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Greensboro / Winston-Salem / High Point March 8 - 14, 2018 triad-city-beat.com

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We are Spartans PAGE 12 Brooklyn barbecue PAGE 6 No guns for teachers PAGE 13


March 8 - 14, 2018

EDITOR’S NOTEBOOK

The newspaper route Jen and I took a dry run of the newspaper route on Monday afternoon, in a thin but persistent rain viewed through a foggy windshield. by Brian Clarey It’s the same route my father, Bob, has been running since we started the paper four years ago, and his first newspaper job since he used to deliver the Albany, NY Times-Union in the 1950s, when he was like 12 years old. Bob’s out for a few weeks after rotatorcuff surgery, and we’ve got to get things in order for his stand-in. The route cobbles together like an old farmhouse, a semi-loop around Greensboro with spurs and offshoots into commercial districts from Phillips Avenue to Quaker Village. We’re trying to rein it in, along with all the other weekly routes which includes mine, through downtown Greensboro, and Jordan Green’s, which covers all of High Point, Jamestown, the airport area and a southwestern pie slice of Greensboro. I may not be the only publisher in North Carolina who delivers his own papers, but I would highly recommend it to all who don’t. My few hours on the route each

week give me invaluable information on our readers at the point of sale, useful intelligence about the competition and put me in contact with business owners, fellow service people and people on the street, from hipster to homeless, sources all. It allows me to personally fulfill our contract with our advertisers, who pay not so much for the real estate in our paper as the eyeballs that will eventually see it, and our readers, who deserve our best, in their hands, at the same time every week. A lot has changed in this business since I came on more than 20 years ago, but there are still just three legs to the stool: content, revenue and distribution. The only one that can be successfully removed is content — that’s what advertisers and pay-to-play newspapers are all about, though we will never stop making quality content. Distribution may be the most important piece. Because what’s the point of putting something out if nobody can pick it up? Jen and I got the route under control in a couple hours, adding a couple shortcuts, trimming underperforming stops and adding a few new prospects, an ongoing process that never truly ends. We’ll meet again Thursday morning, just after the sun has come up, to put the word on the street.

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

We need to confront head-on that most of the time these mass shootings are committed not by women or people of color, but by white men. We need to confront the fact that many of our white teen boys feel entitled to privileges which every aspect of our society, including our education system, tells them they deserve, and that when those privileges are challenged they lash out violently. -Andrew Johnson, a Guilford County Schools teacher, in Citizen Green, page 13

BUSINESS PUBLISHER/EXECUTIVE EDITOR Brian Clarey brian@triad-city-beat.com

PUBLISHER EMERITUS Allen Broach

SALES KEY ACCOUNTS Gayla Price

EDITORIAL SENIOR EDITOR Jordan Green

SALES EXECUTIVE Andrew Lazare

STAFF WRITER Lauren Barber

CONTRIBUTORS

allen@triad-city-beat.com

jordan@triad-city-beat.com lauren@triad-city-beat.com

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1451 S. Elm-Eugene St. Box 24, Greensboro, NC 27406 Office: 336-256-9320 ART Cover by Todd Turner ART DIRECTOR Robert Paquette The Wherehouse Art Hotel in robert@triad-city-beat.com downtown Winston-Salem gayla@triad-city-beat.com

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TCB IN A FLASH DAILY @ triad-city-beat.com First copy is free, all additional copies are $1. ©2018 Beat Media Inc.


March 8 - 14, 2018

NCDOT TO HOLD PUBLIC MEETING FOR THE PROPOSED WIDENING OF N.C. 66 (OLD HOLLOW ROAD) FROM HARLEY DRIVE TO U.S. 158 (REIDSVILLE ROAD) IN FORSYTH COUNTY TIP PROJECT NO. U-5824 The N.C. Department of Transportation will hold a public meeting regarding proposed widening of N.C. 66 (Old Hollow Road) from Harley Drive to U.S. 158 (Reidsville Road), in Forsyth County. The meeting will be held on Thursday, March 22, at Morris Chapel United Methodist Church, 2715 Darrow Road in Walkertown from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Interested citizens may attend at any time during the meeting hours. NCDOT representatives will be available to answer questions and receive comments regarding the project. Please note that no formal presentation will be made. All comments received will be taken into consideration as the project progresses. As information becomes available, it may be viewed online at the NCDOT Public Meeting Website: http://www.ncdot.gov/projects/publicmeetings Anyone desiring additional information may contact Brett Abernathy, P.E., NCDOT, Division Project Development Engineer, at 375 Silas Creek Parkway, Winston Salem, NC 27127, (336) 747-7800 or jbabernathy@ncdot.gov. Comments should be submitted by April 23, 2018. NCDOT will provide auxiliary aids and services under the Americans with Disabilities Act for disabled persons who wish to participate in this meeting. Anyone requiring special services should contact Tamara Makhlouf via email at tmakhlouf@ncdot.gov or by phone at (919) 707-6072 as early as possible, so that these arrangements can be made. Persons who speak Spanish and do not speak English, or have a limited ability to read, speak or understand English, may receive interpretive services upon request prior to the meeting by calling 1-800-481-6494.

Aquellas personas que hablan español y no hablan inglés, o tienen limitaciones para leer, hablar o entender inglés, podrían recibir servicios de interpretación si los solicitan antes de la reunión llamando al 1-800-481-6494.

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March 8 - 14, 2018

CITY LIFE March 8 -14 by Lauren Barber

THURSDAY

Angels in Our Midst @ Hanesbrands Theatre (W-S), 8 p.m.

Up Front

“How I Built This with Guy Raz” 88.5 WFDD listening party @ Venture Café (W-S), 5 p.m.

Personal Space @ On Pop of the World Studios (GSO), 8:30 p.m.

News

The Winston-Salem Festival Ballet presents a dance performance that explores the influence of guardians and unseen forces in our world. Learn more at winstonsalemfestivalballet.org.

Opinion

Join WFDD staff to listen to a new Sunday morning radio show that features the journeys of innovators and entrepreneurs. This episode features Alexa von Tobel, founder of LearnVest. Enjoy snacks, drinks and mingling before listening to the episode at 6 p.m. Find the event on Facebook.

Amnesia @ Monstercade (W-S), 9 p.m. DJ Mauve Angeles presents “Amnesia,” an evening of synth, wave, electronic and dancefloor sounds with a special performance from the Two Youths. Find the event on Facebook.

“How do they sing like that?” @ Bookmarks (W-S), 6 p.m.

Puzzles

Shot in the Triad

Culture

Brooklyn’s Personal Space graces the Gate City with its post-hardcore sounds alongside garage rockers Commander Keen, lo-fi punks Instant Regrets and Greensboro’s own Hulk Homeless. Find the event on Facebook.

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Mezzo-soprano Stephanie Foley Davis discusses six popular vocal artists from Freddie Mercury to Frank Sinatra. She plays samples from each vocalist, providing a brief vocal history of each, and brings insight to how they sing. Wine and hors d’oeuvres begin at 5:30 p.m. Find the event on Facebook.

13th screening & discussion @ Windsor Community Center (GSO), 2 p.m.

FRIDAY

How to haiku: More than 5-7-5 @ Coffee Park Central (W-S), 1 p.m.

Period party @ Finnigan’s Wake (W-S), 6 p.m. Bring unscented pads, tampons and panty liners to donate, and share a pint while helping assemble period packs with the Homeless Period Project, a nonprofit that distributes these items to homeless shelters, food pantries and schools. Find the event on Facebook. Wikipedia edit-a-thon: Jewish women artists @ Greensboro Project Space, 7 p.m. Join a Google Hangout-led workshop with the Oregon Jewish Museum and Shoshana Gugenheim and help create or edit Wikipedia pages for Jewish women artists. Experienced “Wikipedians” will be on site to teach and guide the research and writing process. Learn more at greensboroprojectspace.com.

SATURDAY

SLAM Winston-Salem hosts a free workshop focused on the Japanese haiku poem genre. Bob Moyer, who has taught haiku for 15 years, leads the class. Find the event on Facebook.

View a free screening of Ava Duvernay’s documentary 13th, named for the Constitution’s Thirteenth Amendment, which freed American slaves. The film invites scholars, activists and politicians to examine the systemic criminalization of African-Americans and the growth of the prisonindustrial complex in connection to the nation’s legacy of slavery and history of racial inequality. A discussion follows. Find the event on Facebook.


March 8 - 14, 2018

Greensboro Roller Derby season opener @ Greensboro Coliseum Complex, 5 p.m.

Black Panther paint party @ Five Points Styles Beauty & Barber Shop (HP), 6 p.m.

Up Front News

The Gate City Allstars and Greensboro Counterstrike take on Knoxville’s Hard Knox Roller Girls in the first bout of the 2018 season. A portion of proceeds will benefit Every Campus a Refuge. Join the skaters at Benders Tavern for the after party. Learn more at greensbororollerderby.com.

Black Panther lovers unite for a step-by-step instructed painting class. All art supplies are provided. Find the event on Facebook. Opinion

SUNDAY

Raising backyard chickens workshop @ Colony Urban Farm Store (W-S), 4 p.m.

The Nussbaum Center for Entrepreneurship... Culture

Black Art Party @ 300 S. Liberty St. (W-S), 6 p.m.

Doug Baker & Glenn Jones @ Stage 11 House Concerts (GSO), 5 p.m.

Shot in the Triad

Been dreaming of a backyard flock? This workshop will introduce beginners to the basics of chickens’ diets, healthcare, hygiene and housing. Learn how to raise chickens legally in the city of Winston-Salem and leave with a sample bag of Reedy Fork organic chick starter feed. Find the event on Facebook.

Serious About Your Business?

PROVE IT

Office Space starting at $180 per month The Second Sunday Songwriter Showcase continues with March’s featured songwriters Doug Baker and Glenn Jones. Hear their original material beginning at 6 p.m. and an open mic will follow their featured sets. Find the event on Facebook.

Businesses of any size or age... It is never too late to ask for help.

336-379-5001

www.nussbaumcfe.com

Puzzles

LB “The Poet” performs spoken word at Owen Daniels Photography’s Black Art Party. The evening includes the new collection photography, “More Than A Picture,” an artist talk with Owen, and hors-d’oeuvres. Find the event on Facebook.

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March 8 - 14, 2018 Up Front

NCDOT TO HOLD PUBLIC MEETING FOR THE PROPOSED G R A D E S E P A R AT I O N AT HILLTOP ROAD (S.R. 1424) RAIL CROSSING (722361Y) IN GUILFORD COUNTY

There is no such thing as Brooklyn barbecue by Brian Clarey

Culture

Opinion

News

TIP PROJECT NO. P-5713 The N.C. Department of Transportation will hold a public meeting regarding the proposed grade separation at the Hilltop Road (S.R. 1424) rail crossing (722361Y) of the Norfolk Southern “Main” Line, in Guilford County. The purpose of this project is to improve operations and safety at the crossing. The meeting will be held on Thursday, March 22 at the Korean United Methodist Church located at 2504 E. Woodlyn Way in Greensboro from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Interested citizens may attend at any time during the meeting hours. NCDOT representatives will be available to answer questions and receive comments regarding the project. Please note that no formal presentation will be made. All comments received will be taken into consideration as the project progresses. As information becomes available, it may be viewed online at the NCDOT Public Meeting Website: http://www.ncdot.gov/projects/publicmeetings

Puzzles

Shot in the Triad

Anyone desiring additional information may contact Gregory Blakeney, NCDOT, Senior Rail Project Development Engineer, at 1553 Mail Service Center, Raleigh, NC 27699, by telephone at (919) 707-4717 or by email at gmblakeney@ncdot.gov. Comments should be submitted by April 30, 2018.

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NCDOT will provide auxiliary aids and services under the Americans with Disabilities Act for disabled persons who wish to participate in this meeting. Anyone requiring special services should contact Tamara Makhlouf via email at tmakhlouf@ncdot.gov or by phone at (919) 707-6072 as early as possible, so that these arrangements can be made. Persons who speak Spanish and do not speak English, or have a limited ability to read, speak or understand English, may receive interpretive services upon request prior to the meeting by calling 1-800-481-6494.

Aquellas personas que hablan español y no hablan inglés, o tienen limitaciones para leer, hablar o entender inglés, podrían recibir servicios de interpretación si los solicitan antes de la reunión llamando al 1-800-481-6494.

Fette Sau, in Brooklyn, NY.

FETTESAUBBQ. COM

Despite what you may have read — especially if you read the article “Why is Brooklyn barbecue taking over the world?” on the Vice Munchies blog this week — there is no such thing as Brooklyn barbecue. In fairness, the journalist, Nicholas Gill, is a seasoned food writer and Brooklynite of the most conspicuous vintage, and he was writing about a very specific and well-known Brooklyn restaurant, Fette Sau, in Williamsburg, one among a dozen or so that have cropped up in the last 10 years. At Fette Sau the brisket gets rubbed with espresso instead of cowboy coffee like in some parts of Texas, the potato salad is dairy-free, and the pickles are $1.25 apiece. And the pulled pork runs $23 a pound. For comparison, Stamey’s charges $9.50. Not the same thing, I know. But please. The place’s format and style — meat by the pound, minimalist settings, craft beer and Edison light bulbs — have been replicated in several places around the world, as Gill documents ably. But really, what he meant to say is that Brooklyn barbecue is taking over Brooklyn; it is Brooklyn itself — once the scrappiest and most culturally diverse borough in the city of New York now the epicenter of young, urban chic — that is taking over the world. At least, that’s what they’re saying in Brooklyn.


Up Front News Opinion Culture Shot in the Triad Puzzles

America in the King Years, the threevolume trilogy by Taylor Branch, may be the undisputed master narrative of the civil rights movement — or what might more accurately be termed the “black freedom struggle” — but for me it’s fatally compromised by a dependence on the “great man” theory of history. For obvious reasons, the magisterial trilogy coheres around the biography of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., hewing closely to the campaigns of his organization, the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, to impose a narrative arc on the tumultuous events that turned the United States insideout in the 1960s. But history isn’t made by one person or one organization. It’s a COURTESY symphony of people acting from different Voices of Freedom IMAGE organizing traditions, philosophies and ideologies, constructed from both audacious risk-taking and the habits of everyday life, often times as part of a single current that likely as not summons a counterforce of backlash. That’s why it’s such a revelation to discover Voices of Freedom: An Oral History of the Civil Rights Movement from the 1950s through the 1980s, a book-form companion to the PBS documentary Eyes on the Prize, which aired from 1987 to 1990. Hat-tip to Shawn Gaynor, my fellow Antioch College alum, for putting me on to it. Although I’ve only read about 20 pages, the chapter headings alone signal the book’s panoramic sweep. The oral history format, with the story told directly by the participants, projects both intimacy and a vibrational sense of historic grandeur. The highlights of King’s activism are all included — Montgomery in 1955-56; Birmingham, 1963; the 1968 Memphis Sanitation Strike — but other important sagas also flesh out the history: the 1967 Detroit riots, the Ocean Hill-Brownsville struggle for community control over majority black and Latinx schools in Brooklyn, NY in 1967-68, the Attica prison uprising in 1971, and the Boston busing crisis of 1974-76. Some of the names are familiar — civil rights activists like Jesse Jackson, John Lewis and Diane Nash — but others are relatively unknown. It’s an unruly history. Where does this fit in anyone’s handbook for social change? Albert Wilson, a 13-year-old who was paralyzed from a police bullet while trespassing in a five-and-dime during the Detroit riots, recounts, “It was kind of like a carnival, a parade, a party, because everybody that was there was laughing. No one was crying or worried. If you saw me running down the street, you saw me running with a smile on my face. I saw people running from stores with televisions but with a smile on their face. Everybody was happy. That’s about it. Everybody was happy that day.” In contrast, US Rep. John Conyers, who tried unsuccessfully to persuade the rioters to go home, recalled “a mean-spirited kind of mood that hung over this.” Edward Vaughn, who was returning with friends from a black power conference in Newark, NJ, described his first reaction on hearing news of the riots on the radio as concern about his family’s safety, but he viewed the outcome as positive. “After the rebellion was over, there was a strong sense of brotherhood and sisterhood,” Vaughan says. “We saw more and more sisters began to wear natural hairdos, more and more brothers began to wear their hair in the new natural styles. More and more people began to wear dashikis. We had a strong sense of camaraderie in the community — that was all very good for us. We enjoyed that feeling.” If we can get a handle on the complexity of the history that transpired 70 to 30 years ago, maybe we have an outside chance of grasping the stunning events of the past five years.

March 8 - 14, 2018

History from multiple perspectives by Jordan Green

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March 8 - 14, 2018 Up Front News Opinion Culture Shot in the Triad Puzzles

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NEWS

Conservative charge against Wake sparks anti-trans, racist abuse by Jordan Green A conservative publication claims that Wake Forest University failed to enforce its anti-bias policy, and the far-right internet rains down hatred on LGBTQ and students of color. Wake Forest University found itself at the center of the national culture wars over the course of about 72 hours last week when a conservative student polemic against diversity received a steroid boost from Fox News. The viral story ricocheted around the far-right reaches of the internet, and boomeranged back in the form of vicious trolling against trans and non-white students. The Wake Forest Review — which selfconsciously places itself in the tradition of the Dartmouth Review and other independent, conservative campus publications — launched in 2016. It claims Brooke Burr, the wife of US Sen. Richard Burr, and Todd Poole, an aide to US Rep. Ted Budd, as members of its board of directors. In its second year of publication, the Review won Best New Media Award at the 2017 Collegiate Network Conference. The Review is a member publication in the Collegiate Network. Chaired by Alfred S. Regnery, a conservative publisher and former Justice Department appointee during the Reagan administration, the Collegiate Network “supports independent student newspapers, magazines and journals that serve to focus public awareness on the politicization of American college and university classrooms, curricula, student life, and the resulting decline of educational standards,” according to its most recent 990 filing with the IRS. “The CN also supports paid summer internships and postgraduate, yearlong fellowships at prominent media outlets to promising student journalists committed to the principles of liberty.” In its short history, the Review has already demonstrated marked influence in conservative circles and the rightwing media. Its Twitter feed documents newsroom visits from conservative luminaries like Lt. Gov. Dan Forest and US Rep. Mark Meadows, and its stories have been cited by outlets like Breitbart, the Daily Caller, the Weekly Standard and the far-right website InfoWars. But no story has created quite the same impact as a Feb. 26 piece by Editor-in-Chief Anthony Palumbo entitled, “Wake Forest Declines to Enforce Harassment Policies

for Conservative Student.” The story earned its subject, Ryan Wolfe — who also happens to be the Review’s digital director — a slot on Fox News’ “Tucker Carlson Tonight” on Feb. 28. The story claims that Wake Forest University failed to enforce its anti-bias policies on Wolfe’s behalf because he is white. The case concerns Wolfe’s October 2016 complaint against six students who disparaged him with food-related insults that alluded to his status as a white person during the 2016 presidential campaign. During a panel on the future of the Republican Party at a campus event that included Wolfe and three other white students, student Char Van Schenk commented on Facebook with a photo of four saltine crackers, writing, “Loving the lineup.” The theme continued when another student handed Wolfe a box of saltine crackers after the event, and again when yet another student photoshopped Wolfe’s face onto a saltine cracker and bandied it about social media. The same student who handed Wolfe the box of crackers also responded on Twitter to Wolfe by tweeting, “If you don’t get your mayonnaise lookin asss [sic] out of my mentions….” “It was a juvenile move, and we shouldn’t have done it,” Van Schenck, the student who posted the photo of the four saltines, told Triad City Beat. Wolfe filed a bias complaint against six students, including Van Schenck, who were active with a campus group called Queer Defiance. Wolfe told Carlson that he believes that the university’s rules on harassment and bias incidents “don’t abide by the First Amendment,” but he wanted to make a point that “we’re trying to hold all students to the same standard.” Van Schenck said it’s simply incorrect to say that the university didn’t enforce the policy. Van Schenck said Wolfe requested that two of the students receive mediation, two receive no-contact orders, and two receive judicial action, which could lead to expulsion. Van Schenck contends that mediation is an appropriate enforcement option under the policy. “We all received mediation,” they said. “It was not found that photoshopping him onto a cracker was causing any psychological violence or justifying any violence towards Ryan Wolfe.” Wolfe said the university’s Bias Support Committee presented mediation as

Wake Forest University student Ryan Wolfe appeared on “Tucker Carlson Tonight” on Feb. 28.

an option, but never followed through to facilitate a meeting between him and the offenders. He ended up meeting with Van Schenck and Richard Caban Cubero, who was also named in the complaint, but Wolfe said the meeting came at the initiative of Caban Cubero and Van Schenck, not the bias support committee. Complaints filed through the university’s bias-support system are confidential, so there’s no hard data on how the policy is enforced, but Van Schenck said serious consequences are rare. “As a trans student I’m serially mis-gendered by professors and nothing ever happens,” they said. “I’m subjected to various micro-aggressive tendencies on campus. They really only get enforced through a mediation session.” Wake Forest University responded following the “Tucker Carlson Tonight” segment with an official statement citing federal privacy laws that maintain confidentiality surrounding administrators’ interactions with students. The statement continued, “We can say that the narrative oversimplifies a complex situation that took place 16 months ago in the heat of a polarizing national election.” The original Wake Forest Review article did not cite any comparative bias cases to support the argument that Wolfe was treated differently than students of other races, but Carlson was quick to fill in the blanks with supposition. “I don’t even know what to say,” he told Wolfe during the Feb. 28 broadcast. “I would assume they would have never put up with this if you’d been a different

SCREENSHOT

kind of person. This would have been swiftly punished then, right?” “Right, exactly,” Wolfe responded. “We had a racial-slur incident a couple weeks ago. And let me be clear: I’m not equating what was said by this girl to what was said about me, but that student was asked to leave our school about two days later.” In the incident in question, a video, posted on social media, reportedly [link] shows a student referring to her AfricanAmerican resident adviser with a racial slur, saying, “Let me know why I’m hammered again tonight. It’s 2 o’clock… I just called my black RA a f***ing n***er. Let me know. Why did I do that?” Wake Forest University is a majoritywhite institution where students of color have experienced periodic racial hostility, including a 2014 party hosted by a white fraternity in which attendees were encouraged to come dressed as black people. The fraternity and university administration said the party was canceled after concerns were raised, but some students told Triad City Beat they saw references on social media indicating the party was held after all. In an interview with TCB, Wolfe indicated that he’s unmoved by the argument that the harm created by a bias incident is determined by relative power and privilege of the parties involved. “‘Harm’ is a word that’s used quite a bit,” he said. “The key point of this argument is whether they’re going to treat students equally or not. Is how they define ‘harm’ based on identity or individual actions? That’s the key to this


News

to this story, the negativity that has come out of it has predominantly come from these far-right individuals,” they continued. “The audience that is using this to justify trans-phobic and racist behavior attacking students, attacking young people goes to show there was a very specific audience that needs to see this. There is a very specific audience that Ryan Wolfe wanted to reach to get back at students at Wake Forest.” Wolfe rejected the notion that he’s playing up a sense of white victimhood to exploit racial bigotry. “The point is you can’t really control what the internet says about things,” he said. “We reported the facts. We denounced vulgar, racist, bigoted remarks. I would say the whole part about ‘victimhood’ — what I’ve said from the beginning is that I’d rather have Wake Forest abide by the First Amendment. And I don’t consider myself a victim. Maybe certain people on the internet would like to see it that way, but that’s not my intention.” Disclosure: The writer was employed as an adjunct instructor by Wake Forest University in the fall 2017 semester.

Up Front Opinion

University has previously demonstrated grade, writing that they are “an obese bias by promising to continue granting (white) barrel of crap with wet knickfinancial aid to illegal alien students.” ers for Islam. No wonder she [sic] hates Van Schenck said that since the Review white men, no self-respecting white guy story gained traction, they and other would pi## on her [sic] if she [sic] was students whose names were published in on fire, let alone shag the foul-looking the article have received “online threats beast.” of physical and sexual violence.” Wolfe said he condemns the bigoted One Twitter user identified as “koos” and hateful speech directed at Van tweeted a link to the Daily Caller story Schenck and the other students who with the text, “I want to thank this instiwere the subject of his complaint. tution. You are helping “The internet has a to recruit new generalife of its own,” he said. tions of white national“I wish people wouldn’t ‘They’re trying to ists with your anti-white be harassed and have normalize the farrhetoric.” vulgar remarks made at Koos followed up by them, but there’s only right...’ tweeting to the student so many things we can who handed the box of control.” crackers to Wolfe: “Why Caban Cubero said he not simply admit that you aren’t progresbelieves the staff at the Wake Forest Review sive, but a racial nationalist. PS. The made a calculated effort to generate a NYT was founded by white men and backlash against people of color and any job should go to those who created LGBTQ people on campus. this newspaper.” Another tweet to the “A lot of what they are trying to do student included an image of US Rep. is bring far-right individuals into the Maxine Waters photoshopped to make conversation,” Caban Cubero charged. her look like an ape. “They’re trying to normalize the farKoos also tweeted a YouTube video right and alt-right. That project has been of Van Schenck making a presentation very obvious from the very beginning.” on the Koran when they were in eighth “The reaction that people have given

March 8 - 14, 2018

whole conflict. Based on my understanding, it seems that they based that more on national political events and the identity of the students involve rather than the actual action.” Wolfe makes no secret that ultimately he’d prefer that the bias reporting system be dismantled. “If I had it my way we would just abide by the First Amendment and we wouldn’t have all these rules,” he told Carlson. “If we’re gonna have these strict rules and this bias reporting system, then everybody needs to be held accountable the exact same way.” By the time Wolfe appeared on “Tucker Carlson Tonight,” the Review story had already been picked up by the Daily Caller, a right-wing news site co-founded by Carlson. The Daily Caller story was then republished by the far-right InfoWars site hosted by Alex Jones. Drudge Report, the news aggregation website run by Matt Drudge, tweeted the Daily Caller story to its 1.3 million followers. The Daily Caller story quotes Wolfe as saying, “If this is what social justice looks like in practice, we cannot let this ideology infect our judicial system.” The article also stokes anti-immigration sentiment with the digression: “Wake Forest

Culture Shot in the Triad Puzzles

@ Stevens Center

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March 8 - 14, 2018 Up Front News Opinion Culture Shot in the Triad Puzzles

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Civil rights museum targeted by racist calls after loan forgiven by Jordan Green Welcome news that the International Civil Rights Center & Museum has met an important fundraising goal and no longer owes on a city loan brought an unwelcome backlash on March 1: A handful of threatening phone calls. CEO John Swaine said the staff received four or five phone calls that he characterized as “quite ugly.” Callers berated staff with the word “n***er” and said things like, “Y’all pay y’all’s debts, deadbeats.” Thursday’s announcement that the city was forgiving a $1.5 million loan made over a two-year period from 2013 to 2015 did not come unexpectedly. Under the terms of the loan, the city agreed to forgive one dollar for every dollar raised by the museum to help satisfy outstanding tax-credit payment obligations. While noting violent episodes in recent years like the 2015 Charleston Massacre and the Unite the Right Rally last year in Charlottesville, Swaine said the increasing prevalence of white supremacy is not typically at the forefront of his mind. “I’m working on shutting down the old narratives,” he said. “If you have time to reflect on these things, I think you can have some careful thought. If you’re deep in a survival situation and working on a restorative business model, the pettiness passes by you. We have developed a world-class status, having been added to the US Civil Rights Trail. I have a small staff of four employees. It’s hard work staying open. A lot of the people who harbor racist views — I give

The International Civil Rights Center & Museum opened in downtown Greensboro in 2010.

it little attention. You can’t win an argument with a fool.” The calls prompted Swaine to suspend self-guided museum tours at least for the time being. With a limited staff and a large crowd anticipated for a program tonight on harassment of black entertainers during the McCarthy era, Swaine said the museum simply doesn’t have

JORDAN GREEN

the resources to adequately monitor the ing, “I can’t imagine people in the city exhibit space. wouldn’t celebrate that we’re able to Swaine said that in the past staff has increase traffic in downtown Greensboro discovered damage after patrons took and continue to grow and thrive.” self-guided tours, including scratching on Incidents like the racist threats phoned plastic enclosures and children climbinto the museum provide Greensboro ing on the jail bars in the “Jail, No Bail” with an opportunity to determine what exhibit, although none of vandalism kind of community it will become, appeared to be overtly racist. When the Swaine said, raising a contrast with museum is able to purchase additional Charleston, SC, where white supremasurveillance camcist Dylann Roof killed eras for the exhibits, nine people at a black Swaine said he hopes ‘Let us not go down the church in June 2015. to restore the self“I think this instituroute of Charleston, guided tours. tion is a very important This isn’t the first one,” Swaine said. “I South Carolina.’ time the museum has would appeal to the been the target of more enlightened people threats. in the community: Let After the museum turned down a us not go down the route of Charleston, request from then-candidate Donald South Carolina, where we have failed Trump in September 2016 to use the people. I do believe a 23-year-old child facility for a photo op, Swaine said, with his life in front of him, the adults “People were out of their minds, saying in that community failed him. I would things like, ‘We’re going to burn this hope this community would back up and place down.’ That was the first time we think about what we provide the world had someone walk into the museum with because of the educators who come here a gun.” and are impressed by the resources.” Swaine said he believes there are “many good people in the city that don’t condone these kind of things,” add-


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Culture Shot in the Triad Puzzles

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March 8 - 14, 2018 Up Front News Opinion Culture Shot in the Triad Puzzles

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EDITORIAL

The UNCG Spartans are the Triad’s team… this year

When the UNCG Spartans men’s basketball team won the SoCon tournament this week, earning its first spot in the NCAA Tournament since 2001, they finally flipped the script on the Triad college basketball narrative. It’s true that Wake Forest is the team for Smart money did the discerning Triad ACC basketball fan, not put the Sparbut it’s equally true that the squad has tans as the only been… disappointTriad basketball ing… for years, especially when stacked team to make it to against conference the dance. rivals Duke and UNC, and even, really, NC State, which benefits from a more local fan base than Wake, whose graduates tend to move back to New Jersey. Also counting against the Deacons is the curse of high expectations. It feels like they should get into the NCAA tournament every year, and at least go a few rounds in. The Deacons have made the NCAA Tournament eight times since 2001, the last time UNCG was accepted, never winning more than two games, once in 2004, and losing the first game three times. Whether it’s reasonable or not, we expect better. The only way they will make it into the Final Four Tournament this year is if they win the ACC Tournament this weekend, which seems highly unlikely as they finished the regular season in 14th place, one spot away from dead last. But even though UNCG has been not-so-quietly working on its basketball program for years, even after they won the SoCon divisional title last year and made it to the NIT, even though they beat NC State in Raleigh this past December, smart money did not put the Spartans as the only Triad basketball team to make it to the dance. Even if they don’t win a single game, it’s an enormous victory for the program. And it’s possible they could even win a couple games, which would put them even with Wake’s longest tournament run this century. This is the best Spartans team we have ever seen. And, for now, it’s the best team in the Triad. Anything can happen in March.


Arming teachers is not happening here

Shot in the Triad Puzzles

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Season 8 of The Walking Dead finally continues! Sunday, March 11th at 9 p.m. FREE ADMISSION WITH A DRINK PURCHASE

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by Jordan Green Andrew Johnson, a teacher, was one of a number of The addled celebrity who stars speakers of who argued that preventing school shootings in our national reality-TV show requires educators to address the source of rage driving the suggests arming teachers to violence. prevent school shootings. Fash“We need to confront head-on that most of the time ioned from half-baked assumpthese mass shootings are committed not by women or tions about the competency and people of color, but by white men,” he said. “We need to trustworthiness of a certain kind confront the fact that many of our white teen boys feel by Jordan Green of teacher and the fallacy that all entitled to privileges which every aspect of our society, school shooters are cowards, the proposal unfortunately including our education system, tells them they deserve, must be debated because it comes from the president. and that when those privileges are challenged they lash out “You give them a little bonus,” Trump said during a meetviolently. ing at the White House on Feb. 22. “So practically for free “We need to modify our curriculum to specifically teach you have now made the school a hardened target.” students about white supremacy, toxic masculinity and Practically for free. Oh, except for the cost of the fireother oppressive power structures that breed violence,” arms and training. And bonuses. That’s a quaint thought in Johnson continued. “We need to train our teachers to spot North Carolina, where many classrooms haven’t seen new signs that their students are becoming radicalized by whitetextbooks in years. supremacist websites. In fact, we just need more teachers Two days later, the president was acknowledging that in general because few things lead to stronger relationships there would be a cost, and shunted off responsibility on the between teachers and students than smaller class sizes. We states. need to allocate fewer resourc“Armed Educators (and trusted es into policing and disciplining people who work within a school) our students and more into love our students and will protect ‘Every bit of research tells us that counseling and forming positive them,” he tweeted on Feb. 24. relationships with them. That is the more guns you add to a situ“Very smart people. Must be what will lead to greater school firearms adept & have ansafety and a more transformaation the more likelihood of a nual training. Should get a yearly tive educational experience for deadly shooting.’ bonus. Shootings will not happen all of our students.” again — a big & very expensive The board wound up voting – Todd Warren, president of the Guilford deterrent. Up to States.” 7-2 to table a resolution on County Association of Educators In other words, the proposal school shootings so members has no weight whatsoever, and is could have more time to hear just a flimsy showbiz distraction. public input and debate some In the absence of coherent and effective national leaderfiner points. But there’s no doubt that the two draft resoluship, decisions about school safety get made by local leadtions under consideration broadly align with the sentiments ers like the adults who lead Guilford County Schools. expressed during the public comment period. The speakers who addressed the Guilford County Both resolutions demand “effective and comprehensive School Board on Tuesday evening were unanimous. action from the federal government and the state of North “I know there is some tension in the air talking about Carolina to protect school children.” Both state unequivoarming teachers,” said Todd Warren, president of the cally that the Guilford County School Board “is opposed Guilford County Association of Educators. “I want to go on to the arming of teachers to protect schools and children.” record on this: GCAE will be your next West Virginia if it And both call on Congress and the General Assembly “to comes to that. There is no way I will put armed teachers in appropriate adequate, new funds to increase the number a school building ever. Every bit of research tells us that the of counselors, mental health staff, psychologists, and social more guns you add to a situation the more likelihood of a workers in our schools.” deadly shooting. We need less guns, not more guns. More Pat Tillman, a Republican who represents District 3 and a teachers. Two years ago I was up here talking about pencils; Marine Corps veteran, made the motion to table the resowe don’t have the money for guns.” lution. He said after the meeting that he’d like to amend Lisa Johnson-Tonkins, the Guilford County Clerk of it to include a request for additional money for police in Court, threw more cold water on the idea. schools, known as school resource officers. That’s likely “As a former juvenile prosecutor, I also know how tento run into opposition from progressive board members, sions become high in school in instances where students teachers and parents who, like Andrew Johnson, want to become involved in a fight or show disrespect toward de-emphasize law enforcement in schools. teachers, and I would hate to think that an armed teacher But on one count, there’s likely to be little debate. lost their cool or maybe had some mental-health issues and “I just don’t believe we have the tools, training or money used a gun, whether they meant to or accidentally used it to arm teachers,” Tillman said. on a student and that student was permanently unable to attend school,” Johnson-Tonkins said.

March 8 - 14, 2018

CITIZEN GREEN

OPINION

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March 8 - 14, 2018 Up Front News Opinion Culture Shot in the Triad Puzzles

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CULTURE The Cozy Cannoli’s mother-daughter duo

by Lauren Barber

T

he Cozy Cannoli could hardly be situated in a less cozy-looking shopping center just off of High Point’s North Main Street, but quaint bistro seating, a snug lounge area and warm welcomes quickly shift a newcomer’s perception. Shades of gray blanket the walls with black and white accents and bursts of hot pink, most conspicuously a goldstudded magenta couch across from two black armchairs. Playful pig figurines pose throughout the shelves and counters. “I’m the pink, she’s the grey,” Lucy D’Egidio said, referring to her daughter Lexi. Together, they co-own the European-inspired bakery, which opened last November. Lexi grew up in the kitchen of her firstgeneration Italian-American mother but didn’t see herself pursuing a career in food until exposure to the culinary arts at Greensboro’s Weaver Academy led her to GTCC’s culinary program. She specialized as a pastry chef and took advantage of opportunities to travel and intern in Europe and Africa, picking up expertise and inspiration along the way. “She comes up with really unique flavors,” Lucy said. “She’s got a really creative mind when it comes to picking flavors and what people like.” Any mother might praise a daughter and business partner, but it’s apparent from scanning the counters that Lexi enjoys flexing her creative muscles between the lemon, lavender and almond macaroons, grapefruit tarts and special limoncello cannoli filling. She thrives when working with customers to realize their dream cakes. Lexi crafts everything from traditional carrot cake to Italian cannoli cake to fresh fig and cardamom cheesecake. Lexi describes baking as her creative outlet. “I like to play and push the limit a little,” Lexi said. “It’s a balance between getting to experiment and do cool new things and having to make certain things that pay the bills. I’ll sell 10 pieces of cheesecake before I sell one panna cotta so I love having adventurous people because it’s nice getting to experience their first experience with some of the stuff we bake here. Those are the customers that really make my day, who let me guide them.” On any given day, customers will find a cold display case stocked with bread pudding, vanilla bean crème brûlée,

Lucy and Lexi D’Egidios are bringing twists on traditional Italian family recipes to the Triad.

LAUREN BARBER

creampuffs with tiramisu filling, and counter space populated neighborhood that felt like a web of extended family, a sense with pizzelle and other cookies, cupcakes, napoleons, pastel of community she wants to cultivate in the bakery’s character. de nata and homemade caramels. The D’Egidios also want to provide authentic Italian foods that Most traditional desserts at the Cozy Cannoli aren’t staples are relatively scarce south of the Mason-Dixon. of everyday Italian-American life — they’re typically prepared “We had so much access to traditional foods up north,” for celebrations and during the holidays. Lucy said. “There was a bakery on every corner. Moving down “Holidays are big in our culture,” Lucy said. “That’s when all here, and not finding the same culture, we resorted to baking the women are in the kitchen, which our own breads, pastries and tradibrings kids into the kitchen to make tional stuff that we were used to getthese cookies. Our holidays… are ting all the time.” Learn more at thecozycannoli. about enjoying life and family, whereLexi bakes fresh rolls, baguette, com and visit at 2107 Kirkwood as here in America you feel rushed brioche and rustic loaves daily, and Street (HP). from one thing to another; one job to otherwise reinterprets classic family another. I have to get my eight hours recipes. The two women’s contribuin whereas, in Europe, they don’t care. tions balance and complement each They want to sit outside and enjoy other: Lexi adding twists to the family that cup of coffee.” recipes her mother’s mother and three older sisters passed The Cozy Cannoli features a full coffee and espresso bar, down; tempering her mother’s piglets and hot pink with a which the D’Egidios hope will encourage patrons to slow monochromatic base. down and spend some time lounging with chocolate-hazelnut “We have a really awesome relationship,” Lucy said. “I was biscotti or madeleines. Lucy misses living in the New Jersey a single mom, so… we’re not only mother and daughter, but


March 8 - 14, 2018 Up Front

NCDOT TO HOLD PUBLIC MEETING FOR THE PROPOSED INTERCHANGE IMPROVEMENTS AT U.S. 29 AND REEDY FORK PARKWAY (S.R. 4771) IN GUILFORD COUNTY TIP PROJECT NO. R-4707

Lucy and Lexi D’Egidios show off their Italian cannoli cake.

LAUREN BARBER

As information becomes available, it may be viewed online at the NCDOT Public Meeting Website: http://www.ncdot.gov/projects/publicmeetings Anyone desiring additional information may contact Ahmad AlSharawneh, NCDOT, Project Manager, at 1582 Mail Service Center, Raleigh, NC 27699, by telephone at (919) 707-6010 or by email at aalsharawneh@ncdot.gov. Comments should be submitted by April 26, 2018.

Aquellas personas que hablan español y no hablan inglés, o tienen limitaciones para leer, hablar o entender inglés, podrían recibir servicios de interpretación si los solicitan antes de la reunión llamando al 1-800-481-6494.

Puzzles

Persons who speak Spanish and do not speak English, or have a limited ability to read, speak or understand English, may receive interpretive services upon request prior to the meeting by calling 1-800-481-6494.

Shot in the Triad

NCDOT will provide auxiliary aids and services under the Americans with Disabilities Act for disabled persons who wish to participate in this meeting. Anyone requiring special services should contact Tamara Makhlouf via email at tmakhlouf@ncdot.gov or by phone at (919) 7076072 as early as possible, so that these arrangements can be made.

Culture

we’re also best friends and we keep each other in line.” After 25 years, Lucy still works full-time as a medical coder for Baptist Hospital, which is part of why Lexi’s dedication and expertise are vital to the operation let alone the soul of the place. “It’s a little stressful working full-time during the day and at night,” she said. “Even though I’m tired when I come in here, I enjoy that I can help create things and make people happy. In our nature, we’re both pleasers… We’re not trying to impress you, but we want to put a smile on your face.” They aren’t out to price-gouge their customers either; the D’Egidios’ say that they set prices just high enough to break even, finish decorating the space and pay their employees. To help keep the lights on and honor a family tradition of Sunday pasta dinners, Lexi offers a small group hand and homemade pasta-making class on Sunday afternoons, including the secrets to her marinara sauce recipe. Everyone takes home dinner for four. Looking to the future, her mother hopes to integrate more savory lunch options similar to Italian street foods served bistro style. “I wasn’t so proud of my culture growing up, but I have more of an appreciation now,” Lucy said. “I think my parents being immigrants made me who I am and her who she is. We’re both strong, independent, stubborn Italian women. We are determined not to fail.”

Opinion

The meeting will be held on Monday, March 26 at the Bryan Park Golf and Conference Center located at 6275 Bryan Park Road in Greensboro from 4:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. Interested citizens may attend at any time during the meeting hours. NCDOT representatives will be available to answer questions and receive comments regarding the project. Please note that no formal presentation will be made. All comments received will be taken into consideration as the project progresses.

News

The N.C. Department of Transportation will hold a public meeting to present the selected alternative for the proposed interchange improvements at U.S. 29 and Reedy Fork Parkway (S.R. 4771), in Guilford County.

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March 8 - 14, 2018 Up Front News Opinion Culture Shot in the Triad Puzzles

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CULTURE Frederic Church sheds light on myth and reality at Reynolda

by Spencer KM Brown

F

or Frederic Church, painting became a lifelong pilgrimage in a search for transcendence. During the post-Civil War period when many artists were still focused on neoclassical and religious themes, and more banal depictions of nature and American life, Church’s romantic vision reached beyond a nation at war, to the expanding west and the farthest reaches of the globe, capturing not only what the natural landscapes hold, but the feelings it produces in those who witness them. Frederic Church: A Painter’s Pilgrimage at Reynolda House Museum of American Art, which runs until May 13, focuses on his journey and artistic growth, a search for inspiration that took him to places that existed only in myth and legend to the American public of the 19th Century. Reynolda House, which holds Church’s 1855 masterpiece “The Andes of Ecuador” in its permanent collection, is one of only three venues hosting the exhibit that was organized by the Detroit Institute of Arts. The primary focus of the exhibit is that of Church’s journeys to the Middle East, Greece and Rome from 1867 to 1869. Church was the first major American painter to visit the locations. With the notion of sharing foreign landscapes and architecture with the American public, Church’s travels also held a personal purpose. In the immediate aftermath of the American Civil War and the death of his two small children in 1865, Church turned his artistic eye from nature towards history, specifically history as it touches on the natural world. He wanted to see the ruins of once-great civilizations and where they stood, with hopes of dealing with the loss that affected his country as well as his own personal sorrow. Church’s expansion into historic themes can be seen most aptly in his 1871 painting “The Parthenon,” completed a few years after his visit to Greece. Though on first glance, Church’s famous use of color and luminism catches and directs the eye to the glowing ruins caught in the waning afternoon light, there is still much more at play on the canvas measuring in at almost six feet tall. In the lower horizon of the work, we see the ancient ruins covered by shadow and time, reduced to mere rubble among the dirt. While against an expanse of blue sky, golden sunlight

“The Parthenon,” 1871, existed largely in mythological terms to the American audience when Frederic Church captured it on canvas.

THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART, BEQUEST OF MARIA DEWITT JESUP, FROM THE COLLECTION OF HER HUSBAND, MORRIS K. JESUP, 1914

rests heavenly on the still-standing structure of the Partheallowed, for the first time, to see Church’s numerous sketches non’s columns, making them glow in the most sacred of ways, and plans for what would become his renowned works. On though the threat of shadows and dust prey at the footsteps rare display is Church’s great post-pilgrimage work on his of this once magnificent edifice. The light becomes the focus estate he named Olana, sitting upon a high hill overlooking of the scene, one of Church’s signature features, as if starkly the Hudson River, north of New York City. Taking inspiration illuminating humanity’s accomplishments, while also showing from Middle Eastern architecture and ornamentation, blended its fleeting nature and the brevity of life. with his own aesthetic and spiritual ideals, Olana consumed Caught nearly at the exact center of Church’s sole attention for well over the painting is the tiny image of a man, three decades. The exhibit reveals the For more information on the leaning against the smooth edge of fallarchitectural drawings that Church en brick. Commentary had rarely entered exhibit and to purchase tickets created while planning his Persian-style into Church’s works until the late 1860s. temple on a hill. visit reynoldahouse.org. The painting acts as a sort of meditaThe Church exhibit at Reynolda House tion on civilizations and humans’ lust for displays the artist’s vision and journey power. While societies have been able to into realms and landscapes that were achieve greatness, the artist seems to argue for a recognition thought inaccessible. Moving linearly from the pilgrimage’s of the infinitesimal place human beings hold in the universe. start until its effects on the artist thereafter, the exhibit alThe idea shook Church’s audience at the time and speaks to lows a rare view into the growth of one of America’s most the current climate of the world. lauded masters of art and his search for answers in the world’s Among the finished masterpieces in the exhibit, the public is most remote landscapes.


March 8 - 14, 2018

CULTURE Wherehouse Art Hotel is where it’s at, still

by Lauren Barber

T

Up Front News Opinion

Zach McCraw’s short film “Beyond” screening in the the Gallery Room.

TODD TURNER

Amanda Medina and Ash Williams perform in the Nite Gallery.

TODD TURNER

Shot in the Triad Puzzles

hands that seem to search desperately as myriad colors splash yawning. Williams took the knife, covers Medinas head in a across the footage, eventually giving way to confident, exulted pillowcase and an alarm goes off, beeping in synchrony with a movements from the man whose facial features became clear white flashing light inside the pillowcase. once again as the suggestion of a warm sunrise enveloped “Thank you, that was my dream,” Medina said matter-ofhim, intimating a spiritual revelation, a new beginning. factly. The smell of cigarette smoke oozing from an onlooker’s “The Wherehouse itself has meant so much to people over jacket wafted through the intimate crowd minutes later. A this huge span of time,” Thompson said. “There’s a whole gensingle aquamarine standing lamp shone from the corner of eration of people who had life-changing experiences here and the otherwise dark Nite Gallery as a child’s voice stammered, grew up here. This is a little bit of a museum of what it used to “You can do anything,” leading into “Dance of the Sugar Plum be; it’s fresh and new but it still holds the spirit of what was Fairy.” Barefoot in a long black dress, Ash Williams knelt to really special about it I hope.” gather a white pillowcase, placing it over their head to reveal The event skirted pretension, too, likely to do with Thomplarge holes, and crept behind Amanda son’s ability to curate an experience comMedina, also in a black floor-length dress, fortable enough to unfold organically who gathered most of her long hair into a and encourage authentic interaction with Learn more at high, loose bun and strapped on an electhe space, different people and new ideas wherehousearthotel.com tric guitar above patent-leather boots. through thought-provoking art. The pillowcase now around her neck like Over time and through Thompson’s an infinity scarf, Williams, armed with guidance, Wherehouse continues to white string, fastened the tail to Mereveal and reinforce the power of indina and began winding the string around her performance tentional community by expanding who is included in that partner’s body while dancing to Tchaikovsky’s ballet. Williams definition. threw the ball of string at a man in the audience, chased it “It used to be so exclusive… but what was cool about the and continued encircling and ensnaring Medina as she silently other night was opening it up without being commercialized strummed at the guitar in a trance-like state. Williams moved about it,” Thompson said. “Keeping that discovery a personal their fingers nimbly to match the occasional twinkling of secret — now it’s yours and your experience you can tell your high-pitched piano notes and tugged on the string last tied friends about. I like that people have to research where it is to Medina’s hair to the beat of the song, pulling the guitarist and be brave enough to walk up those stairs. That’s part of the backwards as she appeared to finish a solo on a grand stage on magic.” her knees with triumphant bravado. Then she found a 10-inch knife, cuts away string around the guitar and lays it down,

Culture

he steps lead up from Krankies, a winding stairwell painted a patterned bright red with floraldetailed handrails. Along the walls hang Liz Simmons’ simultaneously charming and haunting mixed-media artwork: collages of animal bones, dried up wasps’ nests and toy figurines. It didn’t always look like this. More than two decades ago, a group of young musicians looking for practice space away from noise ordinances enforced in Winston-Salem’s suburbs found a home in an abandoned meatpacking building erected in 1912. It turned from a squat into a genuine cultural outpost in a once neglected corner of downtown, cycling through a period when it was known as PS 211, adding Krankies coffeeshop in 2003 and keeping the Wherehouse moniker for art exhibits, shows and, now, the Wherehouse Art Hotel, the coolest AirBNB in Winston-Salem. Current owner Haydee Thompson was part of the original Wherehouse scene while attending the UNC School of the Arts, returned after a stint in New York City left her disillusioned about collaborating with other artists, and stayed. Now she curates an experience as much as the space itself. The Gallery Room changes most dramatically as an art installation that is functional as a living space. This month, artist Zach McCraw transformed the Gallery Room and screened his short art film “Beyond” on March 1, when two dozen or so people gathered to visit and sip sangria, some visiting for the first time, others who’d previously lived in the space. Thompson hosts these “art parties” the first Thursday of every month, inviting the public to explore the Wherehouse’s high-ceilinged rooms, ever-rotating artwork and live theatrical performances. That evening, guests stood around the gaudily made-up bed or sat on the white floor, eye level with faux-flower arrangements that contained oddities like a haphazardly placed, ruby-red kittenheeled shoe. Large sheets of golden foil draped from the ceiling like clouds as — amid this organized chaos — McCraw’s trippy video projected onto a blank wall with a crisp rectangular outline. In it, a man visible from the chest up danced with his arms at the beginning of an emotional visual and audio journey. Dissonant waves of sounds accompanied

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March 8 - 14, 2018

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by Matt Jones

60 Laughfest 61 Plane steerer 63 Chemistry class model 64 “If all ___ fails ...” 65 23rd of 50 66 ___ pot (sinus-cleaning apparatus) 67 Ending for pun or hip 68 “Watching the Detectives” singer Costello 69 Nicholas II was the last one

Answers from previous publication.

Opinion

44 Educational acronym sometimes paired with the arts 47 Bailout request 48 Influential groups 51 In pursuit of 53 ___-garde 54 Uno + dos 55 Mr. Chamberlain 56 Make a call (even though nobody physically does it) 57 “Home” author Morrison 58 “___ creature was stirring ...” 59 Qatar ruler 62 Deck count with two jokers, in Roman numerals

News

Down 1 ”Today” co-anchor Hoda 2 “Am ___ only one?” 3 John with a green-and-yellow logo 4 Eugene O’Neill, for instance 5 Ending for human or planet 6 Place for two (or more) peas 7 S.F. NFLer ©2018 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) 8 It makes felines go nuts 9 2012 AFTRA merger partner 29 Impersonated 10 Vanilla-flavored soft drink 30 Doesn’t hold back 11 “Arrested Development” actress Portia de ___ 32 They may get played 12 “Caught a Lite Sneeze” singer Tori 33 At all times 13 President with a specially made bathtub 34 Baby ___ (some potato options) 18 Big trip 37 ___ tai (rum cocktail) 19 Heavenly home of the Norse gods 38 Period for the history books 24 Jake Busey, to Gary Busey 39 Kathmandu’s country abbr., if they were in the 25 “Much ___ About Nothing” 2018 Winter Olympics 28 Go from place to place 42 ___ Cooler (“Ghostbusters”-themed Hi-C flavor)

Up Front

Across 1 Young ‘un 6 “Monsters, ___” (2001 Pixar film) 9 Prehistoric squirrel in “Ice Age” 14 “SNL” alumna Cheri 15 “Boyz N the Hood” actress Long 16 Coffeeshop lure 17 START OF A ONE-LINER 20 Road shoulder 21 Plays first 22 Helper, briefly 23 PART 2 OF THE ONE-LINER 26 “The Wind in the Willows” creature 27 Scouring items 28 Part of the acronym NASCAR 31 Shingle replacer 35 “Mr. Holland’s ___” (1995 movie) 36 Adjust, as text 40 Comedian Chappelle 41 Classic Chevy, for short 43 PART 3 OF THE ONE-LINER 44 Hit the floppy disk icon 45 Mag. positions 46 Growing-sprouts-on-terra-cotta gift 49 Hosp. facilities 50 Held up 52 “All in the Family” creator Norman 54 END OF THE ONE-LINER 57 British comedian known for his one-liners (like this one)

March 8 - 14, 2018

CROSSWORD “An Increasing Problem”--it’s in all the papers.

SODUKO Culture

Answers from previous publication.

Shot in the Triad Puzzles

©2018 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com)

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TCB March 8, 2018 — the Wherehouse Art Hotel  

Curating an experience.

TCB March 8, 2018 — the Wherehouse Art Hotel  

Curating an experience.

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