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Greensboro / Winston-Salem / High Point Dec. 3-9, 2020 triad-city-beat.com

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UNVEILING Artist-activist April Parker’s new work is about reclaiming space and demanding accountability PAGE 12

Rules for sheriffs PAGE 5 Hospital beds low PAGE 9 Bars plead for help

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MONUMENTS Included in this issue: 2020 Holiday Gift Guide


Dec. 3-9, 2020

EDITOR’S NOTEBOOK

An ACC hero for the coronavirus age

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f you start at quarterback. haven’t Practice squads are full of guys like heard of Hinton — fantastic and versatile athletes Kendall who were the best players on their high Hinton by now, it’s school teams. Hinton was a state chamyour own fault. pion as a junior at Southern Durham High He was the School. He was one of the top high school biggest story in prospects in the state when he committed by Brian Clarey sports over the to Wake Forest in 2014, just ahead of his weekend: a practice-squad wide receiver senior year. for the Denver Broncos, called up to play He could have been the next Cam starting quarterback against the New OrNewton — a relatively soft college career leans Saints on Sunday after all four of his with no major injuries, with enough runteam’s QBs were exposed to coronavirus. throw-catch skills to add value to any These were his very first snaps as a pro roster. But that’s not the way it works in football player. the NFL. If you’ve really been With enough practice paying attention, you time and an offense built know that last Hinton to his strong points, Hinton Hilton had one day started at QB in any might have had a more to learn a handful capacity was for the Wake auspicious pro football deof plays before Forest Demon Deacons but. As it was, he had one in 2016, as a sophomore, day — one day! — to learn making his NFL against the Delaware Blue a handful of plays before debut at starting Hens. An injury in the starting against the best quarterback for first quarter of that game team in the NFC. And knocked him out of the believe it: He got creamed the Broncos. rest of his second season out there. He went 1 for 9 of college ball, and redin passing, his sole 13-yard shirted him for the next year. By the time completion good enough, at least to reghe came back as a senior, he had been ister a first down. Two interceptions. Seven converted to wide receiver, holding down rushing yards. A 0.1 QB rating. a halfway decent season — four touchBut man. You’ve got to admire Kendall downs and 1,000 yards — but not enough Hinton, who finally got to shoot his shot to attract attention in the NFL draft. under perhaps the worst circumstances in The Broncos picked him up in April the history of professional football, a hero 2020, then let him go in September. He from the moment he suited up and took accepted his slot on the practice squad on the field. Nov. 4, just a few weeks before he would

BUSINESS PUBLISHER/EXECUTIVE EDITOR Brian Clarey brian@triad-city-beat.com

PUBLISHER EMERITUS Allen Broach allen@triad-city-beat.com

EDITORIAL SENIOR EDITOR Jordan Green jordan@triad-city-beat.com

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Sayaka Matsuoka sayaka@triad-city-beat.com

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1451 S. Elm-Eugene St. Box 24, Greensboro, NC 27406 Office: 336.256.9320 COVER: SPECIAL SECTION EDITOR Nikki Miller-Ka April Parker poses atop the niksnacksblog@gmail.com plinth in Greensboro’s Green Hill EDITORIAL INTERN Michaela Ratliff Cemetery, where a Confederate ART monument once stood. ART DIRECTOR Robert Paquette robert@triad-city-beat.com SALES

KEY ACCOUNTS Drew Dix

drew@triad-city-beat.com

CONTRIBUTORS

Carolyn de Berry, Matt Jones

TCB IN A FLASH @ triad-city-beat.com First copy is free, all additional copies are $1. ©2018 Beat Media Inc.

[Photo by Gui Portel; cover design by Robert Paquette]


Dec. 3-9, 2020

CITY LIFE Dec. 3-6 by Michaela Ratliff

THURSDAY Dec. 3

McLaurin Farms Christmas Festival @ McLaurin Farms (GSO) 6 p.m.

Unveiling Monuments Exhibition and Reception @ Elsewhere (GSO) 7 p.m.

WinterFest 2020 @ High Point Athletic Complex (HP) 5:30 p.m.

Eddie Griffin @ the Comedy Zone (GSO) 7 p.m.

Up Front

FRIDAY Dec. 4

Winter Wonderland @ the Katharine Brasserie & Bar (W-S) 5 p.m.

SUNDAY Dec. 6

Camel City Craft Fair @ Foothills Brewing (W-S) 12 p.m.

Opinion

Following April Parker’s Elsewhere Stories virtual conversation, celebrate Parker’s body of work Unveiling Moments in front of the museum. The series “documents art actions, protests, and public acts that explore the unveiling of memory, memorial, and mourning.” To learn more, visit the event page.

High Point Athletic Complex in partnership with City of High Point Government is giving you the chance to enjoy holiday music, festive lights and decorations from the comfort of your car. Donations of non-perishable food items to the Salvation Army are welcome. For more info, visit the event page.

News

Celebrate the holidays at McLaurin Farms. Ride through the lights on a hayride or enjoy the show from the comfort of your car. To purchase tickets, visit McLaurin Farms’ website.

SATURDAY Dec. 5

The Star @ Wesley Memorial United Methodist Church (HP) 7 p.m.

Handmade arts, food trucks and more will be available at this holiday market. Santa will be there on the 13th for free photos!

Home for the Holidays Adoption Fair @ Animal CARE Foundation (W-S) 12 p.m.

Puzzles

Enjoy a free screening of The Star, the story of the first Christmas. Featuring the voices of Kelly Clarkson, Tracy Morgan and Keegan-Michael Key, this comedy is perfect for all ages to enjoy. For more info, visit the event page.

Shot in the Triad

Until Dec. 31, stop by Reynolda House to view a historic collection of Christmas ornaments including candy, Santa and animals. Visit Reynolda’s website to purchase tickets.

Named by Comedy Central as one of the Top 100 Comedians of All-Time, Eddie Griffin will be at the Comedy Zone for a night of laughs. To purchase tickets, visit ETix.

Culture

Bring in the holiday season at the Katharine with cocktails, hors d’oeuvres and winter-themed dining globes. Reserve your space on ExploreTock.

Antique Glass Ornament Display @ Reynolda House Museum of American Art (W-S) 10 a.m.

What’s more adorable than a precious fur baby with a bow on its head? Animal CARE Foundation has plenty of adoptable animals available just in time for Christmas.

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Dec. 3-9, 2020

Coronavirus in the Triad:

(As of Wednesday, Dec. 2, compared to last week)

Culture

Opinion

News

Up Front

Documented COVID-19 diagnoses NC

367,390 (+28,198)

Forsyth

13,538 (+1,289)

Guilford County

16,987 (+1,502)

COVID-19 deaths NC

5,289 (+244)

Forsyth

166 (+9)

Guilford

239 (+9)

Documented recoveries NC

315,979 (+22,424)

Forsyth

11,142 (+1,217)

Guilford

13,544 (+837)

Shot in the Triad

Current cases NC

46,122 (+5,530)

Forsyth

2,230 (+63)

Guilford

1,175 (-209)

Puzzles

Hospitalizations (right now)

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NC

2,033 (+309)

Forsyth

73 (+14)

Guilford

163 (+11)


NEWS

Dec. 3-9, 2020

NC sheriffs eyeing reform to deal with ‘wandering officers’ by Jordan Green

Up Front News Opinion Culture

Catherine Netter, a former background investigator for the Guilford County Sheriff’s Office, spoke at a rally for law enforcement reform in Graham on Sunday.

to conduct a thorough background investigation regarding whether an applicant should be certified and/or hired.” Failing to share “critical personnel information” could leads to a phenomenon of officers “who are hired at an agency, engage in some misconduct, are allowed to resign, and then move on to be employed at another agency without the hiring agency being aware of the previous misconduct,” the sheriff’s association warned. The report uses the ethnically offensive term “gypsy law enforcement officers”; they’re also known as “wandering officers.” “There’s a lot of agency-hopping that goes on,” Catherine Netter, who formerly worked as a background investigator for the Guilford County Sheriff’s Office, told Triad City Beat. “You get an application, and they’ve already worked at three

or four different agencies. Your question is, ‘Why are they coming here?’” Echoing the sheriff’s association report, Netter said access to an applicant’s employment record often depends on the whims and discretion of the agency that previously employed them. “As a background investigator, you call the agencies,” she said. “You schedule a time to look at their files. The agencies control what you see.” Netter learned firsthand how much sensitivity surrounds personnel information when she filed a discrimination complaint against former Sheriff BJ Barnes. The Guilford County Human Resources Department hired an outside lawyer to investigate Netter’s claim, and she provided the lawyer with other employee’s files to provide evidence of disparate treatment. Sheriff Barnes fired

Puzzles

both oversee certification, which sworn employees are required to maintain in order to remain employed by local sheriff’s offices. The Criminal Justice Standards Division also oversees certification for sworn employees of municipal police departments. Applicants for law enforcement positions are required to sign a waiver allowing a division investigator to access prior employment information. “However, even with that waiver, sometimes former employing law enforcement agencies are hesitant to share some information in personnel records with division staff or with a hiring agency,” the association acknowledged in its report. “Agencies may fear violation of personnel records laws for releasing too much information. Incomplete or missing information prevents division staff or a hiring agency from being able

Shot in the Triad

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he NC Sheriff’s Association is grappling with the question of how to deal with officers who engage in misconduct and are allowed to resign to avoid discipline and then move on to another agency. The association formed a working group including 13 sheriffs from across the state in response to the wave of protests that erupted this summer after the death of George Floyd at the hands of a Minneapolis police officer, and released a report with recommendations for reform on Oct. 21. A draft report with recommendations from the North Carolina Task Force for Racial Equity in Criminal Justice, a group that was appointed by Gov. Roy Cooper and also includes sheriffs, was released on Tuesday. The Sheriff’s Standards Division and the Criminal Justice Standards Division

CAROLYN DE BERRY

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Dec. 3-9, 2020 Up Front News Opinion Culture Shot in the Triad Puzzles

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Netter for violating NCGS § 153A-98, a state law known as “Privacy of employee personnel records.” Netter said the episode underscores the fact that even if relevant employment information makes it to state investigators, it’s liable to be skewed by arbitrary decisions about who gets disciplined and who doesn’t. “I had an officer on my shift who had been charged with an offense,” Netter said. “That officer had been arrested for that offense. It was two years later by the time I filed my complaint. She said, ‘Sarge, they’re calling me in for disciplinary action.’ I told the investigator: ‘Because of my complaint, they’re putting discipline on this employee.’ She got two years of probation, but by the time I made that complaint, the two years was already up. They did that because I had listed her as someone who had a serious offense and didn’t have a disciplinary record.” Netter has marched with activists protesting police brutality in Graham, and has said she is considering running for sheriff in Guilford County in 2022. To remedy the problem of “wandering officers,” the sheriff’s association is recommending that the General Assembly amend state law to explicitly state that civil or criminal liability is waived for agencies releasing employment records to a hiring agency or to the standards divisions at the NC Sheriff’s Association and NC Criminal Justice Education & Training Standards Commission. Ben Grunwald, an associate law professor at Duke University, said he thinks updating the law to protect agencies from liability when they share employment information with each other is a good idea, as far as it goes. “When an officer is applying to a new job and the potential hiring agency will call up a previous employer and ask them for information, there is a fear about saying too much or exposing themselves to liability,” Grunwald said. “I think there is a fear about saying too much or exposing themselves to liability. I think it’s good that they’re talking about waiving liability. I’m not sure how big a part of the problem this is. I’m doubtful that’s going to be a gamechanger.” Grunwald co-authored a recent study of police misconduct among 98,000 law enforcement officers in Florida over a three-year period that found that officers who move from agency to agency are more likely to be fired from their next job and to receive a complaint for a “moral character violation.”

Overall, Grunwald said, the NC know whether there should be a call for Sheriff’s Association’s recommendations reducing the use of force by law enforcecome across as “making edits at the ment until all law enforcement agencies margins of our policing regime.” operate under the same definition, and Another recommendation made by data can be collected on those uses of the association is to launch a public dataforce.” The report goes on to suggest base of decertified officers. that police use of force is not a serious “Making a public searchable database problem by citing statistics showing that of decertified officers might sound like out of about 468 investigations into offia big deal, but it’s not really,” Grunwald cers shooting civilians in North Carolina said. “Officer decertification is incredibly over the past decade, none resulted in rare. Lots of officers engage in misconconviction. The sheriff’s association recduct without getting decertified. That ommends calling the entity “The Center would be a small database relative to the for Analysis of Law Enforcement Use of full magnitude of all police misconduct.” Force” instead. To avoid agencies being unaware of Dawn Blagrove, executive director of past misconduct by prospective emEmancipate NC, excoriated the report in ployees, the sheriff’s association report a comment to ABC 11. advises that “law enforcement agencies “Because the SBI, which is an arm of should be forthcoming with any and all law enforcement, doesn’t find us to be in personnel records and any other records violation of force, and because the disregarding misconduct, discipline or trict attorneys that we elect all over the reprimands, internal investigations, and state of North Carolina never think that commendations to the staff of the divithe police are at fault, so they don’t ever sions and the hiring agencies.” bring criminal charges against them, Missing from the report is any recomthat means they’re doing everything mendation to hold agencies accountable okay,” she said. “It is so tone-deaf and for withholding so in opposition critical informato everything that tion about past heard from ‘Making a public searchable we’ve misconduct. everyone all across “I think it’s a America in the last database of decertified potentially sigsix months in this officers might sound like a nificant problem,” country.” Grunwald said. Other recombig deal, but it’s not really.’ “There is a bandmendations by the – Ben Grunwald, associate law of-brothers ethos sheriff’s association professor, Duke University in law enforcethat have been ment. That ethos widely embraced has only intensified by law enforcein the past 10 years ment and city as the public has become more critical leadership across the country since the of law enforcement. Some officials might death of George Floyd include a ban want to withhold information to allow the use of chokeholds and a duty to an employee to get another job. And intervene when officers observe their colhaving no accountability mechanism leagues using excessive force. might incentivize that.” The sheriff’s association recommends The report also includes a recoma ban on “chokeholds, lateral vascular mendation to change the name of a neck restraints, carotid restraints, or any new state agency established by Gov. other tactics that restrict oxygen or blood Roy Cooper to study police use of force. flow to the head or neck.” The recomFollowing the death of George Floyd, mendation includes an exception by Cooper established the Center for the citing a state law that authorizes police Reduction of Law Enforcement Use of to use deadly force when they believe Deadly Force under the auspices of the another person “presents an imminent State Bureau of Investigation. The sherthreat of death or serious physical injury iff’s association takes issue with the name to others” and to prevent escape by a of the agency, stating in the report that person in custody as a result of a felony it “implies there is a need for a reduction conviction. of force by North Carolina law enforceMost law enforcement agencies in the ment officers.” Eliding the fact that the Triad already ban chokeholds or are in center specifically focuses on “deadly the process of doing so. force,” the sheriff’s report says, “We do The Greensboro Police Department’s not even have a uniform definition of directive on subject control options the term ‘use of force.’ We cannot truly states, “Officers are prohibited from

using chokeholds or any technique intended to restrict an individual’s airway, breathing or blood flow unless the officer reasonably believes a situation exists in which deadly force would be appropriate to protect himself, or a third party.” The Greensboro Police Department also requires officers to intervene physically and verbally to stop colleagues from using force that violates policy and training, and to report incidents to supervisors. The High Point Police Department prohibits chokeholds except in situations when deadly force is authorized. And High Point police officers are required to physically intervene when they witness colleagues using excessive force and to immediately report the incident to a commanding officer. Earlier this year, Guilford County Sheriff Danny Rogers “authorized the adoption of specific policies barring chokeholds and strangleholds, and imposing an affirmative duty to intervene,” spokesperson Lori Poag said. She added that the agency is currently revamping all of its policies and procedures as part of its effort to gain accreditation through the Commission for the Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies, or CALEA. Assistant City Attorney Lori Sykes said the Winston-Salem Police Department “prohibits the use of chokeholds and has established a duty to intervene.” The Forsyth County Sheriff’s Office did not respond to a request for its policies before the deadline for this story. Grunwald cited a recommendation by the sheriff’s association to add new forms “to ensure agencies are requesting and providing personnel records and other records in the hiring process” as emblematic of the gulf between official reforms and the demands raised during the massive protests this past summer. “None of these recommendations make it easier to fire officers who engage in misconduct,” he said. “It doesn’t do anything to improve investigations of police misconduct. It doesn’t do anything to address the fact that what the public thinks should count as misconduct is different from what law enforcement believes should count as misconduct. It doesn’t address the scale of law enforcement, which goes to the demands of the defund movement. It feels like the proposals are designed to improve how we shuffle paperwork, but they do little to address the bigger problem — that the paperwork itself is often flawed.”


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Opinion Culture Shot in the Triad Puzzles

“With the recent surge in COVID-19 cases, I’m taking this step to protect our citizens and ensure that our local businesses can remain open,” Joines said at the time. “I hope that all our citizens understand the importance of being ‘a team player’ and that we never have to issue a single citation. But at this point in the pandemic, we need another tool to ensure the overall safety of our city.” Guilford County Public Health Director Iulia Vann said she’s not surprised by the recent metrics, but that she is concerned about the potential effect on area hospitals. “We do not want to see all of our hospital resources being depleted by COVID-19, as this takes away from other illnesses and emergency situations,” Vann said. “We are all concerned that ever increasing case counts will tax our hospital systems of their resources, which will leave less for other ailments such as stroke, heart attacks and other emergencies. We never want to get into a situation where our hospitals have no beds available especially when COVID-19 can be greatly avoided if more people would follow the 3 W’s: wear a face covering, wait six feet apart and wash hands or use hand sanitizer.” Across the state, hospitalization numbers are climbing according to DHHS numbers. The Triad region, which covers 17 counties including Guilford and Forsyth, is far outranking other regions. According to DHHS, the Triad region leads state hospitalizations with 553 of the 2,033 individuals currently hospitalized due to COVID-19, or about 27 percent. The Metrolina region, which spans the southwestern part of the state and includes populous counties like Mecklenburg, Cabarrus and Stanly trail just behind the Triad with 516 hospitalizations. The Triangle counties of Wake, Durham and Orange are split up into three different regions according to the map. As data from the Thanksgiving holiday trickle in this week and more people plan on traveling for Christmas, Vaughan said that cases are likely rise. “We know that people still need to shop,” Vaughan said. “But people can use curbside and delivery and that includes holiday shopping. We want to support local businesses. You can always buy a gift certificates, we can do a lot of things but it’s still the old message. It goes back to the three W’s.”

News

additional beds throughout the health ed a hospital just for COVID. We were system.” in a better situation than some other Spokesperson Doug Allred, told Triad communities because of that, but we City Beat that Cone Health has a “numalso wouldn’t have had those extra beds ber of contingency plans to expand if if we weren’t in a crisis. Green Valley is need be,” but did not provide any details. our field hospital.” Greensboro Mayor Nancy Vaughan In Forsyth County, positive cases are posted snippets of the email on Facealso increasing, but the situation with book on Monday evening and said in an the hospitals is not quite as dire as in interview with TCB that the numbers are Guilford County. Forsyth County Public alarming. Health Director Joshua Swift said county “We have reached a crisis point when officials are in constant contact with both it comes to beds and hospital care,” Novant Health and Baptist Hospital. Vaughan said. “Cone right now is “Both systems have seen an increase considering whether or not they have in hospitalizations, and both have the to suspend elective surgeries. That is a capacity to handle additional hospitalizavery serious step. If Cone were to take tions,” Swift said in a statement to TCB. that step again, it would have a negative Forsyth County is currently categoimpact on people’s healthcare overall.” rized as orange, according to the state’s A portion of the email addresses the new metrics, with a low impact on area possibility of suspending elective surgerhospitals. ies. “As more people are tested for CO“We are working closely with surgeons VID, we have seen more positive cases,” on which procedures could be delayed,” Swift said. “While this is to be expected, Blackledge states. “But we have not yet we have also seen an increase in the called for a hold on elective surgeries.” percent of individuals who test posiVaughan said that the fact that tive which means there is more comGreensboro has a COVIDmunity spread. Because of only hospital should be this, people must continue a red flag to begin with. Cone is expecting to be diligent to prevent the Currently, Guilford County spread of COVID.” 260 patients by is rated as a “red” county, On Nov. 20, Vaughan isthe worst among three tiers sued an emergency order for Christmas. They of the rate of community Greensboro that reinforces only have 249 spread for COVID-19. Red Gov. Roy Cooper’s executive is classified as “critical” com- beds available. order requiring face covermunity spread while yellow ings and reducing indoor means “significant spread” occupancy. The order added and orange is “substantial spread.” The warnings and subsequent fines for busimetrics, which were established by the ness owners who don’t follow the rules, state Department of Health and Human but Vaughan said if numbers continue Services, or DHHS, earlier this month, to rise, fines for individuals would not be take into account case rate, percent of out of the question. She also said she has tests that are positive and hospital impact the authority to issue another stay-atwithin the county. Red counties have a home order but would rather shut down high impact on county hospitals. Other individual businesses for noncompliance area counties like Alamance, Davie and rather than penalizing a whole industry. Yadkin are also classified as red. “I think people are experiencing Nationwide, hospitalization numbers COVID fatigue,” Vaughan said. “We’ve are increasing with the most recent been talking about coronavirus since data from the COVID Tracking Project March, and I think people are tired of showing that 96,039 people are currently hearing about the virus, and they are hospitalized. taking risks.” And although the county was only Winston-Salem Mayor Allen Joines recently classified as “red” based on the also issued an emergency order on Nov. state’s new metrics, Vaughan said that 24. Unlike in Greensboro, Joines’ order it’s felt like the city and county has been targets individuals and gives police and struggling for some time. fire employees the authority to issue “We felt like we were in the red zone citations for violations with a maximum earlier than we were placed in the red penalty of 60 days in jail and a fine of zone,” she said. “The state needed to $1,000. recognize that Cone Health implement-

Up Front

rea hospitals are running out of beds because of an increase in COVID-19 cases, according to an email from Cone Health sent to Greensboro city officials on Monday. The email from Ryan Blackledge, the director of government affairs for Cone Health, raised concerns about the hospital network’s lack of capacity to handle a continuing increase in COVID-19 positive inpatients. “Just a few weeks ago, our data team had projected 150 patients hospitalized throughout the Cone Health system with COVID-19 by late December,” Blackledge states. “Today, we have 151 throughout the system, including 76 at our Green Valley Campus. These current numbers are alarming, especially given that we’ve not yet seen the expected increase from holidays and the cooler weather.” By Tuesday afternoon, the number of currently hospitalized had risen to 154. Cone Health — which is the largest healthcare network in the Triad after Wake Forest Baptist Health in WinstonSalem — operates five area hospitals as well as its Green Valley Campus, formerly the Women’s Hospital, which was turned into a coronavirus-only facility at the beginning of the year. But even with a location allocated specifically for COVID-19 patients, the recent email from the hospital network sounds the alarm that beds are dwindling. “Due to the sharp increase in the number of COVID-19 positive inpatients in recent weeks, we have reached the point where the Green Valley campus can no longer accommodate the majority of our patients with COVID-19,” Blackledge states. Currently, the campus works with the most severe COVID-19 patients including those who are in severe acute respiratory failure and going forward, will prioritize bed space for only those patients, Blackledge states. Others who aren’t in as severe condition will be treated at other locations. Blackledge goes on to state that hospital staff are planning for 260 COVID-19 patients on Christmas Day. “We do not currently have that many beds for COVID-19 patients,” he states. “As of today, we can find beds for 249 patients throughout the health system based on staffing and room requirements to treat COVID-19 patients. We are working diligently to find and convert

Dec. 3-9, 2020

Cone Health: We are running out of hospital beds due to COVID-19 by Sayaka Matsuoka

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Puzzles

Shot in the Triad

Culture

Opinion

News

Up Front

Dec. 3-9, 2020

OPINION

8

EDITORIAL

Cops and violent crime

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t’s been a bad year for elections time for us to realize that police them— we’re still suffering through the selves don’t stop violent crimes. mess of the last one — and a bad Homicides, for example, almost always year for disease, as a post-holiday happen between people who know each coronavirus surge lies just around the other. And aside from a few elaborate, corner. carefully planned murder schemes, Not incidentally, it’s also been a bad they almost always happen in the heat year for violent crime, particularly here in of a moment, either by accident or on the Triad. purpose. Greensboro Police Chief Brian James There’s nothing the police can do issued a statement on Monday adabout that, or most other violent crimes. dressing the rise of violent crime in the They can document them. They can city, particularly homiinvestigate, and occides, which have risen casionally resolve them. starkly, from 44 in 2019 They can even exacerViolent crime, on to 56 so far this year; bate them. But increased the rise, is not a 47 of the victims were policing by itself does Black people. That’s 84 not solve the problem of problem that can percent. violent crime. And even Winston-Salem had 31 the cops know this. be solved by homicides in 2019. It was Chief James acincreased law the most ever in the city. knowledged as much in So far this year, there his statement: “While enforcement. have been 26 homicides police are responsible in Winston-Salem. for responding to violent Forsyth County Sheriff Bobby crime, we as a community must address Kimbrough has also addressed the rise those factors that lead to violent crime. in violent crime on his watch, pledging Many of those factors are rooted in ac“saturation patrols” at Hanes Mall, which cess to employment, housing, education, has seen several shootings this year. healthcare and mental health care to Violent crime is on the rise nationally; name a few.” the economic hardships, frayed nerves, Violent crime is a symptom of much generalized stress and frustration of the deeper problems, ones that uniforms, coronavirus era certainly contribute, but squad cars and guns cannot touch. And this is not a new problem. applying law enforcement as a solution Naturally, people look to law enforceto socioeconomic problems does more ment to “solve” this problem. But it’s harm than good.


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News Opinion Culture Shot in the Triad Puzzles

operate. But the mandate allows for bars to reopen with outdoor seating only at 30 percent (which equates to 7 people per 1000 sq. ft) capacity or 100 seats, whichever is less. Patrons may enter the establishment to order and use the restroom but no alcohol consumption is allowed indoors. So, what makes bars different from restaurants? Every bar is different, but many bars are housed in narrow, indoor spaces with no windows and little room to move around. Unlike restaurants, which can space tables far apart, bars typically have fixed barstool seating and layouts that encourage people to mingle. People go to bars so they can socialize. Most are not going to want to sit six feet apart and yell. When people drink, alcohol lowers inhibition and promotes breaches of social-distancing protocols, sharing of drinks, food and NIKKI MILLER-KA Like all NC bars, Bull’s Tavern in downtown Winstonpersonal space. People go to resSalem has suffered during the pandemic. taurants to dine, but also to drink. Overall, it’s the human experience restaurants moving our product which was close to half that patrons are seeking. our business,” he says. “Yeah, I’m not making as much Danielle Bull, owner of Bull’s Tavern in Winston-Saas much money, but I can’t complain one bit if I’m able lem, can’t pretend that the restrictions don’t cut deeper to keep my lights on.” than diminished profits. The taxes imposed on liquor seem superfluous, “It’s like a watered-down drink,” Bull says. “It’s a bordering on extravagant. For example, Sutler’s Gin is watered-down bar. It’s not the same. And I can’t dress it $29.95 in every ABC store across the state. up and pretend that it is. It’s just not the same, it can’t Sanborn sells each bottle to NC ABC for distribube the same until we get past this.” tion and product placement in ABC stores for $15.65. While the new mandates have put increased pressure NC ABC charges permit holders, like Howell and Bull, on the bar industry, the circumstances were ripe for $33.70 for the same bottle. And bars are taxed again business failure before the pandemic ever hit. every month based on liquor sales. Not only do busiIn 1937, the NC ABC Commission was formed to nesses have to operate at a severely reduced capacity, provide regulation and control over the sale, purchase, the levels of taxation seem to never end and there is no transportation, manufacture, consumption and posmore financial relief in sight. session of alcoholic beverages in the state of North “This is the Bible belt. We have legislators on both Carolina. Today, NC ABC Commission and county musides of the aisle who still think liquor is a sin,” says nicipal boards operate the retail stores that sell bottles Howell. She goes onto explain how if liquor permit of spirituous liquor. And from the looks of it, it’s the holders surrender their licenses, they are more than “spiritous liquor” that is a problem. welcome to open at 50 percent capacity and serve beer On the other side of the cocktail glass is Scot and wine only. Sanborn, owner and distiller of Sutler’s Spirit Co. in “The word ‘bar’ is a dirty word but they’ll let it be Winston-Salem. served in restaurants and country clubs or private 501“I don’t have a problem with the ABC system,” Sanc3s like lodges and VFW posts,” Howell says. born says. “If there’s one thing I don’t agree with within It’s been 85 years since the government repealed the system, it’s that there are one too many taxes in Prohibition, but the current climate makes it feel like there.” 1935 all over again. He says that Sutler’s retail sales picked up around “I’m very aware that another closure is coming,” Bull 30-35 percent and he didn’t start feeling the pinch of says. “I don’t know if it’s going to be this Friday or the reduced pandemic revenue until April. Still, year-tonext. We’re just going to try to hold on. When the next date, Sanborn says he’s down about 15-20 percent in closure happens, I’m going to shut off as much stuff as I revenue. can and try to stretch it out to the other side.” “Obviously, sales went down not having the bars and

Up Front

he strained sounds of a pop song bounce off the walls and spill onto the sidewalk. Its hollow, tinny sound parallels the look inside the bar: empty. Barstools stand as reminders of the once bustling business and warm-hearted by Nikki Miller-Ka social interactions that took place there. Outside, holiday lights sway in the breeze as traffic lights go through multiple cycles without any cars in sight. A few patrons prohibited from quaffing their drinks inside huddle against railing set up on the sidewalk and sip from their beer cans and tumblers in between puffs of e-cigarettes. The discarded vapor twirls into the night air, unsure where it’s going or what will become of it. The entire scene is a metaphor for what taverns and bars are going through right now. This week marks 85 years since the 18th Amendment, aka the Prohibition Act, was repealed, but North Carolina did not officially repeal Prohibition until 1935. In some ways, it still feels like 1935 to bar owners. Executive Order No. 118 issued on March 17 by Gov. Roy Cooper required restaurants, bars and taverns to shut their doors due to coronavirus safety concerns. There was a glimmer of hope for financial relief for bar owners in early May when the NC General Assembly finalized a $1.5 billion relief package to address the pandemic. The NC House passed a provision that would have allowed businesses to sell mixed alcoholic drinks for takeout and delivery, but it didn’t survive negotiations and was removed from the final draft. By May 30, restaurants — even ones with bars selling liquor by the drink —breweries, taprooms, wineries and distilleries were allowed to open at 50 percent capacity, with social distancing and mask requirements, while bars and taverns were required to stay shuttered. Burke Street Pub owner Tiffany Howell does not think that is fair. “Why would people come to my bar and have to drink outside when they can go a half-mile down the street to get the same alcohol that was purchased at the same ABC location and drink it inside?” Howell asks. “Other establishments had the green light to provide the bar type of experience for my customer. Restaurants, breweries and distilleries were booking bands every weekend. People were ordering beers and shots whether they were ordering food or not, running unchecked. I don’t see the difference.” Relief came into sight in late September when Cooper announced the N.C. Mortgage, Utility and Rent Relief program which can provide up to $20,000 in relief funds per qualifying business location. Bars, taverns, night clubs, cocktail lounges that have not been able to operate during the COVID period were able to apply for up to two business locations. The application period ended Nov. 12 and to date, funds have yet to be distributed. Meanwhile, Executive Order No. 169 became effective on Oct. 2 which allowed bars to open and

Dec. 3-9, 2020

Nik Snacks Triad bars get left in the cold for the coronavirus winter

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Dec. 3-9, 2020 Up Front News Opinion Culture Shot in the Triad Puzzles

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CULTURE ‘Unveiling Monuments’ reclaims space and demands accountability By Sayaka Matsuoka

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he sits rather than stands atop Parker has been working at the concrete slab, the heel of the intersection of art and acher left foot planted firmly on tivism for the past decade. She the surface while her right leg helped found Greensboro’s dangles off the side. She leans back, Black Lives Matter group and her long skirt opening ever so slightly Queer People of Color Collecand she gives off an air of ease, a sense tive in 2014, before anyone reof superiority over the space like she ally knew what the movement belongs there, like she is claiming the looked like. plinth. She wears all black, mostly lace; “We had to convince people the only other color is a crown of deep and explain to them what red roses that adorn her head. She looks ‘Black Lives Matter’ meant,” out at the viewer, her gaze more akin to she says. “I was really rage a stare, one that challenges and comfilled.” mands respect. After taking a few years Fuck with me, I dare you: That’s the to rest, the radical librarian, vibe. as she calls herself, returned Artist and activist April Parker likes to the streets this summer, to tell people that she’s not from the bringing with her a renewed South, but that she’s of the South. energy and focus to the “I’m from New Jersey, but my entire work. She launched multiple adult life has been spent in the South,” projects and initiatives in she says. “My people were sharecropconjunction with Elsewhere pers; I’m from red-clay land.” as its creative catalyst fellow, Parker’s Southern roots weave a including this latest series. IRVING ALLEN “Radical librarian” April Parker (center) has worked at the intersection of art thread throughout her latest work, UnWhile the project is titled and activisim for the past decade. veiling Monuments, which will be shown Unveiling Monuments, Parker in multiple formats starting Friday. uses the term broadly, applydowntown. She also took images at the A&T Four statue on A series of portraits for the project ining it to anything that holds historical or cultural significance. the college’s campus as well as the Nathanael Greene piece cludes shots of Parker standing on top of She points out images of an empty brick storefront in downdowntown. She points out to viewers how both were made by the base of the Confederate monument town Greensboro, which used to be a Black-owned saloon. James Barnill, a white man, just a few years apart in the mid that was toppled in Green Hill Cemetery According to a 2017 article by the News & Record, the Cascade 2000s. this past July. Saloon was owned by Wiley and Ida Weaver in the midst of “It’s really a critique on white creators,” she says. “WhiteAs she looked back on her work from a booming, predominantly white downtown. Warnersville, a ness doesn’t have to be responsible. If you are a creator, sculpthis past summer, which included street few blocks away, however, existed as a thriving Black commutor, artist, what are you about other than this capitalism? protests and funerary processions, nity with schools and Black businesses. All of it was virtually You’re not honoring Blackness.... That is the paradox of where Parker reflected on a piece by poet Carodestroyed in the 1960s due to redlining and racist housing we are as a city. We can’t do emotional and intellectual gymline Randall Williams published in the practices. nastics to avoid looking at the violence of white supremacy. New York Times in June. The work, titled, “I am defining who gets honored, who’s story gets told,” You just have to name it what it is.” “You Want a Confederate Monument? Parker explains. “So, when I think of monuments, it really And that’s something she’s pushing Elsewhere, a historically My Body is a Confederate Monument,” is by definition. But what if the structure is no longer there white arts institution, as well as the greater Greensboro comstarts with a or no longer functions? A monument munity, to do, too. It’s not always about shining a light on the single, stunning can be something that is placed over a Black creatives and individuals, Parker says. It’s about shifting line: “I have memory, like a grave.” the narrative and making sure to understand where the roots On Friday, Parker will be talking rape-colored In addition to honoring locations with of oppression come from. Currently, she says she’s working about her new work in a Zoom skin.” significance to the Black community on relearning the names of powerful Black figures in GreensAccording like the Beloved Community Center and boro’s past and thinking critically about how most of the city’s call and a reception will take to Parker, two the Historic Magnolia House, Parker streets are named after white people. place outside of Elsewhere later white male made sure to center Black women and “All of these things that I’m unveiling are in plain sight,” she in the evening. Learn more on relatives on her femmes in her work. says. “We don’t have curiosity about these things. Where is grandmother’s “I wanted Black women and femmes the outrage?... It’s really trying to highlight local Black history Elsewhere’s Facebook page. side of the famto be held and honored through the and make those connections and applying it to our present ily were a part of eye,” Parker says. “It was about showing day.” the Confederacy. Black women as pillars in our commuIn another image from the Confederate monument series, “I definitely have rape-colored skin,” nity…. This is the coven.” Parker holds a large key in one hand while cradling a crystal she says. “It speaks to how my blood is In the series of portraits outside of the saloon, Parker ball in the other. She says the key represents the key to Gate in the Confederacy, but it also honors honors Ingram Bell, the program director of Cure Violence, a City while the crystal ball is a fortune for the community. the fact that it was toppled and how community-led initiative that tackles gun violence as a public “I feel like Black folks hold the key to the real solutions,” she monuments have been such a converhealth problem. In different photos, Parker gathers organizers, says. “It’s to say, ‘Black people are in your future.’” sation around the South and how to academics and activists as they stand on the porch at Magcontinue that conversation.” nolia House or in the street at the Black Lives Matter mural


by Michaela Ratliff

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Up Front News Opinion Culture Shot in the Triad Puzzles

ona Wu stares in adoration complete. She states that while and disbelief as her 4-yearprintmaking sounds simple, it’s old granddaughter draws and really anything but. creates stories — the same “Printmaking by itself is to be thing she did as a kid. able to work backwards,” she “The comic books at that time would says. “You have to think mirrorbe like picture books telling stories, and like because whatever is printed I was so enamored by those drawings of out will be backwards.”. people and storytelling, so I would make While Wu was printmaking for up stories of my own,” Wu says. HeArtWorks 2020, her colleague Wu — a calligrapher, printmaker and Susan Smoot used her time in collage artist — is a member of Artworks quarantine to explore new ways Gallery in Winston-Salem, a collaborato make art. tive founded in 1984 operated by artist “The pandemic has given me members and volunteers. The gallery an opportunity to kind of explore temporarily closed its doors in March different avenues and different due to COVID-19 but reopened in Octooutlets,” says Smoot. ber with limited hours of operation and Smoot joined Artworks four capacity, only allowing six visitors at a years ago after volunteering the time. previous eight. The representaFrom Dec. 4-27, Artworks will host tional painter is inspired by her HeArt Works 2020, an all-member group surroundings in North Carolina. show featuring two or more pieces from Much of her art is “things that each gallery artist. The works will show have been touched by nature.” their “HeArts” and what they have creDuring quarantine, she found a ated during quarantine months. new appreciation for something “Winter Sky, Night” by Wu features a she had been doing as long as single, bright-red cardinal — a bird typishe’s been making art. cally seen in winter months — perched “Stitching became a really saton a tree with branches covered in snow. isfying expression for me. I could The image represents Wu’s longing sort of sit back, take my time for cold weather during the summer and just stitch,” she says. “Espemonths in which she thought of the cially when you feel like, Oh my idea. goodness, we don’t know how long “It’s sort of, escapism for me,” she we’re gonna be doing this for!” says. Her interest in nature influThe work also subtly touches on the enced some of the textile collages certainty of the everchanging seasons in that appear in the exhibition. One an uncertain time. collage features a red leaf sewn “It’s also comforting to know that, onto three layers of fabric, mimtoo, because these are for certain to icking the appearance of art on a come, whereas now that we’re in the canvas. Smoot uses a variation in pandemic, we just don’t know when it’s stitches throughout the collage, going to end,” Wu says. “That’s what the opting for small, close stiches COURTESY PHOTO “Winter Sky, Night” by Mona Wu. despair is for a lot toward the of people.” edge of each Wu creates her layer of fabsomething that is an expression of my love for the materials HeartWorks 2020 is free and designs by etching ric. The stem of the leaf was created with or for the image.” open to the public. For more an image onto a crisscross stiches, mimicking the thickWu’s favorite thing about being a member of Artworks wooden board. ness of a leaf stem. information, visit Artworks is observing other artists create, using that to motivate her The board is then Although she doesn’t call herself a to produce more work. To her, Heart Works 2020 represents Gallery’s website. To learn covered with ink, bookbinder, Smoot’s prized possessions people coming together through arts and crafts, but in a difmore about Mona Wu, visit and a piece of of HeArt Works 2020 are the leatherferent way. her website. To learn more paper is laid on bound journals she’s bringing to display. “It’s really a combination of art and craft,” says Wu. “Art is top to transfer or She enjoys the challenge of using leather, making the design, the image, the conversation. Craft is when about Susan Smoot, visit her “print” the design. as it is flexible yet durable. She says you execute it.” website. Wu then carves leather feels more like thick fabric than another design animal skin. into the board, “Working with it and sewing through inks the board and prints it again. She it, it’s just a pleasing material to work with,” Smoot says. repeats this process until the design is She continues, “Whenever I’m making art, I want it to be

Dec. 3-9, 2020

CULTURE Art as escapism on display at Artworks Gallery in W-S

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West Elm Street, Graham

Dec. 3-9, 2020 Shot in the Triad

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SHOT IN THE TRIAD

Puzzles

Rev. Greg Drumwright addresses supporters and the press outside the Judge JB Allen Courthouse in Graham. This was one of several stops during a march through the town to demand criminal justice reform. Alamance County law enforcement refused to apologize for its widely condemned use of pepper spray on Halloween, then doubled down by bringing enhanced felony charges against march leader Rev. Greg Drumwright.

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CAROLYN DE BERRY


CROSSWORD ‘You’re Getting Sleepy’—some ways to get there. SUDOKU by Matt Jones

Up Front

©2020 Jonesin’ Crosswords

(editor@jonesincrosswords.com)

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Answers from previous publication.

Opinion Culture Shot in the Triad Puzzles

1 Raccoon relative 6 BTS or Blackpink genre 10 Lawn mower’s spot 14 “It’s just ___ those things” 15 Edison’s middle name 16 Jekyll’s alter ego 17 Make yourself sleepy, in a way 19 “1917,” for one 20 Writer Vonnegut 21 Thicke of “Growing Pains” 22 ___ Domingo (capital of the Dominican Republic) 23 Seed for flavoring soft drinks 25 Gp. with a Brussels HQ 26 “Whose ___ was this?” 27 “Well done” © 2020 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) 30 Got angry 33 Concave cooker 34 Title said by Zazu in “The Lion King” 35 Tall prez, for short 36 Clothing item that I suppose could make you sleepy (if it’s really comfy) 40 Poseidon’s realm 41 Soften up 43 Acne medication brand 44 Tank covering 46 Synthpop duo that released Answers from last issue an album of ABBA covers 48 Transport 22 Give in to gravity 50 Senatorial stretch 24 Tacks on to a friends list 51 Snarky, but less fun 25 “Swoosh” company 54 Lagoon locale 27 Go off in the kitchen? 56 “Star Trek: TNG” counselor Deanna 28 Cookie with a jokey November tweet 57 Egyptian fertility goddess with a cow’s head showing itself in mashed potatoes 59 Rice-A-___ 29 Warm, in a way 60 Chemical in turkey that makes 30 Prominence many people sleepy 31 Service with an “Eats” offshoot 62 ZZ Top, e.g. 32 Supplement that can help make you sleepy 63 Pueblo dwellers 33 Method 64 “Once Upon a Time in the West” director Sergio 37 Early bird’s prize 65 Email app folder 38 Application file suffix 66 “Let’s Roll” blues singer James 39 George’s sitar teacher 67 “Melrose Place” actor Rob 42 “The Hollow Men” poet 45 “Follow me for more ___” Down (snarky meme of late) 1 Scar 47 Website necessity 2 Actress Aimee of “La Dolce Vita” 48 Nearsightedness 3 Brain surgeon’s prefix 49 “Get Down ___” (Kool & the Gang song) 4 “Be honest” 51 Burial vault 5 Back, on a boat 52 “It’s worth ___!” 6 Liqueur used in a Black Russian 53 “Big Little Lies” author Moriarty 7 Feature of some khakis 54 Sunday newspaper section 8 Major kitchen appliance 55 Ripped (off) 9 Soft food for babies 56 Relaxed pace 10 Sword holders 58 1990s game console, initially 11 Demonstration where you might hear 60 Chance ___ Rapper the line “You’re getting sleepy ...” 61 Cheer for Cristiano Ronaldo 12 Fix 13 Style from about 100 years ago 18 “Aladdin ___” (David Bowie album)

Dec. 3-9, 2020

Across

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Profile for Triad City Beat

TCB Dec. 3, 2020 — Unveiling Monuments  

April Parker collaborates with Elsewhere. COVID news. "Wandering officers." The barroom struggle. An ACC hero. And more!

TCB Dec. 3, 2020 — Unveiling Monuments  

April Parker collaborates with Elsewhere. COVID news. "Wandering officers." The barroom struggle. An ACC hero. And more!

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