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Greensboro / Winston-Salem / High Point April 19 - 25, 2018 triad-city-beat.com

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Tornado town PAGE 12 So #WSNC PAGE 6 Hardister’s foes PAGE 10


April 19 - 25, 2018

EDITOR’S NOTEBOOK

Advanced lawnmower repair: Achievement unlocked It’s not the first cut of the season that blows your lawnmower. Even the wheeziest of machines can usually trot out a single lap around by Brian Clarey the property after a winter in the corner of the garage. No, it’s generally the second cut where things go FUBAR, and it generally happens quickly. And so it was that it took me four separate car trips — two to the big-box hardware store and another two to the farmer-supply shop — and six hours to accomplish the single task of cutting my lawn. I wasn’t going to bore you with the details of the breakdown and diagnosis, but I feel I must mention that the mower coughed out on its first pass, and that an attempt at a restart left the ripcord, in technical terms, absolutely jacked. So I did what dads do now: I googled it and watched a video. The repair would have me remove the blower assembly of my lawnmower, drill through three rivets, eventually to be replaced by bolts that came with the kit, and

then replace the entire starter assembly. Anyone can replace a blade or filter, tighten up the wheels or clean the undercarriage. For this I had to take the engine apart — like 10 screws and bolts of different sizes — and replace the entire spring assembly as well as the cord itself! I know, right? They didn’t even have the part at Lowe’s — I had to go to the tractor-supply shop out on Summit Avenue, where my lowly home pushmower barely qualified for service. “You got one of those plastic jobs,” a ballcapped and bearded fellow said sympathetically on my second trip there, as I stood in line with my broken part in my hand. “You sure you don’t want us to service this?” the woman behind the counter asked as she sold me my starter assembly, a sparkplug and a length of cord she measured off a spool of the stuff. I assured her I had it under control, mostly because I wanted to look cool in front of the farmers, with whom I had begun to feel a certain kinship. Men of the land and all that. But also because I did. Have it under control, I mean. I fix engines now. Achievement unlocked.

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

This is an outright lie and it is also a scare tactic. I do not and never have supported a tax on medical services.

— Rep. Jon Hardister, in the News, page 10

BUSINESS PUBLISHER/EXECUTIVE EDITOR Brian Clarey brian@triad-city-beat.com

PUBLISHER EMERITUS Allen Broach allen@triad-city-beat.com

EDITORIAL SENIOR EDITOR Jordan Green jordan@triad-city-beat.com

STAFF WRITER Lauren Barber lauren@triad-city-beat.com

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1451 S. Elm-Eugene St. Box 24, Greensboro, NC 27406 Office: 336-256-9320 Cover photo by sculptor ART and stop-action animator ART DIRECTOR Robert Paquette Elizabeth King, “Pupil” robert@triad-city-beat.com (1990). King is the subject SALES of Double Take: the Art KEY ACCOUNTS Gayla Price of Elizabeth King, a gayla@triad-city-beat.com documentary which will CONTRIBUTORS screen twice during the Carolyn de Berry, Spencer KM International RiverRun Film Brown, Matt Jones, Kat Bodrie Festival in Winston-Salem.

TCB IN A FLASH DAILY @ triad-city-beat.com First copy is free, all additional copies are $1. ©2018 Beat Media Inc.


April 19 - 25, 2018

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April 19 - 25, 2018

CITY LIFE April 19 -25 by Lauren Barber

THURSDAY

Books & Brews @ Bookmarks Bookstore (W-S), 6:30 p.m.

Virginia Eubanks @ Scuppernong Books (GSO), 7 p.m.

News

Up Front

Restaurants, Caterers and Community Integration @ United Metropolitan Missionary Baptist Church ( W-S), 5:30 p.m.

Opinion

Charles Frazier, author of Cold Mountain, visits the Twin City on tour for his latest novel, Varina, which is set in the South in the aftermath of the Civil War. Sarah McCoy, a bestselling author who specializes in historical fiction, joins the conversation. Arrive early for Foothills beer tastings and music at 6 p.m. and stay after the discussion for book signings. Find the event on Facebook.

Eubanks, author of Automating Inequality: How High-Tech Tools Profile, Police and Punish the Poor, is a founding member of Our Data Bodies Project and a professor of political science at the State University of New York Albany. She stops by Scuppernong to offer insight into the consequences of data-based discrimination in finance, employment, politics and healthcare for working-class people. Learn more at scuppernongbooks.com.

FRIDAY

Greensboro City Market @ the Forge, 6 p.m.

River Run

Multiple Intelligence Band @ Centennial Station Arts Center (HP), 7 p.m.

The open-air market is back with live music, curated vendors, interactive tours, local food and artwork. Learn more at gsocitymarket.com.

Puzzles

Shot in the Triad

RUR @ Greensboro Cultural Center, 8 p.m.

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Wake Forest University Associate Professor of Religion and Culture Derek Hicks moderates a panel discussion exploring how food and foodways foster community-building. Krankies Coffee co-owner Mitchell Britt, Delicious by Shereen owner Shereen Gomaa and catering company owner and chef Gordon Simpson contribute their perspectives, considering their cultural role in the community. Sample light fare from the panelists.

Kick back with craft beer and wine as the High Point-based jazz musicians of Multiple Intelligence Band blend classic and contemporary jazz influences. Find the event on Facebook.

The Drama Center presents Karel Capek’s dark science fiction play about artificial intelligence. The play runs through April 28 in the Stephen D. Hyers Theatre. Find the event on Facebook.


April 19 - 25, 2018

Pure Fiyah @ Preyer Brewing Company (GSO), 8 p.m.

Jazz & Jambalaya @ Delta Arts Center (W-S), 7:30 p.m.

Finks, Alternative Champs and It’s Snakes @ Monstercade (W-S), 9 p.m.

Up Front

Roots, rock and reggae group Pure Fiyah performs deep takes in the taproom for the brew house’s Smoketoberfest Smoked Lager release party. Two additional local smoky brews will also be on tap. Find the event on Facebook.

Back porch gardening demonstration @ NC Cooperative Extension Demonstration Garden (GSO), 10 a.m. Extension Master Gardeners of Guilford County demonstrate container gardening, share tips for growing herbs on Family Gardening Day and provide hands-on activities for children of all ages. Learn more at guilford.ces.ncsu.edu.

Bookbinding workshop @ Preyer Brewing Co. (GSO), 1 p.m.

Joe Robinson performs live while attendees share a jambalaya dish, cocktails, a silent auction and dancing in honor of Jazz Appreciation Month and the late, great Billie Holiday. Upgrade to VIP status to attend a champagne VIP reception at 5 p.m. Learn more at deltaartscenter.org.

River Run

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

Opinion

Imperial Blend and Threesound @ the Blind Tiger (GSO), 9:30 p.m. Electronic, Greensboro-based jam band Imperial Blend grooves with Threesound, a trio from Virginia known for fusing funk, rock and soul. Doors open at 8:30 p.m. Learn more at theblindtiger. com.

Mulan @ Bailey Park (W-S), 6:30 p.m. Shot in the Triad

Piedmont Earth Day Fair @ Winston-Salem Fairgrounds, 10 a.m.

Take advantage of a free photo booth and refreshments from Twin City Hive, Hoots Beer Co. and several food trucks before a free outdoor screening of Mulan, in honor of the 20th anniversary of both RiverRun International Film Festival and the Disney classic. The film begins at sunset. Learn more at riverrunfilm.com.

Sip on some local brews and craft a durable, flexible leather journal during this long-stitch bookbinding workshop. Learn more and register at bibliopathologist.com/workshops.

Puzzles

Who doesn’t want live music, food trucks, local vendors, hands-on activities for all ages, and free environmental education? Learn how to support greener practices in cities and celebrate the third planet from the sun in community. Learn more at peanc.org.

News

The night is all about Southern and indie rock’n’roll with a dose of funk for the dancers in the crowd. Find the event on Facebook.

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April 19 - 25, 2018

6 Things GSO People Don’t Know about Winston-Salem by Kat Bodrie

News

Up Front

In last week’s issue, Eric Ginsburg reminded us of the haughty attitude #SoGSO people have toward Winston-Salem. If you’re still using the 30-minute drive as an excuse not to visit, you’re obligated to know what you’re missing. 1. RiverRun International Film Festival After my first RiverRun film a few years ago, I was hooked. The festival alone is why Winston-Salem is Greensboro’s more cultured neighbor. I like the animated and latenight shorts, both for the humor and the stoner UNCSA students. (Okay, it was only that one year.) Read more on page 13 to find out about this year’s festival. 2. Awesome vegetarian food Thick-crusted tomato pie at Mozelle’s. Mac and cheese the way your grandma made it at Irie Rhythms. Grilled tempeh with the awesome sauce at Mooney’s. Living in Winston-Salem is probably the reason I spend my entire disposable income on things I consume.

Puzzles

Shot in the Triad

River Run

Opinion

3. Forsyth County Central Library I practically lived in the UNCG stacks, but I have to brag about our recently renovated public library. It’s a completely different beast from before: classy, spacious, full of natural light. Check out the used books just inside the entrance, sold on the honor system, or the Gutenberg Bible replica on the second floor.

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4. Parks and zen Dude, have you been to Salem Lake? The seven-mile walking/running/biking trail loops around the lake and will make you zen af. The walking trails in Bethania are even more spiritual, maybe because they’re close to God’s Acre Moravian cemetery. But my favorite is the two-mile loop that passes by Reynolda Gardens at Wake Forest. Plunk your nose into a rose and your toes into turf after meandering through the nearby forest. 5. Bowman Gray Racing Have you seen two cars chained together? What about when the front one has the engine and the back one has the brakes? I’d heard about the Madhouse’s reputation for a rip-roarin’ good time just people watching. But sit on the dirt-flecked bleachers for an hour and you’ll start cheering for the underdogs despite yourself. 6. Cozy nighttime nooks and nightcaps Snag the couches and an unfamiliar whiskey at the Trophy Room. Grab a fancy cocktail at Tate’s and head up to the loft lounge, narrowly escaping the bros at the bar. Wander the streets to find more places to disappear into along Burke Street. Better yet: Stay to the wee hours on the lone leather loveseat at Corks, Caps & Taps.


April 19 - 25, 2018

Dr. Martens boots by Brian Clarey

Up Front

They were still made in England when I started buying them back in 1994, and for me, at the time, they were wildly expensive — around $125 for the basic boot, an expense I justified as tools of my trade. I was a bartender, on my feet all the time, and I had been burning through a couple pair of boots a year before I bought my first Docs: the classic 8-eye 1460, in tobacco brown. I wore them every day, both behind the bar and in front of it, had them polished at airports — where they always drew compliments from the shoeshine men — paired them with shorts and tuxedoes and, once, a kilt. Unless I was barefoot, I had them on my feet. I even wore them bowling. I still have them. They’re my lawnmower shoes now. I bought another pair five years later — two, actually, because they were on sale and because I wanted to impress the woman who suggested it, though buying two pairs of boots at one time seemed to me, still seems to me, incredibly indulgent. Both the woman and the boots are still with me. I recently pulled the black ones out of the closet — deeply scuffed and scarred, worn thin as their British-made soles allow, embedded with the stains of a million cocktails — and handed them off to my oldest child, who accepted them with a sort of reverence. They’re genuine Doc Martens, alright, certainly vintage, but I suspect they’ve got a few more miles in their heels. Boots like these always do.

News Opinion

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Shot in the Triad

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Puzzles

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Tickets $10-30 (+NC Sales Tax & $2 Restoration Fee) Starr Theatre, 520 South Elm Street, Greensboro

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Puzzles

Shot in the Triad

River Run

Opinion

News

Up Front

April 19 - 25, 2018

NEWS

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Challengers in Forsyth sheriff race highlight staffing, special units by Jordan Green First elected in 2002, Republican Bill Schatzman is seeking a fifth term as Forsyth County sheriff. He faces one challenger in the Republican primary, and three Democrats are competing for the opportunity to oppose him in the November general election. Bill Schatzman, the former FBI agent who is seeking a fifth term as Forsyth County sheriff, faces a quartet of challengers calling for more robust drug interdiction, crime-scene investigation and law-enforcement presence in schools, while calling attention to conditions in the jail. Schatzman said he’s proud that during his 16-year tenure as sheriff, the county’s crime rate has gone down by 40 percent. He also expressed pride that Forsyth County is regularly reaccredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies. Sheriff BJ Barnes, Schatzman’s counterpart in Guilford County, allowed his agency’s accreditation to lapse, Barnes arguing that it merely provides a scapegoat when things go wrong. “This is a full-service accredited law enforcement agency,” Schatzman said. “There’s no difference between this agency and the NYPD or LAPD. We recruit the same quality of people. We test them the same way mentally, and physically and intellectually. We provide them the same equipment. We apply all of those same procedures and policies. We were reaccredited in 2013 and then again in ’16. This is an agency that is respected. Other sheriff’s offices and police departments come to us. We are a leader in the law enforcement community. I’m proud of that due to the hard work of the leadership and the rank and file who do the work in the street.” Schatzman squeaked through a Republican primary with 52.0 percent of the vote in 2014. This year, Schatzman faces Ernie Leyba, a former sheriff’s deputy, in the Republican primary. Leyba, who did not return calls for this story, is listed as a delivery specialist for Harris Teeter grocery stores in his LinkedIn profile. He previously worked as a sheriff’s deputy in Forsyth County from 2000 to 2002, the year Schatzman defeated former sheriff Ron Barker in the Republican primary. Leyba went on to work as a police officer in Durham, according to his LinkedIn profile. In contrast to four years ago, when

Tim Wooten

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Clifton Kilby

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Schatzman ran unopposed in the general “We expanded our narcotics unit from election, three candidates have filed about three or four officers to about 10,” for the Democratic primary. But don’t said Wooten, who served in the sheriff’s assume they’re all on the same ideologioffice from 1985 to 1995, and then again cal page. Clifton Kilby, who retired as a from 2003 to 2010. “And we had one deputy from the Forsyth County Sheriff’s of the most notorious narcotics units in Office, ran four years ago as Republithe area; we worked with all the big task can, garnering only 8.2 percent of the forces. We brought in a lot of dope back vote. (Dave Griffith, another Republican in those days.” He added that under challenger, took 39.9 percent of the Schatzman, the number of sworn ofvote.) Kilby switched parties, he said, ficers assigned to the unit has gone back because he didn’t anticipate there would down to three. be any other Democratic candidates and Schatzman said he wouldn’t comment thought his odds would improve on the on how many employees are currently Democratic ticket. Tim assigned to the unit. Wooten, a private in“What we do in the vestigator who was fired sheriff’s office is we apply Sheriff Bill from his job as a sheriff’s the resources that we are Schatzman is seekdeputy in 2010, describes provided in a manner ing a fifth term. himself on his website as that is considerate of the a “lifelong Democrat.” needs of the community,” Bobby Kimbrough Jr., he said. a retired special agent with the federal Shortly after filing for sheriff, KimDrug Enforcement Agency, says he brough published an article in Forsyth wants to tackle the opioid crisis. Woman about his wife’s unexpected death Despite his opponents’ extensive law in 2005 from a reported methadone enforcement background, Schatzman overdose. offered a dismissive assessment of them “With the number-one problem in an interview with Triad City Beat. across the country [being] the opioid “It’s easy for someone who knows little epidemic, it’s shameful we haven’t had about what goes on here and certainly the resources to combat that when we’re very little about law enforcement to say losing people every day,” Kimbrough we need 10 more of that, or 10 more of told voters at a candidate forum hosted this,” he said. by the Clemmons Democrats on April All three Democratic candidates say 14. Kimbrough also said the sheriff’s they want to increase staffing on the office needs to build relationships with narcotics unit. federal agencies to bring money back to

Bobby Kimbrough Jr.

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the county from the sale of drug dealers’ assets. Schatzman countered in an interview: “We work hand in glove with the other agencies — the city police in WinstonSalem and Kernersville. We work hand in glove with the FBI. We have personnel. We’ll be assigned to the Safe Streets unit in Greensboro. We will have an asset in the Joint Terrorism Task Force.” Wooten said he established a crimescene investigation unit for the department in 1985 under then-Sheriff Preston Odom. While conceding that the decision to collaborate with the WinstonSalem Police Department on evidence storage and analysis saved the agency money, he said he opposes Schatzman’s decision to outsource crime-scene investigations to the city police. “I want to bring that crime-scene unit back to the sheriff’s office,” Wooten said. “We were different from the city. Our CSIs were sworn deputies so they could go out on a call on their own…. [Now] a deputy has to stay there with the CSI. They are unarmed and non-sworn and they have no way to protect themselves.” Schatzman disparaged Wooten’s account as “not accurate, not factual,” even stating that his opponent had nothing to do with the crime-scene unit. Schatzman said the sheriff’s office secures a crime scene the same way that the city police do, but he acknowledged that the CSIs contracted through the city are not sworn, in contrast to the inves-


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Opinion

Playing April 20-24

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River Run Shot in the Triad

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Puzzles

with Correct Care Solutions, uncovered a pattern of health crises linked to lack of access to common medications and lack of timely medical care. “I would hold them accountable,” Kilby said. “The sheriff was pointing the finger at the medical company. If I was the sheriff and I knew the medical company was at fault I would be jumping up and down when it came to renewing the contract. That wasn’t the case.” Wooten said he would want to look at the county’s request for proposals to determine why no other vendors bid on the contract. Schatzman praised Correct Care Solutions as “a well-respected medical practitioner.” “The sheriff is not responsible for the medical wellbeing; that is the responsibility of the public health director and the county commissioners,” he said. “You understand that generally the inmates are not a well population. They suffer from varied medical illnesses. Substance abuse is very prevalent. Mental health issues is rampant.” Schatzman noted that state regulators investigate all deaths in the jail. “We’re good with that,” he said. “We’re good with the performance that we’re aware of. It’s unfortunate that people die. You know as well as I do that sometimes it’s unavoidable. If it is avoidable then we take appropriate action. People die in hospital settings. People die in rest-home settings.” Wooten and Kilby said some of the safety issues at the jail could be addressed by filling vacancies, noting that about 50 positions are open in the jail and 20 are open in patrol. Schatzman

News

tigators who previously worked for the sheriff’s office. The three Democratic candidates also said they would like to assign more deputies to schools in unincorporated parts of the county through the school resource officer program. Schatzman noted that the school system is responsible for paying for officers assigned to schools, adding that he serves on an inter-agency board that’s looking into school shootings. “We are because of the dangerous times we live in looking into it,” he said. “It’s a complex issue and we’re moving forward with it as quickly as we can. It might not be quick enough for some.” Wooten said he wants to see a deputy assigned to every elementary school. “Sandy Hook showed us that our little kids, our elementary kids were vulnerable for just being at the wrong place at the wrong time,” Wooten said at the Democratic Party gathering in Clemmons. “These are what we call in the business ‘soft targets’…. We’ve got homegrown terrorists, and wouldn’t it be just like them to go into an elementary school that holds 400 kids and hold them hostage to get their way?” The three Democratic candidates have all raised the issue of medical care in the jail while highlighting recent inmate deaths. Two men died of medical-related issues in the Forsyth County jail in May 2017. Before that, TCB reported extensively on the death of Jen McCormack, who died from a heart attack in 2014 after medical staff allegedly failed to provide her with prescribed anti-nausea medication. TCB’s reporting on fatalities in the Forsyth and Guilford county jails, which both contract medical services

Ernie Leyba

Up Front

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April 19 - 25, 2018

Bill Schatzman

said law enforcement agencies across the country encountered challenges recruiting millennials in 2015 and 2016, but the sheriff’s office has continued to make headway and Schatzman said he expects the agency’s vacancy rate to be down to 5 percent by the summer. Wooten was one of 22 people fired after the 2010 election. Prior to his firing, Wooten received the Rufus Dalton Award from the Winston-Salem Foundation for leaving his car in the path of a drunk driver and absorbing the blow to protect a highway paving crew on Interstate 40. Wooten said that at the time he was fired he was only told that his services were no longer needed. “That’s not why I’m coming back,” Wooten said. “Over the past eight years I’ve run my own private investigative firm. I’m coming back because it concerns me what they’re doing to the sheriff’s office. People are not getting the service they deserve.” Kilby said some of his fellow deputies asked him to run for sheriff in 2010, but he was afraid he would get fired and risk losing benefits available upon his retirement the following year. As TCB has previously reported, the Kimbrough campaign has raised $10,000 out of $11,000 reported in his most recent filing from individuals associated with the internet sweepstakes industry. Kimbrough did not respond to inquiries, including addressing how he would handle enforcement in an industry with substantial legal ambiguity. Cynthia Hagie, Kimbrough’s campaign manager, said she recruited him to run and solicited the donations on his behalf. Hagie said on Sunday that she and Kimbrough had decided he should not comment for this story.

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April 19 - 25, 2018 Up Front News Opinion River Run Shot in the Triad Puzzles

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High-ranking Republican lawmaker Jon Hardister faces challengers by Jordan Green Jon Hardister, aka Majority Whip, faces two Republican challengers in the May 8 primary. Republican Jon Hardister was first elected to the state House in 2012 after his party redrew the district map, flipping one of the Guilford County seats from blue to red. A quick study on policy matters and conservative politician with an agreeable disposition, Hardister has risen to the position of majority whip in his six years in office. Shortly before the filing period earlier this year, the courts ordered a new map, flipping one of the Guilford seats back to blue. But Hardister, who moved from Greensboro to Whitsett, managed to remain in GOP-friendly territory during the game of musical chairs, while his maverick Republican colleague John Blust was forced into retirement. Compared to Hardister’s old district, which poked a finger into Republicanfriendly parts of Greensboro, the new District 59 forms a rural horseshoe along the eastern flank of the city. Despite, or maybe because of his stature in the Republican-controlled General Assembly, Hardister hasn’t avoided challenges from

within his own party. Mark McDaniel, a former state senator, is waging a withering attack on Hardister’s role in a 2013 bill to expand the sales tax, while Karen Albright, a paralegal, said her candidacy was more or less an accident. She had planned to challenge the Democratic incumbent in neighboring District 58 and hadn’t realized that the court-ordered redistricting shifted her into District 59. Whoever wins the May 8 Republican primary in District 59 will go on to face Democrat Steven Buccini in the November general election. As a conservative lawmaker with urban roots in a Democratic-leaning county, Hardister has earned a mixed reputation on social issues: He was caught off guard in March 2016 by the furious backlash against his party-line vote for HB 2, a notorious bill that prevented transgender people from using bathrooms in accordance with their gender identity, among other measures. Bemused by the outcry, Hardister posted a photograph of himself posing next to a chalkboard sign outside of Scuppernong Books saying “restroom access denied” to the four Republican members of the Guilford County delegation, including himself. But Hardister’s free-market philosophy has dovetailed with urban constituents seeking to liberalize alcohol laws to promote tourism and support the flourishing microbrewing industry. The so-called “Brunch Bill,” passed in June 2017 allowed alcohol sales to begin at 10 a.m. on Sundays contingent on local approval; the city councils in Greensboro and High Point, along with the Guilford County Commission promptly signed on. The legislation also increased the number of bottles distillers can sell per year to each customer from one to five, and allowed breweries to sell 32-ounce crowlers from their premises. “Craft distilleries and breweries have become a major part of our economy,” said Hardister, who serves as vice chairman of the Alcoholic Beverage Control Committee. “We need to help these businesses operate so they can create jobs, promote tourism and grow our economy.” McDaniel is focusing on one issue: Hardister’s vote with his fellow Republicans to expand the sales tax into services like auto repair, plumbing and air-conditioning repair, as part of the 2013 overhaul that reduced personal and corporate income rates.

House District 59, in tan, covers a substantial portion of rural, eastern Guilford County.

“The fact that this so-called Republican gave birth to a new tax — the sales tax on services, which never existed in the history of North Carolina — this is a dangerous and fatal flaw for voters of all kinds,” McDaniel said. “It’s a misery tax. It’s a tax where if you get your car repaired you have to pay for the labor cost…. They’ve broken through a barrier that heretofore in our history was never broken. If you have a thousanddollar labor bill because you had to get your transmission fixed, you have to pay $70 in sales tax.” Hardister has hit back, accusing McDaniel in a recent Facebook post of being “dishonest” and “running a campaign that is based on distortions and scare tactics.” “Here’s the truth: The tax burden in North Carolina has been reduced by over $4 billion,” Hardister wrote. “Income taxes have been reduced; corporate taxes are down; standard deductions are tripled; the estate tax is eliminated; and we cut the gas tax.” Hardister acknowledged in the post that “the sales tax was expanded into certain services.” McDaniel said the demographics of the Republican base has shifted. “This is no longer a country-club party; it’s a party of working people

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and small businessmen,” he said. “The concern that I also have is that this is an attempt at a tax shift that will expand this into healthcare and veterinarian care — all kinds of things we buy. That would be ruinous. We would have to change our logo from an elephant to a mammoth because we would be just as extinct.” Hardister vowed in his Facebook post that he would never support a tax on medical services. “This is an outright lie and it is also a scare tactic,” he wrote. “I do not and never have supported a tax on medical services.” Albright said when she realized she was running against two fellow Republicans she tried to withdraw, but she missed the deadline. She said the staff at the Guilford County Board of Elections told her that regardless her name will be on the ballot but advised her that she could “keep a low profile.” Since then, Albright said she’s decided to make a go of the campaign. “This is not about me,” she said. “When I spoke to the police department, I said, ‘I don’t have any idea what you need. With my legal background here, you can tell me what you need, and I can go to Raleigh and vote on it.’ Like they teach you in paralegal school, what you


April 19 - 25, 2018 Up Front

Jon Hardister

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body in there; they’re great. My husband and I have dinner. I have acquaintances that are Latino. That’s a touchy, touchy subject. I guess where I’m more liberal is I have a kind heart and I believe in sharing.”

News

feel is not really important.” While her campaign pitch is light on policy objectives, Albright described herself as “a touch liberal.” When asked to elaborate, Albright said, “With the issues on immigration, I eat at a Mexican restaurant. I love every-

Mark McDaniel

Opinion River Run Shot in the Triad Puzzles

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April 19 - 25, 2018 Up Front News Opinion River Run Shot in the Triad Puzzles

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CITIZEN GREEN

OPINION

Residents took initiative to help east Greensboro

As the first fat drops fell on Sunday afternoon I persisted under the illusion that I could finish my backyard project — a compost bin made out of salvaged lumber — and cursed when my drill bit got stuck in a board. Then the skies opened and by Jordan Green dumped a deluge of rainfall in blinding sheets. I dashed around grabbing tools, and then stripped off my soaking clothes to get in the shower. But before I had a chance to get in the hot water I heard a loud, rapid tapping, and was horrified to discover water seeping in through the fireplace. As unsettling and disruptive as the storm felt on the west side of Greensboro, I couldn’t have imagined that at roughly the same time a tornado was blasting the bay window out of my aunt and uncle’s house in the southeast corner of the city near Barber Park as they and their two boys huddled in the bathroom. The storm touched down near Barber Park and carved a swath of destruction along the length of English Street, ripping roofs off, snapping telephone poles and pine trees, and smashing the portable classrooms at Hampton Elementary to pieces while leaving a wake of power outages across east Greensboro. Strangely, like a natural analogue to the institutional racism that enforces a wealth divide down the middle of Greensboro, the storm focused its wrath on the east side while leaving the west side unscathed. But even on the east side, the storm seemed to hopscotch from neighborhood to neighborhood. Driving across town, some areas look relatively normal, with a maybe a section of gutter torn loose from a house or a yard littered with leaves and limbs. Then the next block is an impenetrable tangle of electrical wires and uprooted trees. I wanted to help. Many of us glued to our social-media feeds on Sunday night wanted to do whatever we could. It was hard to tell whether the re-shared posts about school closings and emergency shelter were a practical service to those who needed the information or a salve to make us feel better because we couldn’t do much. My aunt and uncle told me not to come because the street was blocked by electrical

lines in both directions. The best I could do for them was share information about how to leave their dog in the care of the Guilford County Animal Shelter. Local agencies, understandably wanting to minimize the risk of volunteers becoming victims, cautioned civilians against pitching in to help out with recovery. The Professional Fire Fighters of Greensboro urged through a tweet: “Do not self-dispatch. The GFD will hire-back if there is a need for additional personnel. It is unsafe without a proper GFDdriven accountability system in place. There will be plenty of opportunities to assist our city in the coming days.” By 9 p.m. on Sunday, city officials were urging people who wanted to volunteer to call in to the city’s contact center and leave their names and phone numbers. Many who called in discovered the lines were busy. On Wednesday I received a callback from someone directing me to website for the Volunteer Center of Greensboro for a list of volunteer opportunites. None were related to storm recovery. While city crews cleared debris, the American Red Cross provided emergency shelter at Glenwood Recreation Center and Guilford County Schools served hot meals for lunch across the county, many residents took the initiative to respond on their own. Irving Allen of Black Lives Matter put out a call on Facebook to meet at Prestige Barber College on Phillips Avenue at 8:30 a.m. on Monday to go door to door to conduct welfare checks. By 11:30 a.m., Allen and his crew had moved to the parking lot behind McGirt-Horton Library, where they continued to stage welfare checks and began to draw up a list of needed items. People on the ground in east-side communities started posting request lists for water, canned goods with pop tops, peanut butter and jelly, diapers, feminine pads, bread, toilet paper and baby formula. Others headed for Costco and Walmart on the west side to load up on supplies and deliver them to McGirtHorton Library. Simultaneously, collection sites emerged at the Food Lion at East Market and English streets and the Interactive Resource Center. When I visited McGirt-Horton around 5 p.m., there were dozens of people stacking boxes of food and cases of water bottles, welcoming visitors and handing out snacks. A young woman in sweatpants put me to work after dispatching two fellows on four-wheelers to deliver supplies to elderly and disabled residents. I found myself slapping together ham and cheese sandwiches across from a volunteer from Redneck Revolt. Later, as dusk fell on East Florida Street, I ran across two volunteers dragging a cooler behind and offering bottled water to residents and utility workers. I found Sylvine Hill, a former city council candidate, knocking on doors to inform residents about a free meal at New Light Baptist Church. As Hill noted, social media doesn’t do much good when the power is out and there’s nowhere to charge a smart phone.

EDITORIAL

The finger of God In east Greensboro on Tuesday, the entirety of Lord Jeff Drive smelled of sawdust — most of the felled trees had been broken down into piles set at the curb, though a few larger ones still leaned into the homes they had crashed through. The neighbors gathered among the woodpiles, pointing to the worst of the damage, tending their own. You’ve seen the pictures. It looks like a war zone. No home was spared. The tornado cut a devastating path through east Greensboro, where a few of the residents weren’t doing so great before it touched down. Buildings leveled, homes with their roofs torn off, downed power lines and collapsed trees were everywhere, even as recently as Tuesday. These neighborhoods will be without electricity for the foreseeable future; thousands of people will not be able to live in their homes for months; their children will be shuttled off to different schools while It’s a jarring juxtathose affected — four in the Guilford position: So much County system — damage, so much await repair. The whole thing hope. took about 15 minutes. But even before the skies fully cleared the neighbors were on the streets, beginning the recovery. By Monday hundreds of volunteers had reported for duty — most of them just people who showed up, looking to see how they could help. Savvy organizers established water and food stations at churches and strip-mall parking lots, and GPD blocked off the most dangerous roads, discouraging the looky-loos who had seen it on the news. On Tuesday afternoon, the brothers of Omega Psi Phi worked a cadre of charcoal grills in the parking lot of the Renaissance Community Co-op, crisping up several hogs’ worth of donated ribs. A cluster of shopping carts held donated clothing. A dozen volunteers sorted groceries into bags as more supplies kept moving in by car and truck. A platoon of food trucks was on its way. It’s a jarring juxtaposition: So much damage, so much hope. When the finger of God touched down in east Greensboro, it cut a terrible swath. But it left flowers in its wake.


April 19 - 25, 2018 Up Front

You’re free to chart your own course at the RiverRun International Film Festival, starting this week throughout Winston-Salem. But for those who find the list of more than 170 films and events daunting, we deliver this curated guide. Each year we unleash our writers on the festival schedule, allowing them to screen whatever they like. Their choices reveal as much about the festival as it does about themselves.

Among Wolves, dir. Shawn Convey, USA/Bosnia, 2016, 87 min.

years stretch on as his Tibetan disciples fail to appear. One wonders if he and his teacher will survive the months-long trek to Tibet — through busy cities and darkly lit rural roads — or even if they will be able to return at all. Though not a political film, the directors handle the Tibetan-Chinese conflict and the danger of crossing the border with grace and pragmatism. Set primarily against the snowy, mountainous landscape of Ladakh, India, the film is a visual masterpiece and a reminder that life can be extraordinarily difficult and transcendentally beautiful. Becoming Who I Was screens Friday at 2 p.m. at Hanesbrands Theatre, April 22 at 4 p.m. at A/perture 1 and April 24 at 7:30 p.m. at A/perture 2. ­­—Kat Bodrie

Puzzles

Men put horns to mouths, releasing intense, guttural resonances. Worshippers emit multitonal chants and twirl hand drums. Among them sits a 9-year-old boy, bedecked in the burgundy robes of a Tibetan Buddhist monk and blessing those who approach him with a light tap on the head. He is Rinpoche, a high lama who has been reincarnated in northern India, far from the Tibetans’ native homeland. And he seeks to return. This heartwarming documentary follows the young Rinpoche as he spends his days playing with friends, visiting his mother and being fed and dressed by his aging caretaker/teacher. Like a refrain, he repeatedly says he wants to return to the monastery in Tibet where he lived in a past life, which he dreams about at night. But the boy can be easily frightened and is embarrassed by his short height, and the

Shot in the Triad

Among Wolves screens at A/perture 2 on April 21 at 10:30 a.m., on April 22 at 1:30 p.m. and on April 23 at 1:30 p.m. Director Shawn Convey attends all screenings. —Jordan Green

River Run

film, and so it becomes a chronicle of how men cope with the scars of war — partying, performing charity work, caring for horses, fooling around with old artillery pieces and participating in memorial commemorations. With the exception of a nun whose orphanage is the beneficiary of the bikers’ charity work, the women in Livno, and their struggles to cope with the war’s lingering damage, remain invisible. While largely excluding women from the narrative, the film focuses on a herd of wild horses inhabiting the rugged mountains that marked the front line of the fighting. The survival of the herd provides a metaphor for both the cohesion of the motorcycle club and the survival of their post-war society. Among Wolves will leave an indelible impression on viewers, but the pacing drags, making the film feel much longer than its 87 minutes.

Opinion

“I got my first gun on the first of October, 1991,” says Zeljko. “And I turned 18 on the 15th of October. I wasn’t even 18 when I got the gun. Half a year after that I was captured. I was in prison in Knin for a month. After prison, I was in a hospital for a bit… home care, and stuff, and then war again until January 1996. And when you turn 23, you have to try and manage, somehow, to survive.” The difficulty of surviving after war is the subject of Among Wolves, Shawn Covey’s affecting documentary about a small mountain community in Bosnia and Herzegovina. While veterans have traditionally gravitated to outlaw motorcycle clubs as a means of reclaiming the cohesion, purpose and identity of their combat experience, the Wolves is a little different: Under the leadership of Lija, a commander during the war, it’s a humanitarian organization with strong discipline — Lija even threatens a younger member with expulsion for popping wheelies. The gender politics of the motorcycle club remain largely unexamined in this

Becoming Who I Was, dir. Moon Chang-young and Jeon Jin, South Korea, 2017, 95 min.

News

Consider this small sample a list of suggestions from festival veterans as you tick off the ones you want to catch. You can learn more about these and all of the other films at the festival website, riverrunfilm.com.

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April 19 - 25, 2018

The Desert Bride, dir. Cecelia Atán and Valeria Pivato, Argentina, 2017, 78 min.

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Chasing the Blues, dir. Scott Smith, USA, 2017, 75 min.

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Chasing the Blues is an excruciating comedy in the best sense, eliciting laughs from wickedly funny material and agonizing suspense. The humor works because the film’s conceit is so overwrought: An obsession over rare blues vinyl that mimics the hellhound-on-my-trail torment of the genre’s mythology while still paying homage to the form with original music by the Bones of JR Jones. Grant Rosenmeyer and Ron Connor find an uproarious groove as rival collectors — Rosenmeyer as Alan Thomas, the earnest yet superficial white scholar, and Connor as Paul Bettis, the black aficionado with a cunning streak — mining tropes surrounding cultural appropriation and authenticity in late-1980s Chicago. Anna Maria Horsford provides a sparkling take

on Mrs. Walker, the warm and occasionally ribald widow who holds the prized disc sought by the two collectors. Thomas and Bettis’ quest takes them to a dark place and, eventually, prison. Ta-da! Another blues trope. Their release 20 years later looks like an opportunity for redemption at first, but of course they’re stuck in the same cursed cycle. Jon Lovitz, the most recognizable name in the cast, bookends the story as a crepuscularly corrupt Louisiana bureaucrat turned self-storage operator. Chasing the Blues screens April 24 at 1:30 p.m. at Aperture 2 and on April 25 at 8 p.m. at Hanesbrands Theatre. Producer Aria Razza attends both screenings. —Jordan Green

In Pursuit of Justice, dir. Gregg Jamback, USA, 2017, 97 min. Director Gregg Jamback takes an almost clinical approach in this documentary, chronicling the story of Greg Taylor, a North Carolina man who was convicted of murder after stumbling on the body of prostitute at the end of a Raleigh cul-desac while using drugs with a friend. It’s as if Jamback doesn’t want any emotional texture or hint of an agenda to prejudice viewers’ reckoning with the facts. Taylor’s story is miraculous: After an Innocence Inquiry Commission recommended his case for review, a three-judge panel judge unanimously found Taylor innocent in 2010, overturning his conviction. Appropriately, the documentary focuses on the human dimensions of the story: Taylor’s nearly 17-year ordeal in prison, as his parents, brother and daughter experience the emotional rollercoaster of multiple appeals, while also paying respect to the murdered woman, Jacquetta Thomas. But the real bombshell doesn’t come until close to the

end, when a State Bureau of Investigation analyst admits on the stand that he suppressed evidence indicating that a substance found on Taylor’s Nissan Pathfinder came back negative for blood. But it wasn’t just the misconduct of one rogue analyst. Deaver testified that the wording of his report was based on SBI policy set by his superiors. And while the epilogue informs us that the General Assembly passed the Forensic Science Reform Act of 2011 — presumably preventing future acts of evidence corruption — the manner in which the state agency systemically rigged the system against criminal defendants for decades begs for more scrutiny. In Pursuit of Justice screens at SECCA on April 20 at 5 p.m. and at Hanesbrands Theatre on April 28 at 4 p.m. Director Gregg Jamback attends both screenings. —Jordan Green

When the camera lingers on an empty house, stripped of a family’s belongings and ready for sale, it’s easy to wonder if the video stream has been interrupted, but it’s likely that the filmmakers intended the emptiness of the room as a metaphor for the protagonist Theresa’s liminal state. (Or maybe, this is proof of the lasting damage social media has sustained to the attention spans of film reviewers.) Theresa has devoted herself completely to her job as a live-in maid for a family in Buenos Aires and now, taking a bus to an unfamiliar city for an uncertain assignment, she likely has cause to wonder at the age of 54 whether she’s wasted three decades. During a stop near the site of the miraculous “Saint Correa,” a windstorm whips up and Theresa misplaces her bag, thus

providing a device for the film’s exploration of the reawakening of a middle-aged woman. The search forces Theresa to pair up with Gringo, who seems both somewhat shady and magically open to life’s surprises. Their meandering journey across the Argentine desert and awkward conversations seem somewhat random for the first half of the film, until Theresa literally and figuratively lets her hair down. The conclusion is fulfilling, but was the release worth all the tedium that preceded it? The Desert Bride screens on April 24 at 5 p.m. at SECCA, and on April 25 at 1:30 p.m. and April 28 at 1:30 p.m. at A/ perture 2.

­—Jordan Green


Independent film producer Olympia Stone is known for delivering insight into the private lives of eclectic visual artists. In her latest film Double Take: The Art of Elizabeth King, the Chapel Hill-based documentarian unveils the world of sculptor and stop-action animator Elizabeth King, whose strange, iconic work is featured in permanent collections nationwide. Candid interviews with friends, mentees from her days teaching at Virginia Commonwealth University and other artists reveal a playful, curious and meticulous woman obsessed with exploring the scope of human facial expressions, gestures and anatomy. Her decades of work hinge on the hypothesis of “uncanny valley,” the theoretical relationship between the extent of an object’s resemblance to human beings and the viewer’s emotional response to that object. The hypothesis suggests that the closer an object comes to looking fully human, the more likely it is to elicit

The grandeur and fragility of the monarch butterfly, threatened with extinction, nudges viewers towards a reckoning with the sustainability of life itself in Ben Crosbie and Tessa Moran’s gently persuasive documentary. The butterflies’ survival depends on the forest in central Mexico, which is itself under threat by illegal logging. The film draws a none-too-subtle parallel between the indigenous community in Donaciano Ojeda that is committed to defending the butterflies’ habitat and the species itself: Both are barely hanging in the balance. The film lovingly renders the intertwined fates of the butterflies and the community of Donaciano Ojeda by weaving the story of the butterflies’ annual migration, from Mexico up to Canada and then back again, with the life of the community through a full year. Although Donaciano Ojeda comes across as an almost an idyllic example of cooperation and simplicity rich in multigenerational camaraderie and tradi-

Up Front

The Guardians, dir. Tessa Moran and Ben Crosbie, USA/Mexico, 2017

April 19 - 25, 2018

Double Take: The Art of Elizabeth King, dir. Olympia Stone, USA, 2017, 61 min.

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The Guardians screens April 23 at 5 p.m. at Hanesbrands Theatre. Co-director Tessa Moran attends the screening. —Jordan Green

Puzzles

Double Take: The Art of Elizabeth King screens on Friday at 1:30 p.m. at Aperture Cinema and Saturday at 5 p.m. at SECCA. Director Olympia Stone and the film’s subject Elizabeth King will be in attendance for screenings. —Lauren Barber

tion, there are unsettling currents: Some community members would like to cash in and log the land. Others, like Santos, who ekes out a living raising trout and an unreliable avocado orchard, see the wisdom in preserving the forest. Community members pitch in to help with reforestation, and even patrol the forest with rifles to guard against poachers. As the butterflies make their majestic return around the time of Dia de los Muertos, it seems the preservationists are prevailing. The children — seen throughout the film feeding trout, transplanting seedlings, playing soccer and enacting a nativity play — are the reason. “That’s why the sacrifice we make is worth it,” Santos observers. “And we’re going to continue to leave them something.”

Shot in the Triad

feelings of revulsion and discontent, and some of King’s automatons approach believability with startlingly realistic mechanical operations. What’s makes Double Take a worthwhile watch is that the film doesn’t merely feature interviews — viewers get close-up shots as the artist fidgets with the lighting in a display case or crafts new works and explains the labor of producing a single finger over the course of a week. Stone shows King as the small-scale engineer she is. Of King’s process, her sister said, “It’s exacting, it’s devoted and it’s religious.”

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April 19 - 25, 2018 Puzzles

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Retreat, dir. Tom Nicoll, UK, 2017, 82 min. Phantom Cowboys, dir. Daniel Patrick Carbone, USA, 2018, 93 min.

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How do you know if what you experience is in your head or not? Twentysomething Kaitlin Cato, played by Kim Allan, travels with her boyfriend and their pet dog to a large, isolated Scottish estate after a run-in with her ex-military brother (Jason Harvey). Her mother (Jane Paul-Gets) informs her he has died after using substances and falling in the shower. Plagued by a guilty conscience, Kaitlin is spooked by sightings of someone on the property and a strange symbol that keeps appearing in various places, including the dog’s fur. Weaving together typical conventions of the horror genre, Retreat uses discordant music and close-up camera angles to mount tension, and askew angles to hint at the main character’s unstable mental state. The film also gives a nod to the classic

ghost story The Turn of the Screw. But it’s the realness of the story that gets us. The seemingly well-meaning boyfriend downplays Kaitlin’s concerns and becomes increasingly smothering. A healthy dose of flashbacks builds to the psychologically complex ending. Although viewers will have to bend their ears to understand the Scottish accent — and will never forget the boyfriend’s lilting way of saying Kaitlin’s name, over and over — the film artfully explores the edge between madness and gaslighting. Retreat screens on Saturday at 7 p.m. at A/perture 1 and on April 24 at 7:30 p.m. at SECCA. Director Tom Nicoll attends both screenings. —Kat Bodrie

Daniel Patrick Carbone’s dreamlike meditation on growing up interweaves the stories of three young men in disparate corners of rural America. Varied in geography, the locales share a sense that life might be leaving its residents behind. Trona, an industrial town at the edge of Death Valley in interior California, and Pahokee, nestled in the sugarcane fields of south Florida, feel as remote as Parkersburg, W.Va. “I want to go to the ocean,” the 17-yearold Nick narrates over footage of his 23-year-old self, walking up during the pre-dawn hours to begin a shift at Trona Chemical Plant. “That’s one thing I miss. I’ve only seen the whole ocean one time.” Trona is 200 miles from Los Angeles. Similarly, Pahokee is less than 50 miles from West Palm Beach, but might as well be in a different country. The footage of Larry and his friends hunting rabbits in the sugarcane fields is some of the most vivid cinematography viewers are likely to see, somehow chaotic, fevered and contemplative all at the same time. “I want to tell all those animal lovers, we don’t just kill rabbits ’cause we done gone and got drunk, went and got high on drugs,” says Larry’s father. “We don’t kill ’em ’cause we drug addicts. We kill ’em for survival. And something got to eat something; that’s the way of the world right there.” The film doesn’t yield up tidy conclu-

sions about the similarities among the three young men. In some ways, their fates couldn’t be more different. Larry, for example, finds himself recurrently in prison before his 25th birthday, while Nick appears to be chasing a dream of middle-class homeownership. Tyler, the protagonist of the Parkersburg story, is pursuing an avocation as a dirt-track racer, with a modicum of success while acknowledging that his decision to stay close to his four daughters prevents him from taking advantage of some opportunities. Some go further than others, but the common thread appears to be the long shadow of constraint. Carbone seems to be nudging viewers towards reflection on what binds and separates the three young men through repeated visual themes — fire, smoke, smokestacks, trains — in all three stories. As the stories segue from one to the other, he even continues the narration from one while beginning the visual footage of another, bleeding them together at the edges. With arresting footage and compelling narratives, it doesn’t take much persuasion to buy into Carbone’s vision. Phantom Cowboys screens at A/perture 1 on April 26 at 4 p.m. and April 28 at 10 a.m., and at UNCSA Gold on April 29 at 11:30 a.m. Director Daniel Patrick Carbone and producer Ryan Scafuro attend the April 28 and April 29 screenings. —Jordan Green


April 19 - 25, 2018

Sammy Davis Jr: I’ve Gotta Be Me, Samuel D. Pollard, USA, 2017, 100 min.

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Sammy Davis Jr: I’ve Gotta Be Me screens on Thursday at 7:30 p.m. at the Hanesbrands Theatre, and April 23 at 8 p.m. at RED Cinemas. —Brian Clarey

Shot in the Triad

He was the first African American to do impressions of white celebrities on television, the first to kiss a white woman on a Broadway stage, the first to be stay in Las Vegas hotels. Famously, the Sands drained their pool after he swam in it, at the behest of some Southern guests. And he raised the ire of the alt-right of his day, who picketed his shows and threatened his life after he married Swedish model May Britt in 1960. The film makes use of interviews with showbiz peers such as Whoopi Goldberg, Billy Crystal, Norman Lear, Quincy Jones, Jerry Lewis, former paramour Kim Novak and Diahann Carroll, along with input from Afrocentric writers who contextualize Davis’ place in the struggle. But it’s worth the watch for the footage of Davis alone, perhaps the most consummate performer in American history.

River Run

It’s possible that the world doesn’t need another Sammy Davis Jr. biography. Though he was undoubtedly a showbiz legend whose career stretched from the days of minstrelsy through the Rat Pack era and well beyond, the man has been dead for nearly 30 years and several books and films, and even a TV special, have ably memorialized his career. But I’ve Gotta Be Me looks at the entertainer’s legacy through the lens of his blackness, kicking off with Davis’ ill-advised performance at a Republican youth convention in 1972 during which, on television, he hugged President Richard Nixon. In the post civil-rights era, Davis had already been looked upon as something of an Uncle Tom for his antics with Frank Sinatra and the Rat Pack, but Davis’ contributions cannot be overlooked. Born in Harlem during the 1920s, he was a child star who never spent a day in school and crossed the country 10 times before he was 10 years old, often performing in blackface. Later, as part of his uncle’s “negro flash act,” the Will Mastin Trio, his undeniable talent broke down walls.

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April 19 - 25, 2018

East Wendover Avenue, Greensboro

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SHOT IN THE TRIAD

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“Duty: Free”--here comes the freestyle puzzle. by Matt Jones

57 “And many more” 58 “Caprica” actor Morales 59 Popular request at a bar mitzvah 63 “Okay” 64 Complete opposites 65 Rolls over a house? 66 Short religious segment on old TV broadcasts

Answers from previous publication.

Opinion

41 Brian once of Roxy Music 42 Not quite improved? 44 Minimalist to the max 45 Depletes 46 Takes an oath ©2018 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) 48 Be way off the mark 51 New Bohemians lead singer Brickell 25 Truck compartment 52 Almost on the hour 26 Feel unwell 56 Investigation Discovery host Paula 28 Actor Johnny of “The Big Bang Theory” and 60 Hydrocarbon suffix “Roseanne” 61 Open-reel tape precursor to VCRs (and similar, 32 TV host Bee and blues singer Fish, for two except for the letter for “tape”) 34 Traverse 62 “I hadn’t thought of that” 37 Golf club brand 38 Connection to a power supply 39 Uncommon example

News

Down 1 Island where Napoleon died 2 Be active in a game, e.g. 3 Going from green to yellow, maybe 4 The day before the big day 5 Cork’s country, in Gaelic 6 Word after coffee or time 7 Follower of Lao-tzu 8 ___.de.ap (Black Eyed Peas member) 9 Cost-of-living stat 10 Swing to and fro 11 Lacking, with “of” 12 Novelist Lurie 13 Lead ore 15 Branch of govt. 21 Makeup with an applicator 23 “Hope you like it!”

Up Front

Across 1 Cart food served in a soft corn tortilla 11 Former U.N. Secretary General Hammarskjˆld 14 Phone-based games where quizzers often play for cash prizes 15 Oscar ___ Hoya 16 Like some geometric curves 17 Nasty 18 St. Tropez summer 19 Inventor Whitney 20 Obtrude 22 Solitary 24 “I’d like to speak to your supervisor,” e.g. 27 “Dallas” family name 29 Flip option 30 Recombinant stuff 31 They’re silent and deadly 33 “I Need a Dollar” singer Aloe ___ 35 Namibia’s neighbor 36 Calculus for dentists 40 Country east of Eritrea 43 Beethoven’s Third Symphony 44 Double-decker, e.g. 47 Cave ___ (“Beware of dog,” to Caesar) 49 Fur trader John Jacob 50 Customary to the present 53 Pivot on an axis 54 Make further corrections 55 “Oh yeah? ___ who?”

April 19 - 25, 2018

CROSSWORD

SODUKO River Run Puzzles

©2018 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com)

Shot in the Triad

Answers from previous publication.

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TCB April 19, 2018 — RiverRun  

The RiverRun International Film Festival kicks off today in Winston-Salem, NC.

TCB April 19, 2018 — RiverRun  

The RiverRun International Film Festival kicks off today in Winston-Salem, NC.

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