

1773 Richard Rao 49 Orlando FL 1:00:24 MN 1:00:26 1774 Nicholas Blossom 17 Dellwood 1775 Parker Blossom 14 Dellwood MN 1:00:26 1776 Fred Hammerle 79 Bridgton ME 1:00:55 Main 63 Bridgton ME 1:00:56 1777 Gay 1778 Charlotte Jealous 11 Harrison ME 1:01:05 ME 1:01:07 1779 Bridget Meara 42 Portland 1780 Lauren Fried 14 Denmark ME 1:01:07 1781 Victoria Lyons 42 Fryeburg ME 1:01:08 MA 1:01:16 1782 Roger Whipple 65 Duxbury 1783 Rachel Shapiro 14 Denmark ME 1:01:21 Targoff 12 Denmark ME 1:01:21 1784 Zoe 1785 Susan Ofmar 53 Ripley Surrey England 1:01:23 1786 Deni Roy 59 Bridgton ME 1:01:23 ME 1:01:25 1787 Nichole Johnson 32 Casco 1788 Samantha Behle 15 Denmark ME 1:01:25 ME 1:01:26 1789 Sabrina Lemar 22 Denmark 1790 Kaya Equevilley 12 Harrison ME 1:01:28 1791 Jahleil Jenkins 9 Harrison ME 1:01:31 ME 1:01:45 1792 Caleb Dunlap 21 Portland 1793 Emma Potter 13 Pelham NY 1:01:52 16 Chelmsford MA 1:01:53 1794 Maggie Potter 1795 Alice Ganey 14 Denmark ME 1:01:55 1796 Juliette Brook 13 Denmark ME 1:01:55 CT 1:02:03 1797 Emily Friedman 20 Fairfield 1798 Avery Lehman 13 Denmark ME 1:02:07 MA 1:02:27 1799 Kendra Shilale 10 Mendon 1800 Maryn Shilale 13 Mendon MA 1:02:27 1801 Gabriel Kowalczyk 14 Castle Rock CO 1:02:35 1:02:36 1802 Gregg Kowalczyk 55 Castle Rock CO 1:02:37 1803 Catherine Harris 75 Bellingham WA ME 1:02:38 1804 Charlotte London 11 Harrison 1805 Kelly Connell 51 Fryeburg ME 1:02:50 1806 Jaytonn Hunter 13 Fryeburg ME 1:02:50 15 Fryeburg ME 1:02:51 1807 Sam Kriser 1808 Nancy Flanders 59 Houston TX 1:02:57 NY 1:02:57 1809 Grace Flanders 27 New York 1810 Keith Rowe 69 Scarborough ME 1:03:01 1811 Marti Kinsel 61 Scarborough ME 1:03:02 Greene-Houvras 10 Sweden ME 1:03:06 1812 Noa 1813 Phoebe Levine 72 Charlotte NC 1:03:06 1814 Ethan Hunt 13 Harrison ME 1:03:09 1815 Eric Murrer 22 Boxford MA 1:03:11 1816 Mary Barhite 63 Boxford MA 1:03:11 1817 Shauna Perry Smith 34 Naples ME 1:03:17 1818 E J Huston 26 Jamaica Plain MA 1:03:19 67 Bridgton ME 1:03:21 1819 Marian Rabe 1820 Dan Mills 35 Cumberland Foreside 1:03:22 1821 Ken Pierini 66 Harrison ME 1:03:39 63 Pomfret CT 1:03:41 1822 Diane Rees 1823 Jim Rees 64 Pomfret CT 1:03:42 45 Danvers MA 1:03:44 1824 Susan Dirks 1825 Mary Beth Difilippo 50 Danvers MA 1:03:44 1826 Dylan Goldberg 15 Harrison ME 1:03:45 ME 1:03:45 1827 Lauren Baldinger 15 Harrison 1828 Chloe Zilkha 15 Harrison ME 1:03:45 1829 Olivia Steele 12 Harrison ME 1:03:47 1830 Kathy Raimo 48 N. Reading MA 1:03:49 1831 Ullisa Benoit 46 Dracut MA 1:03:50 1832 Caroline Barabell 15 Denmark ME 1:04:10 1833 Hannah Walsh 15 Denmark ME 1:04:11 1834 Haley Taggart 20 East Amherst NY 1:04:19 1835 Karen Kowalczyk 53 East Amherst NY 1:04:19 1836 Gavin Kirn 12 Harrison ME 1:04:20 1837 Mel Fineberg 80 Portland ME 1:04:21 1838 Jameson McGowan 7 Bridgton ME 1:04:25 1839 Jack McGowan 9 Bridgton ME 1:04:25 1840 Meghan Thomas 24 Castle Pines CO 1:04:36 1841 Peggy Jacobson 65 Manchester CT 1:04:36 1842 Jacqui Ordway 10 Denmark ME 1:04:37 1843 Rex Charlston 6 Harrison ME 1:04:39 1844 Gordon Blanchard 71 Bridgton ME 1:04:40 ME 1:04:41 1845 Eloise Blanchard 71 Bridgton 1846 Peter Thomas 61 Castle Pines CO 1:04:42 1847 Katherine McCabe 29 Greenwood Village CO 1:04:44 1848 Nolan Devine 18 Belmont MA 1:04:46 1849 Irene Stokes 54 Bridgton ME 1:04:56 1850 Laura MacLean 52 Bridgton ME 1:04:57 1851 Mikyah Pelton 10 Harrison ME 1:05:01 1852 Weezie Vance 66 Hampton Falls NH 1:05:01 1853 Malaya Moores 11 Sweden ME 1:05:12 1854 Christina Mondgragon 18 Atlanta GA 1:05:13 1855 Susan Robbins 60 Naples ME 1:05:17 1856 Christa Ramage 45 Bedford NY 1:05:20 1857 Heidi Barnes 43 Yorba Linda CA 1:05:20 1858 Helen Wickett 12 Denmark ME 1:05:20 1859 Kristin Nelson 47 Yorba Linda CA 1:05:21 1860 Gail Ramage 71 Arcadia CA 1:05:21 1861 Millie Beane 55 Bridgton ME 1:05:22 1862 Heather Friedman 57 Fairfield CT 1:05:30

VIEW FROM HIGH ABOVE — Mike Dana captured runners heading down Main Street in Bridgton during the 4 On The Fourth Road Race through the use of a drone. 1863 Rachel Manz 30 Jericho VT ME 1864 Marianne Lyons 12 Denmark 12 Denmark ME 1865 Maddie Love 1866 Cynthia Thomas 60 Castle Pines CO 1867 Shirley Green 56 Riverton CT 1868 Maryjane Devine 51 Woburn MA 1869 Lynn Donaldson 68 Manchester CT 1870 Nicole Morgan 42 Bridgton ME 53 Bridgton ME 1871 Diane Miller 1872 Annabelle Baum 12 Denmark ME 1873 Pat Mytkowicz 67 Harrison ME 64 Hanover MA 1874 Ruth Hulke 1875 Jamie Ghiloni 32 Halifax MA 1876 Zack Tucker 33 New York NY 1877 Douglas Donaldson 66 Manchester CT 1878 Holly Palmgren 41 Princeton MA 1879 Courtney Palmgren 10 Princeton MA 1880 Billy McGaffigan 53 Cambridge MA 1881 Fred Sullivan 64 Needham Heights MA 13 Sweden ME 1882 Audrey Zahn 1883 Emma Clift 12 Sweden ME 1884 Nika Naumovich 13 Sweden ME 1885 Amanda MacLeod-Killer 42 Bridgton ME 1886 Jeffry Killer 43 Bridgton ME 1887 Christopher Rice 15 Harrison ME 1888 Lynn Proffer 68 West Hills CA 1889 Melody Millett 17 Naples ME 1890 Jane Hanson 8 Harrison ME 1891 Nathanael Chadbourne 15 Harrison ME 1892 George Brown 78 Harrison ME 1893 Ruth Letourneau 66 Bridgton ME 1894 Charlene Michaud 69 East Waterboro ME 1895 Dennis Carey 69 Atlanta GA 1896 Charlotte Cohen 11 Sweden ME 1897 Cloe Glazer 12 Sweden ME 1898 Lila Silverstein 14 Harrison ME 1899 Jane Strausman 15 Harrison ME 1900 Joan Wood 82 Medfield MA 1901 Sue Potter 53 Chelmsford MA 1902 Hannah Moss 11 Sweden ME 1903 Olivia Montag 11 Sweden ME 1904 Sarah Shaw 34 Medford MA 1905 Talia Martin 11 Sweden ME 1906 Sarah Shaw 34 Somerville MA CT 1907 Becky Robitaille 34 Fairfield 1908 Brent Robitaille 34 Fairfield CT 1909 Chris Gill 60 South Portland ME

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1910 Scarlett Blank 10 1911 Sage Blank 10 1912 Cora Gallagher 7 1913 Jane McGowan 44 1914 Mary Difilippo 20 54 1915 Laurie Gill 1916 Barbara Gelinas 61 1917 Suzanne Federer 77 1918 Michelle Bush 38 1919 Jarrett Bush 6 1920 Irene Jacintho 67 1921 Susie Roy 57 1922 Cordelia Gallagher 11 1923 Rae-Ann Guzman 46 1924 Olyvia Rose 11 1925 Scarlett Scwimmer 9 1926 Johanna Lynch 47 1927 Ann Marie Antolini 54 1928 James Robson 36 1929 Lily Levick 12 1930 Matthew Brill 12 1931 Ellen Webber 48 1932 Margaret Scarlett 19 1933 Kathi Webber 47 1934 Barbara Hanauer 64 1935 Kayla Gordon 19 1936 Ben Sparks 11 1937 Donna Medeiros 59 1938 Paul Devoe 56 1939 Britt Kinevich 51 1940 Robert Weeman 56 1941 Becky Tripp 42 1942 Deb Robson 35 1943 Somer Gray 8 1944 Artie Muse 70 1945 Mitch Mount 16 1946 Colin Baker 16 1947 Sam Muirhead 17 1948 Lola Galliher 7 1949 Jonathan Sparks 42 1950 Riva Sparks 70 1951 Kathy Larkin 60 1952 Jodi Sparks 43 1953 Sara Dematteo 40 1954 Katie Brown 42 1955 Frances Byrne 9 1956 Juliana Zahn 10

Sweden ME Sweden ME North Yarmouth ME Winthrop MA Danvers MA South Portland ME South Windsor CT Falmouth ME North Yarmouth ME Bridgton ME North Conway NH Bridgton ME Sweden ME Bridgton ME Sweden ME Sweden ME Apex NC Braintree MA Naples ME Sweden ME Bridgton ME Venice FL Bridgton ME Venice FL Bridgton ME Telford PA Sudbury MA Rutland MA Leominster MA Denmark ME Denmark ME Naples ME Naples ME Harrison ME Rumford ME Sebago ME Sebago ME Sebago ME Harrison ME Sudbury MA Sudbury MA Bridgton ME Sudbury MA Denmark ME Denmark ME Sweden ME Sweden ME

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FEATURED PROPERTIES CASCO — Hancock Beach Assoc., lovely 4-BR, 2-BA Ranch w/open concept floor plan, light & bright kit., dining rm. & living rm. w/cherry floors. Full walkout bsmt., screened-in sunroom, 2-car gar., ROW to Thompson Lake, tennis & more! $425,000 (MLS 1264407)

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NAPLES — Stunning log home w/320 ft. of sandy frontage on the Songo River near the mouth of Brandy Pond. Direct access to Long & Sebago Lakes! Home boasts 4 bdrms., 3 baths, granite, hickory cabinets, gas fplc., guest house, gar., generator & much more! $749,000 (MLS 1255012)

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www.visualtour.com #0365-7290

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NAPLES — Desirable Steamboat Landing. Rare offering! 1/2 duplex w/gorgeous 274 ft. assoc. beach & boat dock on Brandy Pond. Playground, volleyball, campfires & lg. lakeside picnic area. The other 1/2 of the duplex is also being sold separately. $213,000 (MLS 1238081)

Jocelyn O’Rourke-Shane 207-693-7284 (o) 207-838-5555 (c) jocelyn@hancockpondrealestate.com 692 Roosevelt Independently Owned and Locally Operated

Trail, P.O. Box 97 Naples, ME 04055

2nd,4th

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Regional sports 1957 Sydney Martin 10 Harrison ME ME 1958 Karen Toohey 67 Harrison 1959 Judith Haas 59 Harrison ME 56 Halifax MA 1960 Joan Doran 1961 Kate Ebner 46 Wethersfield CT 1962 Susan Pulaski 52 North Andover MA 10 Sweden ME 1963 Slyvie Bless 1964 Apple Lydon 13 Sweden ME 13 Sweden ME 1965 Anjali Mehta 1966 Jaquie Kizer 12 Sweden ME 1967 Catherine Woodbury 59 South Hamilton MA ME 1968 Olivia Nachman 13 Sweden 1969 Sahmoya Rose-Blake 10 Sweden ME 12 Sweden ME 1970 Ella Andrews 1971 Joan Kimball 60 Haverhill MA 1972 Isabelle Blossom 11 Dellwood MN Friedman 66 Fairfield CT 1973 Ira CT 1974 Aaron Friedman 19 Fairfield 12 Harrison ME 1975 Mikenzie Pierini CT 1976 Alison Warren 55 Avon FL 1977 Samantha Redlund 23 Orlando MA 1978 Brian Hubbard 56 Sudbury MA 1979 Thomas Hubbard 62 Natick 52 Hopkinton MA 1980 Amy Beck MA 1981 Moira Hubbard 55 Sudbury 1982 Edward Curtis 83 Seattle WA 1983 Elizabeth Hanley 55 North Andover MA 1984 Sharon Blossom 53 Dellwood MN ME 1985 Maggie Pierini 12 Harrison 1986 Jeannie Muse 70 Rumford ME 1987 Brendan Beck 9 Hopkinton MA Katz 15 Harrison ME 1988 Alex 1989 Olivia Tantleff 15 Harrison ME 53 Newbury MA 1990 Alison Gibbs 1991 Richard Quinn 75 Estero FL 1992 Loren Kessel 52 Newbury MA Pusch 16 Sebago ME 1993 Eric 1994 Courtney Gould 20 Bridgton ME

This week’s game solutions

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MA 1995 Daniel Poirier 19 Billerica 1996 Renee Kostka 47 Fitchburg MA 1997 Laura McGaffigan 49 Cambridge MA 13 Sweden ME 1998 Sloane Lewis 1999 Sierra Scanlan 14 Sweden ME Steele 14 Sweden ME 2000 Lily 2001 Taylor Sass 8 Harrison ME 2002 Dawn Hemesath 36 Chesapeake VA 2003 Matt Hemesath 36 Chesapeake VA 2004 Aaliyah Davis 12 Harrison ME Noonan 26 Cambridge MA 2005 Jeff 2006 Mike Noonan 53 Wilton CT 2007 Madaket Whittaker 11 Harrison ME ME 2008 Rhea Sanger 14 Sweden 2009 Claudia Lipsey 14 Harrison ME ME 2010 Tiana Ismirnioglou 17 Harrison 2011 Annie Segall 15 Sweden ME 2012 Olivia Wiener 13 Sweden ME 2013 Magdalena Real De Asua 14 Sweden ME 2014 Doris Noonan 53 Wilton CT CT 2015 Morgan Noonan 16 Wilton 2016 Casey Noonan 22 Cambridge MA 2017 Alexsia Romain 14 Sweden ME ME 2018 Jamie Jobson 13 Sweden 2019 Avery Bush 8 Bridgton ME 14 Sweden ME 2020 Molly Potter 2021 Eva Adams 10 Sweden ME 2022 Emma Froelich 12 Sweden ME ME 2023 Julia Hodys 13 Sweden 2024 Annabel Hellman 12 Sweden ME 11 Sweden ME 2025 Gabby Jones 2026 Charlotte Wise 11 Sweden ME 2027 Natalia Hecker 10 Sweden ME ME 2028 Olivia De Dampiere 12 Sweden 2029 Sophia Ligorria 12 Sweden ME ME 2030 Jemima Eastwood 11 Sweden 2031 Sammi Shaw 12 Sweden ME 2032 Noa Cherny 11 Sweden ME

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68 Bridgton 2033 Mary Hubka 2034 Terry Hubka 70 Bridgton 10 Sweden 2035 Sabrina Kizer 2036 Jason Sampson 40 Casco Sampson 39 Casco 2037 Erin 2038 Barbara Grandolfo 68 Harrison 2039 Leigh Long 44 Bridgewater 2040 Daniel Jaronczyk 6 Bridgton 2041 Emma Castle-Smith 21 Sweden 2042 Cami Dillon 15 Sweden 2043 Emily Levine 10 Sweden 2044 Robin Lyles 27 Sweden 2045 Amanda Keegan 25 Sweden 2046 Candice Cobb 27 Sweden 2047 Maya Glass 10 Sweden 2048 Becky Devoe 55 Leominster 2049 Pat Brandenberger 78 Harrison 9 Sweden 2050 Ava Schneider 2051 Jonah Kizer 7 Sweden 2052 Skye Robertson 31 Sweden 2053 Cara O’Connell 24 Sweden 2054 Gracie Ryan 15 Sweden 2055 Melissa Joinville 28 Sweden 2056 Alejandra Hidalgo 8 Sweden 2057 Kathy O’Neil 60 Bridgton 39 Waterford 2058 Jenah Pare 2059 Michelle Wilson 20 Sweden 2060 John Crowe 89 Sweden 2061 Jonathan Crowe 48 Lovell 2062 Cindy Deschenes 47 Bridgton 65 Bridgton 2063 Donna Small 2064 Thomas Jaronczyk 3 Bridgton 2065 Rachel Jaronczyk 38 Bridgton 2066 Mark Weaver 5 Denmark 2067 Alicia Weaver 49 Denmark 4 Bridgton 2068 Trevor Bush 2069 Rita Bush 63 Bridgton Bush 64 Bridgton 2070 Tom 2071 Richard Allan 73 Barre

GLLT upcoming events Degree of Difficulty: Moderate The Greater Lovell Land Trust walks are free and open to the public. Look for “Land Trust Walk Today” signs posted on Route 5 and leading to the trailhead. Be aware that though dogs are welcome on some properties, the GLLT asks that you not bring a pet on a GLLT-sponsored walk. Thank you for your cooperation. Walks last approximately three hours, so please dress for the weather conditions. We suggest long pants, long sleeves and sturdy shoes with socks. We highly recommend that you bring plenty of water, snacks, insect repellant and your camera. Admission is free.

July 14, 2016, The Bridgton News, Page 7C ME ME ME ME ME ME MA ME ME ME ME ME ME ME ME MA ME ME ME ME ME ME ME ME ME ME ME ME ME ME ME ME ME ME ME ME ME ME MA

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(Continued from Page 2C) by teams. Registration fee is $60 for singles and $150 for teams (two or three members). Registration fee is nonrefundable after Aug. 14. Team rosters need not be finalized until race day at the close of registration. All competitors must be 17 years of age or older. (Proof of age may be required) For more information, contact Rob at gachallenge@live.com or (207) 647-5298 or go to the website: maineadventureracing.com NAPLES CAUSEWAY 5K The Naples Causeway 5K will be held on Sunday, Aug. 28 at 8 a.m. Come and enjoy the second annual flat 5K along the Naples Causeway. Views of beautiful Long Lake and Brandy Pond during your run/walk. All proceeds will benefit the Patrick Dempsey Center for Cancer Research. Cost: $25, price increases to $30 after Aug. 26. Online registration: runsignup.com/ Race/Events/ME/Naples/Causeway5K

KEEFE’S MARINE Alan Keefe, Owner KeefesMarine@yahoo.com 207-693-3075 Fully-Insured PO Box 1373 335 Roosevelt Tr., Naples, ME 04055

WWW.KEEFESMARINE.COM

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2928 East Conway Rd. • East Conway, NH • 603-939-2698 townandcountry.com Open Monday–Friday 9-5; Saturday 9-3

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Regional sports

Page 8C, The Bridgton News, July 14, 2016

Trail cairns lead the way More Than Just Piles of Rocks!

I remember it as if it happened yesterday, when a simple row of trail cairns probably saved my life. There were five of us from the University of New Hampshire Outing Club climbing Mount Washington that October day in 1958. We were on the Bigelow Lawn heading for the summit when, out of nowhere, bad weather engulfed us! This can happen in the blink of an eye on Mount Washington. Fog, mist and rain were so thick around us that we couldn’t see more than a few feet ahead of us, and we quickly became disoriented. Our “bail out” plan in the event that something like this happened was to go down the Lions Head Trail into Tuckerman Ravine, but we didn’t want to wander off the headwall in the fog. That would have been fatal, and others have unfortunately suffered that fate over the years. Luckily for us, when the fog had enveloped us we were at a rock cairn marking the trail, and we were able to play “leapfrog” from one cairn to the next, and the next, and so on. With one of us staying at the last cairn, the others strung out until the next one

Senior Rambles Hiking Trips & Tips by Allen Crabtree was found. We then gathered there and repeated the process until we reached the top of the Lions Head trail and climbed down to safety. Frankly, up to that point I’d never given much thought to the ubiquitous trail cairns I’d been passing in my rambles over the years. After this hairraising experience on Mount Washington, however, I gained a new respect for these silent sentinels that mark trails in the mountains. Since then, my fellow hikers and I have built or repaired a number of cairns to help guide hikers along the trail as part of our role as volunteer “trail adopters.” Cairn building is older than history Cairns are essentially just piles of stones stacked on top of one another. The word cairn comes from the Scottish Gaelic càrn. It also can be found in other Celtic languages including the Welsh carn (and carnedd), the Breton karn,

JULY SPECIA L

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A/C TIME!

Auto Body Collision & Painting Tires • Car & Truck BRIDGTON’S Accessories ONLY

Trailer Hitches & Accessories Sales & Installations

Member Dale McDaniel, Owner Phone: 207-647-8134 Fax: 207-647-4314 487 Portland Rd., Bridgton, ME 04009

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the Irish carn, and the Cornish karn or carn. Cairns have been and are used for a broad variety of purposes, from prehistoric times up to the present. Cairns to mark trails are only one use for piling stones. In some cultures, they were used as burial mounds, territory markers, and to protect graves and food storage sites from foraging animals. “A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral,” — Antoine de Saint-Exupery. Rock cairns can be a form of worship in wishing good fortune to be bestowed on the stacker and their family or to remember someone. There is a Jewish tradition of leaving a pebble or stone on top of a tombstone. This signifies that someone has honored the deceased person’s memory with a visit to the grave. Some say that adding a rock to a cairn is good luck, and there is an old Scottish Gaelic blessing: Cuiridh mi clach air do chàrn that translates, “I’ll put a stone on your cairn.” In Highland folklore, it is believed that the Highland Clans, before they fought in a battle, each man would place a stone in a pile. Those who survived the battle returned and removed a stone from the pile. The stones that remained were built into a cairn to honor the dead. Trail Cairns and Trail Ducks We see cairns most often along our hiking trails and they help keep us on the trail. Cairns are particularly valuable on the treeless summits of many of our mountains. With no trail markers or blazes on trees to mark the way, a row of cairns may be the only indication of where the trail is. In poor weather, as I have discovered firsthand, they can save your life! Ideally, a cairn should be

Some feel that adding a rock to a cairn is good luck. Here Denmark Mountain Hiker Jeff Sturgis adds a stone to an impressive trail cairn on Round Mountain. (Photo by Allen Crabtree) large enough to be visible in bad weather to help mark the trail for hikers. They should be tall enough to protrude above the snow in winter, at least three feet high. Cairns should be on or beside the trail. The rationale for a large cairn is that the effort involved in creating a large cairn should provide some confidence you are on the correct path, or at least a well-traveled path. Not many people would take the time to build such a large structure unless they were confident about its location. Each of us can help by adding a rock to the pile as we pass, or helping restore a cairn that has blown over in the wind. A smaller version of the trail cairn is the trail duck. A trail duck is a much smaller rock pile of at least three stones typically stacked just high enough to convince the observer it is not natural. While two rocks stacked on top of one another could be a coincidence, three rocks are not — that is a trail duck! In some regions, ducks also contain a pointer rock (or couple of stacked rocks) to indicate the direction of the trail. Trail Cairns and Wilderness Policy How many trail cairns are enough, and how many are too many? A hiker we know was lost for a while on Pleasant Mountain because he went straight when the trail took a sharp turn to the left. He

infooneagleswings@gmail.com

What We Do and Who We Are At ON EAGLES WINGS

LAKE REGION BOYS SUMMER SOCCER CAMP

The public pays for our services which assists us in offering our facilities and programs free to cancer patients.

July 25, 26, 27, 28 (Mon.–Thurs.) Grades 5-6-7-8 (6:30-8 p.m.) CAMP DIRECTOR: LRHS Head Coach – Michael Chaine Instructors – LRHS Soccer team members Location – Lake Region High School • Development of skills and team play • Promote mentorship between the older and younger generations of Lake Region boys soccer players • Provide a fun, positive learning environment for all skill levels

$25 per student Early Registration due by July 20th, Registration after the 20th up to 28th will be $35 Registration forms can be e-mailed to: mchaine@auburnmaine.gov or mailed to 41 Lakeview Dr., Naples, ME 04055 Payment will be due the first day of camp (Please make checks payable to Michael Chaine / LRHS Soccer Coach All remaining money will go toward the JV and Varsity boys soccer teams)

For more information and/or questions please contact Coach Chaine at mchaine @auburnmaine.gov

Player’s name: Grade: Address:

Phone number: Emergency Contact Person:

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Player Registration Form

All cancer patients going through cancer treatment in the Bridgton area receive free: • Reflexology • Massage • Arts and craft classes

Our services and programs include: • Reflexology • Massage • Various arts and crafts classes • Paintings and crafts for sale

For boys grades 5-8

LAKE REGION BOYS SUMMER SOCCER CAMP

paint markings on the rock ledges, are either removed or allowed to deteriorate with age and weather. We have found that it is a challenge to find the Mud Brook trail when on the summit, requiring map and compass skills and a “leap frog” technique working from one known spot on the trail to the next. Trail cairns here are valuable, but run counter to wilderness policy and the Leave No Trace ethic advocates for leaving the outdoors undisturbed an in its natural condition. Before heading out on a hike in a wilderness area hikers should carry with them both a map and a compass, have a working knowledge of map and compass skills, and be prepared for the challenge when they find the normal trail markers may not be present. The next time you are out hiking respect the trail cairns that help keep you from straying off the trail and give a silent “thank you” to those who have spent their time and labor to build them. If you wish, add to cairns a stone at a time for good luck, but also respect that too many cairns is not necessarily a good thing. “All things in moderation” applies to trail cairns as well as life, and there should be only just enough of them so we can find our way home again and not be like Daniel Boone who once said: “I have never been lost, but I will admit to being confused for several weeks.”

207-803-8025 Fax- 207-803-8026

236 Portland Rd. Bridgton, ME 04009 www.oneageswings2.com

We fix Tire Pressure Monitor Systems. Scan & repair — newest technology.

REMEMBER TO JOIN US ON OUR FACEBOOK PAGE LAKE REGION HIGH SCHOOL SOCCER

was located, safe and sound, but it prompted the Denmark Mountain Hikers to block off the wrong trail with branches and build three large cairns to show hikers where the trail is. This was on the Southwest Ridge trail that we have “adopted” as volunteer trail stewards, and is a good example of where we recognized that additional cairns were needed. On the other hand, it is not uncommon to see what I think are too many cairns along the trail. For example, on Round Mountain we counted 100 trail cairns and trail ducks on a hike there — clearly there was an overexuberance of cairn building on a modest mountain with no real danger of hikers getting lost. An overabundance distracts from cairns used as genuine trail guides, and we have encountered “false cairns” that were not on the trail and would lead hikers in the wrong direction. This was on Caribou Mountain, which is in the White Mountain National Forest’s Caribou-Speckled Mountain Wilderness Area. Forest Service Wilderness Policy restricts the use of trail signs within wilderness and primitive areas to only when necessary to protect the resource or to provide for visitor safety. The policy allows trail signs at the trailhead and some at trail junctions, but other trail markers, including

Open for Reflexology and Massage Tuesday and Thursday 8 a.m.- 3:30 p.m. By appointment only.

What is Reflexology Reflexology involves applying pressure to points on the head, ears, hands and feet. Benefits of reflexology: Reduces stress and improves circulation. Hits the nervous system to relax and calm the mind, body, soul and spirit. Massage involves the muscular system and the massage continues to reduce stress and relieve pressure from sore and aching muscles.

Mix It Up Art Studio Open various dates and times. Drop by our facility & pick up our July calendar. • Drawing & watercolor classes • Children’s programs • Crafts, and acrylic painting classes • Paintings and crafts for sale

We combined a unique two-hour reflexology/massage session — It’s our most popular.

One hour of reflexology to relax your nervous system, followed by one hour of massage to hit your muscular system.

Total cost for two hours in July is $75

Bring a friend and get $5 off each for $70 per person. Reflexology only — $45; Massage only — $50; with hot rocks $55

Acrylic Dolphin Painting Thurs., July 14 6-8 p.m. $25

Beginner Portrait Drawing Wed., July 20, 27, August 3 &10 6:30-8:30 p.m. $45 plus supplies.

FAMILY NIGHT Mermaid Tiaras and/or Boys’ Hardware Jewelry Tues., July 19 • 6-8 p.m. $15 total for parent and child. Angel Lanterns — Fri., July 22 9-11 a.m. No charge (if making for cancer patients). $10 (to make for yourself)

Meet Our Staff Photo on left, pictured left to right: Monique Hayes, our receptionist and appointment coordinator; Ann Ruel, Reflexologist. Whitney Scheiferstein, Massage Therapist. Photo on right: Jennifer Crowley, arts and crafts instructor.

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Page 2C, The Bridgton News, July 14, 2016

(Continued from Page 1C) Preregistration is strongly encouraged. Day of race registration will be accepted starting at 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. at the Casco Community Center on Route 121 in Casco Village. All contestants are required to check in at registration prior to the start of the race even if they are pre-registered. The first 300 preregistrants will receive a Casco Days Road Race t-shirt. Please note that you must register before July 22 in order to receive a t-shirt. Entry donation to the Casco Fire Association:
 $18 until July 22
 and $25 July 23 through race day Register online at the Casco Days website: www.cascodays.com 5K TROT FOR AUTISM The Margaret Murphy Center 5K Trot for Autism will be held on Saturday, July 30 at 9 a.m. at the Geiger Elementary School in Lewiston. Register at http://www. firstgiving.com or www.running4free.com Registration opens at 8 a.m. Entry fee: $20 before July 25, $25 day of the race. WALKING TOWARD A PAIN-FREE FUTURE The Fourth Annual Walking Toward a Pain-Free Future, to raise awareness for Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy/Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, will be held on Saturday, Aug. 6 at 11:15, starting from the Bridgton Community Center. A bake sale starts at 9 a.m. in front of Oberg Agency (Main Street) followed by a raffle drawing at 10:45 and a butterfly release at the Bob Dunning Memorial Bridge in Pondicherry Park at 11 a.m. To register, go to http://goo.gl/forms/ ZB0WRHa9HO9UDXnD3 For more information, contact Rosemary Wiser at rosemary.wiser@gmail.com or 207-756-9464 MAINE STATE TRIATHLON BETHEL – For the first time at any Maine triathlon, no single-use plastic bottles will be used at the 25th Annual Maine State Triathlon, scheduled for Sunday, Aug. 7 in Bethel. Athletes competing in the event, presented by Oxford Networks, will receive a reusable, BPA-free water bottle compliments of event sponsor Androscoggin Valley Hospital. The bottles will be filled with clear Maine water.  “The Bethel Area Chamber’s efforts at making our events more sustainable include increased composting of food waste and recycling efforts to keep as much waste out of landfills as possible,” stated Robin Zinchuk, executive director. “By eliminating disposable bottles from our triathlon we are potentially keeping 500-plus plastic bottles out of the waste stream.” For complete information and to register for this sprint distance tri, 750-meter swim, a 24-kilometer bike, 5.8-kilometer run, visit www.mainestatetriathlon.com. TOUR DE LOVELL The 11th annual Tour de Lovell bicycle race will be held on Saturday, Aug. 13, at 8 a.m. starting at the New Suncook School, located on Route 5. The road (performance racing bicycles) and touring (mountain-comfort bicycles) compete in a 21.6-mile course. Registration is $30 before Aug. 5, and $35 after. The Kids’ Tour (under age of 14, all bicycles) is a five-mile race, starting immediately after the Tour pack leaves. Cost is $5, and $10 after Aug. 5. Register online at: www. bikereg.com/11th-annualtour-de-lovell First 50 Tour & Road registrants receive a Tour de Lovell t-shirt.  
 Tour de Lovell is a fundraising event for Lovell Recreation Department programs, equipment and facilities.  This not-for-profit organization serves the western Maine towns of Lovell, Stoneham, Sweden, Stow, Fryeburg and Chatham, N.H.

 The 21.6-mile course starts at the New Suncook School and travels north on Route 5 and turns right onto Route 5A for a scenic climb with breathtaking views of the White Mountains. Cyclists return to Route 5 at Center Lovell (approximately five miles into the Tour) and will then be challenged by four long winding hills in the rural forested farmland of North Lovell. The turnaround is near the Stoneham town line and cyclists return on Route 5 through Center Lovell and over Christian Hill to the finish at the New Suncook School. GREAT ADVENTURE CHALLENGE The ninth annual Great Adventure Challenge takes place on Saturday, Aug. 20 beginning at 9 a.m. (registration at Shawnee Peak Ski resort closes at 8:30 a.m.) The Great Adventure Challenge is a one of a kind triathlon event that combines kayaking (2.5 miles on Moose Pond), mountain biking (16+ miles) and concludes with a two-mile dash/hike up and down Pleasant Mountain This event is to benefit individuals with intellectual disabilities 
 in Western Maine. All proceeds go to support Morrison Center Fundraising Committee for the purpose of providing opportunities to adults with mental retardation and Autism. The Challenge can be done by either individuals or MORE RACES, Page 7C

Regional sports

GETTING A LITTLE HELP COOLING OFF NEAR THE FINISH LINE from fellow Camp Takajo campers is Carlos Martinez. (Rivet Photos)

WINNER Nicholas Hoch, 15, of Newton, Mass., com- TOP FEMALE was Sarah Keener, 35, of Waterford, who pleted the 5K in 18:26, a pace of 5:57. crossed the finish line in 22:09, a 7:09 pace.

BRANDON CRANDALL, 21, of Harrison finished in CATRINA WILSON, 14, of Harrison turned in a time of 25:57, good for 45th overall, at a 8:22 clip. 27:01 to finish at 55th, at a 8:43 pace.


Regional sports

July 14, 2016, The Bridgton News, Page 3C

Harrison 5K results (Continued from Page 1C) 125. Samantha Wormwood, 19, Norway, 39:48 126. Jan Monteiro, 57, Harrison, 40:53 127. Lauren Milo, 8, 41:20 128. Amy Milo, 41, Havertown, PA, 41:21 129. Bettina Reid, 76, 41:29 130. Angela Maddocks, 33, Harrison, 41:45 131. Jessica Meserve, 36, Harrison, 41:48 132. Dawn Letourneau, 43, W. Paris, 41:54 133. Matthew Appleby, 30, Goode, VA, 42:15 134. Katie Appleby, 28, 42:17 135. Lucy Mustard, 77, Harrison, 43:40 136. Dawn Canales, 59, Harrison, 44:37 137. Boomer Bradley, 16, Birmingham, MI, 45:46 138. Mickey Feeney, 16, Raymond, 45:51 139. William Klatcho, 16, Annville, PA, 45:53 140. Walter Backman, 16, Raymond, 46:02 141. Dianne Morse-Leonard, 58, Waterford, 46:20 142. Eddie Zuckerbrot, 14, 46:58 143. Carlos Martinez, 15, 46:59 144. Maureen Mustard, 43, Harrison, 48:08 145. Laura Mustard, 14, Harrison, 48:09 146. Angie Milo, 48, 50:54 147. Trish Murrin, 49, Harrison, 50:58 148. Gail Gile, 69, Harrison, 53:40 Age Category Winners Female, 6-12 Amelia Bommer, 10, 22:55 Kate Flynn, 9, Harrison, 31:13 Sky Worster, 10, 32:05 Male, 6-12 Bear Brooks, 11, Santa Monica, CA, 21;38 Javari Ellison, 11, 26:34 Robert Vallerschamp, 11, Downingtown, PA, 28:16 Female, 13-19 Sahtia Ellison, 14, 22:51 Shannon LeVangie, 14, Hanover, MA, 24:02 Alyssa Bommer, 13, 25:49 Male, 13-19 Zach Hoexter, 15, 19:58 Noah Currier, 14, Harrison, 20:22 Dimitri Dibiase, 18, Harrison, 20:32 Female, 20-29 Jaclin Mozzicato, 28, Harrison, 26:40 Steph Cramer, 28, Tabernacle, NJ, 28:52 Katherine Smith, 27, 30:40 Male, 20-29

Tom Wright, 22, 20:41 Onx Matong, 28, 24:08 Joseph Norena, 23, Raymond, 25:23 Female, 30-39 Sara Bradley, 36, Waterford, 22:19 Harmony Locke, 35, Norway, 24:37 Jamie Hudson, 38, Harrison, 26:32 Male, 30-39 Eric Martin, 36, Naples, 19:18 Gardner Waldeier, 34, Waterford, 19:33 Timothy Cushing, 30, Bridgton, 19:47 Female, 40-49 Tracie Mason, 46, West Paris, 24:33 Brenda Cauoette, 46, Raymond, 25:14 Tobie Feigenbaum, 41, Harrison, 25:44 Male, 40-49 David Brooks, 49, Santa Monica, CA, 22:33 Eric Malinowski, 41, Waterford, 23:33 Liam McHugh, 46, Naples, 26:01 Female, 50-59 Carmel Collins, 53, Bridgton, 25:54 Jessica Hodgman, 55, Cornish Flat, NH, 27:51 Celinda Crandall, 52, Harrison, 28:48 Male, 50-59 Brian Ladd, 55, Harrison, 20:05 Arno Bommer, 56, Houston, TX, 20:09 Ralph Perfetto, 54, 25:02 Female, 60-69 Sandy Geddry, 66, Norway, 33:33 Rebecca Tracy, 61, Raymond, 33:44 Gail Gile, 69, Harrison, 53:40 Male, 60-69 Chip Tuomi, 63, Harrison, 25:41 Tim Ellison, 61, Bridgton, NH, 28:00 Bill Wood, 63, Harrison, 28:21 Female, 70-79 Bettina Reid, 76, 41:29 Lucy Mustard, 77, Harrison, 43:40 Male, 70-79 John Micavich, 73, Westboro, MA, 27:57 John Wait, 72, Waterford, 33:26

A FINAL PUSH — Chip Tuomi, 63, of Harrison heads toward the finish line, finishing in 25:41. Rebecca Tracy, 61, of Raymond checked in at 33:44. (Rivet Photos)

Land Trust upcoming events LOVELL — The Greater Lovell Land Trust has a variety of events planned for this week. Look for the GLLT table at the Lovell Old Home Days celebration on Saturday, July 16, and take part in these explorations of the natural world.  Tuesday, July 19, 10 a.m. to noon, Connect To Our Natural World Through Poems And Short Prose: A Writing Workshop with Judy Steinbergh, co-sponsored by GLLT and Charlotte Hobbs Memorial Library Please join GLLT at Hewnoaks Artist Colony to explore and reflect on our con-

LAKES REGION PROPERTIES

nections to the landscape, elements, seasons and wildlife. With inspiration from our surroundings, and short pieces by poets and naturalists, we will draft our writing and share with the group. Adults and teens welcome. Please sign up at the Charlotte Hobbs Memorial

NT RFRO ! WATE REDUCED – N I B A C

692 Roosevelt Trail, Naples, ME 04055

CLASSIC MAINE LOG CABIN

e-mail: info@lakesproperties.com

DENMARK – Here is your classic Maine log cabin getaway in the woods! 90 ft. of frontage on Long Pond. Hike, bike, ski from here. Open concept living room and kitchen. Kitchen has custom cabinets, gas stove. Wood stove in the living room makes for a cozy winter evening! 2 bedrooms and 1 full bath. The bath comes with a claw foot tub! Metal roof. Wonderful porch to enjoy. Full basement. $174,900

www.lakesproperties.com 207-693-7000

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Bridgton – Enjoy stunning views of Long Lake from every room in this well-cared-for home. Large deck overlooks the lake. Private 2.3acre lot, sunny yard. $138,500. Kamal Perkins-Bridge, 630-3031456 (MLS 1271306)

Naples – Privacy and proximity. This unique property affords much privacy with over 3.5 acres of land and 313 ft. on Brandy Pond. 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, inground pool. $695,000. Nancy Hanson, 207-838-8301 (MLS 1254401)

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REDUCE

LOG HOME 2 ACRES OTISFIELD – Move right into this very well-maintained newer log home. Open concept living area with full bath and 2 bedrooms, large deck on the front. This home offers expansion in the basement. 2 rooms are finished off for family rooms, office, etc. There is a newer detached 2-car garage with loads of storage for your cars, boats and toys. The setting of this home offers privacy galore. $165,000

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Naples – A little piece of Maine lakefront with 94 ft. on East Shore of Long Lake. Great value with year-round cottage-style home, guest cottage, extensive dock system and more. $699,000. Connie Eldridge, 207-831-0890 (MLS 1273957)

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Naples – Popular “Sebago Unit” with master bedroom on the top floor. Ready for your immediate occupancy. Most furniture included with condo. Brandy Pond ROW! $229,900. Nancy Hanson, 207-8388301 (MLS 1273398)

Library. Ms. Steinbergh has led poetry workshops with adults and students for over 40 years, and authored three poetry-writing texts and five books of poetry. Wednesday, July 20, 7:30 p.m. at the Charlotte Hobbs GLLT EVENTS, Page 5C

BRIDGTON – 1930s Cape Cod style home in wonderful intown location. Located in the heart of downtown yet on a quiet, private street. 3 bedrooms, updated kitchen, large living room, dining room/office. Master bedroom on 1st floor. 3-season sunroom, could be made to year-round easily. Attached shed off the back. Detached 1-car garage, paved driveway. Many upgrades include new windows and shingles. Lovely gardens. $159,000

MOOSE POND GREAT LOCATION BRIDGTON – Looking for an expanded chalet in updated condition? Here it is. Enjoy this 3-bedroom, 2-bath charmer with a large family room addition plus a 3-season, enclosed porch on the front. Open concept, living, dining, kitchen area, new bath fixtures. Laundry room in the 2nd floor full bath. This is on the road to the beach. Prime Knights Hill amenities, swimming pool, tennis courts, sandy beach and more. $169,900

RICE! CED P U D E R Naples – 190 ft. of Long Lake waterfront! Enjoy a day of boating from Long Lake to Sebago Lake. 4 bedrooms, 1.5 baths. Great room and master bedroom with fireplaces. $709,999. Marcia Stewart, 2027-595-2984 (MLS 1263768)

Naples – Spacious 3-bedroom, 3.5-bath Contemporary with guest cottage on East Shore Long Lake! Enjoy that open concept living with cathedral ceilings, lots of glass and 1st floor master bedroom. $949,500. Ray Austin, 207-232-0500 (MLS 1266756)

IEW! THE V LOVE

MT. WASHINGTON VIEWS

Naples - Beautiful New Subdivision of wooded lots with soil test completed and underground wiring. Short drive to Naples Causeway. Major road access to Portland and Conway, N.H. Lots price from $39,900 to $49,900. Sally Goodwill, 207-595-4014 (MLS 1261938)

Naples – Beautiful 3-bedroom log home with deeded beach rights on Sebago with possible building lot for cottage or bunkhouse for extended family visits. $209,500. Kate Loverin, 207-776-8589 (MLS 1269129)

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Otisfield – Stunningly beautiful 3-bedroom, 3-bath Ward Cedar Log home with 300 ft. on Crooked River. 3.3-acre lot, granite fireplace, hickory cabinets, granite counters. Finished walkout basement. $424,900. Jocelyn O’Rourke-Shane, 207-838-5555 (MLS 1264610)

Sweden – Quality-built Contemporary on 8.5 acres with stunning views of Mt. Washington. Close to all amenities. $579,000. Lauri Kinser, 207-310-3565 (MLS 1268848)

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Waterford – Charming, beautiful home. Living room with fireplace, full porch overlooking woods and garden., 2-car garage with workshop and additional garage with carport. $149,900. Sally Goodwill, 207-595-4014 (MLS 1265903)

Windham – Lake living at its best! Well-appointed, meticulouslymaintained home with 4 bedrooms, 4 baths, gourmet kitchen, home gym and lovely landscaping. ROW to Sebago Lake. $499,900. Jocelyn O’Rourke-Shane, 207-838-5555 (MLS 1270780)

Call us for more Home, Land and Waterfront Listings or visit: www.lakesproperties.com

Independently Owned & Operated

BRIDGTON – Outstanding views of Mt. Washington, the White Mtns. and Kezar Lake. Views from every room. This is the perfect retreat you’ve been looking for. Open concept living with 2 bedrooms, 2 full baths, oversized 2-car garage. Includes a screened porch for those summer nights. Gleaming wood floors. Master bedroom has a master bath with a full tub, towel warmer, too. Just imagine relaxing at this 4season delight. $275,000

TO ROOM

! GROW

NEW ENGLAND CHARMER BRIDGTON – Great 2-story New England classic. Lots of room here. Wood floors, glassed-in extra office area. Dining room with built-ins. Updated kitchen. Large laundry/pantry/half bath area off the kitchen. 3+ bedrooms upstairs. Full bath with a claw foot tub. All new windows, wiring, insulated doors. Living room has a fireplace with a wood stove. Nice intown lot with lovely gardens. Highland Lake is just steps away. 1car garage. $137,000 Call 647-5551 or 1-888-400-9858

UPDATED RANCH BRIDGTON – Updated ranch with room to spare. Enjoy the farmer’s porch. 2 bedrooms. Master bedroom has built-in storage, large attached bath with laundry, 2 closets. Ample 2nd bedroom plus additional full bath. Spacious cook’s kitchen with eat-in area. Sunny and bright! Wood floors. Extra sunroom has many possibilities. New septic and drilled well installed in 2011. Oversized 2-car garage with additional workshop area and a 2nd floor for more storage. Walkout bsmt. has room to grow. $170,000

RICE! CED P U D E R

PRICED TO SELL BRIDGTON – Cute bungalow-style intown home, wood floors throughout, enclosed front porch, fireplace in the living room, 2 bedrooms, 1 bath. Detached 2-car garage, workshop area. Attic storage in the garage. Paved driveway, town water, close to all downtown amenities and lakes. Swim and ski is close by. $89,900

FIND OUT WHAT YOUR HOME IS WORTH IN TODAY’S MARKET! Call us for an accurate, confidential, indepth Comparative Market Analysis at no charge. Call 647-5551 or 1-888-400-9858

www.obergrealestate.com


Regional sports

Page 4C, The Bridgton News, July 14, 2016

More Bridgton times 1522 Ariel Moss 13 Sweden ME 51:08 1523 Justin West 29 Sweden ME 51:09 MA 51:09 1524 Gary Bonnell 49 Haverhill 1525 Charlie Siems 10 Harrison ME 51:09 1526 Rachel Pickus 67 Sebago ME 51:10 ME 51:11 1527 Sheila Deringis 52 OOB 1528 Sarah Hajjar 36 Westford MA 51:11 1529 Bruce Wyllie 61 Ewhurst Green Surre 51:14 1530 Payton Ahola 14 Sweden ME 51:15 ME 51:15 1531 Nicole Kagan 14 Sweden 51:22 1532 Talia Diegnan 39 Cambridge MA 1533 Megan Linquiti 22 Washington DC 51:23 44 Denmark ME 51:28 1534 Debbie Brill 1535 Vinnie Troisi 51 Shrewsbury MA 51:28 1536 Emily Anastos 16 Harrison ME 51:34 ME 51:35 1537 Kristine Triglione 54 Bridgton 1538 Rian Benoit 12 Dracut MA 51:37 ME 51:40 1539 Claire Sampson 13 Harrison 1540 Kealani Pasefika 13 Harrison ME 51:40 1541 Kelsey Hale 18 Pepperell MA 51:41 ME 51:43 1542 Grace St. George 16 Harrison 1543 Kimberly Hoffman 49 Naples ME 51:49 ME 51:49 1544 Danielle Bernstein 14 Denmark 1545 Eliana Martini 13 Denmark ME 51:49 1546 Matthew Hoffman 49 Naples ME 51:49 Potter 54 Chelmsford MA 51:52 1547 Jim 1548 Sophie Silbert 12 Sweden ME 51:53 1549 Maria Brown 54 Southborough MA 51:56 1550 Pude Ricker 62 Falmouth ME 51:57 51:57 1551 Julian Reigneau-Hawke 9 Harrison ME 1552 Diane Bilotta 65 Grantham NH 51:59 1553 Simony Allen 48 Harrison ME 52:05 ME 52:07 1554 Jack Becker 66 Bridgton 1555 Laura Varney 32 Bridgton ME 52:07 Turtel 11 Sweden ME 52:09 HARRISON 5K Run By The Lakes finishers (left) Ezra Tsapis, 7, in 36:55 and Kylah 1556 Miki 1557 Jakie Raimo 13 N. Reading MA 52:10 Aker, 37, of Bridgton in 34:05. (Rivet Photos) 1558 Joseph Donahue 26 Bridgton ME 52:11 1559 Deb Pierini 57 Harrison ME 52:12 ME 53:54 1641 James Wolf 62 Naples ME 55:20 1560 William O’Connor 44 Bridgton ME 52:18 1598 Alex Lehman 15 Harrison 15 Harrison ME 53:55 1642 Linette Rao 46 Orlando FL 55:23 ME 52:19 1599 Allie Platt 1561 Elsie Moche 15 Denmark ME 54:00 1643 Gavin Cohen 13 Waterford ME 55:24 1562 Erica Chute 42 Kents Hill ME 52:20 1600 Bridget Newick 19 Harrison Wood 57 Fryeburg ME 54:06 1644 Odin Palmer 10 Waterford ME 55:26 1563 Daniel Chute 42 Kents Hill ME 52:20 1601 Jim 54:10 1645 Sarah Depoian 66 Chelmsford MA 55:27 52:20 1602 Tatyana Markovich 16 Hopkinton MA 1564 Katie Stelmach 39 North Grafton MA ME 54:11 1646 Patricia Hamilton 63 Chelmsford MA 55:27 1565 George Vooris 57 Naples ME 52:22 1603 Cole Kleiman 12 Fryeburg ME 54:12 1647 Zach Whitchurch 8 Harrison ME 55:29 MA 52:23 1604 Lauren Burrent 21 Harrison 1566 Sam Sparks 9 Sudbury ME 54:13 1648 Dwayne Varney 36 Bridgton ME 55:30 1567 Betsy Shreve 62 Amesbury MA 52:23 1605 Nick Payne 12 Fryeburg Frank 15 Denmark ME 54:16 1649 Hallie Sternberg 15 Denmark ME 55:32 1568 Gayle Potter 55 Pelham NY 52:31 1606 Ava ME 54:17 1650 Max Frank 13 Fryeburg ME 55:35 ME 52:32 1607 Sydney Kirsch 15 Denmark 1569 Marjorie Stockford 59 Portland 15 Denmark ME 54:17 1651 Grace Johnson 65 Yorktown Heights NY 55:35 1570 Sean Blaney 32 Hamden CT 52:35 1608 Kate Nova MA 54:20 1652 Patti Irwin 63 Windham NH 55:36 ME 52:35 1609 Kathy Hayes 63 Peabody 1571 Lola Nordlinger 12 Sweden ME 54:21 1653 Marsha Wood 61 Harrison ME 55:39 1572 Hannah Gallin 12 Sweden ME 52:36 1610 Richard Geswell 65 Bridgton 54:22 1654 Eric MacCarthy 26 Cohasset 55:41 MA 1573 Kyle Grigg 14 Bridgton ME 52:36 1611 Mariel Brown 30 Somerville MA ME 54:27 1655 Katie Elkins 18 Harrison ME 55:45 ME 52:36 1612 Jessica McAllister 34 Waterford 1574 Hortense Cristofari 16 Fryeburg MA 54:35 1656 Leah Janover 19 Harrison ME 55:45 1575 Jennifer O’Connor 41 Bridgton ME 52:43 1613 Donna Shilale 46 Mendon ME 54:43 1657 Dash Martin 13 Brooklyn NY 55:47 TX 52:49 1614 Trish Dubrule 58 Bridgton 1576 Janet Densmore 62 Austin 11 Harrison ME 54:49 1658 Stella Holt 12 Los Angeles CA 55:47 1577 Zippy Yellin 12 Sweden ME 52:56 1615 Austin Cox 42 Portland ME 54:50 1659 Mallory Muse 10 Rumford ME 55:49 1578 Tucker Williams 11 Cumberland ME 52:59 1616 Lyle Aker Griffith 67 Bridgton ME 54:50 1660 Jordan Feinzig 12 Waterford ME 55:50 1579 Katherine Stoss 11 Sweden ME 53:01 1617 Bill Doran 58 Halifax MA 54:58 1661 Melissa Newman 25 Fryeburg ME 55:54 1580 Julie Blanchard 39 Townsend MA 53:08 1618 Jim MA 54:58 1662 Clare Bunce 8 Harrison ME 55:55 1581 Jeff Glover 45 Centerville OH 53:08 1619 Greg McLaughlin 48 Plymouth MA 54:59 1663 Nancy Seymour 66 Nokomis 55:56 FL 1582 Deanna Glover 44 Centerville OH 53:09 1620 Kathy McLaughlin 46 Plymouth 64 Pelham NY 54:59 1664 Kathleen Blanchard 67 Nokomis 55:56 FL 1583 Daria James 54 Uxbridge MA 53:15 1621 Everett Potter MA 55:01 1665 Emma Swoap 10 Harrison ME 55:57 1584 Mary Shorey 63 Bridgton ME 53:16 1622 Kathryn Becker 33 Kingston 71 Falmouth ME 55:01 1666 Anna Sampson 15 Harrison ME 55:58 1585 Jon Dupee 36 Auburn ME 53:17 1623 Peggy Ryan Becker 8 Kingston MA 55:02 1667 Katya Markovich 13 Hopkinton MA 55:59 1586 Carolyn Dupee 36 Auburn ME 53:18 1624 Eva ME 55:02 1668 Amy Markovich 45 Hopkinton MA 56:00 1587 Paul Yeager 14 Harrison ME 53:18 1625 Mae Fleischmann 15 Denmark 48 Sweden ME 55:05 1669 Glenn Ambusk 64 Hinesburg VT 56:00 1588 Matthew Dupee 6 Auburn ME 53:19 1626 Carol Kizer MA 55:05 1670 Caleigh Dirks 56:08 14 Danvers MA 1589 Helen Crawford 23 N. Bridgton ME 53:20 1627 Sarah Palmgren 15 Princeton 41 Holden MA 55:06 1671 Courtney Sanne 23 Harrison ME 56:11 ME 53:22 1628 Christi Lucia 1590 Leah Haney 33 Harrison 76 N. Bridgton ME 55:07 1672 Charolotte Chambers 22 Harrison ME 56:11 1591 Clay Johnson 72 San Antonio TX 53:27 1629 Joanne Diller ME 55:08 1673 Aubrey Hawke 14 Harrison ME 56:12 1592 Dennis Johnson 67 Yorktown Heights NY 53:36 1630 Bradley Kaplan 17 Waterford 55:10 1674 Lori 56:12 Anthony 53 North Waterboro 1593 Josh Cohan 13 Fryeburg ME 53:39 1631 Alisha Blanchard 21 West Townsend MA 55:12 1675 Shelby Sullivan 8 Attleboro 56:13 MA 1594 Emi Brown 21 1632 Leah Blanchard 46 West Townsend MA 55:13 1676 Abigail Dirks 56:18 17 Danvers MA Uxbridge MA 53:39 1633 Scott Blanchard 48 West Townsend MA ME 55:13 1677 Lauren Rockwell 14 Sweden ME 56:22 1595 Jennie Ryan 40 1634 Katharine Tilson 14 Denmark ME 55:14 1678 Lucille Kisnter 11 Chevy Chase MD 56:27 North Attleborough MA 53:39 1635 Hallie Hayne 14 Denmark 55:14 1679 Molly Hogan 8 Plymouth MA 56:28 1596 P.P. Parr 48 1636 Brittany Barthelmess 16 Harrison ME 1637 Jackie Morin 45 Waterford ME 55:14 1680 Alice O’Connor 10 Bridgton ME 56:28 Gorham ME 53:44 GA 55:16 1681 William Resnick 46 Milton 56:29 MA 1597 Tatyana Bommer 12 1638 Cole Preiditsch 10 Palmetto 1639 Georgia Preiditsch 7 Palmetto GA 55:18 1682 Dennis Hogan 39 Plymouth MA 56:29 Beverly MA 53:49 1640 Madeline Twombly-Wiser 13 Denmark ME 55:18 BRIDGTON RACE, Page 6C Harrison – Reduced – $190,000.

(EDITOR’S NOTE: These are the remaining finishers of the Bridgton 4 On The Fourth road race, whose names did not appear in last week’s edition) 1453 CarolLeibovitz 62 No Billerica MA 49:20 1454 Helen Brooks 37 Pacific Palisades CA 49:21 1455 Zoe Thorpe 20 Sweden ME 49:21 ME 49:23 1456 Jeanne Sweeney 19 Sweden 1457 Bryan Leonard 27 Westbrook ME 49:27 1458 Nicol Rosen 26 Westbrook ME 49:27 1459 Julie Poulin 52 No Monmouth ME 49:30 1460 Sandy Utterstrom 72 Falmouth ME 49:32 ME 49:35 1461 Caileigh Crowe 12 Lovell 1462 Dawn Crowe 48 Lovell ME 49:35 1463 Jennie Webster 21 Harrison ME 49:38 ME 49:40 1464 Joshua Gough 10 Harrison 1465 Allie Schaffer 14 Sweden ME 49:40 49:41 1466 Jill McGilvray 41 So Weymouth MA 1467 Amanda Perry 12 San Mateo CA 49:43 1468 Emily Proulx 15 Pepperell MA 49:45 13 ”Waterford ME 49:46 1469 Danny Stein 1470 Barry Dechtman 13 ”Waterford ME 49:46 ME 49:47 1471 Katharine Rosa 12 Harrison 1472 Kali Flaherty 17 No Falmouth MA 49:47 1473 Kerrie Revaz 46 New Boston NH 49:50 ME 49:53 1474 John Brooks 79 Falmouth 1475 Mary Tworog 58 Bridgton ME 49:56 NJ 49:57 1476 Nevila Kondili 35 Hoboken 1477 Samuel Youngblood 13 Harrison ME 49:58 1478 Bradley Muse 7 Rumford ME 50:02 Williams 9 Cumberland ME 50:05 1479 Eva 1480 Daphne Raskin 13 Sweden ME 50:05 ME 50:05 1481 Rose Buchdahl 11 Sweden 1482 Meg Kutz 45 Hummelstown PA 50:05 1483 Ashley Wurth 30 So Burlington VT 50:06 50:07 1484 Kyle Ambusk 29 Burlington VT 1485 Pam Talbot 64 Mattapoisett MA 50:10 1486 Jenna Giguere 13 Scarborough ME 50:15 Perry 53 San Mateo CA 50:16 1487 Liz 1488 Kerri Eng 46 Waterford ME 50:22 13 Sebago ME 50:23 1489 Everett Beals 1490 James Cassidy 18 Westwood MA 50:24 1491 Kendall Cardenas 44 Frisco TX 50:24 VA 50:25 1492 Noelle Conforti 48 Oakton 1493 Amanda Thayer 18 N Gloucester ME 50:27 50:28 1494 Nichole Lowell 19 N Gloucester ME 1495 Liv Steinhardt 11 Sweden ME 50:29 1496 Paige Hornbeck 13 Littleton MA 50:31 MA 50:31 1497 Trish Hornbeck 52 Littleton 1498 Carrie Reynolds 38 Bridgton ME 50:33 ME 50:39 1499 Alma Mitchell 11 Harrison 1500 Hadyn Youngblood 7 Mooresville NC 50:40 1501 Tara Youngblood 43 Mooresville NC 50:41 50:44 1502 Neave Revaz 8 New Boston NH 1503 Ellie Miles 16 Harrison ME 50:47 MA 50:47 1504 Roseann Glaser 57 Sudbury 1505 Elizabeth Charette 16 Harrison ME 50:47 1506 Laney Cooper 9 Plymouth MA 50:48 1507 William Kelley 72 Franklin MA 50:50 1508 David Croteau 77 Bridgton ME 50:51 1509 Richard A. King 72 Bridgton ME 50:51 1510 Kirsten Proulx 17 Pepperell MA 50:53 1511 Tess Revaz 11 New Boston NH 50:54 1512 Liz Manz 60 Underhill VT 50:54 1513 Steve Landry 35 Westbrook ME 50:54 1514 Alicia Horton 20 Hanover MA 50:54 1515 Rhonda Giguere 47 Scarborough ME 50:56 1516 Karen Travers Lynch 53 Intervale NH 50:56 1517 Jaimie Giguere 16 Scarborough ME 50:57 1518 Rebecca Thorne 23 Milton MA 50:58 1519 Nancy Thurston 57 Bridgton ME 51:04 1520 Trevor Chute 10 Kents Hill ME 51:06 1521 Addison McNamara 14 Fremont NH 51:08

Only 1/2 mile to Woods Pond. Home is totally-renovated, hardwood floors, granite countertops, new cabinets, stainless appliances. A MUST SEE.

GOT SALMON? New Englander with 160 ft. on Crooked River, best salmon fishing around, 12 rooms, 3 bedrooms+, 2 baths, farmer’s porch, attached barn, 0.92 acres, swim, kayak, canoe, ice skate from home. COME TAKE A LOOK!

Keller Williams Realty 50 Sewall St., 2nd Flr., Portland, ME 04102

207-743-1193 hrobillard@kw.com www.helenrobillard.com

2T28

Call Helen Robillard

CUSTOM WATERFRONT RETREAT 137 Trickey Pond Rd., Naples

A custom waterfront retreat for all seasons. Built in 2001, this very special 2600+ sq. ft. home boasts 4 bedrooms, 2 baths, a home office and unobstructed water views from both floors. With 100 feet of exceptional water frontage, the 4-season 10’x30’ sunroom will become your favorite spot to watch the sun rise. Conveniently located 1 hour from Sunday River, the White Mountains and the vibrant city of Portland. $595,000.

Jim Duplissie

207-939-1252 www.vitalius.com jim@vitalius.com 306 Congress St., Ste. 3, Portland, ME 04101 3T28

4T27

Custom-built Lakefront or View Lot Homes Energy-Efficient — Green-style Stick-built • New Construction Custom-built Homes • Frame to Finish Turnkey Packages

Your land or Our Land Justin Gibbons Bridgton 207-671-1228 hilltoplanddevelopment@gmail.com

Richard Lewis & Son BUILDING CONTRACTOR Serving Maine Since 1968

CUSTOM HOMES & GARAGES ALL REPAIRS KITCHEN/BATH REMODELING REPLACEMENT WINDOWS VINYL SIDING BLOWN INSULATION ROOFING: METAL & ASPHALT INTERIOR/EXTERIOR PAINTING Call Today for a Free Estimate:

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 7/17/16 • 12 noon to 3 p.m.

TF5

Bridgton – Reduced For Quick Sale $129,900

207-415-4476

Come look — be surprised! Brandy Pond Lake Rights

Totally Remodeled! You really should see this pristine, like-new home as it is now. Features oak floors, bright main living area, 2 bedrooms (plus spare room), each with private bath, new whirlpool, central air, heated 2-car garage, newly-appointed downstairs bar and 2nd living room—and Brandy Pond Views in the windows, beach and dock rights. Walk to shopping and all Naples Village amenities…and free golf cart & wide screen TV with purchase of home.…… $239,000 Charles Fox – Broker The Maine Real Estate Network

592-1388 • cfoxera@hotmail.com Home Page: www.mylakefrontmaine.com


Fun & games

July 14, 2016, The Bridgton News, Page 5C

This week’s puzzle theme:

Healthy Lifestyle

ACROSS 1. Hacienda brick 6. World’s oldest broadcasting company 9. Weary walk 13. For getting around, especially in city 14. Ostrich of Australia 15. Because of 16. It’s plucked to foretell love 17. Adam’s famous part 18. Modern day letter 19. *”No ____!” 21. *Mind/body/soul goal? 23. 7th letter of Greek alphabet 24. Eight bits 25. Experienced or consumed 28. ____-and-go-seek 30. Socrates’ concern 35. Toward the lee 37. *Body sufferings 39. Art class support 40. Cash cache 41. Passed out cards 43. A small island 44. Full of emotion, in slang 46. Alpine lift 47. Guitar forerunner 48. Not digital 50. Crude group 52. Sixth sense 53. Movie-____ 55. Anne Boleyn, a.k.a. ____ Bullen 57. *Calcium or magnesium 61. *Stress-related glands 65. Muse of love poetry 66. Cause annoyance 68. Prepare for winter takeoff 69. Red Cross supply 70. Bard’s “before” 71. Runs in neutral 72. Fungal spore sacs 73. Jack Kerouac’s Paradise 74. Deed hearings

DOWN 1. Current unit, pl. 2. Hold as a conviction 3. “The Simpsons” palindrome 4. Emergency pedal 5. Kind of fossil 6. Mountain in Germany 7. *Weight divided by height squared 8. Small secluded room 9. The largest of the small cats 10. *Meat quality 11. Like ear infection 12. Pineapple producer 15. “Get rid of” button 20. Water nymph 22. Had a meal 24. Verbally attack 25. *Type of yoga 26. Mork from Ork, e.g. 27. Major U.S. airline 29. *Selection of foods 31. Hard precipitation 32. Supplied equipment 33. Picts and Gauls 34. *Nightly necessity 36. Twelfth month of Jewish calendar 38. Prelude to a duel 42. Popular taste at a given time 45. Anti-Jewish riot 49. India’s smallest state 51. *Exercise of the heart 54. North Pole workers 56. Attention-seeking 57. Arizona city 58. Wraths 59. Narcotics agent 60. Evening purse 61. Skater’s jump 62. Cairo’s waterway 63. Maple, to a botanist 64. *____ stress 67. Baseball stat

Solutions on Page 7C

GLLT walks & talks (Continued from Page 3C) Memorial Library, Reading the Rural Landscape with Dr. Robert Sanford. Common landscape features ranging from plants and trees to stonewalls, cellar holes, and other altered landforms show the dynamics of human-influenced change in the countryside. As a society, we know a great deal about famous peo-

ple of the past, great historical architecture and important events of the past, but we are surrounded by common, everyday places that also represent history. Yet these ordinary things are in danger of becoming forgotten. What are some common clues to the past? How do we read them? What can we find in our own backyards? We will focus on some typical features and techniques for inter-

preting them as we process the “language” of the land in rural Maine. Participants are invited to share their own insights and experiences with local landscapes. GLLT and Sweden Historical Society host; admission is free. Thursday, July 21, 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Reading the Rural Landscape: An exploration of foundations, stonewalls and mystery stones accompanied by Dr. Sanford, author of Reading the Rural Landscape In the company of university

professor, author and registered professional archeologist, Dr. Robert Sanford, we’ll explore the foundation, stonewalls and mystery stones from the Flat Hill parking lot to Amos Mountain. If time allows, we’ll climb up the mountain and take a look at some of the stonewalls on its southern side. This walk will require us to hike on some uneven terrain so dress appropriately, bring plenty of water and a snack or lunch.  Trailhead: Flat Hill parking lot, Heald Pond Road, Lovell GLLT, Page 7C

At Beaverwood Creek Estates, why wait for one to be built when you can start enjoying the Summer NOW? Finished cottage For Sale! 12 Nature‛s Way, in Bridgton — Check out this ready-to-roll four-season log-sided home, MLS# 1258782. 2 BR, 1 ba & sleeping loft. Relax on the screened porch and just feel the ‘nestled in the woods‛ setting of this natural, 1.88-ac. lot. Short walk to 1200‛ of shared frontage on private Beaver Pond. Lots priced at $32,900. Lots w/build Package $165,000.

1T28

PRICE REDUCED! List Price: $175,000 Now $170,000

Creating relationships for Life

Contact: Jeff Perron 207-647-5081 jperron@tmren.biz

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. 11T27

147 North High St., Bridgton

100 Main Street Bridgton, ME 04009 (207) 647-3311 (800) 660-3315 (Maine) or (800) 486-3312 (outside Maine)

Extremely rare new construction on Highland Lake. 3-bedroom, 2 full and 2 half bath home with attached 2-car garage on a spectacular 2.5-acre lot with sandy, walk-in frontage. Lower level is framed for 4th bedroom and game room. Super energyefficient home with maintenance-free exterior. In addition, there is a completely remodeled 200 sq. ft. lakeside cottage that could be used as a sleeping cottage, picnic house or artist studio. No detail has been overlooked. This exceptional property is scheduled for completion in early August. Brokers protected. $774,900.

NEW LISTING

Lovell – Kezar Lake boat slip comes with this stunning farmhouse! Multiple living spaces, fplc., wood stove, built-in bookcases, 6BR, 4BA, wide pine floors, gourmet kit., great rm., outdoor stone shower, att. 2-car gar. $699,000

Bridgton – Highland Lake’s Highland Pines shared waterfront community! 2BR, 1BA, open concept, mud rm., deck, 2-car gar., privacy, paved driveway, full bsmt. $195,000

Bridgton – Highland Lake home w/150 ft. priv. PLUS 100 ft. shared waterfront! 3BR, 2.5BA, wood floors, tiled baths, cath. ceiling, porch, deck, walkout bsmt., dock & much more. $559,000

Call Mark — 603-479-9095

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NEW LISTING

Bridgton – Cozy & warm log home w/farmer’s porch, 3BR, fin. bsmt., open liv./kit./din. area. Lots of sunshine, 6+ ac. of total privacy, close to town, but tucked away. $229,000

Bridgton – 5+ ac., 3BR, 2.5BA, 1st floor master BR with BA, liv. rm., w/wood stove & brick hearth. Many amenities, incl. oversized heated gar., generator & much more. $335,000

Waterford – Quaint & sunny Bed & Breakfast set in the center of Waterford with restaurant/bar. 9BR, 7.5BA, priv. living quarters, a retail shop and more. Walk to Keoka beach. $275,000

Denmark – Beautiful 5-ac. bldg. lot, selectively cleared, driveway in. Potential views from the upper back end of the lot. Property is just off the beaten path but just a short drive to Shawnee Peak & Bridgton town amenities. $38,000

Bridgton – Immaculate and elegant custom-built exec. home w/Long Lake views. 4500 sq. ft., in-law apt., 4BR, 3.5BA. 3 levels of superb living space, stunninglybeautiful, a must see! $625,000

Bridgton – Beautiful 1.25-ac. lot on the corner of Highland Rd. and Muirfield Drive. Harvesting on the lot has been completed and a shared leach field is in place. Great location abutting Bridgton Highlands Golf course, just minutes to Highland Lake, Bridgton Hospital, all the town’s amenities and 5 mi. to Shawnee Peak. Great lot in wonderful location. $49,500 Stoneham – 400 ft. private waterfront on Keewaydin Lake with 2.4 acres. $189,900

For Lease: 1500’ of prime space next to McDonald’s at a traffic light. Highest traffic count in town! Great location for retail or professional use. Plenty of parking at a price that is less than downtown rents!

Call Mark — 603-479-9095 3T26x


Page 6C, The Bridgton News, July 14, 2016

Regional sports

Bridgton 4 on Fourth 1683 Helena Sheldrick 7 Sebago ME MA 1684 Elaine Camelio 71 Attleboro 1685 Liz Lemieux 13 Denmark ME 1686 Shawn Flaherty 46 Bridgewater MA TX 1687 Erin Dietsch 47 Houston 1688 Luca Sonne 12 Denmark ME ME 1689 Shoshana Ronen 14 Sweden 1690 Jennifer Green 24 Avon CT 1691 Brie Woodworth 30 Danville NH 12 ”Waterford ME 1692 Mack Harris 1693 Maggie Goldman 13 Denmark ME CA 1694 Dick Ramage 73 Arcadia 1695 Sofia Noceda 12 Sweden ME 1696 Brian Kelleher 46 Bridgewater MA ME 1697 Carlota Hildago 10 Sweden 1698 Lila Dupont 13 Denmark ME ME 1699 Campbell Arnone 12 Denmark 1700 Judith Siemen 70 Cambridge MA 1701 Rachel Peters 19 Cape Neddick ME Swain Sr. 58 Saco ME 1702 Jim 1703 Charlie Canto 14 Harrison ME ME 1704 Grace Yannelli 7 Bridgton 1705 David Sweet 55 Saunderstown RI 1706 Anna Wolf 15 Harrison ME ME 1707 Arden Weilheimer 15 Harrison 1708 Pamela White 53 Norway ME 1709 Anita Chadbourne Field 40 Sebago ME 1710 Timothy Becker 40 Boston MA 1711 Kannon Gill 14 Harrison ME 14 Harrison ME 1712 Laura Rein 1713 Caroline Burnham 14 Denmark ME ME 1714 Madeleine Edwards 14 Denmark 1715 Matthew Howell 38 York ME 1716 Michele Mullen 44 Portland ME ME 1717 Norah Howell 7 York 1718 Katherine Epstein 37 Dover NH 14 Denmark ME 1719 Tabitha Burke 1720 Lauren Raved 14 Denmark ME 1721 Merry Preiditsch 47 Palmetto GA ME 1722 Olivia Friedland 14 Denmark 1723 Timothy Lipsey 7 Harrison ME MA 1724 Katelyn Dehey 32 Mendon 1725 Stephen Picardo 63 Medfield MA 1726 Kylie Blitzer 14 Denmark ME ME 1727 Levi Pelton 13 Harrison 31 Bridgton ME 1728 Amy Millar ME 1729 Delia Fontana 9 Naples 1730 Lynn Stockford 61 West Palm Beach FL 1731 Tom Sacco 18 Fryeburg ME ME 1732 Michael Durkin 25 Fryeburg 1733 Cynthia Fontana 45 Naples ME ME 1734 Noah Young 9 Harrison 1735 Christine Curtis 78 Seattle WA 1736 Lyle Aker 68 Billerica MA ME 1737 MacKenzie Dvorak 23 Bridgton 1738 Viviane De Castro 16 Harrison ME 1739 Anna Bradshaw 16 Palmer AK 1740 Moe Bailey 49 Harrison ME 1741 Scott Medeiros 38 Palmer AK 1742 Jeanne Gluck 54 Harrison ME 1743 Linda Porcelli 54 West Newbury MA 1744 Brittany Detlefsen 27 Harrison ME ME 1745 Camilla Hirano 11 Sweden 1746 Cassia Hawke 12 Harrison ME 1747 Katherine Rein 13 Harrison ME 1748 Richard Quinn 51 Danvers FL 1749 Jennifer Quinn 49 Danvers MA 1750 Jessica Miller 37 South Paris ME 1751 Ashlee Griffith 10 South Easton MA 1752 Christine Wu 54 Newton MA 1753 Maeve Sousa 14 Georgetown MA 1754 Maura Sousa 48 Georgetown MA 1755 Brian Griffith 40 South Easton MA 1756 Kelly Rockwell 35 Bridgton ME 1757 Bob Snyder 76 Bridgton ME 1758 Ann MacOne 65 Natick MA 1759 Beth Griffith 39 South Easton MA 1760 Lilly Griffith 8 South Easton MA 1761 William Warren 79 Gorham ME 1762 Jordan Smith 10 Sweden ME 1763 Jennifer Larrabee 40 Bridgton ME 1764 Jennilee Sirois 33 Bridgton ME 1765 Waverly Sumner 12 Sweden ME 1766 Maveon Cohen 10 Sweden ME 1767 Emily Richman 12 Sweden ME 1768 Jamie Kleinbord 12 Sweden ME 1769 Abby Kanter 12 Sweden ME Ziter 51 Castle Rock CO 1770 Jill 1771 Craig Smith 43 Sweden ME 1772 Kristy Kowalczyk 57 Louisville CO

56:30 56:31 56:34 56:36 56:36 56:37 56:38 56:39 56:39 56:43 56:46 56:47 56:48 56:51 56:51 56:56 56:57 56:57 56:59 57:02 57:10 57:11 57:14 57:24 57:24 57:25 57:32 57:39 57:39 57:39 57:40 57:40 57:49 57:49 57:50 57:57 58:00 58:03 58:03 58:04 58:05 58:09 58:10 58:10 58:15 58:16 58:17 58:20 58:21 58:22 58:32 58:32 58:35 58:35 58:41 58:43 58:58 58:59 58:59 59:01 59:03 59:06 59:10 59:15 59:16 59:16 59:18 59:19 59:20 59:25 59:26 59:27 59:27 59:36 59:36 59:38 59:47 59:52 1:00:03 1:00:11 1:00:12 1:00:15 1:00:15 1:00:15 1:00:16 1:00:16 1:00:18 1:00:20 1:00:20 1:00:22

1773 Richard Rao 49 Orlando FL 1:00:24 MN 1:00:26 1774 Nicholas Blossom 17 Dellwood 1775 Parker Blossom 14 Dellwood MN 1:00:26 1776 Fred Hammerle 79 Bridgton ME 1:00:55 Main 63 Bridgton ME 1:00:56 1777 Gay 1778 Charlotte Jealous 11 Harrison ME 1:01:05 ME 1:01:07 1779 Bridget Meara 42 Portland 1780 Lauren Fried 14 Denmark ME 1:01:07 1781 Victoria Lyons 42 Fryeburg ME 1:01:08 MA 1:01:16 1782 Roger Whipple 65 Duxbury 1783 Rachel Shapiro 14 Denmark ME 1:01:21 Targoff 12 Denmark ME 1:01:21 1784 Zoe 1785 Susan Ofmar 53 Ripley Surrey England 1:01:23 1786 Deni Roy 59 Bridgton ME 1:01:23 ME 1:01:25 1787 Nichole Johnson 32 Casco 1788 Samantha Behle 15 Denmark ME 1:01:25 ME 1:01:26 1789 Sabrina Lemar 22 Denmark 1790 Kaya Equevilley 12 Harrison ME 1:01:28 1791 Jahleil Jenkins 9 Harrison ME 1:01:31 ME 1:01:45 1792 Caleb Dunlap 21 Portland 1793 Emma Potter 13 Pelham NY 1:01:52 16 Chelmsford MA 1:01:53 1794 Maggie Potter 1795 Alice Ganey 14 Denmark ME 1:01:55 1796 Juliette Brook 13 Denmark ME 1:01:55 CT 1:02:03 1797 Emily Friedman 20 Fairfield 1798 Avery Lehman 13 Denmark ME 1:02:07 MA 1:02:27 1799 Kendra Shilale 10 Mendon 1800 Maryn Shilale 13 Mendon MA 1:02:27 1801 Gabriel Kowalczyk 14 Castle Rock CO 1:02:35 1:02:36 1802 Gregg Kowalczyk 55 Castle Rock CO 1:02:37 1803 Catherine Harris 75 Bellingham WA ME 1:02:38 1804 Charlotte London 11 Harrison 1805 Kelly Connell 51 Fryeburg ME 1:02:50 1806 Jaytonn Hunter 13 Fryeburg ME 1:02:50 15 Fryeburg ME 1:02:51 1807 Sam Kriser 1808 Nancy Flanders 59 Houston TX 1:02:57 NY 1:02:57 1809 Grace Flanders 27 New York 1810 Keith Rowe 69 Scarborough ME 1:03:01 1811 Marti Kinsel 61 Scarborough ME 1:03:02 Greene-Houvras 10 Sweden ME 1:03:06 1812 Noa 1813 Phoebe Levine 72 Charlotte NC 1:03:06 1814 Ethan Hunt 13 Harrison ME 1:03:09 1815 Eric Murrer 22 Boxford MA 1:03:11 1816 Mary Barhite 63 Boxford MA 1:03:11 1817 Shauna Perry Smith 34 Naples ME 1:03:17 1818 E J Huston 26 Jamaica Plain MA 1:03:19 67 Bridgton ME 1:03:21 1819 Marian Rabe 1820 Dan Mills 35 Cumberland Foreside 1:03:22 1821 Ken Pierini 66 Harrison ME 1:03:39 63 Pomfret CT 1:03:41 1822 Diane Rees 1823 Jim Rees 64 Pomfret CT 1:03:42 45 Danvers MA 1:03:44 1824 Susan Dirks 1825 Mary Beth Difilippo 50 Danvers MA 1:03:44 1826 Dylan Goldberg 15 Harrison ME 1:03:45 ME 1:03:45 1827 Lauren Baldinger 15 Harrison 1828 Chloe Zilkha 15 Harrison ME 1:03:45 1829 Olivia Steele 12 Harrison ME 1:03:47 1830 Kathy Raimo 48 N. Reading MA 1:03:49 1831 Ullisa Benoit 46 Dracut MA 1:03:50 1832 Caroline Barabell 15 Denmark ME 1:04:10 1833 Hannah Walsh 15 Denmark ME 1:04:11 1834 Haley Taggart 20 East Amherst NY 1:04:19 1835 Karen Kowalczyk 53 East Amherst NY 1:04:19 1836 Gavin Kirn 12 Harrison ME 1:04:20 1837 Mel Fineberg 80 Portland ME 1:04:21 1838 Jameson McGowan 7 Bridgton ME 1:04:25 1839 Jack McGowan 9 Bridgton ME 1:04:25 1840 Meghan Thomas 24 Castle Pines CO 1:04:36 1841 Peggy Jacobson 65 Manchester CT 1:04:36 1842 Jacqui Ordway 10 Denmark ME 1:04:37 1843 Rex Charlston 6 Harrison ME 1:04:39 1844 Gordon Blanchard 71 Bridgton ME 1:04:40 ME 1:04:41 1845 Eloise Blanchard 71 Bridgton 1846 Peter Thomas 61 Castle Pines CO 1:04:42 1847 Katherine McCabe 29 Greenwood Village CO 1:04:44 1848 Nolan Devine 18 Belmont MA 1:04:46 1849 Irene Stokes 54 Bridgton ME 1:04:56 1850 Laura MacLean 52 Bridgton ME 1:04:57 1851 Mikyah Pelton 10 Harrison ME 1:05:01 1852 Weezie Vance 66 Hampton Falls NH 1:05:01 1853 Malaya Moores 11 Sweden ME 1:05:12 1854 Christina Mondgragon 18 Atlanta GA 1:05:13 1855 Susan Robbins 60 Naples ME 1:05:17 1856 Christa Ramage 45 Bedford NY 1:05:20 1857 Heidi Barnes 43 Yorba Linda CA 1:05:20 1858 Helen Wickett 12 Denmark ME 1:05:20 1859 Kristin Nelson 47 Yorba Linda CA 1:05:21 1860 Gail Ramage 71 Arcadia CA 1:05:21 1861 Millie Beane 55 Bridgton ME 1:05:22 1862 Heather Friedman 57 Fairfield CT 1:05:30

VIEW FROM HIGH ABOVE — Mike Dana captured runners heading down Main Street in Bridgton during the 4 On The Fourth Road Race through the use of a drone. 1863 Rachel Manz 30 Jericho VT ME 1864 Marianne Lyons 12 Denmark 12 Denmark ME 1865 Maddie Love 1866 Cynthia Thomas 60 Castle Pines CO 1867 Shirley Green 56 Riverton CT 1868 Maryjane Devine 51 Woburn MA 1869 Lynn Donaldson 68 Manchester CT 1870 Nicole Morgan 42 Bridgton ME 53 Bridgton ME 1871 Diane Miller 1872 Annabelle Baum 12 Denmark ME 1873 Pat Mytkowicz 67 Harrison ME 64 Hanover MA 1874 Ruth Hulke 1875 Jamie Ghiloni 32 Halifax MA 1876 Zack Tucker 33 New York NY 1877 Douglas Donaldson 66 Manchester CT 1878 Holly Palmgren 41 Princeton MA 1879 Courtney Palmgren 10 Princeton MA 1880 Billy McGaffigan 53 Cambridge MA 1881 Fred Sullivan 64 Needham Heights MA 13 Sweden ME 1882 Audrey Zahn 1883 Emma Clift 12 Sweden ME 1884 Nika Naumovich 13 Sweden ME 1885 Amanda MacLeod-Killer 42 Bridgton ME 1886 Jeffry Killer 43 Bridgton ME 1887 Christopher Rice 15 Harrison ME 1888 Lynn Proffer 68 West Hills CA 1889 Melody Millett 17 Naples ME 1890 Jane Hanson 8 Harrison ME 1891 Nathanael Chadbourne 15 Harrison ME 1892 George Brown 78 Harrison ME 1893 Ruth Letourneau 66 Bridgton ME 1894 Charlene Michaud 69 East Waterboro ME 1895 Dennis Carey 69 Atlanta GA 1896 Charlotte Cohen 11 Sweden ME 1897 Cloe Glazer 12 Sweden ME 1898 Lila Silverstein 14 Harrison ME 1899 Jane Strausman 15 Harrison ME 1900 Joan Wood 82 Medfield MA 1901 Sue Potter 53 Chelmsford MA 1902 Hannah Moss 11 Sweden ME 1903 Olivia Montag 11 Sweden ME 1904 Sarah Shaw 34 Medford MA 1905 Talia Martin 11 Sweden ME 1906 Sarah Shaw 34 Somerville MA CT 1907 Becky Robitaille 34 Fairfield 1908 Brent Robitaille 34 Fairfield CT 1909 Chris Gill 60 South Portland ME

1:05:30 1:05:30 1:05:39 1:05:42 1:05:43 1:05:50 1:05:53 1:05:55 1:05:55 1:05:56 1:06:08 1:06:08 1:06:09 1:06:10 1:06:12 1:06:13 1:06:13 1:06:15 1:06:31 1:06:32 1:06:32 1:06:33 1:06:38 1:06:38 1:07:06 1:07:24 1:07:26 1:07:26 1:07:41 1:07:46 1:07:49 1:07:49 1:07:55 1:07:56 1:07:57 1:07:57 1:07:58 1:08:01 1:08:02 1:08:02 1:08:02 1:08:02 1:08:03 1:08:03 1:08:04 1:08:05 1:08:05

1910 Scarlett Blank 10 1911 Sage Blank 10 1912 Cora Gallagher 7 1913 Jane McGowan 44 1914 Mary Difilippo 20 54 1915 Laurie Gill 1916 Barbara Gelinas 61 1917 Suzanne Federer 77 1918 Michelle Bush 38 1919 Jarrett Bush 6 1920 Irene Jacintho 67 1921 Susie Roy 57 1922 Cordelia Gallagher 11 1923 Rae-Ann Guzman 46 1924 Olyvia Rose 11 1925 Scarlett Scwimmer 9 1926 Johanna Lynch 47 1927 Ann Marie Antolini 54 1928 James Robson 36 1929 Lily Levick 12 1930 Matthew Brill 12 1931 Ellen Webber 48 1932 Margaret Scarlett 19 1933 Kathi Webber 47 1934 Barbara Hanauer 64 1935 Kayla Gordon 19 1936 Ben Sparks 11 1937 Donna Medeiros 59 1938 Paul Devoe 56 1939 Britt Kinevich 51 1940 Robert Weeman 56 1941 Becky Tripp 42 1942 Deb Robson 35 1943 Somer Gray 8 1944 Artie Muse 70 1945 Mitch Mount 16 1946 Colin Baker 16 1947 Sam Muirhead 17 1948 Lola Galliher 7 1949 Jonathan Sparks 42 1950 Riva Sparks 70 1951 Kathy Larkin 60 1952 Jodi Sparks 43 1953 Sara Dematteo 40 1954 Katie Brown 42 1955 Frances Byrne 9 1956 Juliana Zahn 10

Sweden ME Sweden ME North Yarmouth ME Winthrop MA Danvers MA South Portland ME South Windsor CT Falmouth ME North Yarmouth ME Bridgton ME North Conway NH Bridgton ME Sweden ME Bridgton ME Sweden ME Sweden ME Apex NC Braintree MA Naples ME Sweden ME Bridgton ME Venice FL Bridgton ME Venice FL Bridgton ME Telford PA Sudbury MA Rutland MA Leominster MA Denmark ME Denmark ME Naples ME Naples ME Harrison ME Rumford ME Sebago ME Sebago ME Sebago ME Harrison ME Sudbury MA Sudbury MA Bridgton ME Sudbury MA Denmark ME Denmark ME Sweden ME Sweden ME

1:08:09 1:08:09 1:08:14 1:08:14 1:08:14 1:08:15 1:08:22 1:08:24 1:08:24 1:08:25 1:08:25 1:08:28 1:08:37 1:08:37 1:08:37 1:08:37 1:08:51 1:08:51 1:09:00 1:09:12 1:09:22 1:09:32 1:09:33 1:09:33 1:09:34 1:09:34 1:09:36 1:09:43 1:09:45 1:09:50 1:09:51 1:09:53 1:09:53 1:10:03 1:10:05 1:10:05 1:10:06 1:10:07 1:10:09 1:10:09 1:10:11 1:10:11 1:10:12 1:10:12 1:10:12 1:10:23 1:10:25

FEATURED PROPERTIES CASCO — Hancock Beach Assoc., lovely 4-BR, 2-BA Ranch w/open concept floor plan, light & bright kit., dining rm. & living rm. w/cherry floors. Full walkout bsmt., screened-in sunroom, 2-car gar., ROW to Thompson Lake, tennis & more! $425,000 (MLS 1264407)

D PRICE

NAPLES — Stunning log home w/320 ft. of sandy frontage on the Songo River near the mouth of Brandy Pond. Direct access to Long & Sebago Lakes! Home boasts 4 bdrms., 3 baths, granite, hickory cabinets, gas fplc., guest house, gar., generator & much more! $749,000 (MLS 1255012)

REDUCE

www.visualtour.com #0365-7290

D PRICE

REDUCE

NAPLES — Desirable Steamboat Landing. Rare offering! 1/2 duplex w/gorgeous 274 ft. assoc. beach & boat dock on Brandy Pond. Playground, volleyball, campfires & lg. lakeside picnic area. The other 1/2 of the duplex is also being sold separately. $213,000 (MLS 1238081)

Jocelyn O’Rourke-Shane 207-693-7284 (o) 207-838-5555 (c) jocelyn@hancockpondrealestate.com 692 Roosevelt Independently Owned and Locally Operated

Trail, P.O. Box 97 Naples, ME 04055

2nd,4th

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Regional sports 1957 Sydney Martin 10 Harrison ME ME 1958 Karen Toohey 67 Harrison 1959 Judith Haas 59 Harrison ME 56 Halifax MA 1960 Joan Doran 1961 Kate Ebner 46 Wethersfield CT 1962 Susan Pulaski 52 North Andover MA 10 Sweden ME 1963 Slyvie Bless 1964 Apple Lydon 13 Sweden ME 13 Sweden ME 1965 Anjali Mehta 1966 Jaquie Kizer 12 Sweden ME 1967 Catherine Woodbury 59 South Hamilton MA ME 1968 Olivia Nachman 13 Sweden 1969 Sahmoya Rose-Blake 10 Sweden ME 12 Sweden ME 1970 Ella Andrews 1971 Joan Kimball 60 Haverhill MA 1972 Isabelle Blossom 11 Dellwood MN Friedman 66 Fairfield CT 1973 Ira CT 1974 Aaron Friedman 19 Fairfield 12 Harrison ME 1975 Mikenzie Pierini CT 1976 Alison Warren 55 Avon FL 1977 Samantha Redlund 23 Orlando MA 1978 Brian Hubbard 56 Sudbury MA 1979 Thomas Hubbard 62 Natick 52 Hopkinton MA 1980 Amy Beck MA 1981 Moira Hubbard 55 Sudbury 1982 Edward Curtis 83 Seattle WA 1983 Elizabeth Hanley 55 North Andover MA 1984 Sharon Blossom 53 Dellwood MN ME 1985 Maggie Pierini 12 Harrison 1986 Jeannie Muse 70 Rumford ME 1987 Brendan Beck 9 Hopkinton MA Katz 15 Harrison ME 1988 Alex 1989 Olivia Tantleff 15 Harrison ME 53 Newbury MA 1990 Alison Gibbs 1991 Richard Quinn 75 Estero FL 1992 Loren Kessel 52 Newbury MA Pusch 16 Sebago ME 1993 Eric 1994 Courtney Gould 20 Bridgton ME

This week’s game solutions

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MA 1995 Daniel Poirier 19 Billerica 1996 Renee Kostka 47 Fitchburg MA 1997 Laura McGaffigan 49 Cambridge MA 13 Sweden ME 1998 Sloane Lewis 1999 Sierra Scanlan 14 Sweden ME Steele 14 Sweden ME 2000 Lily 2001 Taylor Sass 8 Harrison ME 2002 Dawn Hemesath 36 Chesapeake VA 2003 Matt Hemesath 36 Chesapeake VA 2004 Aaliyah Davis 12 Harrison ME Noonan 26 Cambridge MA 2005 Jeff 2006 Mike Noonan 53 Wilton CT 2007 Madaket Whittaker 11 Harrison ME ME 2008 Rhea Sanger 14 Sweden 2009 Claudia Lipsey 14 Harrison ME ME 2010 Tiana Ismirnioglou 17 Harrison 2011 Annie Segall 15 Sweden ME 2012 Olivia Wiener 13 Sweden ME 2013 Magdalena Real De Asua 14 Sweden ME 2014 Doris Noonan 53 Wilton CT CT 2015 Morgan Noonan 16 Wilton 2016 Casey Noonan 22 Cambridge MA 2017 Alexsia Romain 14 Sweden ME ME 2018 Jamie Jobson 13 Sweden 2019 Avery Bush 8 Bridgton ME 14 Sweden ME 2020 Molly Potter 2021 Eva Adams 10 Sweden ME 2022 Emma Froelich 12 Sweden ME ME 2023 Julia Hodys 13 Sweden 2024 Annabel Hellman 12 Sweden ME 11 Sweden ME 2025 Gabby Jones 2026 Charlotte Wise 11 Sweden ME 2027 Natalia Hecker 10 Sweden ME ME 2028 Olivia De Dampiere 12 Sweden 2029 Sophia Ligorria 12 Sweden ME ME 2030 Jemima Eastwood 11 Sweden 2031 Sammi Shaw 12 Sweden ME 2032 Noa Cherny 11 Sweden ME

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68 Bridgton 2033 Mary Hubka 2034 Terry Hubka 70 Bridgton 10 Sweden 2035 Sabrina Kizer 2036 Jason Sampson 40 Casco Sampson 39 Casco 2037 Erin 2038 Barbara Grandolfo 68 Harrison 2039 Leigh Long 44 Bridgewater 2040 Daniel Jaronczyk 6 Bridgton 2041 Emma Castle-Smith 21 Sweden 2042 Cami Dillon 15 Sweden 2043 Emily Levine 10 Sweden 2044 Robin Lyles 27 Sweden 2045 Amanda Keegan 25 Sweden 2046 Candice Cobb 27 Sweden 2047 Maya Glass 10 Sweden 2048 Becky Devoe 55 Leominster 2049 Pat Brandenberger 78 Harrison 9 Sweden 2050 Ava Schneider 2051 Jonah Kizer 7 Sweden 2052 Skye Robertson 31 Sweden 2053 Cara O’Connell 24 Sweden 2054 Gracie Ryan 15 Sweden 2055 Melissa Joinville 28 Sweden 2056 Alejandra Hidalgo 8 Sweden 2057 Kathy O’Neil 60 Bridgton 39 Waterford 2058 Jenah Pare 2059 Michelle Wilson 20 Sweden 2060 John Crowe 89 Sweden 2061 Jonathan Crowe 48 Lovell 2062 Cindy Deschenes 47 Bridgton 65 Bridgton 2063 Donna Small 2064 Thomas Jaronczyk 3 Bridgton 2065 Rachel Jaronczyk 38 Bridgton 2066 Mark Weaver 5 Denmark 2067 Alicia Weaver 49 Denmark 4 Bridgton 2068 Trevor Bush 2069 Rita Bush 63 Bridgton Bush 64 Bridgton 2070 Tom 2071 Richard Allan 73 Barre

GLLT upcoming events Degree of Difficulty: Moderate The Greater Lovell Land Trust walks are free and open to the public. Look for “Land Trust Walk Today” signs posted on Route 5 and leading to the trailhead. Be aware that though dogs are welcome on some properties, the GLLT asks that you not bring a pet on a GLLT-sponsored walk. Thank you for your cooperation. Walks last approximately three hours, so please dress for the weather conditions. We suggest long pants, long sleeves and sturdy shoes with socks. We highly recommend that you bring plenty of water, snacks, insect repellant and your camera. Admission is free.

July 14, 2016, The Bridgton News, Page 7C ME ME ME ME ME ME MA ME ME ME ME ME ME ME ME MA ME ME ME ME ME ME ME ME ME ME ME ME ME ME ME ME ME ME ME ME ME ME MA

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(Continued from Page 2C) by teams. Registration fee is $60 for singles and $150 for teams (two or three members). Registration fee is nonrefundable after Aug. 14. Team rosters need not be finalized until race day at the close of registration. All competitors must be 17 years of age or older. (Proof of age may be required) For more information, contact Rob at gachallenge@live.com or (207) 647-5298 or go to the website: maineadventureracing.com NAPLES CAUSEWAY 5K The Naples Causeway 5K will be held on Sunday, Aug. 28 at 8 a.m. Come and enjoy the second annual flat 5K along the Naples Causeway. Views of beautiful Long Lake and Brandy Pond during your run/walk. All proceeds will benefit the Patrick Dempsey Center for Cancer Research. Cost: $25, price increases to $30 after Aug. 26. Online registration: runsignup.com/ Race/Events/ME/Naples/Causeway5K

KEEFE’S MARINE Alan Keefe, Owner KeefesMarine@yahoo.com 207-693-3075 Fully-Insured PO Box 1373 335 Roosevelt Tr., Naples, ME 04055

WWW.KEEFESMARINE.COM

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2928 East Conway Rd. • East Conway, NH • 603-939-2698 townandcountry.com Open Monday–Friday 9-5; Saturday 9-3

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Regional sports

Page 8C, The Bridgton News, July 14, 2016

Trail cairns lead the way More Than Just Piles of Rocks!

I remember it as if it happened yesterday, when a simple row of trail cairns probably saved my life. There were five of us from the University of New Hampshire Outing Club climbing Mount Washington that October day in 1958. We were on the Bigelow Lawn heading for the summit when, out of nowhere, bad weather engulfed us! This can happen in the blink of an eye on Mount Washington. Fog, mist and rain were so thick around us that we couldn’t see more than a few feet ahead of us, and we quickly became disoriented. Our “bail out” plan in the event that something like this happened was to go down the Lions Head Trail into Tuckerman Ravine, but we didn’t want to wander off the headwall in the fog. That would have been fatal, and others have unfortunately suffered that fate over the years. Luckily for us, when the fog had enveloped us we were at a rock cairn marking the trail, and we were able to play “leapfrog” from one cairn to the next, and the next, and so on. With one of us staying at the last cairn, the others strung out until the next one

Senior Rambles Hiking Trips & Tips by Allen Crabtree was found. We then gathered there and repeated the process until we reached the top of the Lions Head trail and climbed down to safety. Frankly, up to that point I’d never given much thought to the ubiquitous trail cairns I’d been passing in my rambles over the years. After this hairraising experience on Mount Washington, however, I gained a new respect for these silent sentinels that mark trails in the mountains. Since then, my fellow hikers and I have built or repaired a number of cairns to help guide hikers along the trail as part of our role as volunteer “trail adopters.” Cairn building is older than history Cairns are essentially just piles of stones stacked on top of one another. The word cairn comes from the Scottish Gaelic càrn. It also can be found in other Celtic languages including the Welsh carn (and carnedd), the Breton karn,

JULY SPECIA L

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Auto Body Collision & Painting Tires • Car & Truck BRIDGTON’S Accessories ONLY

Trailer Hitches & Accessories Sales & Installations

Member Dale McDaniel, Owner Phone: 207-647-8134 Fax: 207-647-4314 487 Portland Rd., Bridgton, ME 04009

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the Irish carn, and the Cornish karn or carn. Cairns have been and are used for a broad variety of purposes, from prehistoric times up to the present. Cairns to mark trails are only one use for piling stones. In some cultures, they were used as burial mounds, territory markers, and to protect graves and food storage sites from foraging animals. “A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral,” — Antoine de Saint-Exupery. Rock cairns can be a form of worship in wishing good fortune to be bestowed on the stacker and their family or to remember someone. There is a Jewish tradition of leaving a pebble or stone on top of a tombstone. This signifies that someone has honored the deceased person’s memory with a visit to the grave. Some say that adding a rock to a cairn is good luck, and there is an old Scottish Gaelic blessing: Cuiridh mi clach air do chàrn that translates, “I’ll put a stone on your cairn.” In Highland folklore, it is believed that the Highland Clans, before they fought in a battle, each man would place a stone in a pile. Those who survived the battle returned and removed a stone from the pile. The stones that remained were built into a cairn to honor the dead. Trail Cairns and Trail Ducks We see cairns most often along our hiking trails and they help keep us on the trail. Cairns are particularly valuable on the treeless summits of many of our mountains. With no trail markers or blazes on trees to mark the way, a row of cairns may be the only indication of where the trail is. In poor weather, as I have discovered firsthand, they can save your life! Ideally, a cairn should be

Some feel that adding a rock to a cairn is good luck. Here Denmark Mountain Hiker Jeff Sturgis adds a stone to an impressive trail cairn on Round Mountain. (Photo by Allen Crabtree) large enough to be visible in bad weather to help mark the trail for hikers. They should be tall enough to protrude above the snow in winter, at least three feet high. Cairns should be on or beside the trail. The rationale for a large cairn is that the effort involved in creating a large cairn should provide some confidence you are on the correct path, or at least a well-traveled path. Not many people would take the time to build such a large structure unless they were confident about its location. Each of us can help by adding a rock to the pile as we pass, or helping restore a cairn that has blown over in the wind. A smaller version of the trail cairn is the trail duck. A trail duck is a much smaller rock pile of at least three stones typically stacked just high enough to convince the observer it is not natural. While two rocks stacked on top of one another could be a coincidence, three rocks are not — that is a trail duck! In some regions, ducks also contain a pointer rock (or couple of stacked rocks) to indicate the direction of the trail. Trail Cairns and Wilderness Policy How many trail cairns are enough, and how many are too many? A hiker we know was lost for a while on Pleasant Mountain because he went straight when the trail took a sharp turn to the left. He

infooneagleswings@gmail.com

What We Do and Who We Are At ON EAGLES WINGS

LAKE REGION BOYS SUMMER SOCCER CAMP

The public pays for our services which assists us in offering our facilities and programs free to cancer patients.

July 25, 26, 27, 28 (Mon.–Thurs.) Grades 5-6-7-8 (6:30-8 p.m.) CAMP DIRECTOR: LRHS Head Coach – Michael Chaine Instructors – LRHS Soccer team members Location – Lake Region High School • Development of skills and team play • Promote mentorship between the older and younger generations of Lake Region boys soccer players • Provide a fun, positive learning environment for all skill levels

$25 per student Early Registration due by July 20th, Registration after the 20th up to 28th will be $35 Registration forms can be e-mailed to: mchaine@auburnmaine.gov or mailed to 41 Lakeview Dr., Naples, ME 04055 Payment will be due the first day of camp (Please make checks payable to Michael Chaine / LRHS Soccer Coach All remaining money will go toward the JV and Varsity boys soccer teams)

For more information and/or questions please contact Coach Chaine at mchaine @auburnmaine.gov

Player’s name: Grade: Address:

Phone number: Emergency Contact Person:

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Player Registration Form

All cancer patients going through cancer treatment in the Bridgton area receive free: • Reflexology • Massage • Arts and craft classes

Our services and programs include: • Reflexology • Massage • Various arts and crafts classes • Paintings and crafts for sale

For boys grades 5-8

LAKE REGION BOYS SUMMER SOCCER CAMP

paint markings on the rock ledges, are either removed or allowed to deteriorate with age and weather. We have found that it is a challenge to find the Mud Brook trail when on the summit, requiring map and compass skills and a “leap frog” technique working from one known spot on the trail to the next. Trail cairns here are valuable, but run counter to wilderness policy and the Leave No Trace ethic advocates for leaving the outdoors undisturbed an in its natural condition. Before heading out on a hike in a wilderness area hikers should carry with them both a map and a compass, have a working knowledge of map and compass skills, and be prepared for the challenge when they find the normal trail markers may not be present. The next time you are out hiking respect the trail cairns that help keep you from straying off the trail and give a silent “thank you” to those who have spent their time and labor to build them. If you wish, add to cairns a stone at a time for good luck, but also respect that too many cairns is not necessarily a good thing. “All things in moderation” applies to trail cairns as well as life, and there should be only just enough of them so we can find our way home again and not be like Daniel Boone who once said: “I have never been lost, but I will admit to being confused for several weeks.”

207-803-8025 Fax- 207-803-8026

236 Portland Rd. Bridgton, ME 04009 www.oneageswings2.com

We fix Tire Pressure Monitor Systems. Scan & repair — newest technology.

REMEMBER TO JOIN US ON OUR FACEBOOK PAGE LAKE REGION HIGH SCHOOL SOCCER

was located, safe and sound, but it prompted the Denmark Mountain Hikers to block off the wrong trail with branches and build three large cairns to show hikers where the trail is. This was on the Southwest Ridge trail that we have “adopted” as volunteer trail stewards, and is a good example of where we recognized that additional cairns were needed. On the other hand, it is not uncommon to see what I think are too many cairns along the trail. For example, on Round Mountain we counted 100 trail cairns and trail ducks on a hike there — clearly there was an overexuberance of cairn building on a modest mountain with no real danger of hikers getting lost. An overabundance distracts from cairns used as genuine trail guides, and we have encountered “false cairns” that were not on the trail and would lead hikers in the wrong direction. This was on Caribou Mountain, which is in the White Mountain National Forest’s Caribou-Speckled Mountain Wilderness Area. Forest Service Wilderness Policy restricts the use of trail signs within wilderness and primitive areas to only when necessary to protect the resource or to provide for visitor safety. The policy allows trail signs at the trailhead and some at trail junctions, but other trail markers, including

Open for Reflexology and Massage Tuesday and Thursday 8 a.m.- 3:30 p.m. By appointment only.

What is Reflexology Reflexology involves applying pressure to points on the head, ears, hands and feet. Benefits of reflexology: Reduces stress and improves circulation. Hits the nervous system to relax and calm the mind, body, soul and spirit. Massage involves the muscular system and the massage continues to reduce stress and relieve pressure from sore and aching muscles.

Mix It Up Art Studio Open various dates and times. Drop by our facility & pick up our July calendar. • Drawing & watercolor classes • Children’s programs • Crafts, and acrylic painting classes • Paintings and crafts for sale

We combined a unique two-hour reflexology/massage session — It’s our most popular.

One hour of reflexology to relax your nervous system, followed by one hour of massage to hit your muscular system.

Total cost for two hours in July is $75

Bring a friend and get $5 off each for $70 per person. Reflexology only — $45; Massage only — $50; with hot rocks $55

Acrylic Dolphin Painting Thurs., July 14 6-8 p.m. $25

Beginner Portrait Drawing Wed., July 20, 27, August 3 &10 6:30-8:30 p.m. $45 plus supplies.

FAMILY NIGHT Mermaid Tiaras and/or Boys’ Hardware Jewelry Tues., July 19 • 6-8 p.m. $15 total for parent and child. Angel Lanterns — Fri., July 22 9-11 a.m. No charge (if making for cancer patients). $10 (to make for yourself)

Meet Our Staff Photo on left, pictured left to right: Monique Hayes, our receptionist and appointment coordinator; Ann Ruel, Reflexologist. Whitney Scheiferstein, Massage Therapist. Photo on right: Jennifer Crowley, arts and crafts instructor.

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Opinion & Comment

July 14, 2016, The Bridgton News, Page 1D

Small World by Henry Precht BN Columnist

Laws, rules and Hillary

The debate would appear to be ended. The highly respected director of the FBI, James Comey, has said Mrs. Clinton and her team were “extremely careless” in using a private e-mail server for official business. His judgment is that no crime was committed and there should therefore be no indictment. End of story. End of Republican hopes that she might be disqualified for the presidency. Not, perhaps, so fast. A little background might be in order. I think back to my Foreign Service friend Ben, a hard working, totally loyal, promising officer who held an important job in one of our Middle East embassies. Working late and required to go out in the evening, he left some classified documents on his desk — not secured in a safe as they should have been. A THE APPEAL OF STEEL — The vintage vehicles were a big hit with the crowd at the Independence Day parade in Marine guard, making his nightly rounds, discovered the lapse Naples. (De Busk Photo) and wrote him up. Ben was rebuked, his record sullied. After that incident, the best job he could get was in the office of the State Department Historian. There are other more celebrated security violations: Distinguished General Petraeus lost out as CIA chief when it HILLARY, Page 7D

Out standing in the road Views from the Uppermost House by S. Peter Lewis BN Columnist

I was a total mess when we dropped our daughter Amanda off at college in Virginia in August of 2010. After endlessly hugging her, with her new roommates and their parents standing around awkwardly while I wept, I walked out into the rainy night, got in the car, drove a few feet and then stopped the car and ran back to her room. My wife Karen rolled her eyes and stayed in the car. After another hug and the inevitable prayer, my daughter pried me off her and looked me square in the eyes and told me that I’d be okay and that I should be brave and drive back to Maine with Mom. Just five years, nine months, 16 days, a pile of money, and

two degrees later, Amanda was scheduled to arrive home on another rainy evening, and I was pacing around the house like an expectant father. She was moving back in with us for an undetermined awhile so she could study for a national certification exam in something medical that involves big Latin words and bones and joints and connective tissues (e.g., sinew) and stuff like that which I understand on only the most rudimentary and pragmatic levels, such as: “Why do my knees hurt when I go trail running a few days in a row?” followed by, “Well, Dad, you are 56 years old and you have an awful lot of miles on those knees and so your cartilage…oh, never mind, take some ibuprofen and talk to me in the morning.” Anyway, even though the empty-nest gig had been pretty sweet for the previous 2,116 days, Karen and I were delighted to welcome our beloved daughter back home again; although it did put a minor crimp in the whole “Let’s put Mandy’s room on Airbnb.com” idea. I had spoken with Mandy a week or so before her departure from her flat in Buffalo, N.Y., and her biggest concern was whether she was going to be able to cram all of her stuff into her car and still be able to see. She knew that the whole “being able to look out the rearview mirror on the turnpike” thing was STANDING, Page 7D

Either you qualify or you don’t

My mother keeps track of her 30 grandchildren and her 45 great-grandchildren. She knows all their names too — pretty remarkable for a woman in her nineties. She’s getting forgetful, but not about family. She had eight children of her own and I’m the fourth. Ours was a large family, but not unique. My FEEDING TIME — Nancy Campbell of Moose Pond in best friend across the street was one of seven and so was my Bridgton saw this Northern Flicker flying back and forth wife. We had only four children, which was considered a lot all day, and when she finally saw the bird land next to her for my generation. Fewer Americans want to have any children nest, two heads popped out! these days though. I’m seeing more people of childbearing age raising dogs and cats instead of babies and I’ve written about it several times over the years. Why don’t Americans want to have children anymore? What is happening to us? Our population is still growing, but mostly because of immigration. The percent of Americans born somewhere else is approaching record levels. In Portland, Maine, one of six people was born in another country and most of those who are by Ron Terciak women are having children at much higher rates than nativeJN Past Commander born Americans. U.S. Power Squadron Americans tend not to marry much anymore either from what I can see. For two months, I’ve been advertising an Long Lake Marine Patrol apartment above our garage, and while several couples have inquired, none have been married. Typically, a woman calls me to say she is interested. I ask if she’s alone and she says no, it would be for her and her boyfriend. That’s the norm these days. When I say I need first and last months’ rent, a security deposit, and a credit check, that all presents too high a bar for most to get over. “Port” and “Starboard” are terms most boaters are Pondering this, I saw a story on CBS News that two out of familiar with. But do you know the origin of the words three Americans could not cover a $500 unexpected expense or an easy way to remember which side of the boat is such as a car repair. I was shocked and realized that statistic which? bodes ill for our nation. There have always been people who First the origin, live close to the edge and spend every dollar that comes their In the early days of shipping, the rudder, then called way as quickly as they can, but 66% of us live like that now? the steering board, was located closer to the right side of Even when we had a young family and were living below the the vessel because the waters near the wharf were shalfederal poverty line, my wife and I kept that much on hand. low hence the left side of the vessel was called the “port” That was back in the 1970s when $500 could buy about what side. Later as dredging made the waters deeper alongside $2,500 buys now. It was hard to save up, but we did so by the wharf, the rudder was moved to the center and the eating a lot of soup and watching where every penny went. term steering board morphed into starboard. Looking back, my wife and I agree those times were among the An easy way to know which side is which is to happiest of our lives. Most of the people we knew lived simiremember that the running lights on the port (left) side are larly, but that way of life is obviously not the norm anymore. red, port wine is red, hence the port side is the left side. What is happening to us? The reason we use the term port and starboard is to Used to be that when people went broke, they could go to clarify what side of the boat we are talking about. If we local churches to ask for money to pay the electric bill, the just used left and right it becomes very confusing. Do you rent, buy heating oil, food, or whatever was the most pressing mean my left or your left? Port or starboard refers to the basic need. Doing so, they had to be accountable to the priest, boat and removes the question.

On the Water

Safe boating

Letters Parading our thanks

To The Editor: A big “thank you” to all who helped run the Bridgton Lions Fourth of July Parade. The Bridgton Police, Town crew, Hancock Lumber, Macdonald Motors and all of the helpful Lions. A “thank you” to the walkers, antique cars, floats, and emergency vehicles that make the parade.

It is with the help of many we are able to have this yearly parade. Bob McHatton Bridgton Lions Parade To The Editor: Chairman The Sweden Fire Department would like to thank all members, family and friends who helped with our barbecue. To The Editor: Special thanks to Angry How I wish Ryan Holt’s Wilderness Warriors Project Men for cooking the meats; had been around when I got to those who came to eat, out of the Marine Corps for hope you enjoyed; to those the first time back on June that came to the Open House, thanks for your support. 13, 1965. Extra special thank you to Let nothing deter you Kaden for being our star fireRyan, build it. Rev. Bob Celeste fighter in the Fourth of July Harrison Parade. Hope you had fun! To all, stay safe and see

BBQ thank you

Build it

you at our next event. Bette-Jean Espeaignette Sweden Fire Department

Shedding light on the ordinance

To The Editor: In response to Julia Marino’s letter to the editor with concerns of a $12,500 expenditure on an electronic sign for the Old Town Hall, first I stand beside you. I feel it is totally out of context with this town’s sign ordinance. As you can read, as I quote from the sign ordinance,

Front Row Seat by Tom McLaughlin BN Columnist minister or rabbi about their spending habits, work habits, and/ or lifestyle that might have gotten them into their predicament. If they went to someone in their family for a loan, the same accountability would usually apply. They’d have to explain how they got in the hole they were in and what they were doing to climb out of it. Today, it’s different. Today, people go to the government. In the 1960s when President Johnson started his “War on Poverty,” the federal government started supporting people. SUPPORT, Page 6D

Medicare nugget

By Stan Cohen Medicare Volunteer Counselor Remember the “doc fix” crises? For several years, Congress made annual, temporary adjustments to the way Medicare paid doctors so that payments to physicians wouldn’t fall off the proverbial cliff. Then came the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015, which essentially ended the year-to-year problem. That legislation also made numerous improvements to our health care system, including payments based on value rather than on volume. The way Medicare currently measures the quality of care provided by clinicians depends on which of six “Alternative Payment Models” they are participating in. These various programs will now be integrated into a single framework to help doctors transition from payments based on volume to payments based on value. “It will improve the relevancy and depth of Medicare’s quality-based payments and increase clinician flexibility by allowing clinicians to choose measures and activities appropriate to the type of care they provide.” We’re getting there — be patient. Medicare volunteer counselors are available for one-on-one consultations at no charge. Call the Bridgton Community Center at 647-3116 to arrange for an appointment.

“The purpose of the Bridgton Sign ordinance (Section 1): The purpose of this ordinance is to encourage the effective and safe use of signs in the Town of Bridgton and to promote a healthy business climate while protecting the aesthetic atmosphere of the town, to accomplish this goal this ordinance is intended to…  A. Promote the safety, comfort and wellbeing of the users of streets, roads and

highways in the town. B. Reduce distractions and obstructions from signs, which would adversely affect traffic safety and to alleviate hazards caused by signs projecting over or encroaching upon public way. C. Ensure that signs provide effective orientation and adequately identify local business and services. D. Preserve and enhance the visual appearance of the LETTERS, Page 2D


Opinions

Page 2D, The Bridgton News, July 14, 2016

Getting the right care at the right time

“The goal is not a good death. Instead, the goal is to have as good a life as possible all the way to the very end.”   That was the message Dr. Atul Gawande, surgeon and author of the New York Times best-selling book, Being Mortal, delivered at a recent Senate Aging Committee hearing that I chaired. Our hearing explored ways to not only expand, but also to improve, the care provided to the approximately 90 million Americans who are living with a serious, often lifethreatening, illness. Advance care planning conversations are critical to the physical, emotional, social, and spiritual wellbeing of any individual living with a serious illness. These important life conversations among the patient, the family, and the health care provider help to ensure that an individual’s wishes are known and that the care they are receiving is consistent with the care they want. Dr. Gawande noted during the hearing that people with serious, potentially life-limiting illnesses may face substantial suffering, particularly during the last year of life. As he said, “Medical care today typically exacerbates this suffering, often without any benefit of lengthened life. We have an opportunity to change this.” That point was underscored by another of our witnesses, Amy Berman, a nurse and senior program officer at the John A. Hartford Foundation, a national health care foundation focused on improving the care of older adults. Ms. Berman is living with stage IV inflammatory breast cancer. In her powerful testimony, Ms. Berman discussed her experience and emphasized the importance of palliative care, calling it “the best friend of the seriously ill” that helps “people feel better and live longer.” Palliative care focuses on addressing the pain and stress of a serious illness and improving the quality of life for both the patient and the family. When she was first diagnosed, Ms. Berman was fortunate to meet with an oncologist who asked her an important, but too often uncommon, question: What did she hope for? In response, Ms. Berman told her doctor that she wanted to hold onto the life she had, maximizing her good days and avoid aggressive treatment that would decrease the quality of those days. Her doctor understood her desire to live the life she had left to the fullest and designed a personalized care plan consistent with her wishes, which excluded debilitating, aggressive treatments and surgeries that offered no hope for a cure. When Ms. Berman received her diagnosis, it was highly unlikely that she would survive five years; yet, here she was testifying before our committee a full five and a half years

Letters

(Continued from Page 1D) Town of Bridgton.     So, I stand with you Julia. I’m sure the Bridgton Board of Selectmen totally understands this situation and will address this with the utmost importance. And personally, $12,500 for a sign is a bit much. Catherine Pinkham Bridgton

Thank you Bridgton voters

To The Editor: Many thanks to all of you who put your confidence in me for the Bridgton Planning Board. I am honored to serve, and will do my best to be fair, reasonable and measured, taking into account our Comprehensive Plan, ordinances and citizen input. Since the Bridgton elec-

PUBLIC NOTICE

TOWN OF CASCO

PLANNING BOARD NOTICE OF SITE WALK – JULY 25TH, 2016 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the Town of Casco Planning Board will hold a Site Walk on Monday, July 25th, 2016 at 9:00 a.m., to view the property which is the subject of a proposed Amendment to a Contract Zone between the Town of Casco and Brian E. Chamberlain and Beverly J. Chamberlain for property known as Settlers’ Village. The property is also known as Map 8, Lot 14-A. The public is invited to attend.

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TOWN OF BRIDGTON

Views from Senate

by Susan Collins United States Senator later! As a result of palliative care, she is able to work full time, travel, and enjoy her family and friends despite her illness. I, too, have seen the benefits of care planning. A few years ago, one of my dear friends was a patient at the Gosnell Memorial Hospice House in Scarborough. Despite her serious illness, her remaining days were filled with visits from friends and family, and many joyful moments. She died peacefully, surrounded by her family just as she had wanted.

As Ms. Berman noted in her testimony, however, this type of person-centered care is unfortunately the exception. While a majority of Americans say that they would prefer to die at home, most people still die in the hospital. In addition, studies reveal that less than one-third of physicians report that their practice or health care system has a formal program for assessing patients’ goals or preferences. We must work to ensure that our federal policies support efforts to relieve suffering, respect personal choice, and provide opportunities for people to find meaning and comfort during serious illness, and — most important — remain in control of their own care. Dr. Gawande truly put it best when he said that the most effective and important way to learn about an individual’s priorities is to ask the individual directly. It is essential for families and health care providers to have these important conversations so that individuals’ wishes are known and reflected in their treatment, and that family members can rest assured knowing that their loved one is receiving the care they want.

A RIBBON CUTTING was recently held at Watkin’s Flowers, located off Route 302 in Casco. Attending were (front, left to right) Sue Mercer, executive director of the Greater Bridgton Lakes Region Chamber of Commerce, E.D. Betty, Gary and Carol Drew of Watkins Flowers, Holly Chase of Norway Savings Bank and Erin Nelson, also of Norway Savings Bank; (back row) Julie Corrigan of Simplicity Salon, Vince Osgood of Norway Savings Bank, and Fred Demers, Chamber Board member. tion, I have sat twice on board meetings; this has served to re-emphasize to me the critical importance and impact we as a board have in our community, and on individual citizens. So, I appreciate even more being able to serve Bridgton. Again, thank you.  Deb Brusini Bridgton

Curiously confused

To The Editor: 
 In last week’s article about Sebago withdrawing from SAD 61, School Board Chairman Janice Barter was quoted as saying that multiage classes are not educationally sound. I am curious to know the basis of that statement. She did say that it has

to do with changes in testing and standards, but that confused me even more. I don’t get the connection there. 
The future of public education will actually have nothing but multi-age classrooms. The new approach being implemented is called Proficiency Based Education (PBE). Students must show proficiency with one standard before moving on to the next. Some will take longer than others, that is just human nature. With PBE, learning is the constant (standards) and time is the variable (each student will move at their own pace through those standards). This is of course appropriate because humans grow and develop at different rates. We will no longer be holding back the advanced students while others catch

up to them. We will now be allowing students who need more time to have the time they need without the unreasonable expectation that they reach a certain level academically just because they have reached a certain age. 
 Social promotion will be a thing of the past. We will no longer have grades (K-12). We will just have students moving through the standards regardless of their age. Teachers will need to constantly adjust what they are teaching based on the current needs of the students. One student may be at Level 10 in Math but only at Level 8 in Language Arts but since time is a variable this will not be an issue. 
As a public school teacher, I am frustrated with how painfully slow the transi-

3 CHASE STREET, SUITE 1 BRIDGTON, MAINE 04009

Notice of Public Hearing The Municipal Officers of the Town of Bridgton will hold a Public Hearing at 6 P.M., on Tuesday, July 26, 2016, at the Downstairs Meeting Room located at 10 Iredale Street in Bridgton, to accept oral and written comments on an application from Towanda’s Specialty Food & Deli (103 Main Street) for a Special Amusement Permit (live entertainment). 1T28 Public Notice

TOWN OF NAPLES Public Hearing

Margherita

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The Naples Planning Board will be holding a meeting at 15 Village Green Lane on Tuesday, July 19, 2016. at 7:00 p.m. On the agenda:

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1.) An application for a Modification to an approved Site Plan for property located at 212 Roosevelt Trail found on Map U05, lots 21 & 21A, submitted by Marston’s Tree Service. 2.) An application for a Modification to a Major Subdivision regarding the mooring and dock plans of Songo Beach Association, found on Tax Map U16. Public welcome

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PUBLIC NOTICE

TOWN OF CASCO

PUBLIC NOTICE: NOTICE OF INTENT TO FILE Please take notice that Town of Casco, 635 Meadow Rd., Casco 04015, (207) 647-4515 and Town of Otisfield, 403 State Rt. 121, Otisfield 04015, (207) 539-2664, is intending to file a Natural Resources Protection Act permit application with the Maine Department of Environmental Protection pursuant to the provisions of 38 M.R.S.A. §§480-A thru 480-BB on or about July 12, 2016. The application is for Pleasant Pond Dam Restoration at the following location: Edes Falls Rd. near State Rt. 121, Casco, Maine. A request for a public hearing or a request that the Board of Environmental Protection assume jurisdiction over this application must be received by the Department in writing, no later than 20 days after the application is found by the Department to be complete and is accepted for processing. A public hearing may or may not be held at the discretion of the Commissioner or Board of Environmental Protection. Public comment on the application will be accepted throughout the processing of the application. The application will be filed for public inspection at the Department of Environmental Protection’s office in Portland during normal working hours. A copy of the application may also be seen at the municipal offices in Casco and Otisfield, Maine. Written public comments may be sent to the regional office in Portland, where the application is filed for public inspection: MDEP, Southern Maine Regional Office, 312 Canco Road, Portland, Maine 04103. 2T28

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tion to PBE is going. My e-mail is dancingowl@gwi. net. I would love to hear from Janice Barter with more of an explanation about why she says multi-age classrooms are no longer viable when indeed they will be an integral part of Proficiency Based Education. I encourage everyone to be a part of the dialogue needed to get PBE fully implemented in our public schools. Robert Dow North Waterford

Connecting the dots

To The Editor: How could information shared in the July 4/11, 2016 edition of The Nation in “Special Investigation: Dying in Private Prisons,” by Seth Freed Wessler provide at least one explanation for the use of white vans driven by federal government employees to deliver improperly processed individuals seeking eventual citizenship in the USA to unsuspecting, unprepared cities and towns throughout the southwestern states bordering Mexico? How many inmates in the privately operated (supplied by federal funding) prisons that became approved during the former Clinton administration are illegal immigrants? What type of jobs are the total number of inmates doing and exactly what is the profit margin for these corporations operating the prisons? Just what makes us think that either a Democratic or a Republican president will be able to influence an improvement in immigration reform when neither party seems in any mood to simply enforce the policies and laws that are currently available to protect our society? Donald Trump is on the mark when he says we need immigration reform with “beef” incorporated in it and an intention to accept whatever retaliation the Mexican government or corrupt organizations may fall back on. Trump wants us to believe he had absolutely nothing to do with the horrifying habit of not deporting undocumented people over the past few decades. His suggested solutions are as poorly designed as any others so far advanced by Democrats or Republicans in Washington. Because of the reading I’ve been able to do over LETTERS, Page 3D


Opinions

July 14, 2016, The Bridgton News, Page 3D

Minimum wage ballot question misleading

The minimum wage was never intended to be a living wage. It is a starting wage for low-skilled workers. But a ballot question in November asks voters to treat it as a living wage. Over time, labor activists have confused the minimum wage with a living wage so they could boost union contracts. That’s because well-paid union workers get another increase when the minimum wage goes up. Raising the minimum wage hurts our lowest-skilled and hard-to-place workers. Twelve dollars an hour is a lot of money to pay a 16-year-old with no work skills. Raising the minimum wage will increase labor costs for local businesses, which will surely lead to layoffs. And when an employer has to lay off a worker, it is the worker with the least skills who is cut first. This proposal will take away the incentive for employers to pay higher wages for good workers. If the wage automatically goes up every year, there is no need to give raises above the minimum wage. The wording of the ballot question is misleading, calling this a “cost of living increase.” A teenager living with their parents does not need a “cost of living increase.” They need

Letters

(Continued from Page 2D) the past few months, I have finally found at least one satisfactory answer for why neither the Bush administrations nor the Obama operatives have made significant efforts to curb illegal immigration. The most important, at this time, must be that Mexico and the other countries of origin of asylum seekers do not want them to return! Why? Please. How does the overall population of humans in the world compare to the amount of resources available to support them (by continent or country)? Human beings appear to share a rather irrational conclusion that there will always be somewhere else to improve their chances for survival if things in their immediate environ-

NEED A

ment deteriorate. Many other species migrate to locate food and water regularly, but they do not intuitively expect equal or better resources or to avoid competition for existing resources in the new environment.  The leadership of the USA has had a fixation on appearing to have enough resources to solve the food, water and health crises for increasing numbers of possible trade partner nations worldwide since post WWII. Keep that superior reputation, while more and more of our citizens live in conditions close to those we hope to eradicate in other countries? It is long past time our leadership states firmly that we cannot harbor any more refugees. It is time we admit that we cannot solve all the disputes among people worldwide over land supervision and distribution

PROFESSIONAL SERVICE? THE BRIDGTON NEWS

Views from Augusta by Paul LePage Governor of Maine more job options and more flexible hours — but the legislature has repeatedly blocked these efforts during my administration. We should be making it easier for employers to hire low-skill workers, not harder. Most importantly, this proposal would change the labor costs of an entire industry that is critical to Maine’s economy. Tipped workers make on average far more than the minimum wage. But the law allows the employer to take a tip “credit,” which lowers the overall payroll and payroll taxes. When an employer has to pay each worker the full minimum wage, labor costs rise sharply. To cover those costs, menu of resources. It is time we clarify that our need to put a halt to accepting more immigrants is unrelated to religious prejudice or skin color or former political affiliations. Acceptance of reality, truth, mortality, limits, celestial powers beyond human control, etc. might make it possible for mankind to survive the outcomes of the next millennium. Mortality is not directly dependent on morality except in human imaginations. It can be directly related to populations and amount of resources, as well as natural disasters. I’ve become more content to make the best of each day. Deal with either delight or despair as it unfolds and move on has had a positive effect on my health through stress reduction.  Cindy Alden West Fryeburg

BUSINESS DIRECTORY

CONSULT OUR LISTING OF BUSINESS SERVICES AND LET AN EXPERT DO THE JOB! ACCOUNTANTS Chandel Associates Accounting, Taxes Audits, Full Service Payroll 3 Elm St., Bridgton Office 647-5711 Jones & Matthews, PA Certified Public Accountants Accounting and taxes Roosevelt Trail Prof. Bldg. Route 302, Bridgton 647-3668 cpas@maine.com

CHIMNEY LINING The Clean Sweep LLC Chimney Cleaning Service Supaflu and Stainless Steel Chimney lining and relining Dana Richardson 935-2501

CLEANING SERVICES First Impressions Cleaning Inc. Residential & Commercial Seasonal 647-5096

DENTAL SERVICES Mountain View Dentistry Dr. Leslie A. Elston Cosmetic/restorative & Family Dentistry 207-647-3628 MountainViewDentistryMaine.com

DOCKS Great Northern Docks, Inc. Sales & Service Route 302, Naples 693-3770 1-800-423-4042 www.greatnortherndocks.com

Servicemaster Prof. Carpet Cleaning – Home/Office ELECTRICIANS Fire/Smoke Damage Restoration WAM-ALARM Systems 1-800-244-7630  207-539-4452 Bosworth Electric Inc. Installation, Service, Monitoring Quality electrical contractor Burglar-Fire-Temperature Sensors TLC Home Maintenance Co. Commercial/Industrial/Residential Free Security Survey 647-2323 Professional Cleaning and Generators/Todd Bosworth/207-838-6755 Property Management bosworthelectricinc@hotmail.com APPLIANCE REPAIR Housekeeping and much more 583-4314 D. M. Electric Inc. & Sons Jones Appliance Service/Repair LLC Dennis McIver, Electrical Contractor Quality service you deserve COMPUTERS Residential/Commercial/Industrial All major brands Licensed in Maine & New Hampshire jonesappliances@aol.com 647-4432 Grammy Geek Bridgton 207-647-5012 Tech support for seniors (jr’s too) ATTORNEYS 1-1 support at your home J.P. Gallinari Electric Co. Malware & virus removal/PC repair Residential - Commercial - Industrial Shelley P. Carter, Attorney Free pick-up & delivery 207-310-0289 Aerial - Auger - Lifting Service Law Office of Shelley P. Carter, PA Bridgton 647-9435 110 Portland St., Fryeburg, ME 04037 Ms. C’s Computer Repair 935-1950 www.spcarterlaw.com Virus and spyware removal McIver Electric PC repairs 207-228-5279 “Your on time every time electricians” Michael G. Friedman, Esq., PA 27 Zion Hill Road, Bridgton 221 Portland Rd, Bridgton 132 Main St. 647-3664 Naples Computer Services P.O. Box 10, Bridgton, ME 04009 www.mciverelectric.net PC repair/upgrades – on-site service 647-8360 Virus and spy-ware removal R.W. Merrill Electrical Contractor Hastings Malia, PA Home and business networking 24 hour Emergency Service 376 Main Street – PO Box 290 Video security systems Residential & Commercial Fryeburg, ME 04037 71 Harrison Rd., Naples 207-693-3746 Harrison 583-2986 Fax 583-4882 935-2061 www.hastings-law.com David K. Moynihan CONTRACTORS BOAT REPAIR Master Electrician Jeff Hadley Builder Licensed ME & NH New England Boat Shop LLC Remodeling, Additions Bridgton 647-8016 Maintenance/Repair/Sales/Service Tile work, Wood flooring Welding/Shrinkwrap/Storage Kitchens, Drywall, Painting EXCAVATION Mark Swanton, owner – 207-693-9310 30 yrs experience 595-8421 JDN Enterprises jhadley44@gmail.com CARETAKERS Septic systems, Water lines Quality Custom Carpentry Site work, Drainage From start to finish and Caretake America 207-647-8146 from old to new Managing and Patrolling Snow’s Excavation Jeff Juneau Naples Kevin Rogers, Owner/Manager Complete site work 207-655-5903 Rte. 35, Naples  693-6000 Foundations-Septic-Lots cleared 207-647-2697 DANCE INSTRUCTION CARPENTRY

ALARMS

Robert E. Guy General Carpentry – Additions Repairs – Remodeling www.bobguy@myfairpoint.net Harrison 743-5120 239-4804 (cell) Jerry’s Carpentry & Painting Carpenter & General Contractor Log homes – decks – remodeling Fully insured – Free estimates 207-527-2552

CARPETING Thurlow’s Carpet & Home Center Carpet and Flooring Sales and Installation 21 Sandy Creek Rd, Bridgton 647-5562 800-310-5563

The Ballroom Dance - Exercise - Yoga - Aikido Main St., Harrison, Maine 207-583-6964

DENTAL SERVICES Bridgton Dental Associates Dr. Paul Cloutier Complete dental care 138 Harrison Rd, Bridgton www.bridgtondental.com 207-647-8052 Bridgton Dental Hygiene Care, PA Complete comprehensive oral hygiene care Infants – Seniors Most dental insurances, MaineCare 647-4125 bdhc@myfairpoint.net

EXERCISE/FITNESS Dee’s BodyCraft Personal Training, Aerobics, Pilates Certified – Experienced Bridgton 647-9599

FLOORING Bolsters Decorating Center Carpet – vinyl – ceramic Always free decorating consulting bolsters@megalink.net 9 Market Sq., So. Paris 207-743-9202 J & M Wood Floors Installation/Sanding/Refinishing Fully insured – Free estimates 207-337-5623

Monster snake

To The Editor: I have been telling my son-in-law for over a year now, about this nice little river in Westbrook, and that we should strap on our wetsuits, masks and snorkels and explore what cool things might be in that serene little stream. Our adventures for artifacts from Maine have taken us all over Cumberland County, Androscoggin County, and Oxford County, yet every time I suggest that we research this pretty riverside park stream, Shaun tells me, “It’s probably already been searched over the years and we probably would be wasting our time!” One of the recent times I drove through Westbrook with my wife on our way to the mall, I convinced her FOUNDATIONS Henry’s Concrete Construction Foundations, Slabs, Floors Harrison Tel. 583-4896 J. B. Concrete Bill O’Brien Poured Foundations 207-647-5940

GARAGE DOORS Naples Garage Door Co. Installation & repair services Free estimates Naples 207-693-3480

prices would increase by as much as 20 to 25%. There’s one way for a restaurant to remain competitive and lessen the impact on the customer’s wallet: eliminate tipping. Now those workers will see a significant decrease in pay. Furthermore, if this referendum were to pass, Maine will have the highest statewide minimum wage in the country. It doesn’t provide for any flexibility to address economic differences between northern and southern Maine or other parts of the country. Finally, arbitrarily increasing the minimum wage will hurt the elderly and others on fixed incomes. The dramatic rise in labor costs will force businesses to increase prices on all goods and services. Fixed incomes will not increase, but the elderly will suddenly have to pay more for everything they buy. This is the wrong way to go. Maine needs to work on increasing a real living wage with good career jobs, not artificially raising the bottom of the pay scale. No matter how high you raise it, it’s still the bottom. A better plan is to eliminate the income tax, which would put money back into Mainers paychecks. It’s the biggest wage increase they can get. Mainers deserve better than a higher cost of living. to hang out in the car while I walked to the river edge. With my nice shoes on and a little hand rake in my hand, I inched my way to the water and scratched around for a minute or two. I found several old items, including a heavy solid brass fire hose end. That reinforced my feelings that we needed to get in this river and muck around the murky bottom. I say muck around because sometimes our searching requires us to simply feel around blindly until we grab something that feels like something we would want to bring back to show in the Maine Antique Bottle and Glass Museum in Naples. We’ve been lining the shelves or the showroom there for several years. The museum is filled with cool artifacts that range from the 1750s, to the early 1900s that we have recovered from similar environments.

PAINTING CONTRACTORS Jerry’s Painting Service Quality Painting – Interior/Exterior Fully Insured – Free Estimates 207-527-2552 Webber Painting & Restoration Interior & Exterior Painting Repairs, updates, mold washing Estimates & Insured (207)831-8354

PLUMBING & HEATING

Burnell Plumbing New Construction, Remodeling Roberts Overhead Doors Well pump installation, replacement, Commercial/residential – free estimates Service 310-7270 Now offering Master Card & Visa 207-595-2311 Collins Plumbing & Heating Inc. Specializing in repair service in HEATING The Lake Region  647-4436 Bass Heating Oil Burner Service Ken Karpowich Plumbing Sales and Installations Repairs/Installation/Remodeling Waterford (207) 595-8829 Master Plumber in ME & NH Over 20 years experience 207-925-1423

INSULATION

Western Me. Insulation Inc Batts, blown or foamed Over 30 yrs experience Free estimates – fully insured 7 days a week – 693-3585

INSURANCE Ace Insurance Agency Inc. Home and Auto 43 East Main Street Denmark 1-800-452-0745

Clement Bros. Lawn and Landscape Organic lawn & garden maintenance Shoreline restoration Creative stonework, property watch Snowplowing & sanding 207-693-6646 www.clementbros.com

REAL ESTATE Chalmers Real Estate 100 Main St., Bridgton Tel. 647-3311

Oberg Insurance Auto, Home, Business, Life 132 Main St., Bridgton Tel. 647-5551, 888-400-9858

Kezar Realty Homes, Land & Vacation Rentals Lovell Village 207-925-1500 KezarRealty.com

Southern Maine Retirement Services Lakes Region Properties Medicare Supplements & Prescription Plans “At the Lights in Naples” Life and Senior Dental Insurance Waterfront, Residential 150 Main St., Bridgton 1-866-886-4340 Commercial & Land 207-693-7000 KENNELS

MASONRY D & D Masonry Chimneys/fireplaces/walks/etc. Fully insured Free estimates Darryl & Doug Hunt 693-5060

MOVING Bridgton Moving Residential & light commercial bridgtonmoving@verizon.net Glynn Ross 240 N. High St. – 647-8255 671-2556 (cell)

MUSIC LESSONS Up Scale Music Studio Piano Lessons – All Levels Composition-Theory-Transcription Evan 647-9599

OIL DEALERS Dead River Co. Range & Fuel Oil Oil Burner Service Tel. 647-2882, Bridgton

SELF STORAGE JB Self Storage Rt. 5 Lovell, Maine Monthly/yearly secure storage 207-925-3045

SEPTIC TANK PUMPING Dyer Septic Septic systems installed & repaired Site work-emergency service-ecofriendly 1-877-250-4546 207-583-4546

SURVEYORS F. Jonathan Bliss, P.L.S. Bliss & Associates Surveying, Land Planning 693 Main St, Lovell 207-925-1468 blissinc@fairpoint.net Maine Survey Consultants, Inc. Land info services – Surveys Boundary/Topographic/Flood elevation PO Box 485, Harrison, Maine Off: 583-6159 D. A. Maxfield Jr. PLS Over 10,000 surveys on file

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

Chalmers Ins. Agency 100 Main St., Bridgton Tel. 647-3311

Bridgton Veterinary Kennels Boarding Route 117, Bridgton, Me. Tel. 647-8804

Of course, our adventures are also filled with hazards that are too many to list, however, a few of them are noteworthy now that we have learned that this peaceful flow of serenity alongside the children’s park is actually home to one of our most feared reptilians, “Wessie.” Having once pulled on a snapping turtle tail in the Crooked River in Bolster’s Mills, and having once placed my hand on a passing snapper’s back in the Saco River, I can tell you that the chances of meeting up with a scary creature in Maine waters are about one in five. About every fifth dive, we manage to come face to face with a mammal that will, at the very least, take your breath away! I have often been told, “Snappers won’t bother you if you don’t bother them.” That’s still not very comforting! LETTERS, Page 5D

Oberg Agency Residential, Business, Lake Shore Property 132 Main St., Bridgton Tel. 647-5551, 888-400-9858

ROOFING JDN Enterprises Shingles – Roofs replaced New construction – Repairs Bridgton 207-647-8146

RUBBISH SERVICE

THIS SPACE CAN BE YOURS Call 647-2851 for details or e-mail bnews@roadrunner.com TRAVEL AGENCY Getaway Travel and Tours, LLC Over 20 years experience Making travel dreams come true www.getawaytravelandtours.com PO Box 402, Harrison, 207-583-8150

TREE SERVICE Q-Team & Cook’s Tree Service Removal-pruning-cabling-chipping Stump grinding-bucket work-bobcat Crane-licensed & fully insured Q Team 693-3831 or Cook’s 647-4051 Toll free 207-693-3831 www.Q-Team.com Rice Tree Service – Sheldon Rice Complete tree service – free estimates Removal-prune-chipping-stump grinding Licensed and insured Utility and Landscape Arborist Waterford ME – 583-2474 Top Notch Tree Service, LLC All aspects of tree care & removal Fully-licensed and insured Excellent references 207-357-WOOD (9663)

VETERINARY Bridgton Veterinary Hospital Small Animal Medicine & Surgery Rt. 117, Bridgton, ME 647-8804

ABC Rubbish Weekly Pick-up Container Service Tel. 743-5417

Fryeburg Veterinary Hospital Small Animal Medicine & Surgery Route 302, Fryeburg 207-935-2244

AM Enterprises LLC Trash & snow removal Serving Harrison & Bridgton ameinc@outlook.com 207-749-2850

Norway Veterinary Hospital Naples Clinic Corner Rte. 302 & Lambs Mill Rd. By Appointment 693-3135

SELF STORAGE Bridgton Storage 409 Portland Rd 28 units & 4000’ open barn Bridgton 647-3206

WINDOW TREATMENTS Bolsters Decorating Center Custom window treatments Always free decorating consulting bolsters@megalink.net 9 Market Sq., So. Paris 207-743-9202


DRIVERS — Great hometime. $1,250 + per week + monthly bonuses. Excellent benefits. Newer trucks. No touch. CDL – A 1 yr. exp. 855-842-8498. 2t27x

FOR SALE

TWO MARVEL — Refrigerated wine cabinets. 1.) Black with glass door, like-new condition. Classified advertising is sold in this Have owner’s guide book. Model space at the rate of $3.50 for 20 #61WCM9, is a steal at $850. words or less and 15¢ a word over 2.) Stainless with glass door, 20. All ads are payable in advance. HELP WANTED — Anticipated also like- new condition. Model Repeats are charged at the same and current employment oppor- #6BAR6013 $850 or B.R.O. Call rate as new ads. Ads taken over the tunities Maine School Adminis- for more info 595-6915. 1t28x phone must be called in by Monday trative District 72, Fryeburg, Me. with payment arriving by Tuesday. A Posted on our website: www. $5 FOR TATTERED — U.S. charge of $1.00 per week extra is msad72.org tf5 Flag when purchasing new U.S. made for the use of a box number if Flag 3’x5’ or larger. Maine Flag requested. A charge of $1.00 per WORK WANTED & Banner, Windham, 893-0339. classified is made if billing is nectf46 SEMI-RETIRED CONTRACTOR essary. Cards of Thanks and In Memoriams are charged at the — looking for plumbing and elec- LOAM AND FIREWOOD — same rate as classified ads. Poetry trical work in the local area. Call Please call Ron between 5 and 8 is charged by the inch. 647-8026. tf9 p.m. 595-8359. 26t18x Classified display is sold at $6.50 LAWN CARE — bark mulch inper column inch. Classified advertisOLD ICE AUGER — 50s or 60s. stalled, mowing, trees cut down, Made by Eskimo. 3HP, runs great, ers must furnish written copy. brush cutting, garage clean-outs, just tuned. $85 price goes up in The Bridgton News assumes no financial responsibility for typographilight trucking and more. Call 595- fall! Call 595-6915. 1t28x cal errors in advertisements other 8321. 6t24x than to reprint that part of any adverHAY/FIREWOOD — Seasoned ODD JOBS — By the hour, day, $260, green $225 cord. Cut, split & tisement in which a typographical week or job. Also power washing. error occurs. Advertisers will please delivered. 1/2 cord seasoned $150, Free estimates. Call 627-4649. green $125. Wendell Scribner, notify the business office promptly of 2t28x 583-4202. any errors that may occur, phone 10t24X 207-647-2851. EXCAVATING — Have hoe, will 2 NEW TWIN MATTRESS — travel. Snowplowing, removal and and box spring sets. $199 each. Discriminatory Advertising sanding. Site work, foundations White metal trundle day bed, under the Fair Housing Act dug, back filling, septic systems, $199. Bridgton 207-347-1595. The Fair Housing Act of 1968 at 42 U.S.C. 3604(c) makes it unlawful “to make, print, sand, loam, gravel. Call Brad 1t28x or publish, or cause to be made, printed, Chute, 653-4377 or 627-4560. tf3 or published any notice, statement, or RED’S FIREWOOD — Cut, advertisement, with respect to the sale, or DAY CARE split and delivered. Any amounts. rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based HAPPY HEARTS CHILD CARE Call 615-6342 for details. tf35 on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, — has openings for ages 6 weeks VEHI­CLES FOR SALE familial status or national origin, or an and up. Promotes outside play and intention to make any such preference, creative learning. Daily schedules JESUS IS LORD — new and limitation or discrimination. and routines. Home-cooked meals used auto parts. National locator. prepared daily. Full and part-time Most parts 2 days. Good used cars. positions available. CPR & First Ovide’s Used Cars, Inc., Rte. 302 Aid Certified. State-licensed. Ac- Bridg­ton, 207-647-5477. tf30 tively involved in the community. FOR RENT & Located in Naples. Flexible schedules if needed. Contact Kayla to- BRIDGTON — Beautiful cape day 207-615-5144. with open concept 1st floor, 2 large Part of the Chalmers Group 4t25x bedrooms, 1 bath, 1-car garage and large yard. Steps to beach and 100 Main Street, FOR SALE town. $1200 mo. includes water Bridgton, ME 04009 GOT WOOD — Ready to burn and heat. Security, last month & October 2016. $250 a cord. Cut, references required. No pets, no Phone: 207-647-3311 3t26 split and delivered locally. Call smoking. Call 318-4465. Fax: 207-647-3003 tf21 647-8146. OFFICE SPACE — 140 sq. ft., www.chalmers-ins.com AIR CONDITIONERS — Two private entrance, convenient Na5000 BTUs, $50 each. Call 284- ples Causeway location. Private BN 28 1t28x bath, newly painted. $300 month 0220. ATTENTION plus winter heat. Text inquiries to DOLL HOUSE — Custom-built, tf24 Classified line ads are now posted fully-furnished. Not for young 617-894-5000. on our website at NO EXTRA child. Value $1200, best offer. Call CHARGE! www.bridgton.com 583-6315. 2t27x

CHALMERS INSURANCE

REAL ESTATE

HELP WANTED

TREE WORKERS WANTED — Also mechanic wanted. Experience a plus. Must have valid driver’s license. Apply online at www.Q-Team.com/employmentapplication tf23

EXPERIENCED COOK — needed for girls summer camp. Please apply online at www.pine1t28 cliffe.com

WAIT STAFF — full-time, yearround wait staff wanted for Punkin Valley Restaurant. Apply in person, Route 302, West Bridgton. tf6

3/4 HP WATER PUMP — and storage tank. Ready for use. Good condition. Great for camp. $85 for both. Call for more info 5951t28x 6915. DRIED FIREWOOD — Dried twelve months. Selling seasoned hardwood year-round. One cord $260, half cord $150. Call 207-595-5029; 207-583-4113. westermainefirewood.com 52t22x

WOODEN DOCK SECTION — 4’x8’ dock section. Thompson Wood Sealer on it. It’s ready for use. $150. Call 595-6915 for more 1t28x info. 70 Fairview Drive Fryeburg, ME 04037 Phone 207-935-3351 Fax 207-256-8303

We are a small family facility with an excellent reputation for providing quality care while enjoying a home-like atmosphere. If you enjoy fulfilling and meaningful relationships with your residents and their families, then this may be the place for you. Currently accepting applications for:

Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) Part Time / Full time 11-7 shift

Stop by and see Deb at Fryeburg Health Care Center, 70 Fairview Drive, Fryeburg, or visit our website at fryeburghealthcare.com for an application.

2T28CD

FOR RENT

BEAUTIFUL 4-BEDROOM — Apartment on Main Street in the center of town, laundry room, dining room, large kitchen, hardwood floors, breakfast nook, closess, located above a storefront. $900 plus utilities. Ann 207-939-3747. tf27

FOR RENT

BRIDGTON — $650/month. 1-bedroom clean, bright second floor, spacious, near downtown, great neighbors. $650/month incl. heat/water. $650 deposit. Visit BridgtonApartment.com or call Paul 978-337-0135 for more info. Available July 1. tf24

CASCO — Completely furnished rooms, heat, lights & cable TV in- SEBAGO — 2-bedroom mobile cluded. $125 weekly. No pets. Call home near Nason’s Beach. Washcell, 207-595-4946. tf46 er/dryer, new rugs. Prefer 2 people. No pets and no smoking. $725 a waterford — 2-bedroom month plus utilities & security. mobile home, newly available. Call 787-2661. 3t27 Quiet neighborhood, large lot, no pets, non-smokers. Landscaping, CONDO — Slopeside at Shawplowing and lawn mowing includ- nee Peak. Beautiful, 2000 sq. ft., ed. $700 month plus utilities. First, 3-level condo. Fully-furnished and last and security required. Call nicely-decorated. Enjoy lake views 583-4011. 3t28x and cool mountain breezes this summer. Still available for August. For rates call 671-8189. 4t26

The Kane Schools

EMT Course Sept. 1 to Nov. 22, 2016 No. Conway Fire Become an EMT in less than three months in this “quick“ schedule course. The EMT is the foundation of the volunteer EMS provider and the start of an EMS career. For more Information or to register visit www.thekaneschools.com or thekaneschools@gmail.com 207 935 2608

HEAP HAULERS — Towing service. Cash paid for junk cars. Call 655-5963. tf12

LANDSCAPE/FIREWOOD — Services in the Lake Region and Oxford Hills area. Looking to pick up more lawn and firewood clients. 207-515-6956. 3t27 NEED A BREAK — Adult daycare available for your loved one. 20 years experience. Contact Eileen at 627-7149 or 890-1764. Meals, medication administration, personal care. One-on-one attention, and plenty of TLC. Overnights also available. We are located in Otisfield. 6t24x

Experienced CNC Machinist Growing company in Fryeburg is seeking an experienced CNC machinist for a lead position on 2nd Shift (Mon. – Thurs. 3:15 p.m. to 1:45 a.m.). Applicants must have experience with CNC Vertical Mills and CNC Lathes, offsetting, adjusting CNCs and programming experience. Manual mill, engine lathe, CAD/CAM experience preferred. Requires good work ethic, reliable transportation and references. Pay based on experience.

2T28CD

ATTN: DRIVERS

BUSINESS SERVICES

LOW COST SPAY/NEUTER — Cats $70-$85, dogs starting at $100. Grant funds available for qualified Oxford County residents. BRIDGTON — Single-bedroom Rozzie May Animal Alliance apartment, convenient location. www.RozzieMay.org 603-447No dogs. Off-street parking. Utili- 1373. tf18 ties included. $775 month plus WANTED 1-month security deposit, references a must. Contact Shannon 207- PLEASE CONSIDER — 461-0025 or Victor 207-650-8071. donating gently used furniture, 27t4x household items and more to Hills Animal Shelter. REAL ESTATE FOR SALE Harvest FMI, go to our website www. SOUTH BRIDGTON —5-acre harvesthills.org for details or call lot with Mt. Washington view. 935-4358, ext. 21. tf44 Driveway in, power conduit in. YARD SALES Beautiful views. $99,000. Call 207-205-6349. 14t28x GARAGE SALE — Sat., July 248 MAIN ST. — Bridgton. Com- 16, 9-1; 25 David’s View, Bridgton mercial building, 1700 sq. ft. half (Knights Hill to Kezar Hts. to basement. Currently pet groom- Wh. Mt. Way to David’s Vw.) ing business, previously coffee Furniture, lawn & yard equipment, shop/bakery. $200,000 or lease at grills, fire pit, household items, 1t28x $1200/month triple net lease. 207- clothing. 899-5052. tf24 GARAGE SALE — Saturday & Sunday, July 16 & 17, 9-3, 83 Cooks Mills Rd., Naples. 1t28x

2T28CD

HELP WANTED

Submit resume to: Dearborn Bortec, PO Box 310, Fryeburg, ME 04037, or e-mail to: ryan@dearbornbortec.com

Help Wanted

RideSource Inc. is seeking full-time and part-time drivers in the Bridgton/Fryeburg area for Non-Emergency Medical Transportation. Qualified applicants will have a clean driving record for a minimum of the last 5 years, no criminal history, and the ability to pass a drug screening test. Defensive Driving and Basic First Aid certification a plus. Training and refresher courses provided at no cost. Wages from $9 to $11 per hour on average. Drivers operate company-owned sedans and mini-vans equipped with GPS and Cellular devices. Current Volunteer Drivers seeking additional income are encouraged to apply! *Must be available to work nights and weekends with pay differential. Send Resume to:

RideSource Inc.

DIESEL MECHANIC Alvin J. Coleman & Son Inc. is actively seeking mechanics to perform repair and preventative maintenance on a fleet of heavy trucks and equipment. Position is full-time, year-round, and available today. HIRING BONUS available and is based on experience. Ask for details. Health Benefits and 401k Available.

PO Box 730 • Norway, ME 04268 • (207) 743-RIDE(7433)

TOWN OF BRIDGTON 3 CHASE STREET, SUITE 1 BRIDGTON, MAINE 04009

— Position Vacancy —

Public Safety Administrative Assistant The Town of Bridgton has a vacancy for the full-time position of Public Safety Administrative Assistant. This position supports both police and fire services and requires a variety of administrative support skills. Applications are available at www.bridgtonmaine.org or at the Bridgton Town Office, 3 Chase Street, Suite 1, Bridgton, Maine 04009. Cover letter, resume and application must be returned to Chief Richard Stillman at 8 Iredale Street, Bridgton, Maine 04009 by noon on Friday, July 22, 2016. The Town of Bridgton is an equal opportunity employer. 2T27CD

2T28CD

CLASSIFIED DISPLAY ADS Deadline: Friday 4:00 p.m. CLASSIFIED LINE ADS Deadline: Monday 5:00 p.m.

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Page 4D, The Bridgton News, July 14, 2016

Classifieds

Apply online at www.ajcoleman.com, stop in, or call Jim Drouin. Alvin J. Coleman & Son, Inc., Rt. 16, Conway, NH 603-447-5936 EOE

The UMBRELLA FACTORY SUPERMARKET Now taking applications for employment.

Must be 18 or older. All positions part-time. Apply in person at The Umbrella Factory. NAPLES SHOPPING CENTER Route 302, Naples, ME 207-693-3988 TF22CD

Mexicali Blues

is currently seeking one part-time, seasonal, sales associate for our Raymond Store. This position focuses on superior customer service and sales. Additional responsibilities include: store upkeep, helping with merchandise transfers, and general sales. Retail experience is preferred. Applications can be found on our website at: mexicaliblues.com and submitted to our retail location at: 1338 Roosevelt Trail, Raymond, Maine 207-655-3901 1T28CD

TOWN OF FRYEBURG IMMEDIATE OPENING

Full-Time Fire Chief

Chevrolet • Chrysler • Dodge • Jeep

The Town of Fryeburg is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

We Are Looking For ASE Certified Techs

Top Pay for Top Techs. Hourly and flat rate positions available. We want team players who are looking to grow and advance with a fastmoving company. No franchise experience necessary.

WE OFFER: • Clean Working Environment • Paid Vacations • Paid Training • Health and Dental Insurance

• Paid Holidays • Paid Sick Days • Bonus Pay Plans • 401k Plan And More!

If You Are Looking For A Better Future, Call Today For A Confidential Interview. Please call or send resumes to Matt Golding

TF22CD

1T28CD

603-356-5401 • mgolding@crestautoworld.com

The Town of Fryeburg is seeking a full-time Fire Chief with a broad professional background, who has demonstrated success in leading a fire department. The ideal candidate will be experienced and confident managing a workforce of firefighters; minimum of five years management-level experience in a similar sized volunteer department; demonstrate knowledge of fire operations and management procedures; instructor training; firefighter II or higher; National Incident Management System (NIMS) certification; experience with municipal budgeting, community relations, staffing, planning and working with other Town departments. Any combination of experience and/or education that provides the necessary knowledge to do the job will be considered. The Fire Chief manages the department’s operating budget and a 30-member volunteer department. The Town has a threemember Board of Selectmen and reports to the Town Manager. The Town offers a full range of benefits including health insurance and a retirement program. To apply, submit your cover letter of interest and resume to Sharon Jackson, Town Manager, 16 Lovewell Pond Road, Fryeburg, ME 04037, or e-mail to townmanager@fryeburgmaine.org by July 29, 2016.


Opinions

Classifieds YARD SALES

COMMUNITY — Flea market: Fryeburg Fairgrounds. every Sunday, 7 a.m. - 2 p.m. Antiques, collectibles, old coins, sports cards, sporting goods, general merchandise and more. Vendor spaces available call 603-4472679, 603-662-3147. 9t27

MOVING SALE — Great deals. Last chance. Patio set, small walnut tables, sewing machine, Christmas items, 5’ buffet, fireplace mantel, lighting, 6’ garden arbor, 22’ canvas porch awning, 40’ aluminum ladder. Friday & Saturday, 8-1, 568 Harrison Rd. (Rt. 35), Naples. 1t28 YARD SALE — Fri., 7/22, 9-2 & Sat., 7/23, 8-2. Antiques, books, crafts, dressers, Mickey Mouse games, vintage chairs, cribs, new clothes, craft supplies, furniture, China, records, lamps, two buildings, tent & yard full of goodies. At old Stevens Brook Elementary off Depot Street, large tent. 1t28x

YARD SALE — 334 Kansas Rd., Bridgton, Saturday 7/16 and Sunday 7/17 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. No early birds please. 1t28

July 14, 2016, The Bridgton News, Page 5D

YARD SALES

2016 Strawberry Breakfast

BRIDGTON, BARN/TAG SALE — Friday, Saturday & Sunday 9-4. No early admittance. Currently a vendor at Main Street Mercantile, across from Renys. Combination flea market antique shop, but much better pricing. Antiques, vintage, hand-painted furniture, home décor, linens, quilts, oil paintings, a bit of everything. The barn has been completely reworked. Dealers you will be able to purchase and resell. Come experience the changes. 75 Highland Road, next to Noble House Inn. Drive up long driveway. See pictures on Craigslist & Facebook at Mainely Painted Things. Please like the page. 1t28x

Estate/Garage

SALE

Sunday, July 17th 8 a.m. – 4 p.m.

JDN ENTERPRISES • General Contracting • Water Lines • Excavation • Septic Systems • Bush Hogging • Retaining Walls • Firewood “ONE CALL DOES IT ALL” 207-647-8146

1T28CDX

236 Slab City Rd., Lovell Tools, Household Items EVERYTHING MUST GO

JACK KOSTKA “JK” jdnenterprisesllc@yahoo.com

TFCD23

HOUSE PURGED ATTIC THRU GARAGE! Furniture, tools, kitchen, stoves (gas, apt., glass), TV, treadmill, Basketball hoop, movies Snowmobile helmets, ACs, clothing name brand & more! 135 Schrader Dr. Denmark (off Mountain Rd.)

1T28CDX

July 15th &16th 9 – 4 p.m.

A Little Bit of This, A Little Bit of That EOWE26

Buying and Offering US Coins Gold & Silver Bullion TFCD

TF26CD

142 Main Street Conway, NH 603-447-3611 Metal Detectors

$210/cord green ~ cut/split/del. • Tree Removal • Logging • Fully Insured

TF28CD

• Lots cleared • Buying Standing Timber • Campfire wood

Turnkey restaurant with lounge for lease.

Bob Mitchell

(H) 647-3584 ~ (C) 583-7438 TF25CD

120 seats with function room and dance floor. Delivery and office space. Lovely water and mountain views. Located at 656 North High Street, Bridgton.

DENMARK SELF-STORAGE

Contact 647-4505.

3T26CD

207-452-2157

TF51CD

10' x 10' Unit $50.00 per month

TF4CD

Residential & Commercial STATION ELEVATION 560 FT.

Date 07/04 07/05 07/06 07/07 07/08 07/09 07/10 07/11

High Low 7AM 77° 54° 56° 83° 56° 56° 82° 56° 60° 87° 60° 61° 64° 58° 58° 66° 56° 56° 58° 55° 55° 60° 55° 58°

Precip ------------.12" .09" .44" .09"

• Recycled Asphalt • Seal Coating & Striping • Grading & Gravel Camp Roads

Saccuzzo Asphalt

JAMES SACCUZZO Owner Operator

10% OFF for all Seniors Serving The Lake Region Proudly

TF23CD

Day Mon. Tues. Wed. Thurs. Fri. Sat. Sun. Mon.

• Driveways • Parking Lots • Roadways

spots and leave the murky mucky spots for those willing to risk a limb or two in the pursuit of a higher calling. Walter Bannon (Continued from Page 3D) Bridgton Last fall, while exploring the Little Androscoggin River in Mechanic Falls, Shaun bolted out into the water ahead of me. I pulled my fins To The Editor: on too quickly and broke a Hello again, Tubbies and strap. I didn’t want to get in Tubbettes. I’m back! You with only one fin on and risk may not have missed me, but swimming in circles if for I have not forgotten you. It’s any reason I needed to swim been a long time, so let’s fast but when Shaun held up recap our story (“Apple a an antique bottle he had just day,” Jan. 8, 2015). discovered, I felt compelled I was a TUBBY; more to jump in. Almost as soon than once I struggled through as I pulled even with him, the “Slough of Despond.” My he was swimming as fast as latest episode, which I expect he could back to the shore to be my last, was a few screaming something about a years ago. I was sick and gargantuous, ugly, prehistoric tired of being sick and tired. snapper in the river. I tried to My weight was at the boilkick hard with my one fin but ing point of water, and I had realized I couldn’t without a BMI (body mass index), turning so I just prayed that aka “body misery index,” I wouldn’t get eaten by this of 28, in the middle of the carnivorous crustacean he’d “overweight” range: 25 to seen as I gently kicked my 30. Above 30 BMI, you are fin, eventually meeting up obese. with him at the shore.  I recently reached a longShaun’s eyes were wide term goal of 170 pounds, open and he fumbled for the which works out to a BMI of words to describe the huge 22.5, in the “normal” range of creature he had just swum 18.5 to 24.9. Why do it, and around. “It’s the size of you how to do it? truck’s hood” he blurted out. Why? Simple: a bet“It’s bigger than you or I, a ter, more productive, more monster.”  “This guy had to engaged, and occasionally be over one hundred years old more rewarding life. and could take your fingers How? My regimen: count off with one bite,” he said.   calories; walk daily; go to I have seen ugly snap- the gym five days a week pers in the water, some with (stretching, weights, aerobic); bumps on their noses and tails weight yourself every mornlike an old dinosaur’s back ing; prepare all your own but I have never seen one as meals; develop a disdain for big as my truck hood. I have junk food; don’t eat after 9 read that there are alligator p.m. snappers but that they don’t Simple? Hardly. It takes live in Maine. According to time; I have been at it — off Wikipedia, they only come and on — for 35 years. You as far north as the Carolinas. can do it. Start with an aeroI am not sure this is accurate bic exercise; for people in my anymore. Somebody needs age range, that means getting to update Wiki. Now, I am your heart (pulse) rate up to curious if boa constrictors at least 75-90 (Fat Burning or other dangerous reptiles Zone) per minute. have migrated as far north as A good place to start Westbrook! I just read that an would be one of the classes alligator was recently found conducted by Gary Colello in a Massachusetts river. of the Bridgton Recreation I don’t wish to scare any Department. of our young swimmers from Bob Casimiro getting out into our numerous Bridgton beautiful lakes and ponds, but after hearing about our own special Loch Ness monster, I hope parents will keep their  To The Editor: kids in safe, well-guarded, A big festive “thank you” often-used, public swimming LETTERS, Page 6D

Letters

Burning fat

NAF thanks


Obituaries

Community events

Page 6D, The Bridgton News, July 14, 2016

Calendar

Nicholas J. Fitzpatrick LEWISTON — Nicholas John Fitzpatrick, 26, of Raymond, went to be at peace this past week. Nicholas was born in Portland on March 30, 1990, the son of John Fitzpatrick (deceased) and Gina Rice. Nicholas was a 2008 graduate of GrayNew Gloucester High School. He loved and enjoyed any opportunity to spend time with his family whether near or far. He enjoyed the outdoors; he especially loved fishing with his cousin, Tino and brother, Jordan. Nicholas was a kind soul who was happy with the simple things in life: a good pizza, a beer, a good road trip with a friend, or just kicking back with his niece, Evelyn Massey or nephew, Jacob Austin. He is survived by his mother and stepfather, Gina and Charles Rice Jr. of Raymond; his grandfather, James Tarsetti; his two sisters, Natasha Fitzpatrick of Gray and Emily Rice of Windham; as well as his brother, Jordan Rice of Gray. He also has many aunts, uncles, nieces and nephews, and an endless list of friends, whom he loved with all of his heart. Nicholas was predeceased by his grandmother, Antonia Tarsetti. A private service will be held at a later date. Arrangements by Jones, Rich & Hutchins Funeral Home, 199 Woodford Street, Portland.

BRIDGTON Thur., Jul. 14 — Rotary Club, Community Center, 7:15 a.m. Thur., Jul. 14 — Hospice of Southern Maine Community Forum: End of Life Conversations: What to say and do, 5:30 p.m., Bridgton Hospital. Thur., Jul. 14 — Bingo, St. Joseph Church, So. High Street, doors open 5:30 p.m. Early birds at 6:30. Regular play at 7 p.m. Sat., Jul. 16 — Walk with the Docs, 9 a.m., Pondicherry Park. Mon., Jul. 18 — Girl Scouts, Community Center 5:30 p.m. Mon., Jul. 18 — Foster Care Support Group, Community Center, 6:30 p.m. Wed., Jul. 20 — BCC board meeting, Community Center, 6 p.m. Wed., Jul. 20 — Bridgton Community Band Concert, Gazebo behind Rite Aid, 7:30 p.m. Thur., Jul. 21 — Rotary Club, Community Center, 7:15 a.m. Thur., Jul. 21 — Bingo, St. Joseph Church, So. High Street, doors open 5:30 p.m. Early birds at 6:30. Regular play at 7 p.m. Sat., Jul. 23 — Used book sale by Friends of the Library, 9 2, weather permitting. Sat., Jul. 23 — Games for Christ, 6 p.m., Community Center. Tue., Jul. 26 — St. Joseph Food Pantry, 225 So. High St, 11 a.m. Wed., Jul. 27 — Bookies Book Group, 3 p.m., library. Wed., Jul. 27 — Bridgton Community Band Concert, Gazebo behind Rite Aid, 7:30 p.m. CASCO Sat.,Jul. 23 — Annual Meeting Pleasant Lake/Parker Pond Association, 9:30 a.m., Community Center. All welcome. DENMARK Fri., Jul. 15 — Difficult hike – North Bald Face (3,610 ft), Evans Notch, NH.  Meet at the Denmark Congregational Church at 8 a.m. FMI: 756-2247 HARRISON Thur., Jul. 14 — Annual meeting of the corporation, Harrison Village Library. Public welcome.

Joseph R. Lavoie BLANDFORD, MASS. — Joseph “Joe” R. Lavoie, 35, of Ludlow, Mass., passed away Thursday, June 9, 2016 in Blandford, Mass. folllowing an automobile accident. Joe was born on June 12, 1980 in Attleboro, Mass. to Regina Issler Lavoie and Roland Lavoie. Joe was a marine mechanic for several years. He enjoyed riding dirt bikes, working on boats, the outdoors and working on cars. Joe attended SAD 61 schools and he later earned his GED at the Bridgton Learning Center in Bridgton. Joe leaves behind his two children, Kyla and Joseph “Joey” Lavoie of Bridgton; his mother, Regina Lavoie and stepfather Buster Arris of Bridgton; two sisters and three brothers; many nieces and nephews; and his grandmother, Neva Nolin of Norton, Mass. The family will hold a celebration of life at the Bridgton Town Hall, 26 North High Street, Bridgton, on Saturday, July 23, 2016 from 12 to 5 p.m. In lieu of flowers, the family asks people to bring copies of pictures they have of Joe for his child to build a memory book or send copies of pictures with a message to Kyla and Joey Lavoie, 26 Burnham Road, Bridgton, ME 04009.

Jaye M. Fabino METHUEN, MASS. — Jaye Michelle (Pitman) Fabino, 48, of Methuen, Mass., born Jan. 19, 1968, passed away peacefully on Monday, July 4, 2016, at Massachusetts General Hospital. She is survived by her husband Rob Fabino and her daughter Eva Bella Fabino; mother Ruth Pitman of North Fryeburg; brother Timothy Pitman of Lewiston and his children, Kolby and Tanner; as well as her niece Morgan Wright and her son Mason. She was predeceased by her father Jay Pitman (2004), and her sister Kimberly Pitman (2005). There will be a memorial service in her memory Saturday, July 16 at 3 p.m., at The Kingdom Hall of Jehovah Witnesses, located at 1320 North High Street, Bridgton. Her official obituary can be found online at eagletribune.com No flowers please, per Jaye’s request.

www.warrensfloristmaine.com

Your one-stop flower shop Floral Arrangements • Greeting Cards Garden Decor • Gift Baskets

…from a single stem to a whole bouquet, flowers say it best! TF1

The Bridgton News

OBITUARY POLICY

The News will run, at no charge, obituaries that have local connections. Photographs may be submitted at no additional charge, and whenever possible, they should be emailed as a jpg file. The News will include: Individuals – predeceased by parents, siblings, spouse, children; survived by spouse, significant other, children, parents. Names of spouses of surviving relatives will not be included. In most cases names of the grandchildren, nephews and nieces will not be listed, just the number of each. However, if the deceased individual’s only connection to the area is a nephew, niece or grandchild, that person will be identified. The News reserves the right to edit all free obituaries. Requests for more complete obituaries will be accepted as paid advertisements. Contact: The Bridgton News, P.O. Box 244, 118 Main Street, Bridgton, ME 04009. Tel. 207-647-2851, fax 207-647-5001, e-mail: bnews@roadrunner.com

Support (Continued from Page 1D) There are standard forms to fill out and few inquiries about lifestyle. Either you qualify for government aid or you don’t. That aid increased steadily and still is. It used to be that most people were careful to save up for emergencies, but if they should save up a given amount now, it would disqualify them from receiving government benefits unless they could hide it. In 2014, America reached the point where more than half of us received some form of government benefit. How long can that trend continue? Not long when we realize we’ll be about $20 trillion in debt by the time President Obama leaves office. That’s double what it was when he was first inaugurated in 2009 and most of that money has gone to pay for social programs we clearly cannot afford. It’s unsustainable. More and more Americans are living beyond their means, but so is the government upon which they depend. It’s not enough anymore to ask what is happening to us. Given the trends outlined above, we must ask what will happen if we continue living this way. Tom McLaughlin of Lovell is a retired middle school U.S. History teacher.

Thur., Jul. 14 — Youth Night, ages 10 to 15, 6-9 p.m. Enjoy a variety of games, fun, music, and socializing. Parent signature required at the Caswell Conservancy Center, 42 Main Street. Fri., Jul. 15 — Coffee Call. 8-10 a.m. Open to all, enjoy coffee and a donut. Donations accepted at Caswell Conservancy Center. Wed., Jul. 20 — Historical Society Open House, Haskell Hill Rd., 1-4 p.m. FMI: 583-2213. Fri., Jul. 22 — Coffee Call. 8-10 a.m. Open to all, enjoy coffee and a donut. Donations accepted at Caswell Conservancy Center. Wed., Jul. 27 — Historical Society Open House, Haskell Hill Rd., 1-4 p.m. FMI: 583-2213. FRYEBURG Sat., Jul. 16 — Mid-Summer Party Celebrate Reading, 1011:30 a.m., library. Sat., Jul. 23 — Old Pequawket Day, events all day. LOVELL Fri., Jul. 15 — Harvest Gold Artist Reception and Open House, 3-6 p.m. Sat., Jul. 16 — Library Community yard sale, 9 a.m.1 p.m. Sat. Jul. 16 — Thrift Shop, Lovell United Church of Christ, Rte. 5, open 10 a.m.-noon. Mon., Jul. 18 — Thrift Shop, Lovell United Church of Christ, Rte. 5, open 10 a.m.-noon. Tue., Jul. 19 — Greater Lovell Land Trust and Charlotte Hobbs Memorial Library host Connect To Our Natural World Through Poems And Short Prose: A Writing Workshop with Judy Steinbergh at Hewnoaks Artist Colony, 10 a.m.-noon,. Register at the library. Wed., Jul. 20 — Thrift Shop, Lovell United Church of Christ, Rte. 5, open 10 a.m.-noon. Wed., Jul. 20 — GLLT and Sweden Historical Society host talk: Reading the Rural Landscape with Dr. Robert Sanford, Charlotte Hobbs Memorial Library, Main Street. 7:30 p.m. Admission free. Thur., Jul. 21 ­ — GLLT & Sweden Historical Society walk, Reading the Rural Landscape: An exploration of foundations, stonewalls and mystery stones accompanied by Dr. Sanford, Trailhead: Flat Hill parking lot, Heald Pond Road. 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Admission free. Sat., Jul. 23 — Thrift Shop, Lovell United Church of Christ, Rte. 5, open 10 a.m.-noon. Mon., Jul. 25 — Thrift Shop, Lovell United Church of Christ, Rte. 5, open 10 a.m.-noon. Wed., Jul. 27 — Thrift Shop , Lovell United Church of Christ, Rte. 5, open 10 a.m.-noon. NAPLES Tue., Jul. 19 — Build Fairy Furniture, 6 p.m., library. Wed., Jul. 20 — “Let’s Talk About It” book discussion, 2 p.m., library. Wed., Jul. 20 — Talk and book signing, Kevin Hancock, Not For Sale: Finding Center in the Land of Crazy Horse, 6 p.m., library. Thur., Jul. 21 — Mad Science “Olympic Madness,” 6 p.m., library. Thur., Jul. 21 — Naples Public Library annual public meeting, 7:15 p.m, library. Tue., Jul. 26 — Family Movie, 4 p.m., library. RAYMOND Fri.-Sat., Jul 15-16 — Art Sale, 4 to 8:30 p.m., Hawthorne House. SEBAGO Sat., Jul. 16 — Sebago Days Book and Bake Sale, 8 a.m. - 1 p.m., library. WATERFORD Thur., Jul. 14 — Summer Reading Program, free to all children. 11 a.m. Fri., Jul. 15 — Coffee Cafe, 9 a.m., library. Mon., Jul. 18 — Knitting, 2 p.m., library. Wed., Jul. 20 — Minecraft, 6 p.m., library. Thur., Jul. 21 — Summer Reading Program, free to all children. 11 a.m. Fri., Jul. 22 — Coffee Cafe, 9 a.m., library. Mon., Jul. 24 — Knitting, 2 p.m., library.

Letters

Strawberry Season Mom with her wild strawberries and milk and sugar. Dad with picking 100 more pounds for me. Yvonne wth her strawberry pies and I have not “forgotten” the cornstarch.

All of us miss you very much. 10-9-1944 to 5-22-2015 — Yvonne Nason 8-26-1917 to 4-9-2006 — Guy Tenney 4-4-1926 to 2-10-1995 — Muriel Tenney — Love, Yvette & Family 1T28x

(Continued from Page 5D) to everyone who made the 2016 Norway Arts Festival such a huge success, despite the rain! Thanks to Scott Vlaun for his lecture about Bernard Langlais and to the Norway Memorial Library for hosting. Thanks to performers Brad Hooper, Rhythm Sparrow, Kristen Short, Martin Dockery, Katey Branch and Ruby DayBranch, Country Bruce, the 195th Army Band of the Maine Army National Guard and Hio Ridge Dance. Thanks to Scott Berk and Katey Branch for loaning sound equipment. Thanks to the artists who provided interactive demonstrations: Michael Shaunessey, Diana Arcadipone, Don Best, Lisa Moore, Mike Everett and

Wed., Jul. 27 — Book Discussion, 11 a.m. Shotgun Lovesongs and The Boston Girl. library. Wed., Jul. 27 — Minecraft, 6 p.m., library. Wed., Jul. 27 — Adult Coloring, 7 p.m., library. AREA EVENTS Thur.-Sat., Jul. 14-30 — M & D Playhouse, Last Gas by John Cariani, $20 in advance, $25 at the door, 7 p.m. FMI: 603733-5275. Sat., Jul. 16 — Free community breakfast, Norway Grange Hall, Whitman Street, Norway, 8-9 a.m., FMI: 461-3093. Sun., Jul. 17 — Finnish American Heritage Society Open House, 2-4 p.m., 8 Maple St., West Paris. Mon., Jul. 18 — Let There be Light, A History of Lanterns, Windham Historical Society, 7:30 p.m. $5 donation suggested. 8921433/892-1306. Wed., Jul. 20 — Into the Woods to Explore Deer Yards w/ Chuck Hulsey, biologist. 7 p.m., Albany Town House, Albany. Thur., Jul. 21 — Monthly Book Discussion Group title, Songs of Willow Frost by Jamie Ford, 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Soldiers Memorial Library, Hiram. Sat.,Jul. 23 — Free community breakfast, Norway Grange Hall, Whitman Street, Norway, 8-9 a.m., FMI: 461-3093. Sun., Jul. 24 — Open Farm Day, Shaker Village, New Gloucester, noon to 4:30 p.m. Sun., Jul. 24 — Finnish American Heritage Society Open House, 2-4 p.m., 8 Maple St., West Paris. ONGOING WEEKLY DAILY Alcoholics Anonymous, 9 a.m., Clyde Bailey Center, 1311 Roosevelt Trl., Raymond. Alcoholics Anonymous, noon to 1 p.m., St. Peter’s Episcopal Church, Sweden Rd., Bridgton. O/D MONDAYS Jumpin’ Janes Senior Fitness, 9-10 a.m. Mon., Wed., Fri., Bridgton Town Hall, No. High St. FMI: 647-2402. Taoist Tai Chi, 9 a.m., Bridgton Community Center. Walking Warriors, 7 a.m. Mon., Wed., Fri., meet at church across from Crystal Lake Park, Rte. 117, Harrison. Tai Chi in the Park, for beginners, free, 9 a.m., Denmark Bicentennial Park, thru Aug. 22. If rain, use Municipal Bldg. Sebago Food Pantry, 9-10:30 a.m. (3:30-5:30 p.m. 2nd Mon.) Nazarene Church, Rte. 114. FMI: 274-1569. Casco/Naples Senior Meal Site, noon, Casco Fire Station. Card games before, bingo after. FMI: 627-4044. Bridge, 1 p.m., Bradley St., Fryeburg. Runs year-round. Cribbage, 2 p.m., Bridgton Community Center. Celebrate Recovery, Christbased 12-step recovery program, 6-8 p.m., Lake Region Vineyard Church, 402 Main St., Bridgton. FMI: 647-5439. Coed Adult Basketball, 6 to 7:45 p.m., Harrison Elementary School. FMI: 583-2241. Bridgton Community Band, 7 p.m., Stevens Brook Elem. School. FMI: info@bridgtoncommunityband.org Narcotics Anonymous, 7 p.m. Bridgton Community Center, 15 Depot St. ODLH Narcotics Anonymous, 7 p.m., Clyde Bailey Center, 1311 Roosevelt Trl., Raymond. TUESDAYS Jeanette’s Free Clothing Closet, 9 to 11:30 a.m., First Congregational Church, Bridgton. Chickadee Quilters, 9:30 a.m., Bridgton Community Center. Tai Chi Maine, Set Practice, 10 a.m., Bridgton Town Hall, No. High St. Naples Food Pantry, 10 to 11:30 a.m., United Methodist Church, Village Green. FMI: 595-2754. Bridgton Food Pantry, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Methodist Church, 98 Main St., Bridgton. FMI: 6474476. Bridge, 12:15 p.m., Bridgton

Community Center. Cards/Board games, noon to 2:30 p.m., Harrison Fire Station Community Room. Pokemon Club, 3 p.m., Bridgton Community Center. Taoist Tai Chi, 6:30 p.m., Bridgton Community Center. Harrison Food Pantry, 6 to 7:30 p.m., Adventist Church, 2 Naples Rd. FMI: 583-6178. Adult Volleyball, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., Brownfield Community Center. Al-Anon Bridgton, 7 p.m. Newcomers Meeting, 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. Open Meeting, St. Joseph Catholic Church. AA Step Mtgs., 7 p.m., Clyde Bailey Center, 1311 Roosevelt Trl., Raymond. WEDNESDAYS Jumpin’ Janes Senior Fitness, 9-10 a.m. Mon., Wed., Fri., Bridgton Town Hall, No. High St. FMI: 647-2402. Crafty Critters, 9 a.m. to noon, Harrison Fire Station Community Room. FMI: 5832241. Gathering Place Support Group, noon, Bridgton Community Center. Senior Lunch, noon, Bridgton Community Center. Ping Pong, 1-3 p.m., Harrison Fire Station Commnity Room, Harrison. Over 40 Pickleball, 5:30 to 7 p.m., Harrison Elementary School. FMI: 583-2241. Bible Study, 6 p.m., Bridgton Community Center. Pickleball, 7 p.m., Casco Community Center Gym. FMI: 627-4187. Alcoholics Anonymous, 7 to 8 p.m., Clyde Bailey Center, 1311 Roosevelt Trl., Raymond. THURSDAYS AA Step-Meeting, 9 a.m., Step Sisters 6 p.m., Clyde Bailey Center, 1311 Roosevelt Trl., Raymond. Tai Chi Maine, set practice, 10 a.m., Town Hall, North High St., Bridgton. The Academy Collects, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Pace Galleries of Art, Leura Hill Eastman Performing Arts Center, Fryeburg Academy. Casco/Naples Senior Meal Site, noon, Casco Fire Station. Card games before, bingo after. FMI: 627-4044. Gathering Place Support Group, noon, Bridgton Community Center. Pinochle, 1 p.m., Bridgton Community Center. Free Community Kettle Supper, 5 p.m., Bridgton Community Center. Ping Pong, 5 to 8 p.m., Town Hall, Bridgton. All equipment provided free. 7 tables. Al-Anon, 7 to 8 p.m., Open Meeting, Naples Town Hall. NA Women’s Meeting, 7 to 8 p.m., St. Peter’s Episcopal Church, Sweden Rd., Bridgton. FRIDAYS Jumpin’ Janes Senior Fitness, 9-10 a.m. Mon., Wed., Fri., Bridgton Town Hall, No. High St. FMI: 647-2402. Taoist Tai Chi, 9 a.m., Bridgton Community Center. Farmers’ Market, 9 a.m. to noon, Charlotte Hobbs Library, Lovell. Harrison Farmers’ Market, 1-5 p.m., Rte. 117, just outside of Village. Free Beginners Spanish Class, 3 to 4 p.m. downstairs, Bridgton Library. Over 40 Men’s Basketball, 4 p.m., Brownfield/Denmark School. SATURDAYS Bridgton Farmers Market, 8-1, Community Center back side of parking lot. Sebago Clothes Closet, 9 a.m. to noon, Warming Hut, Rte. 114, Sebago, next to Nazarene Church. AA Meeting, O/BB/D/A/L, 7 to 8 p.m., Lovell Church of Christ, 1174 Main St., Lovell. Al-Anon, 7 to 8 p.m., Lovell Church of Christ, 1174 Main St., Lovell. AA Beginner’s & Group Mtgs., 7 to 8 p.m., Clyde Bailey Center, 1311 Roosevelt Trl., Raymond. SUNDAYS Alcoholics Anonymous, 6:30 p.m., Harrison Congregational Church.

Karrin Parkinson.  Thanks to the businesses and organizations who offered activities: WMAG, The Advertiser-Democrat, Fare Share Co-op, the Dragon’s Lair, Books N Things, Café Nomad and Fiber and Vine. We welcome more of this kind of engagement next year! Thanks to the poets who shared their words: Martha Stone, John Governale, Mary Hargreaves, Rockie Graham, Becky Cheston, Eric Dibner, Nadia Hermos, Mark Swiedom, Nancy Schaefer and Michalene Hague. Thanks to all the participating artists, vendors, and nonprofits who fill our Main Street with art, life and opportunities. Thanks to our awesome judges Mary Brooking, Jay York and Caren Michel, who all spent their stipend on our streets. Most of all, thanks to the many volunteers who

gave of their time and effort to make the Festival run smoothly: Andrea Burns, Barbara Traficonte, Marge Medd, Brenda Melhus, Brendan Schauffler, Lisa Moore, Lindsey Montana, Lee Margolin, Carol Huotari, Tally DeCato, Cyndy and Forrest Tinsley, Irina Kahn, Francois Fetchko, Rochelle Draper, Paula Everett and Tami Prescott. Thanks to our sponsors: Norway Downtown, Western Maine Art Group, Norway Savings Bank and Western Maine Health. Finally, thank you to the Town of Norway and its extraordinary Police Department. See you all on July 7-8, 2017, for the 50th Sidewalk Art Show and the 15th expanded Norway Arts Festival. Let’s hope it is even more festive and maybe a little drier. Judy Schneider 2016 NAF Director


Opinions

July 14, 2016, The Bridgton News, Page 7D

Laws, rules and Hillary

(Continued from Page 1D) was discovered he had shared secret papers with his lover. Had to make do with a job on Wall Street — which has plenty of secrets but none classified. Then, there was the former senior staffer in the White House, who tried to clean up his record by taking some classified documents out of the Archives hidden in his socks. A hefty fine was his punishment. It’s clear from the record that the government can be quite stern when it comes to protecting documents labeled “Confidential,” “Top Secret,” or other stamps too sensitive to mention. Tens of thousands of documents and electronic signals, maybe more, are christened with a classification each day. If a bit of information is deemed important for security reasons, it may be classified by a qualified officer (not a rare breed). If that official wants to avoid the hassle, he can simply leave the stamp off the paper. That is apparently what happened with some of the otherwise sensitive e-mails sent to Hillary. She says she didn’t see a stamp; she was therefore innocent of a security violation. Leave that bit of trickery aside. Why did she want a private server anyway? Well, that would give her full control over any files that enemies may want to pry open under the Freedom of Information Act. There can be no embarrassing files if the delete button has been pushed. Ordinary State Department officers don’t have that authority. A secret file is a secret file for eternity — unless it is declassified by a special board or a senior official wants to write memoirs and include a few juicy secrets. One final observation before getting to my main point: Far, far too much information is classified by government agencies. It is unnecessary and it is expensive to tend to. A lot of junk gets mixed in with genuine secrets, weakening the fabric of protection that is needed. Where I fault Hillary is for putting herself above the rules established for protecting secrets. Security professionals — people who know the dangers and the measures needed to defend against them — devised the structure. Everyone involved with classified material is instructed on the rules — if not themselves personally, then a responsible assistant.  No one, of whatever rank or station, can simply abrogate those rules for personal or other reasons. To do so is to be guided by an arrogance that ill becomes one seeking higher office – whether appointed or elected. Maybe, my Democrat friends might argue, a mistake was made and will not be repeated. We all know there is a spectrum

Searles Excavation Inc. EXCAVATION CONTRACTOR

(Continued from Page 1D) a big deal to me, and she promised she would align her snow tires in the back seat so she could still see through the holes. Shortly after lunch on the Great Day, the text messages began with an enthusiastic “Leaving Buffalo!” (This, by the way, would be a much better city motto than their inane 2011 creation: “Buffalo. For Real.” At least Mandy’s version has an exclamation point.) Thence, I followed my daughter vicariously for several pleasant hours past a host of great American cities: Utica, Schenectady, Springfield, Worcester; and then I finally heard the cheery news that she was successfully north of Portsmouth, TIGERS TOUGH OUT RAIN — There was some drizzle which might as well be home, if you define home as: “I could during the weekend, but these tiger lilies growing in walk there if I had to.” I was so excited. Downtown Norway did not seem to mind the rain. Late that night, I found “Fryeburg!” flashing across my (De Busk Photo) phone just after I got out of the shower, and realizing that was 10 minutes ago, I ran out of the house and into the middle of the street and stood there in the rain looking south with my arms BUILDING 40+ YEARS IN THE LAKES REGION AREA outstretched, wearing just a towel, a bathrobe, and rubber barn boots. Several minutes passed and then I saw the right headlights through the fog and heard the familiar downshifting, and then there was my multi-degreed daughter, back in my arms again where she belonged. Later that night, I wondered, as I so often do as I parse my odd days in my own rearview mirror, what those other drivers must have thought as they drove past me in the fog. “The police TF45 blotter or the opinion page,” I said to myself. “Either way, I’ll PHIL DOUGLASS (207) 647-3732 JEFF DOUGLASS 207-595-8968 end up in the paper.”

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of mistakes: Mistakes that are products of inattention or “carelessness.” Mistakes that are not inadvertent, but made trying to slip by or short cut. And there are “mistakes” made because the person responsible is governed by a different regimen, believing that he/she knows better and is superior to the established rules. There is no excuse if overriding rules is simply for the personal benefit of a person with the power to make change. But, wait. There’s the cover-up of incomplete truths. Coverup — always worse that the original sin in a political scandal. Henry Precht is a retired Foreign Service Officer. 

8T23

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“I’m a sweet girl that came to the shelter s a stray. I’m very nervous with all the noise and people in and out, but I calm down when you start to pat me. I love to be patted and have my belly rubbed. I like to pretend I’m a rock and not move, but s soon as you start patting me I can’t resist walking around and rubbing on you. I give the most soothing and gentle headbutts that just make your day a million times better! It’s really a life-changer! They recently found out I have high blood pressure so I do need medication each day. I’m looking for a home with someone that will give me the attention and love I deserve.” Visit our website to see other cats and dogs waiting for a new home! www.harvest-hills.org

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2016 Chickadee Quilt Show

Page 8D, The Bridgton News, July 14, 2016


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