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Greensboro / Winston-Salem / High Point April 11 - 17, 2019

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April 11-17, 2019

EDITOR’S NOTEBOOK

Cardi B and me

We were talking line of work.” about Cardi B When I finished they were all just in the office the looking at me, like none of them had other day. ever known a sex worker in their lives. So And though I I asked them. And except for Rob, it was cannot name a true. single piece of I have a very different background than Cardi B’s work — I most of my co-workers — again, except by Brian Clarey believe she’s a for Rob — so I don’t expect them to draw singer of some sort — I am now aware from the same well of knowledge as I. In that, while she was operating as a sex my twenties I was tending bar in New Orworker, she sometimes would drug her leans, and I knew dozens of sex workers, customers and steal their money. male and female and everything in beApparently it’s some kind of controtween, working jobs as mundane as stripversy: She has been ping on Bourbon Street compared to Bill Cosby, to outcalls to straight-up defended by scholars and dinner dates. I still keep in When I finished influencers, her motives touch with some of them they were all just scrutinized, her morality on Facebook. called into question. They talked about a lot looking at me, And because I am old, of the weird stuff they did like none of them to earn their livings — or, I have no idea why this is such a flashpoint in our often, side hustles for had every known culture right now. occasional bursts of extra a sex worker in Upon hearing the news cash — but mostly it was about Cardi B, I said a straightforward business their lives. something along the lines proposition; rarely was of: “Um, yeah. Somethere a need or desire to times your sex worker will further intoxicate their drug you out and steal your wallet. You clients, or steal something that was given have to be careful out there.” freely. This was met with… umbrage… from “It’s the guys that try to talk them down my staff, all of whom are considerably that get drugged,” I said to my staff. “Or younger than I. the ones who get weird or violent. TourUndaunted, I went on. ists mostly, think they can get away with “It’s sort of a self-regulating thing, anything.” though,” I said. “You’re not going to get As for passing judgment on Cardi B, a lot of regulars if you keep drugging that is certainly not my place. And from everybody and stealing their wallets. And what I understand, she’s quite talented. regulars are the name of the game in that She could make something of herself yet.

BUSINESS PUBLISHER/EXECUTIVE EDITOR Brian Clarey brian@triad-city-beat.com

PUBLISHER EMERITUS Allen Broach allen@triad-city-beat.com

EDITORIAL SENIOR EDITOR Jordan Green

EDITORIAL INTERN Cason Ragland ART ART DIRECTOR Robert Paquette

jordan@triad-city-beat.com

robert@triad-city-beat.com SALES

sayaka@triad-city-beat.com

gayla@triad-city-beat.com

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Sayaka Matsuoka STAFF WRITER Lauren Barber lauren@triad-city-beat.com

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1451 S. Elm-Eugene St. Box 24, Greensboro, NC 27406 Office: 336-256-9320 Winston-Salem: Heath Wind, STAFF WRITER Savi Ettinger beekeeper. Photo by Sayaka savi@triad-city-beat.com Matsuoka.

KEY ACCOUNTS Gayla Price CONTRIBUTORS

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TCB IN A FLASH @ triad-city-beat.com First copy is free, all additional copies are $1. ©2018 Beat Media Inc.

Greensboro: Debbie the Artist performs at Mindful Supply on First Friday. Photo by Todd Turner.


April 11-17, 2019

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April 11-17, 2019

CITY LIFE April 11-14, 2019 by Cason Ragland

THURSDAY April 11

FRIDAY April 12

Opening Night for Jesus Christ Superstar @ the Community Theatre of Greensboro (GSO), 7:30 p.m.

Opinion

News

Up Front

Art Collecting 101 @ the Weatherspoon Art Museum (GSO), 7 p.m.

Is your apartment covered in prints of movie posters and cigarette ads from the ’30s? Maybe it’s time to consider sprucing things up a bit. Visit the Weatherspoon Art Museum this evening to learn something about the world of collecting art. Discover a market where the works are both original and affordable. Representatives from Raleigh Arts, GreenHill Center and Leland Little auctions will be there to teach you everything you need to know. Find out more on the WAM website.

Culture

Opening Night for A Midsummer Night’s Dream @ High Point University (HP), 7:30 PM

Need a new, postmodern perspective on the gospel of Matthew, Mark and Luke (feat. John)? The CTG showcases their production of Jesus Christ Superstar this weekend. Come and watch the story of Jesus and discover the relationships that surrounded his life. From Mary Magdalene to the Roman Empire, it seems like everybody had something to say about this guy. If you’d like to know more, take a look at the event on Facebook.

Puzzles

Shot in the Triad

Exploring Spatial Justice @ the Enterprise Conference and Banquet Center (W-S), 9 a.m.

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It’s what your high school English teacher would call an “oldie but a goodie.” High Point University’s Department of Theatre and Dance will put on William Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream this weekend on campus. Take in the story of Theseus, Duke of Athens and Hippolyta in this 17th Century comedy. Check out the event on Facebook.

Gentrification and food insecurity are but two challenges that this one-time workshop plans to confront at the Enterprise Conference and Banquet Center. The workshop goes until 4 p.m., bringing together a diverse group of people to discuss spatial justice and how it applies to modern communities. Check out the event on Facebook


April 11-17, 2019

A Musical Tribute to James Dodding @ Brendle Recital Hall (W-S), 3:00 p.m.

SUNDAY April 14

April Drag Brunch @ PorterHouse Burger Company (GSO), 10:30 a.m. Up Front

Community Fun Day and Cookout @ Southside Recreation Center (HP), 4:30 p.m. April is Child Abuse Prevention Month, so come out and raise awareness for this important cause with an evening of fun and delicious food. If you can, please wear blue to show support for the victims of child abuse. The event is hosted by Family Services of the Piedmont and you can find out more by checking out the event on Facebook. Brews and Bubbles @ the Greensboro Science Center (GSO), 7 p.m.

News

Piedmont Earth Day Fair @ Winston-Salem Fairgrounds (W-S), 10 a.m.

A brunch without a drag show is hardly a brunch at all. Make your way to PorterHouse if you want to fill yourself up with mimosas and empty calories. While you’re there, you can enjoy a series of drag shows hosted by Anjelica Dust at 11 a.m., 1:30 p.m. and 4 p.m. Only those with a ticket may enter the restaurant for that day. For more information, check out the event’s page on Facebook.

Culture

SATURDAY April 13

UNCG Threads 14th annual Spring Fashion Show @ Greensboro Marriott Downtown (GSO), 7 p.m.

Opinion

Find a designated driver and get absolutely wasted at a museum to support the conservation efforts of the GSC. If you don’t want to get wasted, the least you could do is get a little buzzed. This event will only allow those who are 21 or older to enter the museum. For more information, please take a look at the event’s page on Facebook.

This performance honors the late professor James Dodding who once served as the director of musical theatre production at Wake Forest University from 1982 to 2008. The concert will showcase musical numbers from West Side Story, Guys and Dolls and many others. If you’re interested, be sure to check out the event on Wake Forest’s website.

Elm Street Nightmares vs Battleground Betties @ Skate South (HP), 7 p.m. Shot in the Triad

This display of springwear shows off everything from the most practical of party attire to the kind of stuff that you only see in fashion shows. Doors open at 7 p.m. and the event gets underway at 7:30. Make a bid at the silent auction and enjoy what the students of UNCG’s CARS program have to show in the way of wearable art. Check out the event’s Facebook page for more details. It might not be the chariot races at the Circus Maximus, but this clash of roller-derby warriors seeks to excite a crowd of spectators. Visit Skate South in High Point to watch the Nightmares and the Betties duke it out in this fast paced and combative competition. If you’d like to know more, please take a look at the event’s page on Facebook.

Puzzles

Hosted by the Piedmont Environmental Alliance, the Piedmont Earth Day Fair is the largest of its kind in central North Carolina. Some activities include children’s programming, workshops on living a greener life and live music. Find out more on the Winston-Salem Fairgrounds website.

Women’s Circle Open Mic @ the Artist Bloc (GSO), 6:30 p.m. This workshop is reaching out to any and all women who wish to share their creative projects. This could include a piece of visual art, a poem, a story or anything else you’d like to share. Only women are allowed to attend this workshop. To find out more, please visit the event page on Facebook.

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April 11-17, 2019 Up Front News Opinion

Chicago lawyer Flint Taylor (center), one of Marcus Smith’s family’s attorneys, spoke at a press conference on Wednesday announcing the federal lawsuit. The lawsuit, filed in US District Court for the Middle District of North Carolina alleges that Greensboro police officers “caused Marcus’ death by brutally restraining him prone on the ground and hogtying him like an animal until he stopped breathing, and the Guilford County EMS paramedics, who were called to the scene, failed to intervene to protect Marcus from the use of unreasonable force and failed to promptly attend to his serious medical needs.”

Culture

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April 11-17, 2019

Strunk and White by Brian Clarey

News Opinion

The � a new exciting season! s t n High Point Theatre PreseSAUCE BOSS BILLY

Culture

GINA

Recycle this paper.

Up Front

I’ve spent a lot of time these last few months working with new writers. It’s one of my favorite things about the job, and I find that even seasoned hands around the Triad City Beat offices — myself included — can always use a refresher course in the basics. And there is no better compendium on the basics than The Elements of Style, known sometimes in writing circles as Strunk and White, the authors of the book. It was William Strunk who did the heavy lifting as an English professor at Cornell University, compiling and self-publishing the book and requiring it of his students, one of whom was EB White, he of the New Yorker and Charlotte’s Web fame. I first got my hands on one in 1989, my first real college writing course, and it absolutely blew my mind: an articulation of every little thing that goes into a compelling sentence, basic rules of structure, concise and clear writing. More important, there are numerous examples of what not to do: “Do not take shortcuts at the cost of clarity.” “Do not use dialect unless your ear is good.” “Do not break sentences in two.” And the classic axiom: “Omit needless words.” I ordered a bunch of them off Amazon a few months ago, and I’ve been handing them out like Halloween candy to all the new writers on staff, and recommending it to everyone I know who aspires to put words together for money. We don’t follow all of his guidelines — Strunk’s views on comma usage are absolutely archaic, and a lot of the old rules of manuscripts no longer apply. But his mastery of the written language is undeniable. EB White did pretty well for himself, too.

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Up Front

April 11-17, 2019

NEWS

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Universal pre-K set as a goal for Forsyth County by Jordan Green A coalition led by Family Services wants Forsyth County to provide universal pre-K to every 4-year-old by 2022. A coalition of community leaders led by Family Services announced a plan to provide universal early education for every 4-year-old, commonly known as pre-K, in Forsyth County at a press conference at Winston-Salem State University on Tuesday. A report issued by the initiative, named the Pre-K Priority, cites a 2017 Harvard study that found Forsyth County to be the fifth worst county in the nation — only four Native American reservation counties performed lower — “for helping poor children move up the income ladder.” The initiative’s backers believe that early childhood education is the key to disrupting the cycle of poverty, based on recent discoveries in brain science that show that the first five years of life are a time of rapid and critical physical, social, emotional and cognitive development. The report also cited a recent Duke University study of more than a million North Carolina public-school children, which found that pre-K programs “continued to have positive effects on the population of targeted students… as they progressed through middle school. Higher levels of program funding improved students’ math and reading scores, decreased the likelihood they would be placed in special education, and reduced the probability of repeating a grade.” Bob Feikema, the president and CEO of Family Services, said about 60 early childhood development professionals from 20 organizations have been meeting for the past five years to develop a plan to address the problem of roughly half of third graders in Forsyth County not being able to read at grade level. “Our goal is to make high-quality, preK programs available to all 4-year-old children in Forsyth County,” said Feikema, whose agency addresses childhood development, family violence, sexual assault, grief counseling and adoption in Forsyth County. According to the coalition, there are 4,500 4-year-olds in Forsyth County, and while 2,700 are eligible for publicly funded pre-K, only 1,300 are actually enrolled because middle-class families struggle to find affordable, high-quality

programs. An $847,250 grant from the Kate B. Reynolds Charitable Trust will fund a feasibility study by Forsyth Futures, a nonprofit that provides data analysis to organizations in Forsyth County, to determine whether the county had adequate facilities, quality programs and qualified teachers to expand to meet the need for pre-K services, and to launch a public awareness campaign. Laura Gerald, the trust’s president, said the foundation is investing $30 to $40 million in Great Expectations, “a comprehensive funding initiative to try to see that our children enter kindergarten ready for success.” She added, “Those funds, as significant as they are, are not enough to actually pay for universal pre-K.” Feikema said the cost of providing universal pre-K in Forsyth County would be about $30 million “if you started from scratch.” The figure is based on an assumption that the county would need 200 classrooms for an average of 18 children at a cost of $150,000 per classroom. But the overall costs would be defrayed somewhat by an assumption that many parents would pay on a sliding scale based on what they could afford. Feikema and Gerald said the successful launch of the program will require public investment at the local and state level. Both said the target date for implementation depends in large part on buy-in from elected officials. Michelle Speas, the chief development and public relations officer for Family Services, said in a public letter that the initiative has a “goal of incrementally increasing local and state funding to achieve full availability of high-quality pre-K by 2022.” “We really look at a four-year horizon to kind of move forward on it,” Feikema said. “Some of it’ll depend on if the state government through the North Carolina Pre-K program keeps expanding, and if they increase how much they pay per child. And some of it is, will local elected officials make a determination that there needs to be local investment?” Feikema said some of North Carolina’s largest counties, including Mecklenburg, Wake, Durham and Buncombe, have already committed public funds to the goal of achieving universal pre-K.

Family Services President and CEO Bob Feikema greets Kate B. Reynolds Charitable JORDAN GREEN Trust President Laura Gerald at Winston-Salem State University on Tuesday.

A 2017 report by Durham’s Community Early Education/Preschool Task Force includes a recommendation to “serve all 3- and 4-year-olds in Durham County in high-quality preschool by 2023.” The Buncombe County Commission passed a resolution in October 2018 establishing an Early Childhood Education Development Fund. Similar to the initiative in Forsyth County, the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Opportunity Task Force formed in 2015 in response to a 2014 study by Harvard and UC-Berkeley that found that Charlotte ranked last among the 50 largest cities in the US for upward mobility. In June 2018, the Mecklenburg County Commission approved a 3/4-cent increase in the property tax rate to fund the MECK Pre-K program. The investment added 33 classrooms serving 600 4-year-olds in the fall of 2018. According to an implementation progress report released in February, 5,254 out of about 12,000 4-year-olds in Mecklenburg County now have access to public pre-K. Ultimately, the program aims to serve

9,600 children. (Feikema said if pre-K is available to all, typically 80 percent of families will take advantage of it.) In addition to enlisting support from elected officials in county government, Gerald said there are a lot of logistical and workforce challenges to address before Forsyth County is prepared to provide pre-K education to every 4-yearold. “It could be that there are more opportunities in schools; it could be that there are more licensed daycare centers that provide pre-K opportunities,” she said. “We just want to make sure that they are high quality and that they provide access for everyone. As part of the feasibility study, presumably they would look at what is a potential pathway to this? Are there enough quality licensed opportunities? What would it mean for teachers? What about pay differentials between childcare centers and schools, and how do you work with that? Those are the kinds of things you have to study and plan for.”


April 11-17, 2019 Up Front

News

Opinion

Culture

Shot in the Triad

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April 11-17, 2019 Up Front News Opinion Culture Shot in the Triad Puzzles

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Immigrant activists say they’re still waiting to meet with new sheriff by Sayaka Matsuoka Some immigrant activists in the community say they are still waiting to meet with Sheriff Danny Rogers to talk about ICE detainer requests and other issues. A number of activists in the community claim they’ve had a hard time scheduling meetings with new Guilford County Sheriff Danny Rogers to ask questions about ICE and immigration. Danny Rogers, who became the first black sheriff in county history, was sworn in at the end of last year after defeating BJ Barnes, who held the seat for 24 years. Rogers ran on a fairly progressive ticket, promising voters that he would build trust between residents and law enforcement. Now, activists say it’s time for Rogers to make good on his promise. Andrew Willis Garcés, an organizer who works with undocumented people in the Triad, says that groups that he is a part of, including the American Friends Service Committee and Siembra NC, have yet to have a conversation with the sheriff, despite multiple attempts to schedule meetings. According to Garcés, attempts to reach out date back to mid-January when group members handed out community surveys during the Martin Luther King Jr. Day parade in Greensboro. The survey asked takers questions about what they think about officers in schools and whether ICE agents should be allowed to use local jails to detain undocumented immigrants. On Valentine’s Day, members of the community, including several children, made cards for Rogers and were able to deliver them to him directly when he attended the event, which took place outside the sheriff’s office. During the event, which was recorded by a member of Siembra, Rogers stated that he will not detain undocumented immigrants unless he is sent a judicial warrant. “If they want me to detain an undocumented immigrant, then the proper document must be filed,” Rogers says in the video. “If a federal judge has not signed a detaining order, I will not hold them.” Following the Valentine’s Day event, Garcés says he and other members of the community set up a meeting on March 7 with the sheriff to talk about immigration issues. More than 60 people, including some undocumented immigrant showed up to that meeting at New Light Baptist Church. However,

Rogers did not. “A lot of people took a risk [going] there,” Garcés says. “He said he was going to be there. A reporter even asked Max [Benbassat] about it and Max said he would be there. A freshman from UNCG has a lot of trouble reliving the terror of her dad being detained. You can’t just make her tell that story all the time.” When asked why the sheriff missed the March 7 meeting, Max Benbassat, the new public information office for the sheriff’s office, said in an email on Tuesday, that Rogers is “subject to being called away to other concerns… and would hope that in the interest of public safety, that is understood.” A few weeks later on March 25, community organizers tried to meet with Rogers again. This time with a smaller group of just four people. When he failed to show up again, Benbassat told the group that it was because the sheriff had just had eye surgery. The group, which included Garcés, met with some of Rogers’ deputies instead and Garcés said the deputies couldn’t answer activists’ questions. On March 27, some of the same organizers tried to meet with Rogers a third time at a meeting at Melvin Municipal Office Building that included some members of the Latino Community Coalition of Guilford County. When Rogers missed that appointment, Benbassat said that no one at the sheriff’s office had confirmed the meeting and that “the sheriff receives requests regularly from different community groups” and that “he can’t always attend.” “It’s kind of heartbreaking because at the meeting, people were genuinely excited,” Garcés recalls. “People put themselves out there because they think he’s gonna listen. I feel like I just wasted my time and what incentive do I have to participate in the civic process?” Still, others in the community like Addy Jeffrey of the Latino Community Coalition of Guilford County say they’ve had no trouble meeting with the sheriff. “We understand that he’s very busy,” Jeffrey said in a recent phone interview. Jeffrey is also a part of the League of Women Voters roundtable for immigration, which she said has met with Rogers twice to talk about immigration. When asked about the March 27 meeting that he missed, Jeffrey defended the sheriff by saying that it was probably miscommunication.

Guilford County Sheriff Danny Rogers said that his office does not honor ICE detainer requests without a judicial warrant.

“I don’t want to read a lot into that because I don’t know and I imagine that he’s very busy,” Jeffrey said. “We want to continue to have a relationship with him.” David Fraccaro of Faith Action echoed Jeffrey’s feelings. Fraccaro said that while his group has yet to meet with Rogers, that they are planning on meeting with him soon. “We purposely wanted to give him some time,” Fraccaro said. “We have plans in the coming week or two to meet with him. We have not had issues. Both offices have limited hours but there’s been nothing problematic in that regard. We’re hopeful that some positive things will come out of that meeting.” In the email, Benbassat said that “sheriff Rogers cares about all communities in Guilford County and seeks to provide equal protection under the law for all residents. He has met with several groups voicing concerns about our immigrant families and any meetings he is able to attend, he has done so.” A written policy requiring ICE officials to present a judicial warrant for detaining undocumented immigrants in local jails is just one of the requests an immigrant coalition is asking from the sheriff’s office. In addition to the judicial warrant policy, which is on the books in other counties like Forsyth and Mecklenburg, activists are asking sheriff Rogers to implement an ICE courthouse-arrests

COURTESY IMAGE

policy which would require a deputy to escort ICE officials in courthouses to make arrests and require them to wear ID, as well as meet with the coalition and members of Guilford County Schools to review of current SRO training policies. In a phone call on Tuesday evening, Benbassat said that the office does have a judicial warrant policy and any employees who don’t follow the policy would face appropriate consequences. “It’s been a policy for a long time now and we’re not going to change,” Benbassat said. “We have not, and we will not detain people for ICE.” On Wednesday, Benbassat clarified via email that while the policy has not been incorporated into the office’s procedures manual yet, it has been shared with all detention staff via email and trainings. Benbassat also said that between Jan. 1 and March 22, only eight undocumented immigrants had been held in the county jail and that seven of them had been taken into custody by other agencies. Benbassat said all of them were for serious crimes such as narcotics, sex offenses, assaults and theft. None of them were detained for minor offenses like driving without a license. Benbassat also noted that no undocumented immigrants have been arrested at the multiple traffic checkpoints that have been taking place in the city. However, he said that the office will continue to hold checkpoints and that no one,


April 11-17, 2019 Up Front

Immigrant activists met with Sheriff Rogers on Valentine’s Day this year.

cates with ICE concerning the status of inmates’ state criminal charges and keeps ICE informed as inmates progress toward resolution of their charges. Their policy says that they communicate with ICE for two reasons: “It is a commonsense measure to keep Guilford County residents safe; and federal law requires it.” The webpage also states that the

sheriff’s office does not “honor requests (i.e., detainers) from ICE to actually hold an inmate for up to 48 hours after the inmate’s state criminal charges have been resolved. The reason is that the act of holding such inmates after their state criminal charges have been resolved is very likely a ‘seizure’ for the purposes of the Fourth Amendment.”

Opinion

ing a population of people would be considered racial or ethnic profiling, and that is not acceptable.” According to the sheriff’s office website, the office currently accepts written detainer notifications from ICE that pertain to inmates in their custody on non-immigration related state criminal charges. The office also communi-

COURTESY IMAGE

News

regardless of citizenship should drive without a license. “We will keep doing checkpoints,” he said. “The sheriff means business when it comes to public safety.” During a meeting of the NC House Rules Committee on April 1, Rogers spoke out against HB 370, which passed the House on April 3. The bill would require sheriffs to cooperate with ICE and honor the agency’s detainer requests. “I’m not a sanctuary sheriff, I’m not anything that you want to call it, but I do want you to understand something,” Rogers said at the committee meeting. “The people of Guilford County is who I serve. All people, all of them. And I will continue to follow the rules and regulations the way I am supposed to. To tell me that I am putting the citizens of Guilford County at harm, when I ran for this seat, you need to fact check and I sincerely mean that.” In an email on Tuesday, Benbassat confirmed Rogers’ stance on HB 370 by stating that the sheriff “does not support HB 370 or any measures being used to circumvent the local authority of the sheriffs in requiring cooperation with ICE” and that “any acts by law enforcement that could be construed as target-

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April 11-17, 2019 Up Front News Opinion Culture Shot in the Triad Puzzles

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CITIZEN GREEN

OPINION

Redistricting comes to Winston-Salem, unbidden

Republicans are the party of small government, with one caveat: as long as it’s the opposition party’s government. When it comes to their own government, their appetite for maximizing power seems to know no limit. What do Republicans do when the people elect local sheriffs who are committed to protecting immigrant communities? Handcuff ’em! When the people elect school board members who are commitby Jordan Green ted to educational equity? Put ’em in timeout! When Democrats run the board in local municipal elections? Knock over the table and rewrite the rules. In case you haven’t heard, Reps. Donny Lambeth and Debra Conrad, two Republican lawmakers from suburban Forsyth County, released three bills collectively aimed at Winston-Salem/Forsyth County School Board and Winston-Salem City Council. One would switch school board elections to a staggered schedule, another would require the school board to get approval from the Republican-controlled Forsyth County Commission prior to redrawing school attendance lines, and another would completely overhaul the system of electing members of city council.The 300-some people who packed into First Baptist Church on Highland Avenue on Monday evening resoundingly told Democratic lawmakers, city council members, school board members and county commissioners that they want no part of it. The multiracial crowd was predominantly African-American — no surprise considering that the bills most directly affect black leadership — but it’s clear that Winston-Salem residents of all races consider this legislation an affront to the principle of home rule and self-governance. The Rev. Paul Robeson Ford, the pastor at First Baptist, said Lambeth and Conrad were invited to make the case for their bills, but declined to attend. In an email to Triad City Beat on Tuesday, Lambeth downplayed the notion that considerations of race or political party played any part in the legislation. Lambeth previously told the Winston-Salem Journal that the rationale for staggering school board members’ terms is to avoid having all the members replaced at one time. “Staggered terms allow elections to have part elected but also allow incumbents to continue so there is continuity of experience,” he said. “All nine members up for election or re-election at the same time is not good public policy.” But don’t voters have the opportunity to vote for incumbents if they’re happy with their representation, and don’t incumbents enjoy an advantage through superior name recognition? Malishai Woodbury, a newly elected Democratic member of the Winston-Salem/Forsyth County School Board whose colleagues elected her to chair the board, made her case on Monday against HB 490, which comes before the State and Local Government Committee on Wednesday. “The main problem I see is that if the people want an all-new school board, then that’s the will of the democracy, so I think you’re taking away the people’s vote when you try to fix the system versus letting it occur naturally,” she said. Barbara Hanes Burke, another newly elected Democrat who was elected by her colleagues to serve as vice-chair, said there’s no mystery as to why Lambeth and Conrad want to force the school board to get permission from the county commission to change school attendance lines. “I believe all of us see exactly why,” she said. “We ran on the platform of equity and making sure that it does exist in our school system. And I think we have some people that are afraid that we are going to make some decisions regarding our schools and making sure that they are more equitable all the way around. And I do believe that we are being blocked.” As for HB 519, critics note that it reduces the number of majority-minority districts from four out of eight to three out of five, but most eyebrow-raising is that it triple-bunks Mayor Pro Tem Vivian Burke, Councilwoman DD Adams and Councilwoman Annette Scippio. “The outlines of that map draw all three African-American women on the city council into a single district,” Councilman Dan Besse observed. “That was not by happenstance. If you look at the outline of that district and look at the numbers in population between that district and the adjacent districts, the population of that single district is actually substan-

NC Rep. Derwin Montgomery, with Winston-Salem Mayor Pro Tem Vivian Burke, Mayor Allen Joines, Councilwoman DD Adams, Sen. Paul Lowe and School Board Chair Malishai Woodbury describes three bills filed by reps Donny Lambeth and Debra Conrad.

JORDAN GREEN

tially higher than the population of the districts on either side, and the lines of that district bulge out to take in the homes of Council member [DD] Adams and Council member [Annette] Scippio.” Lambeth said on Tuesday that legislative staff drew the map without regard to politics or race. The Republican lawmaker said he and Conrad started looking at Winston-Salem’s election format after the city requested legislative changes last fall to fill vacancies and found that Winston-Salem is an “outlier” compared to how other North Carolina cities conduct elections. Lambeth said the plan is modeled after Greensboro elections, and provided legislative research showing that Charlotte, Raleigh, Durham, Cary, High Point and Greenville all have at least one at-large member in addition to the mayor. Fayetteville is the only city in addition to Winston-Salem that currently uses a pure district system. Conrad told TCB that she takes issue with the notion that the proposed election system would force three members to run against each other. “The new design allows all incumbents to choose whether to run in a district or for one of the at-large seats,” Conrad said. “Two of the ladies may choose to run for two of the new at-large seats and I see no reason why they would not have an excellent chance of winning those seats. It is very possible to have all the current members of the city council win reelection under the new plan.” And to give the proposed plan its due, while the proposed District 2 in northeast Winston-Salem is overpopulated based on the 2010 Census numbers, the proposed District 3 — also a minority-majority district — is underpopulated by almost exactly the same proportion. The map uses Business 40 as a dividing line between the two districts, so it upholds the “communities of interest” principle. Putting the two majority-minority districts together, they represent exactly 40 percent of the city’s population. The non-white population was 48.8 percent, based on the 2010 Census. Sen. Trudy Wade attempted something similar in Greensboro in 2015, although ironically Wade sought to eliminate three at-large seats and expand the districts from five to eight. Similar to the proposed District 2 in northeast Winston-Salem, Wade’s bill overpopulated the majority African-American District 2 in northeast Greensboro and would have forced two African-American members to run against each other. The city and individual voters sued the state legislature, and a federal judge ultimately overturned the law. Judge Catherine Eagles wrote, “This is not a case where it is difficult to discern legislative motivation. As in [Raleigh Wake Citizens Association], all the credible evidence points in one direction: a ‘skewed, unequal redistricting’ intentionally designed to create a partisan advantage by increasing the weight of Republican-leaning voters and decreasing the weight to votes of Democratic-leaning voters.” She also found that the plan “violates the equal protection rights of the plaintiffs and all Greensboro voters.” Mayor Allen Joines said council members will be meeting with a team of lawyers to explore their options for taking legal action if the Winston-Salem bill passes. Rep. Lambeth and Conrad could learn a lesson at Sen. Wade’s expense. “In Greensboro, the senator who introduced that bill is no longer in the state legislature,” Rep. Derwin Montgomery, a Democrat, observed on Monday night. “She lost her election.”


EDITORIAL

by Clay Jones

Up Front News

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Opinion Culture

Nobody’s talking about the Mike never get convicted. But then again, this Causey bribery scandal — nobody on is how a conviction starts. And not all the GOP side of the aisle, that is; the indictments contain recorded conversaDems have plenty to say. But as is so tions offered up by what amounts to a often the case, the state GOP apparatus confidential informant, a double agent, is in such lockstep on this issue that they an inside man. keep repeating the same talking point to Whatever the official ramifications anyone who dares ask about it: Innocent will be — smart money says very little — until proven guilty. behind the wall of talking points there’s They’re all on the got to be some friction same page, except of over Causey’s actions course for Mike Cauinside the party, and sey, himself a veteran exactly what they’re of state party politics, supposed to do now. Does Mike Causey though that didn’t stop Causey had to know him from assisting fedhe’d set a fire among have a future with eral law enforcement in the party that’s been in the NC GOP? Or is he power in North Carogathering information about Robin Hayes, the the future of the NC lina for almost 10 years chair of the NC GOP, now, a party to which GOP? allegedly preserving he is registered as a conversations with US candidate. He had to Rep. Mark Walker and acknowledge, to himotherwise exposing self at least, that they’d what appears to be a be ready to turn on him vast scheme of corruption that pervades as soon as it became politically expedithe highest levels of state government. ent to do so. And he had to understand If they’re found guilty, of course. that, after this, there’s be no future for But not all indictments are crehim among the NC Republican Party. ated equally. All it means is that there’s Unless he is the future of the NC enough evidence to go to trial, that GOP. But that seems too much to hope there’s enough smoke to make it worth for. the people’s time to look for fire. A lot of people get indicted and

Claytoonz

April 11-17, 2019

Unpacking the GOP bribery scandal

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by Sayaka Matsuoka

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April 11-17, 2019

CULTURE Forsyth County beekeepers keep tradition alive one hive at a time

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David Link cares for about 60 hives across the state. “These things are kind of addictive,” he says.

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t’s not as loud as you would think. David Link walks around his hives, carefully pumping out smoke from a small canister in his left hand, aimed towards the thousands of bustling bees flying in and out of the boxes. He’s covered head to toe and wears a tan safari-looking hat with a net to protect his face. Bright blue latex gloves cover his hands. “I had a slight hesitation of being around a stinging insect in the beginning,” Link admits. “But once you get one that works easily… it’s a real pleasure being with them.” While you might imagine the sound of close to 100,000 bees to be deafening, it’s actually more like a low, droning hum. After a while you don’t even really notice it. Link, who has been beekeeping for almost a decade, takes care of three colonies or hives — each with about 30,000

bees — at the Wake Forest Campus Garden off Polo Road. The hives look like separate columns of colorful dresser drawers stacked on top of one another, attracting the bees with their bright hues of red, yellow and purple. The smoker — which looks like a makeshift mason jar with a small funnel encased in a metal cage, with a small accordion attached to the side that releases smoke each time its pressed — helps calm the bees and makes them focus on eating the honey in their hive, rather than investigating the humans ripping into their home. “These things are kind of addictive,” says Link, who owns about 60 hives in Forsyth county and beyond. “Being out here with them is extremely relaxing.” He says he initially started beekeeping to supplement his gardening. Now, it’s become an almost full-time hobby. And he’s not alone. Link is part of a growing community of beekeepers in the Winston-Salem area. He’s a member of the Forsyth County Beekeepers Association which began in 1973 with 38 members and has grown to more than 300 active participants. Heath Wind and June Hartness both belong to the club and are active beekeepers in the area. The latter used to be the president of the association and now runs the group’s

SAYAKA MATSUOKA

beekeeping school, which offers classes once a year. Wind joined the club ten years ago and became certified through the school in 2011. Hartness says the school, which meets five or six times starting in February, has seen rising enrollment over the past few years. “We usually have a waiting list,” Hartness says. “There is definitely an awareness and want to do beekeeping in the area. In this last school, someone drove all the way from Raleigh.” For years, beekeeping was popular among older generations, Hartness says. “It seemed to be older, farming men,” she says. “But now, there’s more women, a younger group, people from different backgrounds. I think that it is changing.” Hartness, who owns about four hives right now, started beekeeping seven years ago. She says she was also looking for a way to liven her large property, full of berry bushes and trees, and had heard about the declining bee population. “It’s the weather change and the chemicals in the environments,” says Hartness about why the bees are disappearing. “We’re cutting down all of the trees and putting homes up. And people grab pesticides instead of doing alternate, homeopathic sprays to get rid of bugs. Until we look at some of that,


April 11-17, 2019 Up Front News Opinion

Beekeepers often use smokers to calm the bees and make them focus on eating their honey.

SAYAKA MATSUOKA

Culture Shot in the Triad Puzzles

it’s gonna be an issue for a while.” mind what I hear,” Wind says. “I have just learned so much about mites particularly She says that this past winter was particularly difficult for bees because of the because to be a good beekeeper, you have to know that the problems are. Mites are fluctuating temperatures. She and others mentioned that they lost between 50 to 75 the 800-pound gorilla.” percent of their bees. Wind explains a complex process that includes pulling the honey out of his 18 differ“Bees don’t hibernate, but they’ll gather in a cluster to stay warm in the winter,” ent colonies — all housed in his backyard — taking his colonies up to the mountains to Hartness explains. “We had a warm January and once it gets to about 50 degrees, the feed on sourwood trees, extracting the queen bees and treating the colonies with an bees will come out but in January, there’s not that much blooming. And then they oxalic acid vaporizer, all before the weather gets colder in September. won’t cluster to keep warm and they die when it gets cold the next day. Or they can’t And sometimes, it’s not enough. find food and they’ll eat their food stores and then starve.” Once, when Wind went to check on his bees in the mountains, he says he found that According to research by experts like David Tarpy, a profesa bear had gotten into his hives, searching for honey. His boxes sor at NC State University, honeybees are the primary insect were strewn about and scattered, leaving a mess. But that did pollinators for many of the different agricultural crops in the not break Wind. Find out more about the Forsyth state; about a third of our diet depends either directly or indiIn a matter of hours, he constructed an electric fence barrectly on bee pollination. rier, powered by a solar panel, around his hives, complete with County Beekeeping Association A 2015 study first published in Proceedings of the National a peanut-butter trap that would scare off the honey-seeking at fcba.wildapricot.org. Academy of Sciences also found that the wild bee population pest. in the contiguous United States declined 23 percent between “It’s a constant process of learning,” he says. “It’s not easy; 2008 and 2013. it’s challenging.” Hartness says that she continues to keep bees to educate Hartness agrees. Neither get paid to keep bees, and yet, people about the harm they could be doing. during the busy season from March to June, these hobbyists spend about four to five “Unless you’ve been beekeeping, you don’t realize these things and people will be hours a day, tending to their hives. like, ‘Oh my goodness. I’ve been killing the bees,’” she says. “You can change their “It’s like people who golf,” Hartness says. “It’s an expensive hobby, but it’s an imporminds. That’s the best thing about it.” tant one. We’re helping to give back.” In addition to a warming climate, habitat destruction and harmful pesticides, anAs for the future of beekeeping and the plight of the bees themselves, Wind says other looming threat to bees in North Carolina are the varroa destructors, an external there’s still hope. parasitic mite that attaches to honey bees and weakens them. “The future is bright in that people are becoming more aware of the need for plants Wind says he’s been working to perfect a method of keeping the deadly mites at for pollinators,” he says. “If you want to do something for bees, planting shrubs and bay. And after about a decade, he thinks he’s figured it out. trees that are good for bees is a really good idea because that initial bit of work can “I spend an awful lot of time reading about bees, about mites, critiquing in my own provide a beautiful thing that lasts for longer than we will be around.”

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by Lauren Barber

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April 11-17, 2019

CULTURE Debbie the Artist infuses their music with their truth

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Debbie the Artist performed at Mindful Supply on First Friday.

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he sound of car tires spinning across cold rain on South Davie Street pairs with the sprinkle of the rainmaker in Miata Yomo’s hands. She’s performing with her friend and mentor Debbie the Artist (Debbie Long) this first Friday of April, with a snake plant and mod standing lamp bookending the duo who sit under cobalt script reading “Be Mindful” on the shop’s largest wall. The two NC A&T students, joined by Julian Gordon on djembe, radiate warmth in Mindful Supply Company, a store in downtown Greensboro dealing in sustainably sourced clothes. When

Debbie the Artist, who is gender non-conforming, isn’t playing shows — on stages at bookstores, food festivals and the living rooms of secret late-night gatherings — they’re dabbling in other endeavors like screen printing and painting, poetry and songwriting workshops for kids, and activism, which they also view as a creative endeavor, not at all separate from the music. “My degree is in social work, so my concern is with bringing folks together,” Debbie says. “I don’t call myself an entertainer anymore. I want to establish some commune of emotion. I want us to collectively grow and transform through experience. I think using every inch of my resources to make that happen is artistry, some sort of craft.” They consider music-making the most universal language of their creative talents, the one that holds the most attention and allows them to reach people from disparate walks of life.

TODD TURNER

“When I’m just a student or a social worker — perception is reality — I might be this black femme with a message people don’t want to hear,” Debbie says. “But when I’m singing to them, they’re lulled into it; their ears perk up. So, then I’m glad to have your attention, but what do we do with that?” Tonight, with soulful bluesy vocals, Debbie delivers acoustic renditions of Kanye West’s “Heartless,” Radiohead’s “Creep” and Adele’s “Rolling in the Deep” with lips painted royal purple before offering up an original, “Soul Cry.” “With ‘Soul Cry,’ it’s a very political message,” they say. “I’m going to take you there, even if it’s not a place you might be willing to go. You may not be ready to hear about the blood in the street, and especially the blood on Greensboro’s hands, but artists are supposed to change the world, and that’s what I’m here for. I’m seeking real change in this city.” Debbie left home on the south side of Chicago at 16, eventu-


April 11-17, 2019 Up Front News Opinion TODD TURNER

Shot in the Triad Puzzles

ally finding their way to North Carolina where their experiences as a first-generation ing me, if you’re killing folks in my community and destroying their opportunities, HBCU college student have shaped their perspective on what it means to be a creative then what I’m doing doesn’t matter; it doesn’t matter if I’m afforded places if other of color in a small, Southern city. people aren’t eating, don’t have the spaces or opportunities.” “[Greensboro] is oversaturated with artists, but there’s not a lot of recognition So post-graduation, when faced with deciding whether to stay or go, they ask for those artists, and this city treats artists of color the way it treats themselves, “What can I aspire to in this town? Am I supposed to stay people of color,” Debbie says. “Especially as a queer femme of color, in Greensboro for 20 years just to see people get to a table where they it’s difficult having to vie for spaces maybe with people who are still might not be able to eat?” Find Debbie the Artfriends with A, B, C, D, E, F, G. Then there are people willing to pay Later tonight, when Debbie begins to parcel out the contents of you, but they don’t pay you your worth; they pay you enough to get Mindful Supply’s goodie bag to their fellow performers, they find that ist on Instagram at you to come back. It’s not just one type of person who will exploit the business is providing gifts for them, too — in welcome contrast to debbie.theartist for you, either; I’ve been exploited by people who look like me.” years of managed expectations. information about Debbie names a recent exception: NC Represents, a weekly live“I don’t think I can go into a space and not try to transform that music series at Joymongers Brewing Co. that local musician Molly space in some way,” Debbie says. “I think every space should be left upcoming shows. McGinn created to feature marginalized musicians. (NPR invited the with a touch of magic, but I’m not egotistical enough to think the two to interview and perform on “The State of Things” last August magic is just the music; the music has to have a message… and I’m after Debbie’s series appearance.) But Debbie also notes that there relentless in mine. I’m inviting other people to become more selfaren’t yet spaces spotlighting black musicians, specifically, on a regular basis, and is aware.” frank about the barriers of being a queer, black artist in a segregated city, about realiAnd Debbie the Artist is doing it through community-building, week after week ties like paying other artists of color out of pocket to perform alongside them when after week. During their finale with the original song “Magic,” their co-hosts hand out venues refuse. percussive instruments to the audience and everyone is out of their seats dancing, “I’ve had to fight tooth and nail to be invited into spaces, so I feel at this point singing along, while the hot whistle of the train, which cleaves this old textile town there’s a lot of unfinished business because I am getting these opportunities now,” into parts, joins the chorus. they say. “I’m grateful to be received, but it’s not about me. Even if people are uplift-

Culture

“When I’m just a student or a social worker — perception is reality — I might be this black femme with a message people don’t want to hear,” Debbie says. “But when I’m singing to them, they’re lulled into it; their ears perk up. So, then I’m glad to have your attention, but what do we do with that?”

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by Savi Ettinger

Culture

Opinion

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Up Front

April 11-17, 2019

CULTURE It always rains on First Friday

Puzzles

Shot in the Triad

Customers seek shelter from the First Friday storm inside Oscar Oglethorpe in downtown Greensboro. Indoor events have become the norm on First Friday, as it has rained eight of the last 12 dates.

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t always rains on First Friday. The saying rings true today, on April 5, as the sky above Downtown Greensboro turns gray early in the morning. According to the National Weather Service, since April 2016, approximately 67 percent of First Fridays have faced rain, yet the plans continue. The smell of acrylic paint permeates the studio of Greenhill, where a father sits on a barstool beside his elementaryaged daughter, who eagerly smears a green hue across her canvas. Jaymie Meyer, director of education, walks through an adjacent room housing handmade paper bird nests made by local schoolchildren. The bright papiermâché and the neon decorations of the studio contrast with the dreariness outside. “I can never tell if [the rain is] go-

SAVI ETTINGER

ing to bring people into the building or if it’s going to make Outside, the downpour picks up. people stay home,” Meyer says. “People don’t like to get wet in Center City Park lays bare, empty as the First Friday Drum Greensboro.” Circle postpones its jam session. Sheltered underneath a Despite the weather, guests amble through not only Greenbalcony, a man works his saxophone, sending woody notes hill but most of the Greensboro Cultural Center. A musician through the drumming of the rain. Passersby can see the Voicbegins to set up in the gallery, Greenhill’s routine First Friday es of God’s Children Community Choir performing through attraction, alongside extended pay-what-you-want studio the glass panes in front of the International Civil Rights Center hours. Adults and children alike sit in front of large pieces of and Museum, and some duck inside to listen. paper strung across a wall-sized, paintDuring a quick recess from singing splatter-covered easel. gospel songs, members of the choir and Across the hall, the Center for Visual audience exchange memories of the The next First Friday is May 3 Arts hosts the opening reception for songs and of the Civil Rights movement Unbound, featuring local creators who in the spirit of the venue. A man steps up in downtown Greensboro. hone a literary edge in their artwork. to a microphone to share a story about Blackout poetry, textless visual narrahis involvement with the protests that tives and text-based paintings line the took place in the very building, as CEO walls. The Greensboro Bound Literary Festival draws together John Swaine takes a seat at a window. Despite the rain and the collaborators, as festival coordinator Deonna Kelli Sayed sometimes difficult parking, he believes First Friday serves as pours wine for a trio of attendants. an important platform. “It feels fresh,” she says of the gallery. “It feels very current “When it comes down to being an educational hub,” Swaine and contemporary.” says, “I want people to be challenged and know more.”


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Inside the warm lighting of Oscar Oglethorpe, Dune Sea strums an upbeat melody. Three separate acts prep for a Sofar Sounds show, a pop-up concert that only confirmed its location and time yesterday. Energy overflows the small space as optician Liz Wall snaps a picture of some flyers to advertise the last few remaining seats on social media. The wind whips up, and she glances outside at the weather. “It’s like it doesn’t even rain on other Fridays,” Wall laughs. A couple strolls around as it gets dark, looking for an outdoor market that closed early due to weather. The woman tugs on his shirt, pointing to the open door of Just Be, a gift boutique located on Elm Street across from Natty Greene’s. Elsewhere’s brightly colored insides pop as the sun sets and solidifies a starless night. Communications Manager Amelia Nura ruminates on the night’s success in front of a gigantic chalkboard calendar. For her, Elsewhere’s happenings vary, but always bring together different art communities, fitting First Friday as she sees spaces connecting along Greensboro’s busiest streets. “I see a lot of organizations and businesses try to drive people down South Elm,” Nura says. A middle-aged man inspects the right wall of the first room in the makeshift museum, digging a plastic building block out of a wooden display bin. A few other guests straggle around the first floor following a curator talk, enjoying Elsewhere’s signature strangeness right up until the evening slows to a close. “It always rains on First Friday,” Nura says. “But there’s always a lot of life.”

April 11-17, 2019

SAVI ETTINGER

TRUTH IS POWER

It always rains on First Friday. But the art remains.

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East Hendrix Street, Greensboro

April 11-17, 2019 Shot in the Triad

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April afternoon.

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CAROLYN DE BERRY


by Matt Jones

Across

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1 “Weekend Update” co-anchor Colin 5 Barry Manilow’s club 9 Cold shoulders 14 Apiece 15 “Chocolat” actress Lena 16 Records, informally 17 Lucy’s neighbor with a nasty attitude? 19 Rico, to Napoleon Dynamite 20 Lover of suffixes? 21 “___ I Believe” (2018 song by Clean Bandit) 23 ___ de vivre 24 “It sucks being a young horse,” e.g.? 27 Sweat equity concept 29 “Hotel California” band 30 Big scallion 31 In actuality 35 “La ___” (Debussy composition) ©2017 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) 36 NPR host Shapiro 37 Color in a Patriots uniform 40 10,000 square meters 44 All-night party 45 Like a venomous snake 48 Room for negotiation 50 Studs and labrets that are a bargain? 54 Pioneer Boone, folksily 55 Hand sanitizer additive 56 Actress Lawrence of “The Cool Kids” 59 Bush Supreme Court appointee 61 Completely stocked with enemies? 63 Hands, in Spanish Answers from last issue 64 Small spot of land 27 Nightmare street of film 65 It may have rings and needles 28 Greens ___ 66 Dating app motion 32 Have a picnic, e.g. 67 Falcons’ home? 33 Monk’s title 68 “Gone Girl” actress Ward 34 Mattress filler 37 Unadjusted stat Down 38 Actress Longoria 1 Humvee forerunner 39 “Who ___” (Cincinnati Bengals chant) 2 Promising words 40 Natural vantage point 3 Claudia once married to David Copperfield 41 Thought transference 4 Roxette hit of 1989 42 Pet you water 5 Dot-___ bubble 43 Director Roth 6 Acid used in soapmaking 44 Passes on a present 7 “Shine” instrument 45 Fester’s family 8 Per ___ (yearly) 46 Mariner’s set of rules 9 “Law & Order: ___” (spinoff that will 47 Pressed sandwiches break a record for longevity) 49 Be covetous of 10 Lego series with its own 2017 movie 51 Like some D&D characters 11 Straighten, as a hose 52 Awaken 12 Writing credit 53 Honeycomb components 13 Comes down in icy drops 57 On an even ___ 18 Shakespearean king 58 Piece of mind? 22 Work on ___ 60 Sugar suffix 25 Inc., in Australia 62 Rent out 26 Back muscle

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April 11-17, 2019

CROSSWORD ‘Normcore’— parse that carefully.

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Profile for Triad City Beat

TCB April 11, 2019 — Soul Cry  

Debbie the Artist, beekeeping in Forsyth, universal pre-K, sheriff and ICE, and it always rains on First Friday.

TCB April 11, 2019 — Soul Cry  

Debbie the Artist, beekeeping in Forsyth, universal pre-K, sheriff and ICE, and it always rains on First Friday.

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