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Glass Pavilion SANAA Toledo, Ohio Bryce Beckwith Nick Coates Brian Kato


Project Data, Chronology, and Conclusions Project Life Safety and Accessibility Material Palette and Tool Sets Project Design, Development, and Construction System and Detail (Wall section/enclosure) Site Documentation


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Glass panels designed by UAD Group in New York, manufactured in Germany by Pilkington, sent to China where they were 3-D heat curved by SanXin

February 2000 - Project Approved

April 2004 - Ground-breaking

January 2001 - SANAA Selected

SANAA was selected as architect for the Glass Pavilion because of their experience with producing artistically outstanding buildings that house work of art. In addition, they were chosen because of their successful use of glass as a major architectural feature and its ability to blend buildings into their context.

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August 2006 - Opening

December 2005 - 1st Glass Panels Installed


CIRCULATION EGRESS + ACCESS THERMAL COMFORT FIRE PROTECTION


A. Circulation space throughout the building B. Programmatic diagram

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The material qualities of the circulation spaces are synonymous with that of the exhibition rooms diminishing the difference in characteristics between circulation and exhibition. Glass rooms and halls allows for visibility across the pavilion but also encloses a space with a degree of reflectivity.

CIRCULATION


VE DA

O WO RK PA

A. Means of entering and exiting the building B. Front Entrance off Parkwood Avenue C. Emergency egress stair from basement D. Service drive way E. Back entrance to exterior courtyard

. SERVICE DRIVE WAY

EMERGENCY EXIT

MONROE ST. MUSEUM MAIN BUILDING 3

Four entrances to the upper floor of the museum, three of which are accessible by visitors; all placed in the cardinal directions. Entrance off of Parkwood Avenue is more of a formal entrance to visitors, entrance on Monroe Street faces the main facility (across the street) and is intended to be an entrance for guests circulating from the main building to the glass pavilion.

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EGRESS + ACCESS


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Air intake vents, radiant heating panels, and air conditioning kiosks are the three thermal comfort elements that manipulate to the circulation and temperature of air in each capsule. The physical plant is located in a nearby building, not among the facility itself in order to try to maintain the quietness of the space.

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CAVITY TEMPERATURE CAVITY TEMPERATURE CAVITY TEMPERATURE

VAPOR BARRIER

CAVITY TEMPERATURE CAVITY TEMPERATURE CAVITY TEMPERATURE

RIGID INSULATION

CAVITY TEMPERATURE CAVITY TEMPERATURE CAVITY TEMPERATURE CAVITY TEMPERATURE

A. Air intake vent in floor slab B. Section detail of radiant heating systems and insulation C. Thermal climate monitor D. Air conditioning kiosk E. Cavity air circulation F. Room air circulation G. Thermal map of cavity in comparison to room

CAVITY TEMPERATURE CAVITY TEMPERATURE CAVITY TEMPERATURE

CAVITY TEMPERATURE CAVITY TEMPERATURE CAVITY TEMPERATURE CAVITY TEMPERATURE

INTERIOR CAVITY

CAVITY TEMPERATURE CAVITY TEMPERATURE CAVITY TEMPERATURE CAVITY TEMPERATURE

LOW IRON LAMINATED INSULATED GLASS 3/8” + 3/8”

INTERIOR ROOM

THERMAL COMFORT


A. Structural column placement in plan B. Pyramid-like drainage areas on roof correlate with column placement C. Sprinkler system installation D. 3.5� column in Glass Pavilion Fire protectant paint, similar to that which is used in the Glass Pavilion

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Thirty-four identified columns are painted with a fire protectant paint. Some columns contain services that run from the roof structure to the basement. Some columns act as drainage for the roof.

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FIRE PROTECTION


Material Palette & Tool Sets 13


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Materials

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Pilkington Optiwhite Low Iron Glass 3-D Heat Curved

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Glass Manufacturer: Pilkington (Germany) Glass Fabricator: SanXin Glass Technology (China) Designer: UAD Group (New York) Installation: Toledo Mirror & Glass (Ohio)

Use of existing hydraulic equipment and an electric manipulator that could rotate the panels up to 90 degrees

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Project Design, Development, and Construction 5


The schematic design went through three major steps. In the first layout, the building was organized on a strict grid system which was then altered to fit the program requirements in the second step. Another part of the second step was to make all of the walls curved so there were no corners in the building which presented each room as one continuous elevation. The third step was to make each room independent of the surrounding rooms by using buffer zones between walls as an interstitial space.

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Every wall in the building adheres to strict geometry. Each curve is based on the circle, with it being a quarter of the circumference in most cases. On the larger scale of the building, each programmatic element is ordered on the grid and all the corners of each programmatic element is rounded using the order of the circle. The overall building shape also reflects the ordering of the individual rooms within it by being a rectangle with rounded corners.

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The building is ordered on strict geometry down to the smallest detail. In the image to the left, the column is lined up with the outlet, the glass joint, the vent, and the exterior glass joint. Every detail in the project was taken into careful consideration.


The steel roof structure works around the space designated for the courtyards in order to accommodate for the completely transparent ground floor. The roof is supported by thin steel columns in addition to the opaque core spaces constructed of solid steel.

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Structural Roof Diagram

The glass panels were installed using a special machine that would slot the top edge up and into the ceiling and then drop the panel down into the floor.

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Solid Steel Core Space

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Glass Panels Being Installed


System and Detail


Site Documentation


Works Cited

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“Anodized Aluminum.” Nucraft Furniture. N.p., n.d. Web. 3 Feb. 2013. Bell, Michael, and Jeannie Kim. Engineered Transparency. New York: Princeton Architectural, 2009. Print. Carpico, Ryan. “Pritzker Prize Worthy: SANAA’s Glass Pavilion at the Toledo Museum of Art.” Buildipedia. N.p., 14 May 2010. Web. 1 Feb. 2013. “Case in Point: The Glass Pavilion at The Toledo Museum of Art.” Dunbar Mechanical. N.p., n.d. Web. 2 Feb. 2013. Cecilia, Fernando M., and Richard Levene. “Glass Pavilion at the Toledo Museum of Art.” El Croquis 121/122 (2007): 110-121. Print. Cecilia, Fernando M., and Richard Levene. “Glass Pavilion at the Toledo Museum of Art.” El Croquis 139 (2007): 80-101. Print. Chakroff, Evan. “Toledo Glass Pavilion.” Flickr. Yahoo!, 27 Jan. 2009. Web. 2 Feb. 2013. “Google Earth.” Google. N.p., n.d. Web. 3 Feb. 2013. “Glass Center for the Toledo Museum of Art Toledo Ohio (USA).” Transsolar. N.p., n.d. Web. 2 Feb. 2013. “The GLASS Quarterly Hot Sheet.” Blog.glassquarterly.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 5 Feb. 2013. Lane, Tahree. “$30 Million Glass Pavilion to Open Aug. 27.” Toledo Blade. N.p., 10 Mar. 2006. Web. 4 Feb. 2013. “The Pilkington Blog.” Pilkington Self Cleaning Glass. N.p., n.d. Web. 4 Feb. 2013. “Saint Gobain Adds New Production Line to Calarasi Glass Factory.” Daily News in English from Romania. N.p., 19 May 2010. Web. 5 Feb. 2013. “Through the Looking Glass.” Constructor Magazine. AGC of America, n.d. Web. 1 Feb. 2013. “Timeline: Museum of Art Launched in 1901.” Toledo Blade. N.p., 08 Aug. 2006. Web. 30 Jan. 2013. “The Toledo Museum of Art.” The Toledo Museum of Art. N.p., n.d. Web. 29 Feb. 2013.

SANAA Glass Pavilion Building Analysis  

Building Analysis done by Bryce Beckwith, Nick Coates, and Brian Kato

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