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Greensboro / Winston-Salem / High Point March 28-April 3, 2019 triad-city-beat.com

GREENSBORO EDITION

FREE

Furniture

is art PAGE 16

Jeremy Kamiya and Plant Seven revitalize furniture-making in High Point

Abigail Dowd PAGE 18

Sheriff and ICE PAGE 12

‘Shrill’ binge PAGE 7

INSIDE THIS WEEK: TRIAD CIT Y BITES, THE TRIAD’S FINEST DINING GUIDE


March 28-April 3, 2019

EDITOR’S NOTEBOOK

What the ghosts are telling me Mike was just 25 when he left us, gone before the medics made it out to the wreck on Long Island’s Meadowbrook Parkway. “He died by Brian Clarey fast,” was one of the things we said to each other in the following days, as if that horrible truth made it any easier to swallow. On my own timeline, Mike’s death pops up 25 years ago, at the front end of an extended period of nihilism, where I completely lost faith in any sense of the world as it had been taught to me — though, at the time, I just thought I was partying. That funeral was the last time I saw Mark, Mike’s younger brother… until Friday, when we ran into each other in downtown Winston-Salem. We both still dream about him. That night, I was visited by the ghost of Tim LaFollette, who became my friend more than 15 years ago, and who also left too soon. And while Mike’s visage came across in his younger brother’s features and mannerisms, Tim was a specter in the

Crown during the Kudzu Wish reunion show, so very present in the lyrics and basslines and the wild, happy crowd that frontman Adam Thorn seemed genuinely surprised not to see him. “Where the f*** is Tim, man?” he said from the stage. “It’s getting late.” The third ghost came Monday, over the phone. Danny wasn’t my friend, exactly — he was my friend’s little brother back on the street where we grew up. I recognized the number when it came up on the display, a vestigial trace from a time when we used to commit phone numbers to memory. I believe it was the first phone number I ever knew besides our own family phone. A few years ago, Danny, 40, shortly after the birth of his first child, went to bed one night and woke up dead. It was his mother calling, trying to track down my own mother here in North Carolina. And I recognized the despair in her voice when we talked about her son, deeper, I believe, than my thoughts have ever taken me. Mike. Tim. Danny, too. But the rest of us are still here. Maybe that’s the only point. And for now, it’s enough.

QUOTE OF THE WEEK How can we buy the record if they’re slapping one of our sisters? How can we separate the music of the man? -Donna Bradby

BUSINESS PUBLISHER/EXECUTIVE EDITOR Brian Clarey brian@triad-city-beat.com allen@triad-city-beat.com

ART ART DIRECTOR Robert Paquette

EDITORIAL SENIOR EDITOR Jordan Green

KEY ACCOUNTS Gayla Price

PUBLISHER EMERITUS Allen Broach

jordan@triad-city-beat.com

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Sayaka Matsuoka sayaka@triad-city-beat.com

STAFF WRITER Lauren Barber lauren@triad-city-beat.com

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1451 S. Elm-Eugene St. Box 24, Greensboro, NC 27406 Office: 336-256-9320 Winston-Salem Cover: CONTRIBUTOR Savi Ettinger Photo by Todd Turner calendar@triad-city-beat.com

robert@triad-city-beat.com SALES gayla@triad-city-beat.com

SALES Johnathan Enoch

johnathan@triad-city-beat.com

CONTRIBUTORS

Carolyn de Berry, Matt Jones

TCB IN A FLASH @ triad-city-beat.com First copy is free, all additional copies are $1. ©2018 Beat Media Inc.

Greensboro Cover: Courtesy of Jeremy Kamiya


March 28-April 3, 2019

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March 28-April 3, 2019

CITY LIFE March 28-31, 2019 by Savi Ettinger

THURSDAY March 28

Metropolis @ Hanesbrand Theatre (WS), 7:30 p.m.

Up Front

Silkroad Ensemble @ Wake Forest University (W-S), 6:40 p.m.

FRIDAY March 29

UNCSA Thesis Exhibition @ SECCA (W-S), 6 p.m. This exhibit features works from senior students of UNCSA’s High School Visual Arts Program. Explore the paintings, drawings and sculptures of young artists, influenced by a variety of artistic backgrounds. Find the event on Facebook. Carolina Crossing @ the Ramkat (W-S), 7 p.m.

News

This series of ballet pieces by Gary Taylor lend insight into a city through vignettes of its inhabitants’ lives. The dances move through subjects like construction workers, recycling and blind dates. Learn more at winstonsalemfestivalballet.org.

Culture

Opinion

Mad at Miles: A Black Woman’s Guide to Truth @ Triad Stage (GSO), 8 p.m. Winston-Salem-based band Carolina Crossing plays an upbeat set that meshes funk with rock and folk. William Hinson and Reliably Bad join in, adding lively pop music to the night. Find the event on Facebook.

Wait Chapel hosts a concert from an ensemble that pulls from international musical traditions and cultures. Silkroad Ensemble creates a cohesive, global body of work that embraces diversity through sound. A discussion precedes the performance. Learn more on Facebook.

Unspoken Tradition @ Muddy Creek Cafe & Music Hall (W-S), 8 p.m.

Puzzles

Shot in the Triad

Judy Goldman @ Scuppernong Books (GSO), 7 p.m.

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Unspoken Tradition plays a set celebrating roots traditions through contemporary songwriting. Their bluegrass lyrics reflects the history and customs of Western and Central North Carolina. Find the event on Facebook.

Judy Goldman visits Scuppernong to discuss her newest book, Together: A Memoir of a Marriage and a Medical Mishap. The creative-nonfiction work follows Goldman and her husband after he becomes paralyzed from the waist down during a medical procedure. Find the event on Facebook.

This play by Pearl Cleage centers around the essays and scripts from women facing the trauma of abuse. The lyrical work explores the path of black women healing from abuse and finding solidarity. Buy tickets at ttnc.org.

Jazz for Geeks @ Community Theatre of Greensboro (GSO), 8:30 p.m. This performance celebrates the end of Geeksboro, to raise funds to supply the Triad’s Title I schools with age-appropriate comic books . Musicians deliver jazz renditions of themes from Star Trek, Cowboy Bebop and other nerdy hallmarks. Find the event on Facebook.


March 28-April 3, 2019

SATURDAY March 30

Dance Marathon @ Greensboro Cultural Center (GSO), 9 a.m.

Tie Dye Patio Party @ Boxcar Bar + Arcade (GSO), 1 p.m.

SUNDAY March 31

Comics Life @ Revolution Mills (GSO), 11 a.m. Up Front

Trans Day of Visibility Celebration @ ARTivity on the Green (W-S), 3 p.m. Opinion

Join a team or create your own during the third annual Dance Marathon to fundraise for the School at City Arts. Live performances, parties and competitions fill the day with movement, all to encourage dance education. Find the event at danceproject. org.

Bring out the T-shirts, bandanas, tote bags or other tie-dyeable accessories for this event sponsored by Sweetwater Brewing Company. Make kaleidoscopic patterns while enjoying deals on Sweetwater drinks and a fish tank with prizes. Find the event on Facebook.

News

This new educational event spotlights the behind-the-scenes of comic books. Workshops and panel discussions explore both the distribution and creative sides of comics. Artists and vendors offer a marketplace for guests. Find the event on Facebook.

Big Daddy Love @ Incendiary Brewing Company (W-S), 8 p.m. Culture

Grand opening @ Winston Junction Market (W-S), 11:30 a.m.

Shot in the Triad

Big Daddy Love showcases what they named “Appalachian Rock.� Their signature fusion of rock and roots involves both acoustic and slide guitar, alongside banjo and melodic vocals. Find the event on Facebook.

Puzzles

This indoor market opens its doors for guests to shop through vendors for local food and handmade goods. The market revitalizes an abandoned factory space, and the grand opening features a community canvas painting and a raffle. Find the event on Facebook.

Transgender people of the Triad can come together during this party for the Trans Day of Visibility from North Star LGBTQ Center. The laid-back event promises snacks and a sense of community for all identifying as trans or nonbinary. Find the event on Facebook.

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March 28-April 3, 2019 Up Front News Opinion Culture Shot in the Triad Puzzles

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5By Sayaka questions for Donna Baldwin-Bradby, director of Mad at Miles Matsuoka Touring Theatre of North Carolina stages Mad at Miles: A Black Woman’s Guide to Truth at Triad Stage Thursday through March 31. The work was adapted by Donna Baldwin-Bradby from a book by Pearl Cleage in 2008 — the first adaptation in the country from the written work. It was first performed in 2008 at Triad Stage. Tickets and showtimes can be found at ttnc.org. How did you find out about Mad at Miles? Well [Cleage] wrote it in the ’90s about Miles Davis. I had never heard about Mad at Miles; I had heard about Pearl Cleage of course. A student named Amanda Baker performed one of the monologues in an audition in 2006. The work is about how Miles Davis wasn’t remorseful when he was abusive to women. [Cleage] came under a lot of pressure for it. She lost a lot of friends because she called out this musical icon. She was ahead of her game for what we call the #MeToo movement. What about it drew you to want to put it on as a play? Personally, what drew me to it, I am a survivor of sexual abuse from a family member. So, anything that deals with that subject matter, I’m always drawn to it. A lot of what happened I hadn’t dealt with it, and Mad at Miles helped me deal with it. It was in a world that I could understand, in theater. I don’t believe that things happen by accident. The first time we did it, I was terrified. After the performances, it got an overwhelming response. People would come up to me or the cast in tears. And I’d be like, ‘No lady, I have a story to tell you. Can you help me?’ I had to have counseling. I’m a theater artist, I’m not a therapist. It was an awakening for me. Many of [the actors] have had experiences that connect them to the stories. Sometimes we just have to stop and breathe for a minute. The show is heavy but it’s light. There’s some funny stuff in there. They have a lot of fun doing the show. The story hits right in the middle of conversations about how or whether to separate the artist from the art in the #MeToo movement. We’ve got people like Kevin Spacey, R. Kelly and, most recently, Michael Jackson. How do you feel about that? It really is #MeToo! Every time we’ve done it, I’ve had people come up to me. I’m not talking about two people, I’m talking about 12 people. How can we buy the record if they’re slapping one of our sisters? How can we separate the music of the man? In the story, Mad at Miles, you see this woman talking about how his music inspired her. She’s in turmoil, and by the end of it, she goes almost insane because she couldn’t forget about Cecily Tyson, the woman who Miles abused. Donna Baldwin-Bradby first adapted Pearl Cleage’s work, A Black Woman’s Guide

COURTESY IMAGE

You’re putting on this show again for the first time in 10 years. What’s to Truth, in 2008. It runs this weekend at Triad Stage. that like? Back then, we were dealing with it when we did it, but in a more intimate setting. People came to the show and people would share stuff. But in the day of social media, the platform is huge. It’s large. Now it’s broader, more robust. There’s conversations about it all day every day. What frightens us now is what frightened us then. We didn’t know how people would respond. I wouldn’t have guessed that there would be an international movement. The difference is social media. People can immediately respond to your work on their own. People can start tweeting about it. The control is with the people now. The backlash that Pearl dealt with it then, people aren’t dealing with it as much now.

Why is this piece important? It’s an hour long. I believe this needs to be a first-year experience. Freshmen need to see Mad at Miles. Statistics show that mostly it’s freshman being preyed on by older students. It really makes you think about sexual assault, racism, sexism. The show is meant for everyone. I know that theater has been at the heart of cultural change. We create a unique community. I think that there’s a difference in live theater. I think it’s relevant now because everyone that comes to see it, they can get it where they fit in. [The story] “Good Brother Blues” is a call to action for men for example. The show is all about love. The goal with Mad at Miles is that it becomes that tool for universities and perform it at universities and tour so that we can go to every university.


GINA

THE MANHATTAN T “CRASH” CRADDOCK

April 27th, 2019 Show | 8:00pm / Doors |7:00pm With nine #1 singles and countless top-ten charted singles to his credit, this Greensboro native will perform such mega hits as “Rub It In” and “Knock Three Times”.

Raleigh Ringers

BRANFORD PASSPORT To Entertainment 2018 & 2019

LBA

RYTHM OF THE DANCE

News

THE SAUCE BOSS

THE HIGHPOINT BALLET veters o L et

Up Front

I always knew that an altweekly office would make a great setting for a sitcom. “Shrill,” a short series on Hulu — just six episodes in its first season — makes good on that premise, though not in the way I would have handled it. It’s based on the writings of real-life altweekly journalist Lindy West, whose time at Seattle altweekly The Stranger was marked by conflict with Editor Dan Savage, who is probably the most famous character in the history of our industry, if you don’t count Norman Mailer. West’s work is channeled by “Saturday Night Live”’s Aidy Bryant, who plays Annie, a low-level alt staffer trying to move up from the calendar desk into something more substantial. And while the series hits some off notes in its characterization of altweekly office life — nobody has that many employees anymore, let alone so many people of color — and takes some liberties with the real-life relationship between Savage and West as works of biofiction are wont to do, it’s a winner on so many levels. Finally, a plus-sized lead that defies easy stereotypes and characterization. Finally, an exploration of the cultural divide between Generation X and the Millennials. Finally, something funny from Hulu! Watch it for the sharp writing and fantastic wardrobes. Watch it because it’s about altweeklies, which are more important to American life than some people think. Watch it because it’s only six episodes, and you can probably knock it out before bedtime tonight. And watch it so they will make more of them. Because I want to see more.

March 28-April 3, 2019

‘Shrill,’ and altweekly TV by Brian Clarey

The � a new exciting season! s t n e s High Point Theatre Pre SAUCE BOSS BILLY

N E R LIND Blues, Cajun, rock and country withBAa sideHof AL gumbo!

May 7th, 2019

MARSALIS QUARTET

Show | 7:30pm / RDoors A EDE |6:30pm N

Concert goers are asked to bring food donations in support of the Greater High Point Food Alliance.

Opinion

THE QUEEN’S Acts and dates are subject to change. For tickets and updates, go to HighPointTheatre.com or call 336.887.3001 CARTOONISTS

Recycle this paper. Culture Shot in the Triad Puzzles

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March 28-April 3, 2019 Up Front News Opinion Culture Shot in the Triad Puzzles

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NEWS

Speaker: Healthcare reform will be front and center in 2020 election by Jordan Green Political polarization foreclosed on the possibility of bipartisan compromise to fix the Affordable Care Act, Dr. Jonathan Oberlander says, so expect candidates in the 2020 election to propose “radically different ideas about what the future of American healthcare is.” Dr. Jonathan Oberlander, a professor of health policy and management at UNC-Chapel Hill, told the audience at Union Square Campus in Greensboro on Tuesday that he was invited by the League of Women Voters of the Piedmont Triad to share his expertise on healthcare reform and help voters make an informed decision in the 2020 election. “You’ve got a long ways to go, and a lot of speakers and a lot of issues to consider,” he said. “So I’ll see if I can knock off one date for you.” Because of myriad woes in the US healthcare system, including people facing financial ruin while fighting disease, surprise medical bills and high costs overall, Oberlander said the idea of “Medicare for all” has come roaring back. “There’s no question that it’s part of a debate in a way that it really hasn’t been since the 1970s,” Oberlander said, noting that the architects of Medicare when it was signed into law by President Johnson in 1965 assumed that it would be only a matter of time before the program expanded from the elderly to cover the entire population. “And my guess is that the Democratic nominee in 2020 will be in favor either of ‘Medicare for all’ or expanding Medicare, what I call ‘Medicare for more’ — allowing people 50 and older to buy into Medicare, allowing uninsured to buy into Medicare, something like that,” he said President Trump, Oberlander predicted, will advocate for a “repeal and replace” plan that is even more severe than the one Republicans unsuccessfully attempted to pass in 2017. On Tuesday, the Trump administration filed a brief in support of a lawsuit against the federal government filed by Texas and five other conservative states seeking to overturn the Affordable Care Act. Oberlander said people should keep a close eye on the suit, which could land in the Supreme Court and lead to the loss of popular provisions like the prohibition on health insurance companies denying

coverage based on preexisting conditions. The sharp divergence between the two parties is a testament to the escalating polarization in American politics, Oberlander said. “The Affordable Care Act is just one front in a much larger partisan struggle,” Oberlander observed. “One of the frustrating things about the Affordable Care Act is you can imagine a scenario where Democrats say, ‘We love Obamacare, but it’s got problems. Okay, we agree. Let’s make some changes.’ And Republicans say, ‘We hate Obamacare, but some parts of it work. Let’s come together as two parties and let’s make the Affordable Care Act work better and make it more affordable.’ That has not happened. There’s no bipartisanship on this. And the reason there’s no bipartisanship on this is that chasm between the two parties.” While the Affordable Care Act has succeeded on a number of fronts — outlawing discrimination based on preexisting conditions and based on gender, and dramatically reducing the number of uninsured people — in other areas, it remains flawed, Oberlander said. “The Affordable Care Act, if you’re buying coverage in the marketplace, is a pretty good deal if you’re very low income, but if you are not very low income it’s not such a good deal,” he said. “There are millions of middle-class Americans for whom healthcare is still not affordable, and that’s because the subsidies under the Affordable Care Act are not comprehensive enough for middle-class Americans. “When you hear people say, ‘The Affordable Care Act is unaffordable,’ it’s absolutely the case that for many Americans, health insurance is still unaffordable under the Affordable Care Act,” Oberlander added. Also, Oberlander said, the online insurance pools created by the Affordable Care Act proved to be more volatile than people predicted, with the cost of plans increasing on average by 21 percent in 2017 and by 32 percent in 2018. While the law provides that subsidies rise to cover rate increases, Oberlander said, “There are still a couple million Americans inside the insurance marketplace who aren’t subsidized at all, so they bear absolutely the full weight of those premium increases. And outside of the

Dr. Johnathan Oberland of UNC-Chapel Hill discussed fact and fallacy in Medicare for all at Union Square.

marketplace there are still Americans buying coverage directly from insurance brokers and directly from insurers, and they don’t qualify for subsidies. And they’ve been hit.” Even with widespread dissatisfaction, Oberlander said it would be “very difficult to take the patchwork healthcare system that we have,” and merge 160 million people with employer-sponsored coverage, those who receive Medicare or Medicaid, and those who remain uninsured into a single plan. And while the majority of Americans say they support “Medicare for all,” Oberlander said support plummets in public polling when respondents are told that the program would lead to delays or rationing. Many Democratic candidates for president have embraced some form of “Medicare for all,” but Oberlander cautioned that it’s important for voters to press them on what they mean by the label. As an example, he said “Medicare for all” is generally understood to be different than single-payer healthcare. Medicare, since its inception, has allowed a role for private insurers, who process claims and provide private plans with additional benefits. In contrast, under

JORDAN GREEN

single-payer healthcare, as exemplified by the Canadian system, there is only one government insurance program, which is administered by each province. “When you ask Americans about ‘Medicare for all,’ a lot of Americans, what they hear is, ‘Oh, what you’re saying is anybody could buy into Medicare as an option,’” Oberlander said. “The opinion polls will show you that most Americans when you say ‘Medicare for all’ don’t think you’re literally talking about every single American in Medicare. They think it means every American would have a choice to join Medicare, which is very different than saying Medicare is going to replace everything.” Joking that “there might be two or three people on Medicare in the room” to an audience that drew heavily from area assisted living communities, Oberlander continued, “As you all know… Medicare has lots of benefit gaps and lot of holes itself. And so, most of the plans that are out there in Congress or that presidential candidates are offering for ‘Medicare for all,’ they’re not talking about the current Medicare program; they’re talking about taking the current Medicare program and improving it and adding more benefits to it.”


March 28-April 3, 2019 Up Front

News

Opinion

Culture

Shot in the Triad

Puzzles

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Puzzles

Shot in the Triad

Culture

Opinion

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Up Front

March 28-April 3, 2019


March 28-April 3, 2019 Up Front

News

Opinion

Culture

Shot in the Triad

Puzzles

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March 28-April 3, 2019 Up Front News Opinion Culture Shot in the Triad Puzzles

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At community forum, Forsyth Sheriff updates his position on ICE By Sayaka Matsuoka Newly elected sheriff of Forsyth County, Bobby Kimbrough, faced tough questions about immigration and cooperation with ICE from community members at the inaugural community forum on Monday. Members of the community hounded Forsyth County Sheriff Bobby Kimbrough with questions about immigration and the sheriff’s office’s cooperation with US Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials at a community forum on Monday evening. More than a dozen immigration activists held up signs that read “Uncheck the Box” at the Forsyth County Central Library, where more than 120 members of the community gathered for an inaugural community forum hosted by the sheriff who recently celebrated his first 100 days in office. “Currently, we are talking to the US Marshals about that box,” said Kimbrough about a contract between the sheriff’s office and US Marshals that checks off ICE as an authorized user of the local jail. At a February press conference, Kimbrough announced that he would no longer authorize ICE to use the local jail to detain suspected undocumented immigrants under the contract which is up for renewal in April. The contract, which was initially signed under the previous administration in May 2016, authorizes ICE to detain “individuals who are awaiting a hearing on their immigration status or deportation.” Kimbrough walked back his pledge in comments on Monday evening that contradicted his assurance in February that he would renegotiate the US Marshals Services contract to no longer lease jail beds to ICE. “There’s contractual agreements that I have to respect because I can’t cost the county money based on what I feel or what I think,” Kimbrough said at Monday’s meeting. “We are negotiating with the US Marshal Services because what that is, is bed space with ICE,” Kimbrough said. “ICE is not only immigration. ICE handles human trafficking, guns, they handle a school of things. When the contract says ICE, it doesn’t mean immigration… So when we negotiate that contract, what we’ve got to do is… structure that contract specifically with the lawyers to make sure that we don’t address it to where we talkin’ about immigration or to house immigration violations.”

Christina Howell, the public affairs officer for the sheriff’s office, gave context on Kimbrough’s comments via phone call on Wednesday. “It’s not him wavering on his commitment; it’s making sure we uphold our legal obligations with honoring the rights of individuals,” Howell said. “We understand that this is a subject that stirs a lot of emotions. It’s a complex issue, and we appreciate the public taking the time to educate themselves, to do their research, to ask the questions.” She confirmed that they have not decided whether or not to continue authorizing ICE to use the jail when they renegotiate the contract. She said that under the current contract, ICE detainees are only allowed to stay in the jail SAYAKA MATSUOKA Forsyth County Sheriff Bobby Kimbrough said his positions on cooperation for a maximum of 72 hours with ICE will comply with federal law. and that they do not have any undocumented immigrants prisoners after they’ve posted bond or enforcement check the immigration being held at this time. completed adjudication. I-203 requests status of “any person charged with a The federal government reimburses are administrative documents signed by criminal offense or an impaired driving the county $70 per day for each prisoner, ICE officers and are not warrants. offense.” Currently, state law requires according to Kimbrough. The sheriff However, Kimbrough stated that if his local law enforcement to check the status told reporters during his press conferoffice were to receive an arrest warrant of anyone charged with a felony or drivence in February that reimbursements from a US judge or federal magistrate ing while impaired, which Kimbrough for ICE prisoners since the beginning to hold someone in ICE custody, that his confirmed that his office does. The bill of the fiscal year on July 1, 2018 have office would honor that warrant. would additionally make it unlawful totaled $38,000. Another community member asked for any office to “prohibit federal law Laura Garduño Garcia with SiemKimbrough what he would do if a bill enforcement officers from entering and bra NC, an immigration that requires local law conducting enforcement activities at a advocacy group, said enforcement to detain uncounty jail, local confinement facility, that Sheriff Kimbrough ‘It could be the old documented immigrants district confinement facility, or satellite shouldn’t have to wait became a law. jail/work release unit.” Those who fail sheriff’s decision, until April to modify the “If it becomes law, it’s to comply would be fined at least $1,000 contract. A paragraph on but he’s the sheriff law and I have to follow for the first offense and $25,000 for each page 12 of the contract it,” Kimbrough said. subsequent offense. now so he’s states that “either party “There’s only so much Lonnie Albright, a Forsyth County may initiate a request for responsible.’ that I can do. And I will assistant attorney who is the police atmodification to this agreeobey the law. I have no torney assigned to the sheriff’s office, said – Laura Garduño ment in writing” and that choice.” in an email to TCB that he believes the all modifications negotiGarcia House Bill 370 was bill is unconstitutional and violates the ated will be effective after filed on March 14 in Fourth Amendment of the Constitution. written approval by both response to several sher“Marbury v. Madison, an 1803 US parties. iff’s departments — including Wake, Supreme Court case, essentially means “It could be the old sheriff’s decision, Durham, Orange and Mecklenburg that laws, rules, statutes repugnant to the but he’s the sheriff now so he’s responcounties — announcing that they will United States Constitution are invalid,” sible,” Garcia said in a phone interview limit cooperation with federal immigraAlbright said in the email. “This oldie is on Tuesday. tion officials. The bill, which is backed still the law of the land and it established “Other sheriffs have done the same by House Speaker Tim Moore, would the principle of judicial review in this thing,” Garcia added. require local law enforcement to honor country… My crystal ball says this has Kimbrough also said at the meetdetainer requests provided by ICE. The about as much a chance of becoming ing that his office does not honor I-203 bill would also require that local law law as does recreational marijuana.” detainer requests from ICE to hold


Up Front News Opinion

Kimbrough opened Monday’s meeting by introducing members of his commanding staff, then listed some of the office’s accomplishments such as creating a new response team as part of the school safety initiative and a taskforce for fighting the opioid epidemic, a large part of the platform he ran on in 2018. “We won’t run from any hot topic,” he said as he opened the forum for questions. Many community members congratulated Kimbrough while others posed questions about ICE, police officers in schools and police brutality. Several members asked questions about school safety and whether or not officers are armed at schools and what Kimbrough thinks about arming teachers. “Of course they are,” Kimbrough said about whether or not the school officers are armed. The sheriff also noted that the school officers recently underwent an outfit revamp so that they are clothed in khakis, Nikes and polo shirts.

“It’s a softer look,” he said. “They can perform the same things in that look.” As for arming teachers, Kimbrough responded by saying that he didn’t think it was a good idea. “Carrying a gun is more than the notion of putting a gun on your hip,” he said. “You can’t teach and worry about where your firearm is…. You can’t pull that bullet back once you discharge it… I don’t think teachers should be armed, that’s my opinion.” As more members of the community thanked Kimbrough and his office for their work, he said he was grateful for the opportunity to be the county sheriff. “We will always be transparent,” Kimbrough said. “I welcome your calls, your letters, your emails, your complaints. It’s the people’s office.” At the end of the forum, many members stuck around to shake Kimbrough’s hand and personally congratulate him on his first 100 days. Yusef Suggs El, a longtime WinstonSalem resident, said he was pleased with how the meeting turned out. “I’m glad that we have a sheriff that’s standing upon the law,” he said. “I’m loving the culture that the sheriff is working on changing.”

March 28-April 3, 2019

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Culture Shot in the Triad Puzzles

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March 28-April 3, 2019 Up Front News Opinion Culture Shot in the Triad Puzzles

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CITIZEN GREEN

OPINION

Having it both ways on Greene Street — for cars

In some respects, the two streets that flank Elm — Greene to the west and Davie to the east — are the service roads that support downtown Greensboro’s vital corridor: The pedestrian-friendly hum of commerce, dining, shopping and leisure that courses up and down Elm is made possible by a collection of back-end parking garages by Jordan Green that allow auto-dependent visitors, workers and residents to come in and out of the center city with ease. Greene Street in particular is designed for the convenience of people driving into downtown Greensboro who want to quickly park and get to their destination, with three south-bound lanes allowing drivers to turn into three parking decks that span as many blocks, including Lincoln Financial Group deck and two public decks. The result is a somewhat inhospitable stretch for pedestrians without much vibrancy, despite providing a front door for key institutions like city hall, the Guilford County Courthouse and Elon Law School. As Greensboro cautiously embraces human-scale urbanism, the city is finally moving on a long-debated proposal to revert Greene Street back to a two-way street. Considering the goals of the BiPed Plan — adopted in 2015 — including investment in bicycling infrastructure, improving transportation “equity and choice” and increasing connectivity, one might assume that adding bike lanes to the revamped Greene Street would be a given. That’s exactly what Bicycling In Greensboro is pushing for. To date, the nonprofit has collected 332 names on its petition to add bike lanes to Greene Street, including both online and hard copy, said Nicole Lindahl, project coordinator for Bicycling In Greensboro. According to Transportation Engineering Supervisor, online JORDAN GREEN comments in favor of two-way conversion have outnumbered those The priorities of the parking garages are still driving the process on Greene Street in downtown Greensboro. opposed, 29 to 18. But even more commenters — 30 — “did not clearly support nor oppose the project but rather requested bike as courthouse workers exit the Greene Street parking deck, while traversing three lanes to lanes, crosswalks, landscaping and traffic-calming enhancements,” she said. turn right onto Washington. It certainly provides a convenient access to North Edgeworth Nicole Lindahl, who is also an employee of the Interactive Resource Center, pointed out Street for those heading up Battleground Avenue to the northern suburbs, or to South to me that many of the homeless day center’s guests rely on bicycles for transportation. Spring Street, for those headed south on Randleman Road. But when the two-way converThey frequently visit the courthouse to resolve misdemeanors, as well as the Family Justice sion takes place, they could just as easily drive up to Friendly Avenue and hang a left to Center, also located on Greene Street. It’s vital that one of the city’s most important streets catch either Edgeworth or Spring. serve all residents, she argues. Councilwoman Marikay Abuzuaiter, who chairs the Greensboro Metro Planning OrgaAnd it’s a matter of safety. Lindahl points to the city’s progress in bike-friendly infranization Transportation Advisory Committee, is sympathetic to the plea from Bicycling in structure to argue for why continuing on that trajectory can make a real difference. She Greensboro. But she told me that she doesn’t think it’s feasible to include sold her car and bought a bike in 2004. At that time, many elected officials bike lanes, at least in the crucial three-block stretch of Greene Street from ridiculed the idea that Greensboro residents would want to transition from Washington north to Friendly Avenue. But she said it might be possible to auto transportation to cycling. It wasn’t until 2007 that the city added the The result is a include bike lanes from Friendly Avenue north to Bellemeade Street. first bike lanes — on Spring Garden Street and Florida Street. From 2004 to Abuzuaiter said she’s focusing on getting bike lanes added to all feeder somewhat inhos2010, Lindahl said she was hit six times by cars while riding her bike. streets that bring people downtown, including North Elm Street from Fisher “I don’t want to jinx myself by saying this, but I haven’t been hit since that pitable stretch for Avenue to Cone Boulevard. time,” she said. “I credit bike infrastructure and more people riding. Chris Spencer, the city’s traffic engineering manager, told me that city pedestrians and “It’s a completely different atmosphere than it used to be,” she adds. staff is concerned that narrowing Greene Street to two lanes would create “This stuff works.” cyclists. an unacceptable level of congestion. Without a second southbound lane, Notwithstanding the city’s professed support for cycling, the current plan he noted, traffic turning into the parking garages could bring traffic to a for Greene Street’s two-way conversion does not incorporate bike lanes. standstill. Instead of sacrificing one of the three traffic lanes, the plan calls for two Lindahl doesn’t disagree, but she asks why it’s a bad thing to slow down southbound traffic lanes and one northbound lane. traffic. The priorities of the parking garages are still driving the process. I haven’t found a city “When you slow things down during rush hour, it makes things safer,” she said. “It’s official who can give me a good explanation for why there’s a higher demand for traffic almost like they’re choosing driver convenience over the safety of people.” going southbound than northbound, other than force of habit from drivers being accustomed to using the current three southbound lanes. I’ve observed the 5 p.m. weekday rush


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After two years of hints, cajoling and results of Mueller’s investigation roll cattery, Special Counsel Robert Muelout in real time for more than a year. ler dropped his report on the Trump Trump’s former campaign chair, Paul organization in a late Friday news dump, Manafort, got 7.5 years in federal prison almost like he was embarrassed to file it. for tax fraud, money laundering and This may be the most perfect obstruction of justice. Trump’s former government report in history, if only lawyer Michael Cohen pled guilty to because no one has seen it yet, and as making false statements to Congress such can be the perfect blank screen for about his meetings with Russian busiall of the projections we’ve built up as ness interests during the campaign. Forindividuals, as political parties and as a mer National Security Adviser Michael nation. Flynn is awaiting sentencing for lying Trump’s folks can say to the FBI about his that it vindicates Trump meetings with Russian against everything from officials. Those who say the government collusion with Russian George Papadopoulos, efforts to influence our Rick Gates and Alex Mueller Report is election, to obstruction van der Zwann all pled insignificant are of justice, to sprayguilty to activities they tanning. Folks on the engaged in while workjust as wrong as left are already crafting ing for the man who those saying it will would become presithe sorts of corrupt and conspiratorial scenarios dent. Roger Stone, who bring down the the likes of which we pled not guilty of lying president. haven’t seen since to Congress and witness Obama’s birth certifitampering, awaits trial. cate. Oh, and 25 Russian Or, you know, Benghazi. agents and companies were indicted for Blame it on the media for outsizinfluencing the American presidential ing the import of the Mueller Report. election of 2016, and also wire fraud. Blame it on Trump for being exactly So those who say the Mueller Report the sort of guy that most Americans is a big ball of nothing are just as wouldn’t mind seeing taken down a few mistaken as those who claim it will bring more notches. Blame it on the Trumpers down the president when it inevitably who were determined to shout down gets leaked to some ambitious Washany findings before they were even ington DC reporter. registered. If we’re smart, the electorate will But the Mueller report has become move on to the next big thing, which that rare document that satisfies everyis finding a candidate that can actually one and no one at the same time. beat Trump, and not dwell on an invesAnd that’s precisely because no one tigation that will never bear the sort of has seen it. fruit for which they clamor. But truly, we have been watching the You know, like Benghazi.

by Clay Jones

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By Sayaka Matsuoka

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March 28-April 3, 2019

CULTURE Old World craftsmanship in High Point design space

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Jeremy Kamiya’s woodwork fuses a Mid-century Modern aesthetic with ancient techniques.

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eremy Kamiya walks around the bright, open exhibition space and points to a striped entryway table with spindly legs and a smooth, buttery top. He notes where the joints of the piece meet, the corners flush, not a single screw in sight. “In the old days they would hide the joinery,” he says as he holds the lightweight tiger-maple table upside down. “But it’s cool cause you can see that someone made it.” Rather than using hardware to put together his pieces, Kamiya says he prefers his method of sliding perfectly complementary parts together, like pieces in a puzzle, and gluing them into place. The result makes his pieces look like single, continuous pieces of wood, like sculp-

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An entryway table is constructed without screws or nails.

tures carved out of marble. Actually, Kamiya says, each piece is made from a single tree but that the components are fitted together like Legos. “The leg is constructed by a square peg and square hole,” he explains. Behind the table, three more similar designs stand in a row, in darker wood. Next to those, smaller, circular side tables create a boundary between his pieces and another designer’s. The showstopper is a warm, Mid-century Modern-inspired coffee table with a floating shelf underneath. The pieces are part of Kamiya’s upcoming exhibition as part of High Point’s furniture market and is housed at Plant Seven, a newly opened textile factory-turned-creative makerspace downtown. The market opens in early April and it’s Kamiya’s third time showing at the international event that draws thousands of buyers to the area twice each year. “We wanted to activate creative juices,” says Tim Branscome, the CEO of Plant Seven. “We are particularly focused on

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younger generations coming into the industry.” And while Kamiya is in his early forties, he’s one of the artists that Branscome says is revitalizing furniture making in High Point. “We formed as a focused and affordable option for makers and local artisans to access the High Point furniture market,” Branscome explains. “We were looking at ways to create a collaborative workspace.” Kamiya is part of the Mill Collective, a branch of Plant Seven that acts as a coworking space as well as an exhibition space for furniture makers. Until last year, he was in the business of importing and selling furniture, not making it. He owned and operated Kamiya Furniture Gallery out of Durham for about three years, importing furniture from countries like Indonesia, where his wife is from. “People would say, ‘This is beautiful, did you make this?’” says Kamiya. “And I got tired of saying no.” Building on his background in graphic design and photography, Kamiya began watching YouTube videos on furniture-


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making to start. From there, he began deconstructing the old pieces of imported rarity of it.” furniture he had and using them to actualize his own designs. And his unique designs are what caught the eyes of Branscome and his partner Luci“I just thought, ‘I should try to do this,’” he says. “‘I could probably do this.’” ana Mikos, Plant Seven’s operations manager and co-founder of the Mill Collective. In 2015, he made his first piece, a side table, for his wife, Irene. “We brought him on board because he has a unique perspective of woodworkers,” Now, he’s pursuing a full-time career in furniture. He’s moving to High Point with Branscome says. “We want to stand in front of the world and say, ‘Look at what we’ve his family to be a part of the city’s deeply rooted furniture-making tradition. The done here in North Carolina. We’ve got creativity; we’ve got innovation.’ We’re trying home he’s moving into formerly belonged to a man to create a new perspective for the market and the who worked at the textile building that houses Plant state in general, and Jeremy is the poster child for that.” Seven. He looks forward to converting the garage into After opening Plant Seven in April 2018, Branscome Find out more about Jeremy’s Kamiya’s his new workspace. and Mikos say they realized that there was a larger “It just dawned on me that my best chance of makcommunity of makers and creatives in the area than furniture at kamiyafurniture.com. Learn ing a run at making furniture would be with the Mill they initially realized. more about Plant Seven and the furniture Collective and with this showroom,” Kamiya says. “This particular community was fragmented,” Bransmarket at plantseven.com. So far, he says he’s made about 40 pieces to date and come says. “They weren’t properly networked.” sold half of them. Now, they hope their efforts help bring more artists “I make for myself in a way,” he says. “I make what I like Kamiya back to the area to continue the tradition like.” of making high quality craft furniture. Growing up half-Japanese, Kamiya says he’s inspired by the aesthetic of Asian and “Am I wrong to think that we might be at the beginning of a renewal or change in Japanese buildings. He notes the minimalist approach that melds with the style of the tide for new appreciation for limited quantity, for passion-inspired furniture?” old-school temples. He mentions that a lot of Asian furniture designs omit the use of Kamiya asks. “Where people are putting their time into it? That wouldn’t surprise me fasteners like he does. if that were the case. It wouldn’t surprise me if that’s something that society is look“If you want something to be valued, you have to develop a brand,” he says. “That is ing for.” my trademark. I hate to admit to that commercial aspect but that’s how it is. I like the

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Kamiya has made about 40 pieces to date, and sold half of them.

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by Lauren Barber

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March 28-April 3, 2019

CULTURE Abigail Dowd, beneath the surface

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Abigail Dowd’s newest, Not What I Seem, is grittier, by necessity, than her 2017 debut. “I wanyed you to hear the emotion in my voice,” she says.

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here’s this character in The Green Mile, he’s really healing,” Greensboro-based singer-songwriter Abigail Dowd says, referencing Steven King’s 1996 serialized novel. “When he lays his hands on people, he opens his mouth and flies come out; fortunately for me, songs come out.” Dowd releases Not What I Seem, her second studio album, on April 5 and performs an album-release show in the Crowne at the Carolina Theatre on April 6 with Sam Frazier and the Side Effects. Like King’s character she aims to heal, but found she needed to start at her roots. Not What I Seem is an album about reckoning: with memory and

trauma; with the strange gratitude that can rise from ashes; of holding dear and letting go. It’s grittier, by necessity, than her 2017 debut Don’t Wake Me. “I pushed the vocals a little more in this one,” Dowd says. “The first album was a little softer, more controlled. I wanted my voice to sound nice and pretty and with this one, I wanted you to hear the emotion in my voice.” She grapples with what — and who — resides in the chasm between self-perception and others’ reception of us. The album’s title track “Not What I Seem” reveals an artist no longer concerned with being easy on the ears or eyes of others. Dowd sings, “Like Ophelia in the water, you stand and gaze upon her while she drowns/ and comment on her beauty as if it was her duty to please your eye and make you feel something inside.” “When that lyric came out — that line about Ophelia — there’s a painting by Millias in the Tate Gallery in London, and the model for that painting caught pneumonia because she

TODD TURNER

was posing in the bathtub and almost died and suffered health problems the rest of her life,” Dowd says. “She has an amazing story herself. But it’s always about the powerful man with the woman as the muse, and he makes her immortal.” Dowd, for so long, lived under the weight of the male gaze. It was inextricable from her earliest understanding of possible paths to becoming a singer. “I had this notion as a small child that if you wanted to be a singer that didn’t write your own music, you had to take your clothes off [like Madonna],” Dowd says. “Because I had to write my own songs first … I had it in my head that I had to be able to play the guitar. That idea ended up forcing me to get really good at the guitar, though, which I’m grateful for.” Through re-visiting, challenging and, often, revising her life’s narratives, Dowd grants listeners permission to do the same: to mine experiences and patterns from a place of curiosity and awe for the nature of the subconscious mind. This is


March 28-April 3, 2019 Up Front News Opinion Culture

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especially true of “Old White House.” “You’ve got to go back and get that little girl.” “I was doing shadow work, where you do deep imagin“I usually write the music first, so I’m playing with a ings — almost hypnosis work, going into the things that guitar riff and all of a sudden the lyrics to that song fell trigger you every day, and identifying them,” Dowd says. out,” Dowd says. “I realized by the second verse what “I identified [an emotion] as shame and then, Wait, when I was singing about, and that was really wild because is the first time that you felt that really was the only way I that? It immediately took me could go back and get that little back to this time when I was girl, through the song. It’s like Learn more at abigaildowd.com. three-and-a-half, four years old. releasing the story and it has no And I realized that was really power anymore, and then other heavy, and I’d been carrying it people can relate to the song, around.” and maybe it’ll be healing for them, too, knowing that The resurfaced memory prompted Dowd to reach out they’re not alone in that. The fact that I wrote this song to an aunt she’d distanced herself from out of sublimimeans I don’t own it anymore. I let the story go. And nal association with that traumatizing time. Her aunt then I can sing it with a total freedom.” imparted advice she heard from Oprah Winfrey, who is vocal about the repercussions of trauma in early life:

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Dowd, for so long, lived under the weight of the male gaze. The new work grapples with what resides in the chasm between self-perception and how others see us.

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March 28-April 3, 2019 Up Front News Opinion Culture Shot in the Triad Puzzles

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CULTURE At 100, Ferlinghetti still packs a house by Savi Ettinger

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am waiting for my case to come up,’” Brian Lampkin reads. He flips the page in Lawrence Ferlinghetti’s Coney Island of the Mind, leaning back in his seat. The amalgamation of barstools and armchairs makes the back of Scuppernong seem more like a living room than a bookstore as the Sunday afternoon moves on. A balding man reaches up to scratch his beard in thought as Lampkin makes his way through the poem. Lampkin recites the piece as part of one of many celebrations across the world for the 100th birthday of Lawrence Ferlinghetti. Born March 24, 1919, Ferlinghetti made his mark through poetry, painting and co-founding City Lights Booksellers & Publishers in San Francisco, becoming a figure of the Beat Poetry movement. Events for Ferlinghetti spanned from New York City to Venice to City Light’s home in San Francisco. In Greensboro, a chalkboard sign reading “A Ferlinghetti Day” out front beckons fans of the anarchist Beat into Scuppernong Books, strangers relating through a counterculture of literature. “‘I am anxiously waiting for the secret of eternal life to be discovered.’” Lampkin stops. “He may have found it, dear god.” The room stays silent as Lampkin delivers the piece. Only the occasional creaky wooden floorboard breaks through the streams of consciousness the 1958 poem delivers. Lampkin says that of all of Ferlinghetti’s works, the full staff of City Lights Booksellers recommended this — a repetitive list of desires for the future called “I Am Waiting.” “‘I am awaiting perpetually and forever a renaissance of wonder,’” Lampkin ends. Ferlinghetti received an undergraduate degree from UNC Chapel-Hill in journalism, went on to earn a masters in English literature from Columbia and a doctorate from the University of Paris. Through his enterprise of City Lights, he helped publish figures from the wideopen or Beat poetry movements, including most notoriously Allen Ginsburg’s Howl and Other Poems. The association landed Ferlinghetti with an arrest in 1956 for the sale of writing labeled as obscene. Ferlinghetti’s beating of the case led to a wider legal understanding of culturally relevant artistic works.

Lawrence Ferlinghetti’s 100th birthday celebration at Scuppernong combined books, Beat poetry and barely remembered interactions.

Lampkin grabs his copy of Ferlinghetti’s Little Boy from atop a plaid-covered table full of the man’s poetry, prose and criticism. His newest work came out on March 19 of this year, published on the cusp of a century of his life. “I wanna publish a book at 100!” Lampkin laughs. A college-aged man scoots his chair over to better watch as a projector turns on, displaying clips of Ferlinghetti walking around an art studio. On screen, he picks up a palette and then sets it down, turning to re-position vast stretched canvases of abstract and impressionist paintings instead. “I met him once,” a man speaks up. He passes around an

SAVI ETTINGER

autographed copy of Ferlinghetti’s 1993 collection These are my Rivers bought from the famous bookstore. A woman pauses, her hand on top of the loopy signature, as Lampkin breaks her attention briefly with his own story. Lampkin’s encounter happened decades ago, at a party in the 1980s. The conversation was short, but impressionable. “Of course I said hello,” he recounts. The group continues on, bouncing around their discussion of Ferlinghetti and the Beat movement. They mention how some works fall into the white-male centrism of many literary canons, but the ripples made by movement remain.


March 28-April 3, 2019 Up Front

“There is something about the energy memory of being a young boy in Lexof the works,” Lampkin says. ington, North Carolina, finding solace A young man in the writings of mentions the Ferlinghetti and rumors around his contemporaries Scuppernong Books can be psychedelics and like others in rural drug use of the time, areas did. Peers found at 304 S. Elm Street and a few who lived took cross-country in Greensboro, or online at through the period hitchhiking voyages scuppernongbooks.com. laugh. inspired by Ferling“There’s no doubt hetti contemporary that the Beats alJack Kerouac and lowed the ’60s to reflected upon their happen,” Lampkin continues. sense of humanity through Ginsburg. Dave Williams nods, resting his elbows “They found something in it,” Williams on his knees as he sits. He relives the says. “Those kids did.”

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1 Morty’s mom, on “Rick and Morty” 5 Short timetable? 9 Drop knowledge 14 Beige shade derived from “raw” 15 2004 Queen Latifah/Jimmy Fallon movie 16 He wears the horizontal stripes 17 Airline with only kosher in-flight meals 18 Former Israeli politician Abba 19 Word in a 1997 Will Smith title 20 Loss of prestige, perhaps 23 180, slangily 24 “I guess that’s ___” 25 Hair knot 26 Indy 500 unit 29 Fill-up option 33 Throwing ability 34 Fred who sneezed for Edison’s first film 35 Prefix for morph or plasm ©2017 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) 36 Le ___ (French port city) 39 Their workers go to blazes, for short 40 He won “The Masked Singer” (sorry for the spoiler) 41 “Pity, that... “ 42 ___ Ranganathaswamy Temple (Hindu pilgrimage destination) 43 “Evita” role 44 Much of their cultivation is in the dark 50 Abbr. on a French envelope 51 True crime author Rule 52 Article in Berlin? 53 Boot part 54 Future aspirations 58 Noun category 60 Meat seasoning mixtures 61 “Boo’d Up” singer Mai Answers from last issue 62 “Riptide” singer Joy 30 Boggy area 63 Cookie with a 2019 “The Most Stuf” variety 31 Fizzle out (around 4x) 32 Cartoon skunk PepÈ 64 “Carpe ___!” 36 “Mad Men” star Jon 65 See-through 37 Reunion attendee 66 Exhausted 38 Petroleum product and long-time pageant 67 “Your excellency” secret used on teeth (ew) 39 Prime seating choice Down 40 Sandal strip 1 Strengthen, as security 42 Karaoke selection 2 Custard-filled pastry 43 Harvard color 3 Ireland’s ___ Bay 45 Park employee 4 Boat’s bottom 46 Big name in baby food 5 Chest bone 47 And others, in footnotes 6 Detonation sound 48 Painter’s purchase 7 Physical, e.g. 49 TV Street celebrating a 50th anniversary 8 Pictographical Zapf typeface characters 55 More than enough, for some 9 Selena’s music genre 56 Currency symbol that looks like a C crossed 10 Carolina Panthers safety Reid with an equals sign 11 Tommy’s cousin on “Rugrats” 57 Some humongous ref. books 12 Smoke, informally 58 Electronics dept. displays 13 “Over here” 59 “You think that’s the right answer??” 21 Renaissance ___ 22 Sign of oxidation 27 Opposing opinion 28 Serf

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CROSSWORD ‘Mighty Good Connections’— two letters in a row. SUDOKU

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Profile for Triad City Beat

TCB March 28, 2019 — Furniture is art  

Furniture returns to High Point. Abigail Dowd looks inward. Forsyth sheriff changes his tune. And more.

TCB March 28, 2019 — Furniture is art  

Furniture returns to High Point. Abigail Dowd looks inward. Forsyth sheriff changes his tune. And more.

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