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Greensboro / Winston-Salem / High Point July 11-17, 2019 triad-city-beat.com

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July 11-17, 2019

EDITOR’S NOTEBOOK

Goodbye, Frida Kahlo On Wednesday, the artist Jeks, aka Brian Lewis, stands atop a double-scissored man-lift and under an orange outdoor umbrella. He’s by Brian Clarey got an iPad in one hand, for reference, and he’s rattling a spray-can in the other. On the west wall of the Pig Pounder building in Midtown, and after much to-do about the piece of artwork he created just over a week ago, he’s eradicated Frida Kahlo’s face from the gun-toting torso, wiped the necklace of medallions and beads from around her neck, removed the earrings that looked like tribal shields. In their place, he’s restored the face of the original model for the photograph, as shot by photographer Robert Toren. It was Toren who put Kahlo’s face on a friend’s body to create this challenging piece of art. But it was Jeks who put it up on the wall. Now he’s adding a few wisps to her hair with an easy stroke of his hand, a whisper of pressure on the nozzle. “This was my decision,” he says, “after thinking about it for a long time. Sitting back and taking everything in. “This is the only option,” he says. It’s been a long few days for Jeks. The mural raised an immediate opposition on social media and elsewhere. TCB editor Sayaka Matsuoka took it on in this week’s issue — she hated it. It was, in this editor’s memory, the

BUSINESS PUBLISHER/EXECUTIVE EDITOR Brian Clarey brian@triad-city-beat.com

PUBLISHER EMERITUS Allen Broach allen@triad-city-beat.com

OF COUNSEL Jonathan Jones

1451 S. Elm-Eugene St. Box 24, Greensboro, NC 27406 Office: 336-256-9320 COVER: Johanna Elsner inside STAFF WRITER Lauren Barber her Airbnb in Winston-Salem, one lauren@triad-city-beat.com of the most popular in the area. STAFF WRITER Savi Ettinger savi@triad-city-beat.com [Photo by Sayaka Matsuoka] EDITORIAL INTERN Cason Ragland ART ART DIRECTOR Robert Paquette

EDITORIAL SENIOR EDITOR Jordan Green

robert@triad-city-beat.com SALES

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Sayaka Matsuoka

gayla@triad-city-beat.com

jordan@triad-city-beat.com

sayaka@triad-city-beat.com

SPECIAL SECTION EDITOR Nikki Miller-Ka niksnacksblog@gmail.com

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longest and most intense conversation about a piece of art Greensboro has had this century. Fueled in part by Matsuoka’s articulation of her problems with the image, the ire created a vortex that drew in Jeks, Toren, developer Marty Kotis, gun-shop owner Jay Bulluck and the model for the original photograph back in 2012, Donnette Thayer. Jeks talked to her himself. “She was bummed out that I made the decision to change the identity,” he says. “But she was honored to be part of it too. “I was excited about doing a piece that shows female empowerment,” he continues. “A lot of times I get asked to paint men. I was thinking it would be a positive thing. But it is what it is.” He adds a few more wisps to her hair and deepens the shadow defining her jawline. “Now I’m giving her her body back.” He coats his finger with white paint and carefully approaches Thayer’s face, gingerly adds a daub to the pupil, making it gleam, making her come alive. He gives a smoky undershadow to the eye, studies it, then adds a thin layer to the lock of hair obscuring her other eye. Jeks lights a cigarette, wipes the iPad on the front of his T-shirt and looks at the wall. It’s almost finished. “I don’t regret it,” he says. “I learned a lot, and that’s why I don’t regret it.” He pulls on his smoke. “I think I’m leaving it how I wanted to start it,” he says. “It was supposed to be about women’s empowerment.”

KEY ACCOUNTS Gayla Price CONTRIBUTORS

Carolyn de Berry, Matt Jones

TCB IN A FLASH @ triad-city-beat.com First copy is free, each additional copy is $1. ©2018 Beat Media Inc.


July 11-17, 2019

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July 11-17, 2019

CITY LIFE July 11-14, 2019 by Cason Ragland

THURSDAY July 11

TND’s 3 Strike Thursday Vol. 2 #10 @ Lost Ark Video Games (GSO), 6 p.m.

FRIDAY July 12

Lights for Liberty: A Vigil for Detained Migrants @ Governmental Plaza (GSO), 6:30 p.m.

Opening night for Stoo’s Famous Martian-American Gumbo @ Arts Based School (W-S), 6:30 p.m.

News

Up Front

rd

Released just over 20 years ago, Street Fighter III: 3rd Strike stands as a cult classic for the fighting game community. The high skill ceiling of these games often deter unfamiliar players, but the folks at Lost Ark Video Games in Greensboro want that to change. If your combos need work or you want to learn the basics, head on down to the arcade for some virtual fisticuffs. More information can be found on Facebook. When the extraterrestrial Stoo moves away from home, he finds out that his favorite fruit from Mars doesn’t grow on Earth. His new friends Billy and Kacey help him find earthly ingredients to create a brand-new dish. For more information, including additional showtimes, check out the event’s page on Facebook.

Puzzles

Shot in the Triad

Culture

Opinion

Walking on Water @ a/perture cinema (W-S), 6:30 p.m.

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After the death of his wife, environmental artist Christo creates The Floating Piers, a floating yellow walkway on Italy’s Lake Iseo. Following the film, artists Leigh Ann Hallberg and Paul Bright plus SECCA curator Wendy Earle will host a discussion. More information and tickets are available through a/perture’s website.

Candlelight vigils will be held all across the country on Friday to raise awareness of the Trump administration’s migrant concentration camps. Latinx speakers, artists, musicians and migrants will tell their stories in both Spanish and English. The hosts ask that attendees bring their own battery powered candles. Find out more on Facebook.

Game Builders Club Camp @ Code Ninjas (HP), 9 a.m. Kids 7 and older are invited to create their very own video games this weekend through Code Ninja’s Game Builders Club. Those who attend will use an application called Scratch, a special programming software designed for children. There are both half-days and full-days still available. You can find out more about the camp on Facebook.


July 11-17, 2019

SATURDAY July 13

Blacksmith demonstrations @ High Point Museum (HP), 10 a.m.

SUNDAY July 14

Cousins Maine Lobster @ Pig Pounder Brewing (GSO), 1 p.m. Up Front

Best of the 48-Hour Film Party 2019 @ the Carolina Theatre (GSO), 7:30 p.m. Last month, the various production teams of the 48-Hour Film Project undertook the immense challenge of creating their respective films. Not only that, but they had to write, shoot and edit their movies all within 48 hours. The Carolina Theatre will screen the best of them, followed by an awards ceremony. Learn more and buy tickets via the Carolina Theatre’s website. Pop-up Ramen Shop @ Thai Harmony (W-S), 11 a.m.

News

Shokunin Ramen will open soon in the Innovation Quarter of Winston-Salem. For now, though, their crew are back in Thai Harmony to serve their ramen. A select few bao and yakitori will also be for sale through this pop-up. Find out more on Facebook.

Culture

The High Point Museum has hosted several blacksmith demonstrations throughout the summer and this weekend is no different. Head on down to see that some people do, in fact, still make things like they used to. Discover more details via Facebook.

Glenn Miller Orchestra @ UNCSA Stevens Center (WS), 3 p.m. The world-famous orchestra comes to the Triad for a bombastic, big-band performance. While nothing could be finer than ham and eggs in Carolina, the orchestra will not go on in time for breakfast. That being said, you should really consider eating breakfast before 3 p.m. Tickets are available through UNCSA’s website.

Opinion

The Charlotte based food truck, Cousins Maine Lobster, tours the country and will stop by Pig Pounder Brewing this weekend. They’ll serve up lobster tacos, lobster rolls and other crustacean creations all afternoon. The Facebook page for the event has more details.

Shot in the Triad Puzzles

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July 11-17, 2019 Up Front

Reverse parking is un-American by Brian Clarey

The Black Panthers: Portraits from an Unfinished Revolution by Eric Ginsburg

Culture

Opinion

News

It’s perfectly acceptable to drive through a parking spot. Anything else is just psychotic.

FILE PHOTO

Let’s start by stating the obvious: People who reverse park — that is, back into parking spots instead of driving directly into them as god intended — are only doing it to show off. It is not easier than parking nose-first in a space. How could it be? And despite whatever these people will tell you, it’s not “almost as easy” either. Reverse parking requires more precision than a parallel park, which is one of the trickiest moves in parking. And sure, it’s easy to pull out of a parking space when you’re already facing the right way, but it’s a fair sight easier to pull out of a spot in reverse than to pull into one. It looks suspicious; it jams up the driving zones; it causes complete havoc in lots with slanted spaces and one-way thoroughfares. And how are you going to load your groceries like that? Some will recognize that the nose-out parking style enables a faster getaway, and it obscures rear-mounted tags, to which I ask: What kind of caper are you pulling here at the movie theater where you’ll need to leave in such haste and anonymity? Others will point out that in other countries, everyone parks that way. Bah! We’re Americans. We go in head first, guns a-blazin’; we’ll stay as long as we like, and we’ll worry about what happens when we leave as the time comes. There are a thousand excuses to park in reverse, but just one reason — to exclaim, “Look at me! I can drive backwards!” It’s a minor skill at best, like knowing how to tie a bow tie. I will give a clarification: It is perfectly acceptable to drive through a parking spot into the one from the opposing row so that the car remains facing out. For one, the math is completely different. And then, it’s not quite reverse parking now, is it? North Point Grill hosts

Shot in the Triad

Nik Snacks Restaurant Takeover

sponsored by Triad City Bites on Saturday August 10, 2019 5 pm-9 pm. The dinner menu features award-winning dishes straight from Nikki Miller-Ka’s blog,

Nik Snacks including: Fried chicken tenders with white cheddar and chive biscuits Pickled blueberry salad with basil vinaigrette Philly Cheesesteak Cheesecake

Puzzles

Red Wine Cream Cheese Brownies with seasonal ice cream

All entrees are a la carte

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7843 North Point Blvd, Winston-Salem, NC Call 336-896-0500 or visit northpointgrill.com for more information

The Black Panthers: Portraits from an Unfinished Revolution was published in fall 2016.

ERIC GINSBURG

I’ve read a half dozen books about the Black Panther Party and probably watched an equal number of documentaries about the leather-clad revolutionaries. But there are a few things that set The Black Panthers: Portraits from an Unfinished Revolution apart. Most importantly, the book edited by Bryan Shih and Yohuru Williams is a collection of oral history-style interviews with primarily rank-and-file members from across the country. Most accounts of the Black Panthers focus on the leadership, but this book’s strength rests with the everyday foot soldiers, ranging from New Orleans to Queens. Some attempts have been made locally to commemorate and document the work of the Winston-Salem chapter of the Panthers — most noticeably a historical marker installed in 2012 — but they’ve largely been left out of the larger narrative. This book changes that. Here, Nelson Malloy, Hazel Mack and Larry Little discuss why they joined the Panthers and talk about their time in the party, narrowing on the free ambulance service they established. Mack, who later founded the Carter G. Woodson charter school, details the branch’s lesserknown efforts, including a pest-control program. She also describes how the FBI failed to divide them and the local NAACP using fake letters. “It got to be a real joke because people would bring us the letters,” she said. “We knew each other. These were people you grew up with.” Malloy, who ran the free ambulance program, explains how the operation worked, revealing that the Panthers actually partnered with Bowman Gray Stadium. Malloy also describes how he survived an assassination attempt by fellow Panthers as the organization fell to ugly infighting. Little is perhaps the most well known locally of the three, his name appearing repeatedly in these pages for his continued activism and scholarship. But you likely don’t know the gripping stories he offers in the book, including one about how the Panthers faced down the Klan. “One time the KKK said that black children had lice and that they were going to stop all black kids who got off the bus and inspect them before they could go to the white school,” Little said. “We told them they were not going to do any such thing.” Winston-Salem also receives a shout-out in one other interview, where Phyllis Jackson describes interviewing Panther women about how their families reacted when they joined the party. “This one comrade, Haven Henderson, from the Winston-Salem chapter, said her mom came down in a fur coat and a Cadillac and said, ‘What are you doing down here? Come home!’” she recounted. Accompanying the dose of local history, The Black Panthers is also a worthwhile book for its moving photography. Large portraits of each Panther take up full pages accompanying each interview. The photos are all contemporary, bringing this history to life, and illustrating the Panther alumni among us.


NEWS

A disparity study commissioned by the city of Winston-Salem aims to identify gaps where businesses owned by people of color and women are under-utilized when it comes to public contracting dollars.

Up Front News Opinion

Reggie Smith, director of the Winston-Salem Disparity Study, explains the purpose of the study at a public engagement meeting on Tuesday.

Cont. on Pg. 8

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trend. Martha Gomez, who provides translation and interpretation services through Catholic Charities, said she recently went through the process of becoming an approved vendor through the city’s Minority- and Women-Owned Business Enterprise program. “I was able to complete that process, but then I found myself saying, ‘Where do I go next?’” she said. “How do I find out about the contracts available? How do I know who needs language services? What doors do I knock on? What am I supposed to do? I find myself in a situation where I believe being on the vendor list helps me, but I don’t see how I can make use of it.” Smith said when the disparity study is complete, it will include a detailed list of the goods and services the city is buying. “And we’ll have percentages of what they’re spending in those different categories,” he said. “Then you can do a match: These are the firms and the services that they’re offering — that we’re offering — and here’s the city — this is

Shot in the Triad

I’ll make you wait another 30 days. I’ll other people of color who live in the come up with some jive reason as to why city. But Hasan’s point stood: If African I can’t pay you.’ But you the city sitting Americans are systematically excluded over here, you paying him. He’s getting from city contracting, many won’t even his money. Why are you allowing him to bother. not pay the subs?” “Why would you encourage someone Mitchell said concern about how the to come in and catch all of this hell?” he city enforces the goals of the Minorityasked. and Women-Owned Business Enterprise Hasan said black-owned businesses, program has been a theme of the first which historically lack access to capital, two public-engageall too often find that ment meetings. About prime contractors 18 people attended doing business with To learn more about the first meeting at the the city refuse to make Enterprise Center in timely payments, putthe Winston-Salem southeast Winstonting black subcontracDisparity Study, visit Salem on Monday tors in a bind when morning, and another they have to pay for wsdisparity.com. 10 showed up for the materials. Tuesday evening ses“How can the city sion at the Georgia set up and watch Taylor Neighborhood Center. The third these prime contractors walk out of meeting was scheduled for Wednesday there weekly with millions and millions from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Hanes of dollars in contracts and then won’t Hosiery Community Center on the force him to pay the subs?” asked Hasan, north side. who has 40 years of experience in the Another emerging theme was access construction industry. “He pays the subs to information, although Mitchell said when he wants to. And if you make a there isn’t yet enough data to call it a ruckus, they say, ‘Well, I’ll fix you good.

JORDAN GREEN

Culture

Ghali Hasan, a senior project manager for his wife’s construction company, posed a question to a group of consultants hired by the city of Winston-Salem during a public engagement meeting on the city’s south side on Tuesday night. “If we make up 35 percent of the city’s population, my God, why can’t we get but 5 percent of the revenue?” Hasan asked the consultants as a court reporter recorded his statement. “I think our goals need to be at least what our community represents. If you’re taking my tax dollars, but then you’re not allowing me to participate in the city’s business.” The city’s minimum goal for participation in public contracting by minorityand women-owned business enterprises is 10 percent. That breaks down into two buckets — a 5 percent goal for businesses owned by white women, and another 5-percent goal for all businesses owned by people of color, men and women. For fiscal year 2017-18, the share of city business that went to MBEs — or minority-owned business enterprises — stood at 5.5 percent. The year before that it was 3.3 percent. And for the four preceding years, minority participation in city contracting didn’t even crack 3 percent. In February, Winston-Salem City Council voted to hire MGT Consulting Group at a cost of $333,570 to undertake a disparity study to compare the utilization of minority- and women-owned businesses against the availability of such businesses in the regional marketplace. The consultants are examining the city’s contracting history over a five-year period, from July 1, 2013 through June 30, 2018. “If we do find disparity,” said Reggie Smith, the project director for the study, “then we’re going to make recommendations to deal with correcting that issue.” Vernetta Mitchell, the project manager for the study, cautioned Hasan that the disparity study will measure utilization of African-American and other nonwhite businesses against their share of the overall business population, not the percentage of African Americans and

July 11-17, 2019

Exclusion of black contractors highlighted in W-S public meeting by Jordan Green

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July 11-17, 2019 Up Front News Opinion Culture Shot in the Triad Puzzles

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what we’re buying. And then you got to try to match those two together. And where there is no match, then you’ve got to do some kind of training program to get businesses and people that are interested in going into business to match those services that are not currently being matched.” Sherman Transou, who owns a landscaping business, said a mentor took him aside and helped him understand that he could take advantage of better opportunities by shifting from residential to commercial jobs. To make the transition, he had to learn to read blueprints and a ruler. Now he’s handling a contract for Malloy Park, a 4-acre park to honor former Councilman Nelson Malloy that was financed through the 2014 bond. “I am creating a program that I can take any landscaper that aspires to be in this industry — I’m gonna show them how to do it,” Transou said. “I’m meeting with an architect… as well as some other contractors to take these individuals to say, ‘Here, we’re gonna help you walk yourself through this process so you can have it.’ Because the revenue is greater than what you make on the residential side.“That’s where I’m coming from — is working with the minorities to help them achieve the — take ’em and say, ‘Yeah, you can fight the system,’ but sometimes if you fight the system, the problem is that we don’t have the people that can do the work,” Transou added. Hasan offered a different perspective, arguing that there are plenty of AfricanAmericans ready to work, but the city’s economic resurgence is passing them over. “If you can’t work right here in the city with all the work that’s going on in the city — you’re not working, and you’re pouring concrete?” he said. “They’re tearing down a building it seems like on every corner. Every road’s covered up, and all these black men are standing on the corner with a 40 and a hat turned around backwards. Something’s wrong.” After the meeting, Hassan said he’s skeptical that the city will use the disparity study to hold prime contractors accountable for opening opportunities to people of color. “I think black people in this city have been left out so long that you may have to do some intentional things like create a black business district and let city money go directly to people that hire people in that area,” he said.

TRUTH IS POWER

Cont. from Pg. 7

Hard news at no cost to you, and no matter the cost to us.


July 11-17, 2019

Triad colleges work to prevent sexual assault on campus by Sayaka Matsuoka With a wider conversation about sexual assault in the general culture, local universities are working to provide prevention tactics for students, staff and faculty.

Up Front News Opinion

According to a 2016 study conducted by the Bureau of Justice, one in five college women experience sexual assault.

Cont. on Pg. 10

Puzzles

conducting campus climate surveys that gauge how much students know about sexual assault and whether they know what the school’s resources are. Emily Scott, the Title IX coordinator for Greensboro College, said that in addition to an online program, the institution conducts a survey every two years. “Our campus has become more aware of this topic,” she said. “The data [from the survey] showed a jump in what students know about the sexual misconduct policy, particularly from 2015 to 2017. We saw a big jump in students who were aware that we had a policy and had received training about the topic. “The more you discuss this on campus, and certainly the more society in general discusses this topic, it lends itself to an increase in reports,” she said. And while it may seem counterintuitive, an increase in reports of sexual assault can be a good thing. “Because more people recognize it and there are more resources, there’s an increase in reports,” said Sexton-Lewter, the senior assistant director for wellness at UNCG. “People know where to get help.”

Shot in the Triad

course. Peer-led training is a key part in Like UNCG, many other universisexual-assault prevention, according to ties in the area, including Wake Forest Michelle Carroll, the associate director University and High Point University, reof external programming at End Rape quire students, particularly freshman, to on Campus. The nonprofit was founded take mandatory online courses to learn by Annie E. Clark and Andrea Pino, two about sexual assault. Wake Forest began survivors who were highlighted in the providing a course through EverFi, a 2015 documentary The Hunting Ground, national company that specializes in which exposed sexual assaults on college online courses and trainings for schools campuses including UNC-Chapel Hill. and workplaces, in 2016. “Prevention has to address multiple “It provides a base,” said Tanya Jachilayers,” she said. “It has to address miak, Wake Forest’s Title IX director. individual biases, prevention at the re“There’s a common language like what lationship level between individuals, the is effective consent and community level and what should a bystandthe cultural level.” er do?” Carroll said that To learn more about Wake Forest also while having online requires additional campus sexual assault courses is fine, it’s not training for their athto create lastand for resources, visit enough letes, as mandated by ing change. the NCAA, and works “It’s not enough at endrapeoncampus.org. with student leaders in all,” she said. “How fraternities and sororimuch brain power do ties. you need to put in to “We know that peer education is complete it? These are difficult concepts. incredibly important,” she said. “We They’re difficult because we don’t talk have fraternities and sororities who have about sex education or sexual violence wanted to become more involved at an until students go to college.” organizational level so they receive adOne of the things that Carroll said ditional training.” that all universities should be doing is

FILE PHOTO

Culture

One in five college women experience sexual assault. That’s based on a 2016 study conducted by the Bureau of Justice. During a time when more people are having conversations about sexual assault and harassment in society — due in large part to movements like #MeToo and #TimesUp — local colleges and universities are working to raise awareness of sexual assault. At UNCG, a new online sexual assault-prevention course kicks off this month. In past years, the school used a broader, widely-distributed online course but this year marks the introduction of a customized course built by UNCG faculty for UNCG students. The course, named Student Well-Being: It Matters, is mandatory for all new students, both graduate and undergraduate, and aims to shed light on sexual assault. “It’s a really good way to reach the general population to show what sexual assault is,” said Kim Sexton-Lewter, the senior assistant director for wellness at the university. “People think it’s just rape, but it’s so many other things as well. It helps students be more conscious in its prevalence and how to prevent it.” The course opens on July 15 and requires new students to take it during the summer, before they start school in the fall. It’s short; it takes only two hours and is split into two parts, but covers definitions of sexual assault, personal and community rights and responsibilities and information related to bystander intervention. It also points students to additional resources on campus. It was created by faculty at UNCG to fit the specific needs of the university. “UNCG is a unique campus,” said Jeffrey Milroy, an assistant professor at UNCG and one of the faculty members who designed the new course. “We’re not drinking at the same rate as other institutions, which can reduce risk for other negative consequences. Tailgating is not a part of our school as much. That’s why we decided to move toward a much more customized approach.” Still, all students under 25 at UNCG are required to take an alcohol-awareness course that deals with how to monitor drinking. Topics like mental health and sleep wellness are also covered in the

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Culture

Opinion

News

Up Front

July 11-17, 2019

Cont. from Pg. 9

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Carroll also notes the importance of intersectionality when talking about sexual assault. Issues like race, class and power dynamics are hard to learn in a single online course. For that reason, Carroll advocates for repeated in-person trainings and believes students should be involved every step of the way. “Universities should have students on the committee to develop programming or review programming that the school is interested in purchasing,” she said. “They should also be involved in the creation of next campus climate survey. The committee should be representative of the school community — students, teachers, staff, athletics.” Carroll also recommends universities build strong partnerships with local rape crisis centers so students have an outside source they can turn to for confidential reporting. “Rape crisis centers are experts on issues of sexual violence,” she said. “School administrators can’t be expected to be experts on all of this. The centers also help build trust with the student body. Students don’t trust their institutions, and there are a lot of reasons for that.” At UNCG, Sexton-Lewter said her department works to make sure students know that there is a plethora of resources for students to get educated about the topic. She said the university provides trainings about healthy relationships and conducts presentations in which students act out certain situations. Israel Smith, a rising junior at UNCG and a campus tour guide, said that he believes the resources and trainings help students. “A lot of times people say, ‘I didn’t know,’” he said. “But with the courses, you can’t say ‘I didn’t know’ anymore. It’s good that it is mandatory. I definitely do think it helps create consent culture because you can know the signs.” For Sexton-Lewter, getting students to rethink learned behaviors is key to changing the culture around sex. “I’ll have students question what consent is,” she said. “Like they’ll say, ‘If a girl texts me to come over, that’s not consent?’ and I’ll say absolutely that’s not consent. And we’ve seen students that didn’t realize that maybe they have been sexually assaulted. That just because this person is [their] boyfriend and [they] had sex with them before doesn’t mean it’s okay. I like to say, ‘Yesterday doesn’t mean yes today.’ The challenge is getting that mindset out of people who have been conditioned to think that way.” Carroll said that in addition to preventing sexual assault, universities need to do a better job supporting survivors. “In the past five years, this has become a dinnertable topic,” she said. “We have to spend time telling students that their experience matters, that their story matters, that their pain matters. We need to keep each other alive in this movement, and good prevention creates a movement.”


Latinx Border patrol agents: ‘Us against them’

Opinion Culture

More than 50 percent of Border Patrol employees are Latinx, and yet an us-againstthem mindset prevails.

News Shot in the Triad Puzzles

control. The border ultimately is an arbitrary political line drawn to give meaning to a forced idea of who is a “true” American, defined mostly in the negative by who it keeps out. How can Latinx Border Patrol agents show such contempt towards people who look like them, whose aspirations so closely mirror their own, whose stories are an echo of their own families’ journey? In her April 2018 article in the Los Angeles Times, Brittany Mejia wrote about Jose Avalos, a 28-year-old Border Patrol trainee in Imperial County, Calif. who was born in the United States shortly after his mother, Fanny Posada, illegally crossed the border from Mexico in the late 1980s. Posada herself applied to join the Border Patrol in 2001, she told Mejia. Agents grilled her during her interview on how they could be sure she wouldn’t let immigrants go free. “You’re paying me, and I have to do my job,” Posada replied. “But I’m not going to be mean and I’m going to tell them how they can try legally. That I will try to share with them — because I know they’re nice people; they’re just looking for employment. Now if I found someone with drugs, I probably won’t be that nice.” She ultimately decided not to join because there was no one to watch her children. But research by David Cortez, an assistant professor of political science and Latinx Studies at the University of Notre Dame, suggests that kindness doesn’t survive long in the agency. To the contrary, its function breeds contempt and dehumanization. Over the course of 13 months, Cortez has interviewed numerous Border Patrol agents. One agent in particular, Cortez writes in a July 3 opinion piece in USA Today, said he felt unhappy about the requirements of his chosen line of work, but “emphasized the need to push aside feelings of empathy if he hoped to pay his own bills.” It’s the paycheck that motivates Latinx agents to do a job that requires them to “round up or deport neighbors and family members from the very communities they call home,” Cortez writes, not “self-hatred,” not “a denial of ethnic identity,” not a belief that “being party to the state’s exclusionary machinery cements, in a way, their own individual claims to belonging as Americans — to whiteness.” The parallels between Border Patrol agents doing a job to provide for their families and “migrants willing to risk their lives and flout immigrations laws in the hopes of providing a better life for their families here in the United States” might be glaringly obvious, Cortez writes, “but such comparisons only seem to reinforce for Latinx agents the ‘us vs. them’ distinctions.”

Up Front

One of the jarring aspects of the flurry of reporting over the past few weeks about secret Facebook groups where Border Patrol agents share hate is the surnames of many of the perpetrators. A July 5 article by Ryan Devereaux in The Intercept shows a by Jordan Green meme posted by Hector Garcia Jr. that purports to show Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez performing oral sex through a detention center fence in a mock Porn Hub preview. One member named Eric Castillo made fun of dead migrant children by writing, “Little tonk blanket ideas!” The word “tonk” is a slur for migrant, and the post included a video of a large portion of meat wrapped in foil, with the idea that the foil apparently resembled the mylar blankets given to unaccompanied children by Border Patrol. In another thread, Border Patrol members named Gabriel Gonzalez, Zack Smith, Anthony Ramos, Rick Mora Jr. and Michael Scherer ridiculed Central American names, while posting intake forms and IDs with the names of detainees. In one respect, the phenomenon is not surprising. A paramilitary force whose mission is preventing undocumented people from entering the country by its nature promotes an us-against-them attitude. And given that the majority population in the areas along the southern border, from the Rio Grande Valley across the southern portions of New Mexico, Arizona and California, is Latinx, it makes sense that Latinx people would make up a large portion of the agency’s workforce. In a region saddled with high poverty, a job with the Border Patrol is a ticket to middle-class stability. More than 50 percent of Border Patrol employees are Latinx, according to an April 2018 report in the Los Angeles Times, and 10 out of 11 people taking part in the Border Patrol’s citizens’ academy that year were Latinx. The militarized border dehumanizes both the migrants subjected to squalid conditions and those tasked with enforcing its policies. Like the mass-incarceration state that sorts the economically desperate into roles of prisoner or prison guard, the exclusionary apparatus of the state projects an economic force that draws an unforgiving line between oppressed and oppressor on the border. The willful refusal of the Trump administration to provide adequate staff and facilities to meet the needs of asylum seekers and migrants, including families and children, ensures barbaric conditions, and makes it all but inevitable that frontline agents eventually come to despise those under their

July 11-17, 2019

CITIZEN GREEN

OPINION

11


by Clay Jones

Up Front

July 11-17, 2019

Claytoonz

Stevens Center lost in the shuffle Forget for the moment the question of Gov. Roy Cooper’s veto imposed upon the Republican budget, and the compromises from the two camps that followed this week. He could be forgiven for quashing the thing on pure principle, considering the manner in which the GOP has run roughshod over the state legislature for the last decade. For now, let’s look instead at a smaller thread spun off of the overall budget story and the document’s main author, Rep. Donny Lambeth of Forsyth County. The House draft of Lambeth’s budget called for $42.2 million from the state to renovate the Stevens Center, UNCSA’s downtown performance space, which began life in 1929 as Winston-Salem’s Carolina Theatre. But it also did not allow for the expansion of Medicaid, a demand by the Democratic caucus in the legislature, as well as the governor himself. So Lambeth put the Stevens Center money on the bargaining table, informing the Forsyth County House delegation that the funds would be revoked in the Senate version of the budget unless they all voted in favor of the House ver-

sion, in defiance of their party’s strategy. Don’t let his puerile name fool you: Donny plays hardball. Reps. Evelyn Terry and Derwin Montgomery voted against the budget, and the money vaporized. Now let’s veer back to the compromises offered by the GOP and Cooper’s office, both of which incorporate some form of Medicaid expansion, and one of which will likely pass. One representative told the News & Observer on Tuesday that any form of Medicaid expansion would help between 300,000-500,000 North Carolinians who are currently without health insurance. That rep was… Donny Lambeth, and the bill he was talking about is his own, a version of his Carolina Cares bill that GOP leadership refused to advance in 2017. And so now this bill, which includes some Medicaid expansion, becomes the carrot to entice Dems to vote for the bdget. Meanwhile the Stevens Center renovation appears to have gotten lost in the shuffle, another casualty in the political pissing match that’s been passing as governance for almost 10 years now.

Don’t let the puerile name fool you. Donny Lambeth plays hardball.

News Opinion Culture Shot in the Triad Puzzles

12

EDITORIAL

claytoonz.com


July 11-17, 2019

Nik Snacks School lunches, all summer long, help Triad kids stay fed

S

Up Front News Opinion

“We’re worried about the kids eating,” says Tracie Fulp, Carver High School’s foodservice supervisor. “This is just one more option for them to eat.”

NIKKI MILLER-KA

Shot in the Triad Puzzles

program. partnership with the Second Harvest Food Bank of Northwest “I’m taking 90 meals out today and that will give me more North Carolina. than enough” he says. “If I feel we are going to run out of food, In Guilford County, lunch is offered in select parks as part I’ll contact another supervisor. We do the very best we can to of the ENERGY in the Park, a summer playground program. make sure each kid gets food.” Greensboro Parks and Recreation also provides free meals to The school district food truck that circulates in neighborchildren participating in its recreation center day camps. hoods without transportation access to food sites originates One set of groups aims to put plans into action sooner, and operates out of Union Cross Elementary School in Kernerrather than later. The Urban Food Policy Council in Forsyth sville. County has been commissioned since 2018. The council, which While the Winston-Salem metropolitan area is seventh was formed to initiate and promote actions that increase in the nation for food food access in Winstonhardship among children, Salem, and which has a according to the Food And Childhood Hunger Action To find summer meal programs and sites near you, Action Center, more than Group working to impletext SUMMER MEALS to 9779 or your ZIP code to 26 food- and hunger-rement a universal breakfastlated partner agencies and in-class program in all 877-877. Call the Hunger Hotline at 866-348-6479 groups are listed on the city public schools where 50 or visit fns.usda.gov/summerfoodrocks of Winston-Salem’s webpercent or more students site. In 2018, Mayor Allen receive free or reduce-price Joines announced a major lunches. citywide campaign called Marcus Hill, a member of “Think Orange” to combat hunger and food insecurity in Winthe Food Policy Council and co-coordinator of Forsyth Foodston-Salem and Forsyth County. The Think Orange campaign works, is a staunch supporter of food systems in the area. is funded through a $115,500 grant from the National League “It’s been tricky to find the agency as for what this council of Cities in partnership with the Washington, DC-based Food can do, what power does it have and what we can do,” he says. Research and Action Center. Winston-Salem is one of six cities As one of 34 councils in the state of North Carolina, it aims selected. The Think Orange campaign encompasses nine major to highlight local food councils and change food systems. initiatives including expansion of summer nutrition programs Until then, the green beans are packed, ready to go. The and a hot meals after-school program for children that is a day’s work is not done.

Culture

o many green beans. While the hallowed halls of school are empty, the kitchen is alive with activby Nikki Miller-Ka ity. Hundreds of small Styrofoam cups stand like soldiers on trays as workers fill them feverishly with spoonfuls of warm green beans. Steam billows up from the hot pans filled to the brim with more pods. Garlic and paprika spice the air as the next set of pans are carried away, only to be replaced with more Styrofoam cups, more beans, and then more scooping. The low din of kitchen noises combined with the whirring of the powerful exhaust system fans punctuates laughter and chatter. Tracie Fulp, Carver High School’s foodservice supervisor and her team prepare breakfast and pack lunches to feed hundreds of children each weekday during the summer. Carver is the largest and busiest site for the Winston-Salem/ Forsyth County School summer nutrition program. Ward Elementary and Union Cross Elementary are second and third. Between five vans and 15 employees, more than 450 meals get packed up daily to be delivered into area neighborhoods so that kids have something to eat. Also known as the Summer Food Service Program, this US Department of Agriculture offering ensures that children in low-income areas continue to receive nutritious meals during the summer, and other times when they do not have access to school lunches or breakfasts. In addition to lunch, shelf-stable breakfast packs are also available. “We’re worried about the kids eating. This is just one more option for them to eat,” Fulp said. The packs are given to the children in order to tide them over until “we can get back to them the next day.” Today’s lunch: cheeseburgers, packs of baby carrots with ranch dressing, fresh fruit, juice and water. And, of course, green beans. They never know how much to make, but they never run out of food. “It’s a guessing game. They get demographics from property managers and after the first week, we adjust as we go.” Kerry Riddick, food service supervisor for North Forsyth High School, is one of the system’s van drivers. This year marks his second summer working with the

13


July 11-17, 2019 Up Front News Opinion Culture Shot in the Triad Puzzles

14

CULTURE Triad Airbnbs use crafting and creativity to draw visitors by Sayaka Matsuoka

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or two months during summer 2017, Johanna Elsner and her family of four lived out of a tiny house while their home was being remodeled. They went from their 3,000-square-foot farmhouse to one a tenth of its size. Sometimes she wishes they still lived in it. “I didn’t want to go back,” says Elsner, who grew up in Winston-Salem. “We had plenty of space and we spent more quality time together.” Elsner, who helped build the tiny home and now lists it on Airbnb, says it’s her most popular home on the vacation rental website. Several homes in the Triad garner interest from visitors each year as Airbnb rentals. Unique properties boast individual charm that makes them perfect for quick getaways or a much-needed staycation. According to data from Airbnb, North Carolina residents made close to $100 million as hosts in 2018. Greensboro ranked 10th in the top 15 cities in the state based on number of guests and income while Winston-Salem and High Point didn’t make the cut. Asheville ranked the highest in the state by a landslide. A recent press release by Airbnb contends that the company’s vacation rentals complement rather than compete with the state’s hotel industry and that their “unique and un-replicable” homes contribute to the growth in the state’s travel industry. In Winston-Salem, the 36-foot house on wheels, also known as Roost 36, sits parked on the Elsners’ property next to their 125-year-old farmhouse on Beeson Dairy Farm. The family began constructing tiny homes in 2014 after friends asked them to build one for them. The Elsners had been in the home construction business for years, flipping area houses and even bought their home as a fixer-upper. But now, their focus is on tiny homes. “We found the thing we didn’t know we were looking for,” says Elsner, who runs Perch and Nest, a tiny-home company, with her husband. Since then, the couple has built about 25 tiny homes, three of which are parked on their four acres of land and are available on Airbnb. Roost 36 has five stars on Airbnb with more than 60 reviews. Elsner says it’s so popular that they haven’t had a week-

Amanda Jane Albert’s listing in Greensboro is a kind of treehouse with a focus on having a small ecological footprint.

SAYAKA MATSUOKA

end off since they put the house up on the site last September. Elsners’ relaxing farm or await the occasional visit from their The house looks a bit like Bauhaus meets Southern charm, pot-bellied pig, Hammie. with its stark-white exterior and floor-to-ceiling, black-framed Elsner says putting the house up on Airbnb was a no-brainer windows. The floors have a distressed, worn-in look that runs and that it’s helped them share their love of tiny homes. throughout the bottom floor of the space which houses the “It’s very rewarding to have people come to our farm and living area as well as a small kitchen, complete with a cooklove it so much,” she says. “And to come to something we top and a mint-green Smeg refrigeradesigned and built and be so complitor and matching green toaster oven. mentary.” Canvases of farm animals adorn the Half an hour away in Greensboro, To learn more about these listings walls while colorful rugs and pillows Amanda Jane Albert can relate to visit inhabitsustainably.com and add warmth to the already inviting Elsner’s love of creating one-of-aperchandnest.com. atmosphere. A row of windows cuts kind nests. She built her own Airbnb rectangles out of the walls, letting in too, the same year the Elsners were plenty of natural light. Two additional building theirs. skylights enhance the airiness. Tucked Constructed nine feet up in the away in the back, just past a bathroom complete with a full air, Albert’s “Roost” is conveniently located near Revolution soaking tub, is a twin mattress under the stairs. They lead to Mill and is situated behind her home in the McAdoo Heights the loft where a queen mattress sleeps two. It’s small, but not neighborhood. The property also has five stars on Airbnb with as small as you’d think. a little more than 100 reviews and was recently revealed as the A spacious patio with retractable screens and a gently most wish-listed property in Guilford County by Airbnb. swaying windchime invites guests to take in the view of the From the outside, it looks like a giant treehouse.


July 11-17, 2019 Up Front News Opinion Culture into a home and now rents out the ranch-style home they previously lived in. As she walks around the 430-square-foot treehouse, Albert points out the medley of materials she collected to bring her vision to life. Old slate roofing tile repurposed for kitchen countertops. Corrugated metal roofing lining the walk-in shower. Reclaimed barnwood that wraps around the queen-size bed. Weathered wine boxes from the Red Collection that serve as extra storage under the built-in couch in the living room. Everything is intentional with no detail overlooked. And that’s what Albert likes about the space. Sometimes she likes it so much she wishes she lived in her treehouse full-time. She doesn’t have a TV, and that’s on purpose. “It’s supposed to be a retreat,” she says. “I wanted people to come and be present and in tune with their environment, to relax and to get away from things.” Don’t worry though, she has wi-fi.

Puzzles

Up two sets of stairs, guests enter a cozy and inviting space that looks like it’s right out of a storybook. Planks of warm pine make up the floor while the ceiling shows off what Albert says is a less commercial poplar because of its natural markings. “I think that’s what makes it beautiful,” Albert says. Albert worked for Habitat for Humanity for 17 years before deciding to build her own getaway. Like the Elsners, she now owns her own business, Inhabit Sustainable Living Solutions, an eco-conscious building company that focuses on using environmentally friendly materials to create living spaces. This Airbnb property started off as her first experiment. “We wanted to figure out what materials we could use,” she says. “How energyefficient could we get it. What resources were available? It was the first time I could just design what I wanted, freely just create something on my own.” So far, she’s built five houses for customers in the area. At least two of them are also on Airbnb. She says that one family asked her to convert their backyard garage

SAYAKA MATSUOKA

Shot in the Triad

The Elsners’ most popular Airbnb is Roost 36, which sits on their four-acre property in Winston-Salem.

15


July 11-17, 2019 Up Front News Opinion Culture Shot in the Triad Puzzles

16

CULTURE At the Westerwood, Matty Sheets is at it again by Brian Clarey

I

t’s a Tuesday night, and so Matty Sheets, like he has done almost without exception for the last 17 years, drags himself out to host open-mic night. The clubs have changed — first it was the Flatiron with his pal Mikey Roohan; later it moved to New York Pizza before it landed here, at the Westerwood Tavern, where he’s held this Greensboro standard for the last 110 weeks, missing just one installation for a trip back home to New Hampshire to celebrate his mother’s 70th birthday. “On my brother’s frequent-flyer miles!” he exclaims. “First class!” It’s half an hour before showtime and he’s working the floor, double-checking the sign-up sheet against people who are actually in the room. He keeps the list in an old-school marbled composition book, crosses off each act as they get on stage. It’s a different show every week. Tonight a few first-timers will make their debut, including a groovy folk singer from Atlanta named Carly who will pull a couple sets. After he tunes his guitar at the bar, Michael Springer will drop a couple of tight originals to the barroom’s delight. “He just moved to Greensboro,” Sheets will say. “He’s been here since Saturday.” Then there’s Bob Liana, a harp player who’s in town on business from New Jersey who likes to drop in on open-mic nights when he’s on the road. Before he begins his piece, he’ll admit that back in the 1970s he studied under Piedmont blues harmonicist Sonny Terry, and then rip into a frenzy of blowing, stomping, hooting and hollering to raise the ghosts of the flatlands. Sheets has been a stanchion of the city’s creative underclass for 20 years. He’s played with Laila Nur and Molly McGinn. He’s played with Magpie Thief. He was a Monkeywhaler and a Blockhead. And does anyone even remember Deviled Eggs? And hey — there’s Kristen Leigh over in the corner of the Westerwood Tavern, waiting for the show to begin. She called herself Callie West when she used to play Sheets’ Flatiron open-mic night, and eventually joined his band. Later she’ll pull out a shruti box and make it drone like a bagpipe while belting out a country spiritual and, on guitar, an original.

Seventeen years in, Matty Sheets keeps the open-mic lineup in a marbled composition book, a practice he started when the event moved to the Westerwood Tavern 110 weeks ago.

BRIAN CLAREY

Sheets hasn’t seen her in 10 years, but he loved her once, started using the notebook after he settled in here at Westerlong ago. wood. But maybe he loves them all. He’s still got the flannel shirt, the ballcap, the thick glasses He wants you to know about Brandi Alexandria, who just that make him look like he’s staring at everything with wonmoved up from Charlotte and has been coming by to sing a cader, but Sheets has gained a kind of troubadour’s gravitas after pella for a couple weeks now. He all these years holding it down, wants you to know about Mikey through sickness and health and the bartender, about Buster the everything else that came with dog, And there’s this new act, it. He’s wiser. And maybe a little Matty Sheets hosts open-mic night at Film Noir, featuring a young, tired. But it’s showtime. Westerwood Tavern in Greensboro every scorching guitarist dripping Matty Sheets shuffles to the Tuesday. Sign-ups begin at 8:30 p.m. with jewelry and a bearded grad stage with a ukulele strapped student making rhymes. Later across his body with what looks on, they’ll enter quickly through to be a piece of red ribbon tied the back door, burn the place down with a short set and then around the instument’s waist. In a moment he’ll drop a fourmake a hasty exit. stringed lament that somehow beautifies his pain and gives “Oh yeah,” Sheets says now. “Those guys.” They’ve already it to the room like a gift. But before he can open his mouth landed a Thursday night gig at Preyer Brewing, he says. to the microphone, the crowd comes alive with shouts and He’s about to go on, so he finalizes the list in the notebook. whoops. At the Flatiron he used a chalkboard on the wall, and at New “Thank you for being Matty Sheets, you beautiful son of a York Pizza he wrote it on a pizza box, until he felt guilty for bitch!” a bar patron shouts. wasting a whole pizza box, so he started stealing the white Sheets nods his head. It’s all he ever wanted. sheets of paper from the folded boxes and using that. He


CULTURE From spoken word to rap: W-S rapper drops new EP Cason Ragland

July 11-17, 2019

R

Up Front News Opinion

Demi Day poses in Da Urban Lion Studios in Winston-Salem where her EP, PLANS, was recorded.

CASON RAGLAND

Shot in the Triad Puzzles

On a track titled “Outta Pocket Freestyle,” Day boasts that the first line. If I can’t capture your attention with my first bar, she “Orchestrate[s] the flow like philharmonic,” describing her then why would you listen to the rest? Once I get that then deliberation towards the flow of her verses. Often, the listener I’m good and I can rip through the rest of the track.” can notice metric couplets where the meter from one line mirWhile her lyrics don’t show many signs of religious symrors the meter of the next. bolism in her work released thus far, Day often incorporates “Years ago, my raps were very straightforward…. I just used hip-hop into her ministry. She’s compared Ecclesiastes 1 to the a consistent flow through that entire time,” said Day. works of Lauryn Hill. She’s juxtaposed the fall of Adam and She signed with King Poole Music Group four years ago in Eve alongside the lyrics of Alicia Keys. Her talents in preaching Gastonia, and got to know record producer Irving Poole. led her to win Emmanuel Baptist Church’s Excellence in Minis“[We] would talk about music, the ear try Award. She won the 2017 Addie Davis and the importance of diversifying meter Award for Excellence in Preaching by Bapfor the listener and adding those surprise tist Women in Ministry, an organization Demi Day’s new EP, PLANS, elements,” she says. Day honed her techthat aims to give a platform to women in drops on July 26. Find it on nical capabilities as a poet and started to the clergy. Even with all these accolades, create more metrically diverse music. though, Day still fights an uphill battle in Day puts a lot of thought into how her her clerical career. verses flow with the instrumental of any “I like preaching because there’s a given track. This kind of careful contemplation comes through performative aspect to it... but for me I think I’d be [better] hours of work that Day squeezes into whatever free time she able to sustain myself through hip-hop rather than through has. preaching.” Day says. “That’s mostly because of access. I can “There’d be a lot of listening and shopping for different propreach at my church once or twice a month if I really insist but ductions,” Day says, reflecting on how she’d spend 24 hours I don’t get invited that many places to preach and I don’t have of free time on her music. “If I have the beat first, I’ll listen access to many places to preach. to it and try to see where it takes me in terms of memories “Because I’m a queer black woman, even though I’m orand visions, and I’ll cling to one and out of that I’ll carve out a dained,” she says. “I’m not being invited everywhere to preach. concept of.” I’m a decent preacher, too! Before she starts writing lyrics, Day chooses the proper “I see the preaching coming and going, but hip hop is how I melodies and considers the sonic aspects of the track. think I can sustain myself.” “The most important part for me, when writing [lyrics], is

Culture

afters suspend the high ceiling of Da Urban Lion’s recording studio in Winston-Salem. Red, white and black paint coat the walls and cables criss-cross each other on the floor. A carved portrait of a lion hangs on the outside of the engineering booth and Demi Day McCoy sits back on a small, red leather couch in the corner of the studio. “It just kinda blew up,” she says, referring to her stint in spoken-word poetry during her undergraduate years at Pepperdine University. “I was getting booked here and there and all the while I have rap on the side as a hobby. I [hadn’t] shared [my music] with many people. Spoken word got popular when I was in college and I got the opportunity to record a spoken-word album. When I got to the studio that was my first time being in a studio space…I got into the booth and I was so upset that I was doing a spoken-word album. I was like, I need to be making music in here!” Demi Day grew up in Upper Marlboro, Md. with her parents. Her father served in the US Air Force and her mother works in sales and teaches hospitality at Prince George Community College. She knew she wanted to create music ever since she was a kid. “My mom sings, my sister sings and growing up we’d play around and write songs together,” said Day. “I used to listen to Ludacris and Missy Elliot. Those were the two MCs that got me inspired to pick up a pen and try my hand at rapping.” After high school, Day received her bachelor’s degree in religious studies and later her master’s in divinity at Wake Forest University. She performed her spoken-word piece “Waves” at Pepperdine’s 2019 associate’s dinner in honor of university president Andrew K. Benton. The metric structure and rhyme scheme of the piece contrasts the non-rhyming, free-verse style of many other spokenword poets. Really, the only thing missing from “Waves” is a beat. Performance, the common thread that weaves together Day’s poetry, music and love of preaching, drives her. Day reaches out towards a wide variety of people with each of these artforms and can therefore have a greater, more positive impact within her community. “I want people to understand themselves, just like I want to understand myself,” says Day.

17


July 11-17, 2019

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‘Unstated’—shows not set in a specific state, for a long time. by Matt Jones

Across

Open Mic Saturday July 13th The Two’s- Push On Tour Sunday July 14th Viva la Muerte Community Celebration ©2018 Jonesin’ Crosswords

(editor@jonesincrosswords.com)

©2017 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com)

602 S Elam Ave • Greensboro

Answers from previous publication.

Answers from last issue

Shot in the Triad Puzzles

28 Sch. founded by Thomas Jefferson 29 “La mer” salt 30 Protective auto accessory 31 Put together 32 “___ Boot” (1981 film remade as a Hulu series) 33 Eggs in nigiri sushi 34 Magazine unit 35 Sleeping sickness transmitters 36 Emperor who abdicated on 4/30/2019 37 Movie theaters 38 Title for the Virgin Mary 39 What some music stores sell 40 Danson of “The Good Place” 42 “___ on both your houses!” 43 Comedian Eugene who plays Gene on “Bob’s Burgers” 46 Cpl. and Sgt., e.g. 47 “Fantastic” character in a Roald Dahl book 48 Traveler’s reference 49 Norw. neighbor 51 Agricultural warehouse 52 Nonchalance 55 First openly transgender NCAA Division I athlete ___ Allums

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Collegiate URL tag Desserts served in bars African sightseeing trips Boosler of stand-up 13.1-mile races, informally Switch ending Peter Shaffer play about a stableboy “If I Ever Fall in Love” R&B group (1992) Conduit under a road “The House of the Spirits” author Isabel Demolition expert Ocean floater with a bell Armenia and Georgia, once Liar, relatively politely Word before tender or guardian ___ Recordings (label co-founded by Lil Jon) Rainforest inhabitant

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Every Wednesday Matty Sheets and Guest

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1 To be, to Brutus 5 “___ Haw” (show with the segment “Gloom, Despair and Agony On Me”) 8 Wound remnant 12 Two-way 13 Root beer brand that “has bite” 15 1991 NHL MVP Brett 16 2004-2007 Nickelodeon show with Emma Roberts set somewhere in the eastern U.S. 18 Penne ___ vodka (pasta dish) 19 Long-running soap where the location of Salem wasn’t revealed until 2013 21 ___ New York (upscale department store chain) 22 Tallahassee-to-Tampa dir. 23 Sinus doc 24 Video game designer Sid who created the “Civilization” series 25 “En ___!” (fencer’s call) 27 Starter starter? 28 Ithelpsconnectoldercomputerstonewerdevices 33 Current CW show set in “Rockland County” 35 Meals in a shell 38 National Coming ___ Day 41 Backgrounds for fireworks 42 Entertain 44 A in a Wagner opera? 45 Albuquerque coll. 48 Had high hopes 50 With 54-Across, 1994-1998 Nickelodon show set in the town of Paradise Valley 53 Valley that’s the site of the Reagan Presidential Library 54 See 50-Across 56 “And others” 57 “Alas” 58 Mark of “The Full Monty” 59 Okay, but not great 60 Ballot markings 61 The Big Board, for short

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July 11-17, 2019

CROSSWORD

19


Profile for Triad City Beat

TCB July 11, 2019 — Hosts with the most  

The Triad's best Airbnbs

TCB July 11, 2019 — Hosts with the most  

The Triad's best Airbnbs

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