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Greensboro / Winston-Salem / High Point June 4-10, 2020 triad-city-beat.com

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Love and rage on Triad streets as protesters respond to George Floyd’s murder George Floyd - Breonna Taylor - Marcus Smith - Ahmaud Arbery - Chieu Di Thi Vo - Sandra Bland


June 4-10, 2020

EDITOR’S NOTEBOOK

It gets complicated on the ground On Saturday of the earlier protest, the one that marched night I posted down Gate City Boulevard and shut down up on South Elm Interstate 40 while Greensboro Police held Street near the traffic so no one got hurt. I was bringing Vivid Interiors her a phone charger so she could continue shop, my Faceher coverage, but somehow ended up out book livestream there myself. humming along Something I knew about shoe-leather by Brian Clarey with hearts, smileys journalism but maybe had forgotten: It and angry faces bubbling up on the screen. gets complicated on the ground, whether Twenty yards to my right, 50 or so proyou’re covering a golf tournament, an electestors were lined up against officers from tion or a nationwide protest during a global the Guilford County Sheriff’s Department pandemic. A hundred — a thousand! — in full riot gear — shields, helmets, the events are happening all at once: beauty whole deal. The protesters were angry — and terror, rage and fellowship, creation shouting at the police, and destruction. And like pacing in front of them, the bible story about the expressing generations of blind men, we can only A hundred — a pain against injustice while perceive one part of the thousand! — events elephant at a time. the cops silently accepted this criticism without When confronted are happening all breaking ranks, the whiff with unknowable chaos, at once: beauty and journalists fall back on of pepper spray still in the air. their training. We’re here terror, rage and Twenty yards to my to document, not police; fellowship, creation understand, not affect; left, a different crowd had begun breaking windows relay, not relate; bear witand destruction. on South Elm, some of ness to events, not shape them personally liberatthem. At our best, as we ing T-shirts, shoes, skateboard decks and say, we are both the lantern and the mirror: other merchandise that had been trapped shining light on the dark corners that must behind the glass at the shop called, ironibe exposed, creating accurate reflections cally, Stolen. Bursts of crystalline showers to show us who we truly are. The best of punctuated the shouting and footfalls as us try to manage this without fear or favor, more windowpanes fell. avoiding pre-set narratives and always In that moment, there on the sidewalk, I seeking an objective truth. That’s why we understood both were expressing the same love documents. sentiment, each using a different mechaAnother journalism maxim: Comfort the nism. afflicted and afflict the comfortable. I was out there because earlier in the On Saturday night in Greensboro, the day, I had been moved to tears by Associpower dynamic was not always clear. It gets ate Editor Sayaka Matsuoka’s live footage complicated on the ground.

BUSINESS PUBLISHER/EXECUTIVE EDITOR Brian Clarey brian@triad-city-beat.com

PUBLISHER EMERITUS Allen Broach allen@triad-city-beat.com

EDITORIAL SENIOR EDITOR Jordan Green

ART ART DIRECTOR Robert Paquette

jordan@triad-city-beat.com

robert@triad-city-beat.com SALES

sayaka@triad-city-beat.com

gayla@triad-city-beat.com

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Sayaka Matsuoka SPECIAL SECTION EDITOR Nikki Miller-Ka niksnacksblog@gmail.com

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1451 S. Elm-Eugene St. Box 24, Greensboro, NC 27406 Office: 336-256-9320 Cover: A mural of George Floyd, who was killed at the hands of STAFF WRITER Savi Ettinger savi@triad-city-beat.com Minneapolis police on May 25 by artist Jenna Rice.

KEY ACCOUNTS Gayla Price CONTRIBUTORS

Carolyn de Berry, Matt Jones

TCB IN A FLASH @ triad-city-beat.com First copy is free, all additional copies are $1. ©2018 Beat Media Inc.


June 4-10, 2020

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June 4-10, 2020

CITY LIFE June 4-10, 2020 by Rachel Spinella

THURSDAY June 4

Up Front

Comedy Open Mic w/Lady ShaMar @ Off DA Hookah and Vape Lounge (GSO) 8:30 p.m.

Skeeball tournament @ Boxcar Bar + Arcade (GSO) 5 p.m. Head down to this bar for a night of friendly competition. The tournament will have 15 teams of three players each. Winners will have a chance to win gift cards as well as other various prizes. For more information check out the downtown Greensboro website. Pop-Up Drive-in @ A/perture Cinema (W-S) 7:30 p.m. A/perture is pivoting! Lawren Desai and crew have begun a pop-up drive-in series beginning tonight with Back to the Future in the parking lot of the Presybterian Church downtown. This one is sold out, but they’ve promised another. Look to their Facebook page for the next announcement.

News Opinion Culture

FRIDAY June 5

Looking to share a few laughs with friends? This lounge will be featuring comedian Lady ShaMar on Thursday. Born in Brooklyn but raised in NC, her comedic act draws from the struggles that she had faced in her everyday life and has found humor in everything. She’s performed with Michael Blackson, Joe Torrey, AJ Johnson, Talent and Drew Fraser of the NY Kings of Comedy and many more. Check out the event on Facebook for more information. Live Music with Jerry Chapman @ Quiet Pint Tavern (W-S) 6 p.m.

Triad Stage’s Friday Night Live @ Triad Stage Facebook page (GSO) 8 p.m. Another pivot! The venerable downtown presence debuts a new summer series, kicking off with Georgia Rogers Farmer and a set of musical theater and jazz standards. Tune in live on Facebook. Full Moon Vigil for Justice @ Terra Blue (GSO) 6 p.m. The witches of Terra Blue consort with the full moon in a moment of gratitude, justice and peace. Free to attend, candles provided.

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SATURDAY June 6

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The bar will be featuring live music from this Mount Airy singer-songwriter. He has released four solo albums, two of which were recorded at Sputnik Studios in Nashville with Grammy-winning producer Mitch Danes and were mixed by another Grammy winner, Vance Powell. Come on down to listen and enjoy Chapman’s eclectic style of music and psychedelic rock. Find the event on Facebook for more.

6001. Film Photography Project Weekend Workshop @ Sawtooth School of Visual Arts (W-S) 9 a.m. Founded in 1945, the Sawtooth School of Visual Arts has classes and events open to everyone in the community. FPP founder Michael Raso will be cohosting with Leslie Lazenby, Mat Marrash, Mark O’Brien and special guest Joseph Brunjes to cover a range of film photography topics like large format, wet plate, home development, low IOS films and more. Guests will be able to try new products, exchange ideas and learn

new skills with film enthusiasts and may win a raffle. Check out the event on their website for more information.

SUNDAY June 7

Virtual Sunflower Door Hanger Making Party (HP) @ 3 p.m. Hosted by Paint and Play, a mobile paintparty business, this event will teach individuals step by step how to create a sunflower hanger perfect for the front door. Register online for just $15 to receive a supply list and sunflower woodcut. Find the event on Facebook for more information. BlackoutNC @ Lebauer Park (GSO) 2 p.m. For “anyone and everyone who believes in the cause.” Organizers ask that you wear black, have a mask and bring a sign.


June 4-10, 2020 Up Front News

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June 4-10, 2020

Coronavirus in the Triad: Up Front

(As of Wednesday, June 3)

Documented COVID-19 diagnoses

NC 30,000 (+888 today) Forsyth 1,465 Guilford County 1,352

News

COVID-19 deaths

NC 969 Forsyth 13 Guilford 70

Opinion

Documented recoveries

NC 18,860 Forsyth 95 Guilford 729

Hospitalizations

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NC 684 Forsyth n/a Guilford 230

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NEWS

June 4-10, 2020

Peaceful marches, broken windows, pepper spray and white supremacists. Here’s your recap of the protests in GSO and W-S that started on Saturday by Sayaka Matsuoka

SATURDAY

Up Front News Opinion Culture

Peaceful protesters gather and kneel in downtown Greensboro on Tuesday.

phone interview. “White supremacy is real. These people have terrorized for years. I understand, but I don’t agree. It shows that they are acting out of emotion and not logically. We don’t have to go at it an emotional way. People only see the dark side of us, then they’ll launch tear gas.” Greensboro Mayor Nancy Vaughan said that she doesn’t think those who caused destruction are from Greensboro. “We are experiencing damage throughout the city,” she said on Wednesday. “There have been busi-

nesses that have been looted that are not downtown. We have strong reason to believe that they were people who had come in under guise of being protesters. I don’t think the people who are looting our buildings, the people who did the damage on Saturday and Sunday nights, were from Greensboro. We’ve had lots of protests in our history. There has been anger but there has never been this widespread violence before. People who live in Greensboro never would have touched the civil rights museum.”

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to clear out. At some point during the evening, the county courthouse was also set on fire. Ron Glenn, the Greensboro Police Department’s public information officer, said that he does not know who caused the damage at the museum or the courthouse and that both incidents were still under investigation. One of the organizers of the event, Anthony Morgan, said that he doesn’t agree with the looting and the rioting but that he understands. “These people have learned this behavior from a system,” he said in a

CHRIS ENGLISH / TIGERMOTH CREATIVE

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It started around noon on Saturday. Mounting stress and concerns over the coronavirus, which has been found to disproportionately kill black and brown communities, came to a head after video footage of a white police officer killing George Floyd flooded social media and the country’s social consciousness in the past few weeks. Tired, upset and hungry for change, hundreds of protesters in Greensboro gathered in downtown where they sought to bring light to systemic racism and seek justice for those involved. They marched for close to nine hours down Elm Street towards Gate City Blvd. and all the way to Interstate 40, where they quickly took over all six lanes of traffic. The entire trek spanned about four miles. A single police car and multiple officers on bikes followed the group of protesters the entire day. The sun began to set and as protesters sang and chanted over the sides of the overpass, dozens of cars drove underneath, their drivers honking horns and raising fists out of the windows in support. A small party ensued with protesters dancing and singing in the middle of the street. After 9 p.m., several of the protesters retreated back to the downtown area where they were joined by other groups. Livestreaming from downtown, Triad City Beat captured footage that showed a heavy police presence while hundreds of protesters gathered and chanted at the Melvin Municipal Office Building on Washington Street. Earlier in the evening, one of the windows at the International Civil Rights Museum was busted out. It is unclear who caused the damage. For several more hours, protests continued peacefully in downtown with chanting, gathering and marching. At about 10:30 p.m. publisher Brian Clarey, who was livestreaming the footage, said he smelled what he thought was tear gas or pepper spray in the air despite protests remaining largely peaceful. Footage also caught sounds of what Clarey described as pepper spray bullets. Around 11 p.m., store windows on South Elm Street started to be broken and some stores were looted. By 12:30 a.m., most of the crowds had dispersed and downtown was beginning

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June 4-10, 2020 Up Front News Opinion Culture Puzzles

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Peaceful protesters march in downtown Greensboro on Tuesday.

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SUNDAY

On Sunday, more protests took off in downtown Greensboro starting around 6 p.m. with chants and marching through the streets for more than three hours. Organizers of the larger protest march from Saturday repeatedly emphasized that they planned to be peaceful as they took over a loop that went down Elm Street to Gate City Boulevard and back up Murrow Boulevard. At one point during the evening after the larger, formally organized protest had disbanded, a police line drove a wedge between one group of protesters at Friendly and another group that had busted out windows along three blocks south of Washington Street. The

damage included the Lincoln Financial Building, the Wrangler store, Scuppernong Books, Charlie’s Grocery and Cheesecakes by Alex, among others. Unsubstantiated rumors of white supremacists in the downtown area created some chaos for about 30 minutes at the end of the larger, protest. TCB confirmed that the photo of a group of armed white men in the back of a pickup truck wearing Hawaiian shirts was in Asheboro and not Greensboro. However, around the same time, three armed white men took up a post on North Eugene Street across from the ballpark in Greensboro. One of them, Jason Passmore, is affiliated with the Stokes County Militia. While the group

JORDAN GREEN

was apparently there to protect the Triumph motorcycle shop, the owner of the shop, who did not wish to be named, told TCB that he called the police on Passmore’s group twice, emphasizing that he did not invite them to protect his business and didn’t know them. “I was terrified,” the owner said. “They had guns, number one. They had a pickup truck. I thought they came to steal my motorcycles.” At about 11 p.m., the police played a recording announcing that the demonstration was over and that anyone who remained would be arrested and detained. Around midnight, TCB got reports that police fired what appeared to be a gas canister near Washington

Street downtown. According to Deonna Kelli Sayed who was helping clean up glass outside of Scuppernong Books, “businesses owners were on the street sweeping up. Then, the line of riot police deployed a tear-gas canister and everyone started running. One protestor yelled at the cops in the car, saying, ‘Why are you doing that? Businesses owners have arrived and they are trying to clean up!’ I could smell/ taste the tear gas on Elm. At that time, no one was in the street and no one was even heckling them. Really, things were winding down and people were just hanging out. It seemed like a silly way to defuse the situation.” In a contrasting account, Greensboro


June 4-10, 2020

mayor Nancy Vaughan said in a phone interview that tear gas was deployed when protesters threw rocks picked up from the train tracks at police to disperse the crowd.

MONDAY

News Opinion Culture

Peaceful protesters march in downtown Greensboro on Tuesday.

and then when a thousand people we didn’t expect showed up, they just decided to march,” said Calvin Peña, one of the organizers. “The police asked if they could escort us — that came from them.” Joshua Black, another organizer, asked protesters to go home at the end of a slate of speakers, which included state Rep. Derwin Montgomery and antiviolence activist Frankie Gist. Mayor Allen Joines also showed up, but listened

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Liberty and Sixth streets at about 5 p.m. and began marching in a loop through downtown that passed the Forsyth County jail, Winston-Salem City Hall and the Forsyth County Hall of Justice, cresting at more than 1,000 people. Echoing protests across the country, they lifted up the names of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor, while chanting, “No justice, no peace.” “We talked to the police, and we told them there wasn’t going to be a march,

CHRIS ENGLISH / TIGERMOTH CREATIVE

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TUESDAY

Tuesday marked the third day of peaceful protests in Winston-Salem. Mostly dressed in black, protesters gathered at the intersection of North

Up Front

On Monday afternoon, Greensboro mayor Nancy Vaughan issued a citywide curfew from 8 p.m. to 6 a.m. for the foreseeable future. The order exempts employees coming home from work, emergency personnel and journalists, amongst others. High Point officials enacted a similar curfew shortly afterwards. Vaughan said that she enacted the curfew not to protect property but to protect protester’s lives. “This was down for the health and safety of the people in those protests,” she said in a phone interview. Vaughan said that if “protests remain peaceful” that the curfew could be lifted on Monday or Tuesday. She said she plans to keep the curfew through the weekend because there is another protest planned. On Monday evening, a much smaller group of protesters gathered in downtown Greensboro for a third evening of action. While the protests remained peaceful, the group faced off against a line of more than a dozen tactical police officers who approached them with large protective shields. Shortly after the 8 p.m. curfew hit, police told protesters to go home or be arrested. After protesters defying the curfew dispersed peacefully at the order of the Greensboro Police Department, TCB visually confirmed once again that Jason Passmore was hanging out with a group on North Eugene St. According to police reports, five individuals were arrested in downtown Greensboro on Monday night. None of them were Passmore. One of the individuals was a man named Victor Andrew Arrios, who according to TCB’s livestreamed footage and a news report by WFMY, is the individual who made and brought Molotov cocktails to the protest. The police report states that Arrios was arrested for the “manufacturing and possession of a weapon of mass death and destruction.” The other four individuals arrested downtown had charges of being out past curfew and trespassing.

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June 4-10, 2020 Up Front News Opinion Culture Puzzles

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Artist Jenna Rice paints a portrait of George Floyd on the outside of Crafted: The Art of the Taco in downtown Greensboro.

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instead of speaking. The formal protest ended at about 6:30 p.m. with organizers urging people to return on Saturday at 12 noon and gather at City Hall while wearing black. A smaller group of about 200 people decided to keep marching, taking over the streets for another 90 minutes and making two loops through downtown as they held signs aloft and chanted. The march was non-confrontational, with the exception of short period when protesters briefly surrounded a squad car at the intersection of Fifth and Cherry streets, chanting, “No justice, no peace. Fuck these racist-ass police.” About an hour later, police Chief Catrina Thompson appeared at Sixth and Cherry, standing in in the middle of the

street and addressing seated protesters without amplification. “What happened to George Floyd was wrong; there was nothing right about that,” the chief said with visible emotion. “I want to also tell you that what that officer did is not representative of the law enforcement profession.” Thompson told the protesters she has a 15-year-old autistic son who might not be able to respond if an officer told him to raise his hands. “I would not stand here in this position and support in any way, shape or form anybody in our organization if I believed that they would bring harm to my son or any of you,” she said. “I will tell you that we come to work every day with a bullet-proof vest attached to our

chest and a service weapon attached to our hip. We leave our homes and we tell our children, we tell our families goodbye, not knowing if we will ever make it back, but we’re okay with that. We’re okay with that because we believe in what we do. So, to that end, I want to tell you: Thank you. Thank you for believing in us. Thank you for being out here, and for letting our voices and our pain be heard and felt without destroying our community.” Concluding her remarks, Thompson said, “And on that note, COVID is real, y’all. Let’s move!” Later in the evening, the group mobilized once again and took over highway U.S. 52, shutting it down completely, according to the Winston-Salem Journal.

CHRIS ENGLISH / TIGERMOTH CREATIVE

Over in Greensboro, a small group of protesters gathered once again in downtown on Elm Street. They chanted and sat on the ground but mostly dispersed after the 8 p.m. curfew. Down a few blocks on Martin Luther King Jr Dr., around 8:30 p.m., TCB confirmed that at least 13 gunshots were fired in the Southside district. According to officers on scene, no one was harmed.

USE OF FORCE BY POLICE

Ron Glenn, the public information officer for the Greensboro Police Department, said the police had used pepper spray on Saturday evening. He said that he was not sure about Sunday evening. “I know it’s generally used when you need to disperse a crowd,” Glenn said


Up Front News

Pepper spray pellet casing found in downtown Greensboro.

Shot in the Triad

police corralling peaceful protesters and then tear gassing them and using flash grenades. LaFrancois, who was in the middle of the attack, repeatedly said in his stream that his eyes and skin were burning. “I don’t understand what just happened,” he says in the video. Shortly after LaFrancois’s stream, the Charlotte police department released a statement on Twitter that they were “internally reviewing the circumstances that developed this evening on 4th Street to ensure policy and protocol were followed.”

Culture

missions are trained, equipped and prepared to assist law enforcement authorities and first responders,” said Air Force Gen. Joseph Lengyel, chief of the National Guard Bureau, in a press release. “We’re here to help and assist local authorities,” he said. “Our troops are here to protect life and property, and preserve peace, order and public safety.” In a phone call on Wednesday, Greensboro Mayor Nancy Vaughan said that they declined the deployment of National Guard troops to the city. In Charlotte on Tuesday evening, Queen City Nerve’s publisher Justin LaFrancois captured live footage of

SAYAKA MATSUOKA

Opinion

sor to make a thorough investigation of the incident and to forward a report as require.” Glenn told TCB that use-of-force reports are not public record as they are part of employee’s personnel records. Glenn also confirmed that the police department has rubber bullets at their disposal, although he said they have not been used yet. The Guilford County Sheriff’s Office assisted with policing protests but a department spokesperson said officers “did not use any force.” Both agencies rely on state law to dictate whether to use force in certain situations. According to general statute 15A-401, officers are permitted to use force, but not deadly force, to prevent the escape of a criminal from custody or to arrest a person the officer reasonably believes has committed a crime. They can also use force to defend themselves from what they reasonably believe to be the use or imminent use of physical force while attempting to arrest someone or prevent their escape. Nothing in the general statute describes use of force to disperse large crowds. Glenn told TCB that he is not sure if there is written protocol for use of force during crowd control situations. He said that while all officers that were downtown during the weekend were trained in crowd control, that he’s not sure if there is a directive specifically about use of force in these situations. Five hours away, on Monday afternoon, Washington DC park police and national guard officers deployed tear gas and shot rubber bullets to forcefully disperse peaceful protesters so President Trump could take a photo in front of a church. One day prior, North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper authorized the mobilization of 450 national guard troops to Charlotte, Raleigh and potentially other North Carolina cities. “Guard personnel assigned to these

June 4-10, 2020

in a phone interview. “Like when people start throwing rocks at police and there’s usually large crowds of police.” On Saturday evening, Brian Clarey reported smelling and feeling either tear gas or pepper spray in the air in downtown. On Sunday, one eyewitness said that a tear-gas canister was deployed just around midnight. On Monday evening, TCB did not notice any use of tear gas or pepper spray. In protests across the country, police have been seen using various kinds of weapons including tear gas, pepper spray, pepper spray bullets and rubber bullets on protesters, bystanders and journalists, often times unprovoked. When asked if police deployed the use of pepper spray balls, Glenn stated that the police department did not use those on Saturday. However, on Monday afternoon, TCB found multiple casings of what the department calls “PepperBall Projectiles” in downtown Greensboro near the railroad tracks as well as on Washington Street. These red plastic spheres are filled with “chemical irritants” and are launched from “high-pressure air launchers that delivers the projectiles with enough force to burst the projectiles on impact, releasing the irritant” according to the department’s directives. Although the spheres are “classified as a less-lethal device, the department’s manual states that the potential exists for the PepperBall projectiles to inflict injury when they strike the face, eyes, neck, and groin.” In two separate instances in 2004, the use of projectiles like the pepper balls used over the weekend in Greensboro, caused one death in Boston and damage to an unarmed student’s eye at the UC Davis. The department’s manual also states that any time a use of force is shown by an officer, “immediate notification of the employee’s supervisor is required. It is the responsibility of the supervi-

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Up Front

June 4-10, 2020

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EDITORIAL

When pandemic and pepper spray collide

Claytoonz by Clay Jones

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his last week in the Triad saw a Meanwhile, our state had its worst surge of street protests in our weekend yet in terms of new cases of cities, with moments beautiful COVID-19, and we’re using 80 percent and terrifying. of the state’s ICU capacity. In Greensboro, a Saturday afternoon And just for context: Our president action saw protestors shut down Interhad tear gas deployed at peaceful state 40 with the help of some officers demonstrators on Monday so he could to protest the death of George Floyd have his picture taken in front of a from a policeman’s knee on his neck. church, holding a brand-new Bible. Later that day, after hours of more If you’re looking to a 350-word or less peaceful demonstrations in newspaper editorial to make sense of it downtown Greensboro, chaos erupted. all, you’ll probably be disappointed. Shops on South Elm We can take some Street were vandalized solace in knowing we are and looted while the more The drama still all hurtling through one of formal protest actions the most dynamic periods plays out in unfolded on the tracks. in history, one that can Tear gas, pepper spray, only be fully understood excruciating those paint-ball pellets through the lens of hindwith pepper spray in them slow motion. sight, which won’t be in — all were deployed in place for years. the name of public safety. Meanwhile, the drama The conflict carried over into Sunday still plays out in excruciating slow night. motion: more new cases, more deaths In Winston-Salem, a different narraand recoveries, more businesses going tive emerged: Four days — so far — of under, more demonstrations against peaceful street protests and dempolice brutality, more actual police onstrations with virtually no conflict brutality in response, and occasional between activists and police, and no moments of sweet triumph amid the violence or vandalism save for a couple bedlam. smashed windows over the weekend, The world is burning. But we have to one at a downtown barbershop after believe something better will emerge the owner said some racist stuff on from the flames. It wouldn’t make Facebook, the other at Escape Salon. sense otherwise.

claytoonz.com


June 4-10, 2020 Up Front

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June 4-10, 2020

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South Elm Street, Greensboro

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June 1, 2020.

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CAROLYN DE BERRY


Across

by Matt Jones

Saturday June 13th

Sidney Abernathy Thursday June 18th

Open Mic Night

Saturday June 27th

Andrew Kasab

Up Front

©2020 Jonesin’ Crosswords

(editor@jonesincrosswords.com)

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602 S Elam Ave • Greensboro

Answers from previous publication.

(336) 698-3888

Opinion Culture Shot in the Triad Puzzles

1 “Interstate Love Song” band, briefly 4 “Fiddler on the Roof” dance 8 Frenzied 14 Some old Chryslers 16 Former Georgian president Shevardnadze 17 *Pioneering video game company founded in 1972 18 Egyptian goddess of love 19 Like almost all restaurant orders these days 20 Plate 22 Lennon’s second wife 23 *Japanese variation on a frozen dessert 28 Like old wristwatches 30 “I know! Pick me!” 31 Turn bad ©2020 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) 32 “Where ___” (song by Beck) 35 “Wow, cool!” 39 *Redundant-sounding title for an “X-Files” agent 42 “I’m Gonna Git You ___” (Keenen Ivory Wayans film) 43 “Clueless” actress Donovan 44 Powerful sphere 45 “___ a Kick Out of You” (Cole Porter song) 47 First name in the 2020 campaign 49 *Home of Indira Gandhi International Airport Answers from last issue 54 Prefix meaning “egg” 55 Nickname of a ‘50s-’60s sitcom kid 25 “House Hunters” cable channel 56 Freudian error 26 Did a Cuban ballroom dance 59 Is untruthful with 27 Cassowary’s cousin 62 *Former TLC reality show about tattooists 28 Kennel noises 65 Candle material 29 Chef Matsuhisa who co-owns a restaurant 66 “Go easy on me” with Robert De Niro 67 Bequeaths 33 Be really mad 68 Show that moved from Fox to ABC, familiarly 34 Comm. from some translators 69 “I just finished the puzzle!” exclamation 36 Characteristic of Schonberg’s music 37 “Boys for Pele” singer Amos Down 38 “It’s either hunt ___ hunted” 1 “Get a move on, Mittens!” 40 “Just joking around” 2 “The Wizard of Oz” dog 41 Publisher’s multi-digit ID 3 Down-to-earth 46 Macaroni shapes 4 ___ polloi 48 “Mr. Mojo ___” (repeated words in The 5 Sash for a kimono Doors’ “L.A. Woman”) 6 “Amazing” magician famous for 49 Nick of “Cape Fear” debunking 50 Dasani rival 7 PC character system used for some “art” 51 Handle with skill 8 Laugh from Beavis 52 Fancy way of saying “feet”? 9 “When Your Child Drives You Crazy” 53 Covered with green creepers author LeShan 57 “Lost ___ Mancha” (2002 documentary) 10 Partner of paste 58 It’s seen near the hyphen 11 Lake between two states 60 Traffic sign warning 12 Richie Rich’s metallic, robotic maid 61 Pull along 13 Format for Myst, back then 63 It may come after long 15 Emulate Pavlov’s dogs 64 Blanc behind Bugs 21 ___ Brothers Records (longtime label for “Weird Al” Yankovic) 24 Invention of new words

EVENTS

June 4-10, 2020

CROSSWORD “Take Two”– one of each to connect. SUDOKU

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Profile for Triad City Beat

TCB June 4, 2020 — Say their names  

Our first print issue back after 10 weeks of pandemic hiatus, with comprehensive coverage of the Triad protests, coronavirus numbers and mor...

TCB June 4, 2020 — Say their names  

Our first print issue back after 10 weeks of pandemic hiatus, with comprehensive coverage of the Triad protests, coronavirus numbers and mor...

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