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Greensboro / Winston-Salem / High Point July 19-25, 2018 triad-city-beat.com

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Under Wraps The fine art of black hair and other cultural artifacts at Revolution Mill PAGE 14

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July 19 - 25, 2018

EDITOR’S NOTEBOOK

Death and the creative underclass Joey Deweese He wasn’t anybody special, I suppose — lives on behind a kid from High Point who stuck around, Mother Tucker’s believed in his family and his friends, up on Spring Garden for a good time or a long talk or a night Street in the form of high adventure. But his passing at just of a photorealistic 28 years old in such a sudden manner mural by Greensresonated in that nocturnal sphere where boro artist Brian art and music come together, a scene with by Brian Clarey Lewis, thrown up its own setting, themes and characters on the cinderblock wall on a creative jag propelled by creativity and the fine art of fueled by sorrow and spray paint. hanging out. It’s out back by the dumpsters, surThat’s what he symbolized. rounded by candles, cans of cheap beer On Sunday night at the Westerwood and empty Cook Out cups — he was a Tavern, Greensboro digital artist Jordan fan of the milkshakes. There’s a box of Morris held vigil on the deck, monitoring Kleenex, a vase of flowers with the words the sales of Deweese-inspired artwork “Rest in Power” on it, a and collecting more well-ground skateboard images via email, coming deck, a bottle of Maker’s in from around the world Deweese had a Mark in a paper bag, a after an unspoken call face that begged to photo of a chihuahua to artists bore more fruit be drawn — all sharp tucked under a Steel Rethan Morris could have lines and smooth serve tallboy’s un-popped imagined. surfaces. tab. “He was very much Lewis’ mural captures an ass man,” Morris said, Deweese’s clean haircut, pulling on his vape. “So a the loose loops of his lot of the artists are doing earlobes, the smattering of freckles across butt-related material.” the bridge of his nose, the resting smirk Morris is still working on his own Deand the game gleam in his eye. weese — a vector that captures the angles Deweese had a face that begged to of his face, with playful, cartoonish flourbe drawn — all sharp lines and smooth ishes of color and texture. He’s got plans surfaces. for stickers and T-shirts, a line of merch The first tribute piece, by another local with proceeds going to his survivors. artist of note, Gina Franco, sold quickly “He was fun, man,” Morris said, and his during a Facebook burst in the days after laughter trails off. he was killed by a drunk driver during the It’s still so sad, still so fresh. They just long Fourth of July week. It will hang in held the service yesterday, and it’s starting one of Greensboro’s Crafted restaurants to become real. owned by Chef Kris Fuller, with whom And in times of grief the creative unDeweese shared a sense of sartorial style. derclass does what it always does: It does The proceeds will go to his family. what it can; it does what it must.

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July 19 - 25, 2018

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July 19 - 25, 2018

CITY LIFE July 19-25, 2018 by Lauren Barber

THURSDAY

Up Front

Quinston: LGBTQ young professionals social @ Fair Witness (W-S), 5:30 p.m.

The Lion King @ LeBauer Park (GSO), 8 p.m.

News

Che Apalache & Apple Chill Cloggers @ 6th & Liberty streets (W-S), 7 p.m.

Dodgeball tournament @ Griffin Recreation Center (GSO), 12:30 p.m. Rank your dodgeball skill level when registering as a free agent and be matched for Stonewall Sports’ second annual summer dodgeball tournament. Learn more and register at stonewallgreensboro.leagueapps.com. Hand-pie bake-off @ Preyer Brewing Company (GSO), 1 p.m.

The North Star LGBTQ Center welcomes queer young professionals to unwind and connect with new folks in the community. Learn more at northstarlgbtcc.com/programs.

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

Ghassan’s, PorterHouse Burger Company and Café Europa offer food and refreshments nearby as one of Disney’s best screens at sundown close to 8:30 p.m. Find the event on Facebook.

Opinion

Cliff Eberhardt & Louise Mosrie @ Muddy Creek Music Hall (W-S), 8 p.m. Amateur bakers pull out all the stops for final judgement from the public. Bring an empty stomach and cash (only) because it’s for a good cause — all proceeds benefit BackPack Beginnings, a nonprofit focused on feeding and clothing children in need. Learn more and enter at preyerbrewing.com/bakeoff.

Culture

Just Eat It: A Food Waste Story @ Aperture Cinema (W-S), 1 p.m.

Painting & refinishing furniture workshop @ Mixxer (W-S), 7 p.m.

Eberhardt, known for his melodies and lyrical twists, plays alongside award-winning singer-songwriter Louise Mosrie out of Nashville. Find the event on Facebook. The Big Lebowski @ Foothills (W-S), 11 p.m.

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The four-man string band from Buenos Aires incorporates Latin American styles with traditional bluegrass and warm vocal harmonies. Learn more at downtownws.com/music.

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Sometimes it’s best to let the pros show the way. Learn blending, distressing, prepping, sealing, glazing, washing, staining, stripping, stippling and crackle techniques to get your furniture-upcycling game back on track. Learn more at wsmixxer.org.

The Dude is on the big screen as Foothill’s free Friday Night Flicks summer series continues. The brewpub is serving up flavored popcorns in addition to the late-night menu. Learn more at foothillsbrewing.com/events.

Just Eat It is the final film showed during Aperture’s FilmFeast series, aimed at raising awareness of issues of hunger, sustainable farming, food insecurity and celebrating culinary culture. Filmmakers examine systemic food waste and pledge to quit grocery shopping and survive only on discarded food for six months while interviewing activists and experts. Obsession with expiration dates, portion sizes feature prominently along the way. Tickets are free, but the cinema is accepting donations of goods or funds for New Communion Mobile Pantry. Learn more at aperturecinema.com.


Mars night @ Kaleideum North (W-S), 7 p.m.

SUNDAY

Dori Freeman @ High Point Museum, 6 p.m.

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July 19 - 25, 2018

Revolution Cycles, NC

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10-40% off Bikes 20% off “Stuff” 1907 Spring Garden St, Greensboro, NC 27403

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A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum @ Stained Glass Playhouse (W-S), 8 p.m.

336.852.3972 revolutioncyclesnc.com

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Mars is about to make its second-closest pass to Earth in 16,000 years and Kaleideum is ready to celebrate with planetarium shows, crafts, science demonstrations and an opportunity to view Mars and other celestial wonders through professional telescopes after sunset. A family-friendly DJ will be onsite spinning tunes while adults squeeze lime juice onto fresh-made tacos from Taqueria Luciano’s food truck, and maybe a little something from the cash bar. Learn more at downtown.kaleideum.org/programs.

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Pack a picnic dinner and pull up a lawn chair for some family-friendly Americana from singer-songwriter Dori Freeman. Find the event on Facebook. Puzzles

Do as the Romans do at Stained Glass’ rendition of the fast-paced, Tony Award-winning Broadway show, inspired by the works of ancient Roman playwright Plautus. Romance, mistaken identities and scheming neighbors await. Learn more at stainedglassplayhouse.org.

Piedmont Triad Jazz Orchestra @ Guilford College (GSO), 6 p.m. Who doesn’t love a free outdoor jazz concert? The orchestra is gearing up for two, 45-minute sets before sundown. Find the event on Facebook.

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July 19 - 25, 2018 Up Front

How our senators and members of Congress reacted to President Donald Trump’s disaster in Helsinki by Brian Clarey 1. Sen. Richard Burr (R, retiring at the end of his term in 2022) “Vladimir Putin is not our friend and never has been. Nor does he want to be our friend. His regime’s actions prove it.” (via Twitter)

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2. Sen Thom Tillis (R, up for re-election in 2022) “There cannot be any equivocation: Vladimir Putin is to blame for Russia’s poor relations with the United States and the rest of the free world. It is Putin’s regime that illegally invaded Crimea, props up Assad’s murderous regime in Syria, assassinates dissidents on foreign soil, and meddles in the elections of the United States and its European allies….” (from a released statement)

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3. Rep. Ted Budd (R-13th District, up for re-election this year) “I support President Trump’s effort in attempting diplomacy with Putin, and it’s my hope that the president’s rhetoric in the coming weeks and months will be in line with his administration’s actions.” (reported in the Salisbury Post) 4. Rep. Virginia Foxx (R-5th District, up for re-election this year) “The findings of our nation’s intelligence agencies and the House Committee on Intelligence leave no doubt that Russia maliciously attempted to influence our elections. The US-Russia Summit was an opportunity to hold Putin accountable for his attacks on our country’s interests and to put him on record for his indiscretions. His disregard for American values and tyranny precludes a relationship necessary to achieve diplomatic goals. This was an opportunity for the president to take a strong stance for American interests and condemn the actions of a foreign adversary.” (released statement) 6. Rep. Mark Walker (R-6th District, up for re-election this year) “Diplomacy should be pursued but it’s crucial to remember Putin’s record of human rights violations. I have met with dozens of parliamentary members in Eastern Europe warning us of Putin. We must continue monitoring the cyber-security attacks by Russia, China and other bad actors.” (via Twitter)


July 19 - 25, 2018

with Randy Eaddy by Lauren Barber

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Opinion

Randy Eaddy begins his term as president and CEO of the Arts Council of Winston-Salem and Forsyth County.

After nearly eight years serving on the board of the Arts Council of Winston-Salem & Forsyth County, Randy Eaddy will succeed Jim Sparrow as the organization’s president and CEO following Sparrow’s resignation to become executive director of the Fort Wayne Ballet. Eaddy is retiring from Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton law firm after almost 25 years as a partner.

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What do you see as unique about the arts in Winston-Salem and Forsyth County? The diversity and high quality of what we have to offer in the arts arena in a city of our size surprised me when I got here and continues to impress me. We really do live up to the moniker that the Arts Council has adopted which is the “City of Arts and Innovation.” When my friends come to visit from Atlanta they really are taken aback by the quality and variety of the arts here in Winston-Salem.

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Which projects are you looking forward to most? We have a significant project ongoing where we are reconfiguring some of space inside the Milton Rhodes Arts Center in order to create a new performance space that will give us the capacity to have multiple performance events going on simultaneously. We also recently sold our old theater out on Coliseum Drive… and a part of what we structured in connection with that sale was the relocation of…the Little Theatre and the North Carolina Black Repertory Theatre. An important piece of work we need to continue to do is ensure that both of those organizations are effectively relocated to new spaces where they can continue to do their valuable work in the community.

Culture

What most excites you about joining the council as president and CEO? One of the things the arts council has focused on a lot over the last several years — and one of the main legacies of Jim Sparrow’s — is the extension of the arts council’s support into new areas of our community. We have several mini-grant programs for new artists and small organizations, and it’s amazing how much of a catalyst some of those small grants can be for people doing impressive work; that outreach is one of the things that excites me. I’m stepping into a dynamic group of people and I’m looking forward to coming on board as their captain so to speak, but to continue the outstanding teamwork they’ve demonstrated over the years.

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July 19 - 25, 2018

NEWS

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Morehead Foundry halts operations amid allegations of racism by Jordan Green Morehead Foundry, a Greensboro restaurant complex next to the Downtown Greenway, has temporarily closed following an employee walkout and allegations of racism against its owner. Lentz Ison, the director of operations for Fresh. Local. Good Food Group, posted his letter of resignation to owner Lee Comer on Facebook on Sunday. “I have been directed to make decisions and take action that are unethical and are not in the best interest of staff/ and the community we support,” Ison wrote. “For example, being asked to not hire eligible persons due to race.” In his Facebook post, Ison added, “I have never before been asked to fire someone just because they injured themselves and filed for workers comp, out of retaliation.” Comer, a restaurateur who owns the Iron Hen, opened Morehead Foundry in November 2016 as a restaurant complex near the southwest corner of the Downtown Greenway. The refurbished building includes kitchen space for Fresh. Local. Good Food Group’s catering service, along with Four Flocks and Larder, Revolution Burger, the Baker & the Bean and Hush speakeasy. Reached by phone on Monday, Comer responded, “His allegations are completely false in terms of the context that he made them.” She added, “When you look at how many employees I have, there are far more African Americans than whites. My record speaks for itself. I have a very diverse staff, including gay, straight, transgender and Hispanic.” Comer also said Ison “was in charge of all hiring and firing of any kind. If he wanted to make a change, he should have made it.” Ison said he stands behind his assertion that Comer discouraged him from hiring African Americans. “The racial things were talked about multiple times,” said Ison, who took the job of director of operations in March. “She thought they were working for a couple months to get unemployment. She based it on race; it was not based on an economic thing. It left a bad taste in my mouth. She would say, ‘I don’t want to hire any black people.” While acknowledging that Morehead Foundry’s staff is racially diverse, Ison said that’s the to the credit of the management team and not Comer. Ison and Bar Manager Ryan Hill said

Morehead Foundry, a restaurant complex near the southwest corner of the Downtown Greenway, houses four separate concepts in Lee Comer’s Fresh. Local. Good Food Group.

they walked out last week after learning Alex Dummit, Comer’s executive that paychecks to lower-level employees assistant and director of sales, also said had failed to clear. Hill, who joined the she’s never heard Comer say anything team on June 28 at Lentz’s invitation, like what Ison is alleging. told Triad City Beat that on one occasion “As a hiring manager, I’ve never been he witnessed Comer screening a group discouraged from hiring anyone unless of customers based on race. Hill said they weren’t qualified,” she said. “I know he received an inquiry from a party Lee has hired plenty of African Ameriof 150-200 people who wanted to pay cans.” individually for food and drinks. From Ison said the turmoil that led to his the restaurant’s perspective a more ideal sudden July 12 resignation began with arrangement would be to take a lumpthe firing of an employee who slammed sum payment for food and open bar, but a door on their finger the previous Hill said he was willing to make it work. weekend. “She asked: We’re “They filed a workers they black?” Hill compensation claim af‘For example, being recounted. “And I said, ter they shattered their ‘Yes.’ And she intifingertip,” Ison said, asked to not hire elimated that she didn’t adding that Comer “diwant their business. She gible persons due to rected us to terminate said something to the him. Because of that race.’ — Lentz Ison negative of, ‘No, thank it felt like retaliation.” you.’” Ison said the official In light of the flurry of discussion reason for the employee’s termination on Facebook and media interest in the is that he walked out to his car without controversy, some of Comer’s current clocking out. employees came to her defense. Reached a second time on Monday, Lori Loftis, the executive baker and Comer said she has retained a lawyer, bakery manager at the Baker & the who advised her to not comment further. Bean, said since the time she started Dummit said the employee was fired working at Morehead Foundry in August not because of the injury, but because 2016, she’s “never been instructed to not “he was not working on company time,” hire a black person, never been instructalthough she doesn’t know the specifics ed to not hire a Hispanic.” of the employee’s alleged violation of

JORDAN GREEN

workplace policy. Darick Palmer, who was hired as a bartender at Morehead Foundry in April, said he doesn’t encounter Comer enough on the job to comment on her racial attitudes, but harbors skepticism on the claims against her. “I was referred to come to this job by a black man who was a friend of the owner who I attend NAACP meetings with,” said Palmer, who is himself black. “I don’t think he would be involved with her if that was the case.” Palmer levied a criticism of the restaurant industry in Greensboro that he said applied to Lentz’s team just as much as any other food-service operation in the city: They overlook the AfricanAmerican market, and they allow their standards of service lapse when it comes to black clientele. “I don’t think [Comer] is any more guilty of [racism] than any other restaurateur in Greensboro,” Palmer said. “If you walk into a situation you don’t like and you can’t change it, you don’t want to be part of it. Or maybe you’re okay with it. The problem I keep running into in Greensboro in particular — I’m a lifetime service industry person — is that these restaurants have low numbers. Whether it’s the ownership or the managers or the staff, they always forget to reach out to upper-middle class, recently


EVENTS

July 19 - 25, 2018

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graduated, young black people.” Comer said on Monday that Morehead Foundry has “temporarily closed for us to reorganize and figure out what our next step is.” She added, “The closing of the foundry was something that was in process well before [Ison] made his malicious allegation.” Notwithstanding Comer’s statement, Lonerider Brewing abruptly announced a delay of a new “beer den” within Four Flocks and Larder on the same day as Ison’s resignation and one day before the planned July 13 opening. Comer also said she’s suing Ison for violating a confidentiality agreement that applies to the company’s social media policy. Ison responded that he’s not worried about getting sued because the confidentiality agreement only applies to the duration of his employment. He added that he can’t be sued for defamation because everything he’s said is true. Ison’s allegations against Comer and his public resignation resonated with Wesley Phillip Painter, a former Iron Hen employee who now lives in New York City. Painter said he resigned from his job as a cook at the Iron Hen in 2010 after Comer loudly objected to him training a dishwasher who was intellectually disabled to prepare food. Arriving at work at 5:30 a.m. for a catering job, Painter recalled, “I could hear her yelling in the office. I could hear her talking about this kid. She said the word ‘retard.’ She said, ‘I don’t want this retarded kid touching my food.’ I thought: This lady doesn’t deserve a second more of my time. I walked in the office and said everything I wanted to say. I said, ‘You have no idea what it takes for him to get to work every day. You don’t appreciate him. He’s helping you out. We’re all helping you out.’ That’s the only job I’ve walked out on. I’ve never forgotten the feeling. It’s an incredible feeling.” Dummit, who has worked off and on for Comer over the past eight years, said she’s never heard her boss use the word “retard” or make fun of anyone for an intellectual disability. “Yes, she’s a hard person to work for,” Dummit said. “She raises her voice. She definitely is not a fair person who believes everyone is equal. This is a capitalist society. She does not believe that if someone works harder they get the same pay. She gives everyone the same opportunity. That is not discrimination. I’ve never heard her discriminate based on race.”

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Two Democratic challengers have outraised Republican incumbents in state House races in Forsyth and Guilford counties as midterm elections approach.

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July 19 - 25, 2018

Democrats flush with cash to challenge GOP in state House races by Jordan Green

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Gov. Roy Cooper and House candidate Terri LeGrand

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COURTESY PHOTO

Democratic challengers in Forsyth and Guilford counties are riding into the upcoming November election on a flood of cash, buoying hopes to break the Republican supermajority in the state General Assembly, allow Gov. Roy Cooper to sustain a veto and rebalance power in state government. Four Republican House seats in Forsyth and Guilford counties, including the district represented by Majority Whip Jon Hardister, are on a list of targets released by the state Democratic Party in April. Almost all Democratic challengers in the two counties have posted impressive campaign fundraising totals in second-quarter reports, which were due on July 10, and in two districts the Democratic challengers have outpaced Republican incumbents in both receipts and cash on hand. At the head of the pack is Terri LeGrand, an administrator at Wake Forest University, who is seeking to unseat Debra Conrad, a three-term Republican lawmaker and former Forsyth County commissioner known for pushing hardline immigration-enforcement policies. House District 74, which carves a horseshoe around the north side of WinstonSalem, is typical of the suburban and exurban areas where the Democrats are seeking to make gains. LeGrand has been raising money since last October and has reported a fundraising total of $163,229, more than double what Conrad posted. Gov. Cooper himself came to Winston-Salem in May to help LeGrand raise money.

“We felt like that was indicative of two things,” LeGrand said. “He believes this is a winnable race, and he really wants us to break the supermajority.” The party needs to pick up four seats in the House or six in the Senate to reach that goal. Martha Shafer, a retired executive at Cone Health who previously served as a vice president at Women’s Hospital, has raised a reported total of $147,757, almost 10 times more than Republican incumbent John Faircloth, in her bid to flip House District 62, which covers a slab of western Guilford County from Summerfield through Colfax and down into High Point. Ashton Clemmons, who has worked as an assistant superintendent and school principal, has raised a reported total of $129,104 in the new House District 57 in Greensboro, compared to negligible fundraising by Republican opponent Troy Lawson. The new district’s voter composition favors a Democratic candidate. The district effectively flipped through a court-ordered redistricting plan earlier this year that forced Republican lawmaker John Blust into political retirement. In other local legislative races, Republican incumbents maintain a fundraising advantage, while Democratic challengers have posted respectable numbers. Republican Trudy Wade has raised $189,062, compared to $104,999 by Democrat Michael Garrett in Senate District 27. Republican Jon Hardister has raised $114,180, compared to $81,614 by Democrat Steven Buccini in House District 59. And in House District 75, Republican incumbent Donny Lambeth has raised $73,033, compared to $50,369 by Democrat Dan Besse, who currently serves on Winston-Salem City Council. Democratic candidates’ fundraising performance in the Triad supports party leaders’ continued confidence in a “blue wave” election. “Democrats across the state are outworking, outhustling and outraising Republicans, showing that the grassroots energy and momentum are on our side and many Republicans are going to be caught flat-footed in November,” Wayne Goodwin, the party’s state chair, predicted in a July 12 statement. “The party is in the strongest position we have ever been in before a midterm election, with outstanding Democrats running in every single district for the first time ever

and the resources and support they need to get their message out.” Matt Bales, the political director of the House Republican Caucus, discounted the notion of a Democratic fundraising advantage. Although not all Republican candidates have filed second-quarter reports, Bales said Republican House candidates hold more cash on hand in aggregate. If Republican incumbents’ fundraising totals appear unimpressive compared to Democratic challengers, Bales said that’s because sitting lawmakers were in Raleigh through the end of the legislative session last month. “It’s easy to focus on fundraising while the Republicans are in the General Assembly delivering Hurricane Matthew recovery money, expanding rural broadband access and conducting the people’s business while all the Democrats are doing is spending time fundraising,” he said. “Each Republican candidate is up to the task of getting their message to the voters of the great state of North Carolina,” Bales added. Republican John Faircloth, who has only raised $15,303 so far in the current election cycle, acknowledged the enthusiasm of voters on the opposite side of the political ledger, but expressed a sanguine view of the money race. “They were raising money while we were in session,” he said. “It’s relatively early in the season. We’ll be raising money and talking to our supporters about what we need. I think in the long run it will work out fine.” Not surprising given Martha Shafer’s career as a hospital administrator, the largest chunk of financial support for her campaign has come from individuals employed in the healthcare industry, followed by higher education and public schools. The professional composition of LeGrand’s donors reflects a similar pattern, but with healthcare slightly trailing education. As a reflection of grassroots enthusiasm, each candidate has received $10,200 from Work for Democracy, a political action committee organized in early 2017 that has built a donor base among progressive activists in Greensboro and Winston-Salem. Both campaigns have received cash infusions from Lillian’s List, a state PAC that supports candidates that champion reproductive freedom. Shafer’s campaign has also drawn support from Fred Stanback, a Salisbury philanthropist who supports conservationist causes, and Our Shot

NC, a PAC financed by a national donor base that includes a significant number of healthcare professionals from North Carolina and New York. “I think there’s a lot of palpable enthusiasm for our campaign,” Shafer said. “We’ve put together a good campaign. We’re working hard reaching out to voters. It seems like the money is following.” In 2016, the Democrats didn’t even bother to field a candidate against Faircloth, but Shafer said the new electoral map imposed by the courts has made the district more competitive. “I’ve certainly been getting that message out to voters that this is an opportunity to make a change,” Shafer said. “In the past, the chances weren’t as favorable as this.” While Shafer’s campaign has benefited from large donations from a handful of prominent supporters and political action committees, she’s also collected donations as small as $5 and $10. With nearly 500 donations in total, the average amount received by the Shafer campaign is $304, compared to $402 by the Faircloth campaign. The contrast is even greater in House District 74, where Democrat Terri LeGrand has amassed more than 850 donations, averaging $189. Donations to Debra Conrad, LeGrand’s Republican opponent, average $423. Both candidates are pulling significant support from affluent neighborhoods like Buena Vista that flank Reynolda Road and Country Club Road in northwest Winston-Salem. LeGrand’s top donors include employees of Wake Forest University and Jose Isasi, the owner of Que Pasa Media. Banking and finance represent the largest industry sector in Conrad’s donor base. Her largest donor to date is Steve Vanderwoude, a former telecom executive and investor based in Chapel Hill, followed by Edgar Broyhill, a furniture industry scion and investor who has been active in Republican politics for decades. A political newcomer, LeGrand said her biggest challenge will be overcoming Conrad’s “excellent name recognition” as a three-term incumbent and former county commissioner. “My task is to get my name out there,” she said. “That’s why I have to raise a significant amount of money. “All Republicans are vulnerable because of the direction they’ve taken our state,” LeGrand added, “and people are motivated to change that.”


57 Seasons of Music Excellence

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YOUNG ARTISTS ORCHESTRA TONIGHT! THURSDAY, JULY 19 8 P.M. Dana Auditorium, Guilford College Grant Cooper, conducting; Neal Cary, cello

July 19 - 25, 2018

Experience...EMF

YOUNG ARTISTS ORCHESTRA FRIDAY, JULY 20 Dana Auditorium, Guilford College 8 P.M. José-Luis Novo conducting; Randall Ellis, oboe

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A HERO’S LIFE SATURDAY, JULY 21 8 P.M. Dana Auditorium, Guilford College Gerard Schwarz, conducting; Kun-Woo Paik, piano; Jason Vieaux, guitar World Premiere: Hyekyung Lee’s Climbing Tomorrow EMF OPEN HOUSE – FREE SATURDAY, July 21 1-5:30 P.M. Guilford College Campus

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Percussion Ensemble Recital 1 p.m. Dana Auditorium Guitar Recital 2:15 p.m. Hege Library Pianopalooza 3 p.m. Sternberger Auditorium Conducting Scholars Showcase 4:15 p.m. Dana Auditorium Music for a Sunday Evening in the Park – FREE SUNDAY, July 22 6 P.M. Founders Lawn, Guilford College Triad Jazz Orchestra Chamber Music MONDAY, July 23 8 P.M. Recital Hall, UNCG College of Visual and Performing Arts EMF Faculty, Kun-Woo Paik, piano; Jason Vieaux, guitar

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Chamber Music TUESDAY, July 24 8 P.M. Dana Auditorium, Guilford College EMF Faculty 4th Annual Guitar Summit WEDNESDAY, July 25 8 P.M. Temple Emanuel Julian Gray, Kami Rowan & Jason Vieaux, guitar

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BONUS: FREE Jason Vieaux Master Class FRIDAY, July 20 4 P.M. Sternberger Auditorium, Guilford College

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July 19 - 25, 2018

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EDITORIAL

Trump, treason and choice Trump’s weird submission to Russian President

Vladimir Putin — on international television! — and incoherent bumbling in Helsinki set his own forces against him: Fox News “commentators,” most of the GOP machinery and most importantly, if we can extrapolate from anecdotal newspaper reports, with voters who perhaps feel as if the final leg has been pulled from under the stool. Forget for a minute that our moron in chief just hand-delivered to Putin the best press conference the dictator ever had in his life, and throw away the ridiculous “double negative” explanation and Trump’s eventual, begrudging “acceptance” of the findings of every national security division within the federal government over the word of his pal Vlad. Let’s keep our eye on the midterm election, just a couple Mueller indictments away: 35 Senate seats, all 435 seats in the House. The Republicans hold a majority they hope to keep, and the district lines have been drawn in their favor. So now, while most of the country is trying to decide if the president committed treason, the political animals are If they were real trying to figure out how to run on it — or patriots, we’d against it. And that is never be in this the trick. Because sure, spot in the first tough-guy Trump place. just committed what Newt Gingrich called “the biggest mistake of his presidency,” forcing most legacy Republicans to at least disagree with the sentiment if not outright condemn it. But how, exactly, will that play out with the voters? Come stump season, Republican candidates will be forced to either stand by their man — no matter how much like borscht he’s beginning to smell — or play the patriot card and start paying attention to what US authorities, including Mueller, are saying, distancing themselves from Trump in the process. We should allow them no middle ground. Ultimately, most candidates will likely fall on whichever side the prevailing wind favors as the election looms near. Because if they were real patriots, we’d never be in this spot in the first place.

CITIZEN GREEN

Bree Newsome and past as prologue

There’s a view that Nov. 8, 2016 arrest, he had written, “The event that truly awakened me represents a distinct cleavage in was the Trayvon Martin case.” the American story. Even as the Before traveling from Columbia to Charleston to murder Obama administration carried out black parishioners who welcomed him to their prayer meetrecord deportations, and evidence ing, Roof wrote that he read a Wikipedia page on Martin. of unjustified police violence “It was obvious that Zimmerman was in the right,” Roof against black bodies accumulated wrote. “But more importantly, this prompted me to type in on social media, it was thought the the words ‘black on white crime’ into Google, and I have by Jordan Green system could be nudged towards never been the same since that day. The first website I the righteous path without a radical overhaul. The myth came to was the Council of Conservative Citizens. There of continual progress remained intact. Then, on election were pages upon pages of these brutal black-on-white night, for many, the picture went dark and absurd. murders. I was in disbelief. At this moment I realized that Those of us who held that view — looking in the mirsomething was very wrong.” ror here — saw history unfold from positions of relative Of course, in the overwhelming majority of violent privilege. Certainly Trump is the first president to win crimes, the victim and the perpetrator are of the same race. election to the White House by exploiting a sense of white Chillingly, the same year as the Charleston massacre, grievance. And he’s probably the most racist president then-candidate Trump retweeted an info-graph depicting since Woodrow Wilson. Yes, he said there “were some very a thuggish young man covered in bandannas that falsely fine people” among the white nationalists who rallied in claimed 81 percent of white homicide victims were killed by Charlottesville last August. And, as the Anti-Defamation black people. The actual percentage, according to the FBI, League and Council on American-Islamic Relations have was 15 percent. documented, hate crimes have surged with As Newsome reminded her audience in Trump’s election. And yet it’s easy to forget Winston-Salem on July 14, the Confederthat modern racial terror and battles over ‘The battle for Confed- ate flag first represented the Southern symbols of the Confederacy did not begin erate monumnents is states’ willful continuation of slavery. with the 2016 election. But back then we had “And then after the Confederacy lost really a proxy war for the luxury of seeing them as anomalous, not the war it became emblematic of the an ongoing as a feature. Jim Crow laws that would govern the For the activist and artist Bree Newsome, South for the next 100 years — laws struggle over policy the inflection point came three years earlier. designed to control and limit the political and ideology.’ “The past seemed to be rising in the sumand economic power of the free black mer of 2013, but not in good ways,” Newsome population,” she said. Blacks were rou– Bree Newsome told an audience at the Enterprise Center in tinely murdered for failing to respect the Winston-Salem for the Uniting for Our Future parameters of white supremacy. conference on July 14. In the aftermath of the Charleston Massacre, as the First, she noted, the Supreme Court gutted key proviSouth Carolina legislature dithered over whether to remove sions of the Voting Rights Act, with state lawmakers in the Confederate flag from the statehouse grounds, NewNorth Carolina hastily passing legislation to make it more some undertook one of the most audacious acts of civil difficult for black and brown people, poor people, students disobedience in recent years. Supported by team comand the elderly to vote. prised of Occupy Charlotte veterans and activists with the Equally galvanizing for Newsome, a Florida jury returned then-nascent Movement for Black Lives, she scaled the a not-guilty verdict in the murder trial of George Zimmerflagpole and removed the Confederate flag at dawn on man, who shot and killed Trayvon Martin, a 17-year-old, June 27, 2015. unarmed black American walking in his own neighborhood. In the Trump era, it can be easy to succumb to the view “For many of us, the killing invoked images of Emmett that police violence against people of color and white Till, a 14-year-old African-American teenager from Chinationalist violence to prevent the removal of Confedercago who was lynched while visiting family in Mississippi ate symbols are distinct plagues competing for attention in and his racist killers were acquitted of their crimes,” Newa shell-shocked progressive movement besieged from all some said. “Like many, I was deeply disturbed by the facts sides. Newsome’s activism should tell us otherwise. and circumstances surrounding Trayvon’s death. The case “Really since the 1960s — the late ’60s after the passage sparked a new movement led by black and brown youth of the Civil Rights Act — the Republican Party has become who saw themselves in Trayvon.” home to the neo-Confederate movement,” Newsome said. What followed two years later looks like a dress rehearsal “And this is especially the case in recent years in North for the Trump era. Carolina. The battle over Confederate monuments is As Newsome noted, “The Travyon Martin case not only really a proxy war for an ongoing struggle over policy and inspired a new generation of young freedom fighters, but ideology. The monuments are representative of a particualso the man that would go on to massacre nine black palar social order. So we have to understand that we are not rishioners at a prayer meeting at Mother Emanuel Church simply pushing for a policy change, right? We are pushing in Charleston, SC.” In a manifesto discovered after Roof’s for a change in culture and values.”


July 19 - 25, 2018

CULTURE The brunch dilemma, solved at M’Coul’s

by Brian Clarey

W

Up Front News Opinion Culture

A traditional boxty is a potato pancake. The M’Coul’s version comes thin as a crepe and stuffed with housemade corned-beef hash, among other brunchy delectables.

BRIAN CLAREY

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pancakes and French toast, steak and eggs and shrimp and tato, and a couple of runny eggs. And there on the side rests a grits. Because M’Coul’s adheres to a Celtic motif, brunch seleccrock of cheese sauce — a rarebit — with its own bounty of potions include items like bangers and hash, potatoes everytatoes, onions and spices that, when spooned over the boxty, where. creates the sort of heavy-duty meal that would prepare one On the signature side, a traditional Irish breakfast pairs for a long day of shepherding or putting up low stone walls. eggs with grilled tomatoes; the corned-beef hash seems to Pro tip: Brunch is best consumed in pairs. A two-top can be made in-house — meaning always slip through the that it does not resemble dog wait if they’re not picky food even a little; most dishes about seating or are willing M’Coul’s Public House; 110 W. McGee St. GSO, come with potatoes O’Brien, a to post up at the bar. 336.378.0204, mcoulspub.com signature side. We ate on the upstairs Most intriguing is the boxty, a deck — the downstairs traditional Irish potato pancake, spaces had filled up by noon served here in an eggs/bacon and a crowd had gathered configuration or with the aforementioned corned-beef hash. in the upstairs lounge to watch the World Cup final between M’Coul’s boxty seems made from exceptionally smooth lashed France and Croatia. It was hot, sure, so we drank a lot of water potatoes — it is almost like a crepe — browned like a pancake as we watched the flags flow in the slow, hot breeze and lisand folded over the goods. It provides an excellent medium for tened to the cheers from the bar. the hash, made with a blend of peppers and big chunks of po-

Shot in the Triad

e can all agree, can we not, that brunch is just great… in a general, vague sort of way, that is: Breakfast food — ish — served all day, and on a weekend no less, when most of us have the time and inclination to do it right. Anthony Bourdain, of course, had real disdain for the meal, categorizing it as plates of eggs and warmed-up leftovers prepared and served by people who would rather be anywhere else on earth to hungover zombies just looking for the excuse to start drinking in the morning. Nevertheless, brunch is having something of a moment in the Triad right now, with the passing of the Brunch Bill allowing booze to be served before noon and the slow proliferation of both restaurants that care to do a good job on brunch service and those who are willing to come out and pay to experience it. And therein lies the rub: With everybody getting into the brunch game, how do we choose? It takes approximately as much time to choose a brunch place as it does to eat brunch, necessitating a series of questions that demand answers. Will there be boozing? If so, to what degree — are we talking bottomless mimosa or a single, great bloody Mary? Buffet-style or off the menu? Do we want to sit outside? Do we refuse to sit outside? Do we want to wait for a table? Budget and time are concerns. And what do we want to eat, anyway — classic dishes like eggs Benedict or something a little more off the nose? Brunch prime time begins at 11 a.m. and lasts about 90 minutes, and then it hits again after 1 p.m., when the late-risers scramble to get in before the service ends around 3 p.m. This must be taken into consideration. And so it was that we settled on M’Coul’s Public House in downtown Greensboro, a noted player in the brunch game that hit all the right notes. M’Couls is downtown, which ups the price point and also the atmosphere, a big-city feel in the center of the action. A menu of cocktails seems designed especially to soothe difficult mornings: individual slates of both champagne cocktails and bloody Marys, craft numbers made with electrolyte-laden coconut and cucumber. The servers bring lots of water. The menu stands out, too. They’ve got both sweet and savory covered with

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July 19 - 25, 2018

W

hen my mama finished my hair she would pull the hair from the comb, sit it in her ashtray and burn it,” Anj writes in the first line of a tender poem nestled on her website beside a photograph of people with intertwined arms, their faces obscured — his wound up with gauzy cloth and hers by an encirclement of braided hair.

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CULTURE Anj ponders significance of black hair and other adornments

by Lauren Barber

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“Gleti,” the moon goddess.

CHRISTINE BENZ

“Anj” is multimedia artist, writer and creative entrepreneur Ashley Johnson, a UNCG grad who grew up in WinstonSalem and who’s recently landed her first solo exhibit in the Central Gallery at Greensboro’s Revolution Mill. Reach, a selection of Johnson’s past and contemporary works that focuses on generational aspects of Southern femininity and black-hair identity, will find a home at the old textile mill through Aug. 12. “The crux of my work and the crux of who I am today is tied to the practices of black hair,” she says. Johnson’s mother chemically straightened her hair for as long as she can remember. She recalls picking at scabs from burns the relaxer’s hydroxides seared into her scalp, and years of backof-the-mind curiosity about the natural layer of growth underneath. “This work started when I cut off all my hair,” Johnson says. “I had lived 24

years of my life without knowing what my actual hair looked like and I didn’t know anything about it. It was a foreign object. I didn’t know about porosity. I didn’t know there was such a thing as curl patterns; I hated it and I actually called myself ugly. I thought, I wanna know why I feel this way. And I also wanna know how far this feeling traveled to get to me because it’s not my own self-hatred. I started asking myself, ‘What did my mom say about my hair when I was growing up? What kinds of words did she use to describe my natural hair?’ It was never good, so I’m thinking, Where did my mom get that?” That temporary state of fragile self-worth didn’t impede Johnson’s exploration of the subject. She’s nothing if not imaginative and steadfast. “My whole process is very resourceful,” Johnson says. “We weren’t rich, so I’ve always been like, ‘If I don’t have this, then I will make this,’ never, ‘Well I don’t have a camera so I’m not a photographer.’ That makes no sense to me.” Because she couldn’t afford anything close to a first-rate camera or lighting equipment, Johnson made a study of natural light; she knows the angle of the sun every hour of the day, regardless of season. She shot most of her first series Woven behind a Food Lion on her iPhone until running across a “janky” Cannon T-3. As she turned away from photographing weddings and newborns she refocused her lens on darkskinned women, faces decorated with delicate magnolias that had been blooming nearby or draped elegantly in large-scale woven pieces against blacker-than-black backgrounds. “Gleti,” moon goddess and ruler of the stars, wears a magnificent coral reef of magnolias ASHLEY JOHNSON Reach hinges on striking images of a white woman wearing beaded and white-ish yarn structures. The Fulani braids, unconcerned with the implications of her adornment. later Magnolias series sought to tie together themes of Johnson’s hair Her new work, though, is less planned and stylized. journey in a larger body of work. Told in five chapters, Johnson “I have three nieces and they’re inspirational,” Johnson says. captured dark women draped in white with masks of long “I see so much of myself in them and I like documenting them braids encircling their heads, young ones shrouded in darkness so a lot of the new work I’m making is an observational look and magnolia leaves. into their lives. I think just starting to document them was a “Those braided masks are me,” Johnson says. “All of my push to create more because that felt natural [and] it has a portraits are self-portraits. It doesn’t matter if it’s of a white different feeling.” girl with beads; they’re all distorted self-portraits.” Her latest work stems from a sensitivity to tension and the


July 19 - 25, 2018

Playing July 20 - 24 LAWNCHAIR DRIVE-IN: It’s your chance to see a movie UNDER THE STARS at our New Location! We will be playing it at our new location 2618 Lawndale Drive. FREE ADMISSION WITH DRINK PURCHASE! Bring a lawnchair or rent one from us for $2. Saturday, July 21st.

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Beer! Wine! Amazing Coffee! 2618 Lawndale Drive, Greensboro geeksboro.com •

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Board Game Night 7 p.m. Friday, July 20th. More than 100 Games FREE TO PLAY Saturday Cartoons run at 10 a.m. and 12 pm. on Saturdays! Free admission! Bowls of cereal are $2.50 each or $5 for a BOTTOMLESS BOWL OF CEREAL! Saturday, July 21st. Totally Rad Trivia 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, July 24th $3 Buy-In! Up to Six Player Teams! Dragonball FighterZ Tournament League 5 p.m. Sunday, July 22nd $5 Venue Fee! $5 Entry Fee!

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ASHLEY JOHNSON

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questions that follow. This time, Johnson tackles culchalantly blows bubblegum, entirely unconcerned with tural appropriation in a photo series also dubbed Reach. the implications of her adornment. “When you wear other people’s cultures sometimes “I haven’t worn those, I’m not from the Fulani tribe. it’s well intentioned,” she Or am I?” Johnson quessays. “Sometimes you tions. “I do know that have no intention; you like I’m African-American, this print or braid style. though, and I do know I’m Learn more at hiaj.co and visit the exhibiBut there’s such a visceral a Southern woman.” tion at 1150 Revolution Mill Drive (GSO). emotional reaction for “I hope my work black women when we see prompts others to ask it. I wanted to trace that questions about their emotion and ask, ‘Why? What ownership do I have over ownership, about what they lift from other cultures,” cornrows?’ For African-Americans who don’t have a lot Johnson continues. “I think that’s where some of the of lineage because of slavery or displacement, is being emotion comes from: feeling not credited, feeling that black enough?” you’re good enough to be taken from but not good Reach hinges on striking images of a white woman enough to be a representative of those things.” wearing beaded Fulani braids. In one, the woman non-

Shot in the Triad

Johnson sought to synthesize her hair journey in a larger body of work that became the Magnolias series.

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July 19 - 25, 2018 Up Front News Opinion Culture Shot in the Triad Puzzles

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CULTURE Pentley Holmes fights above his weight class

by Sayaka Matsuoka

P

entley Holmes grew up in a family that focused on sports—particularly boxing—more than talking. He says he was the weird one out, and still kind of is. “I was always more outwardly emotional and I think that’s why I’m able to play music,” Holmes says. “That’s why they would think I’m weird.” Holmes is the nephew of the heavyweight boxing champion Larry Holmes, who held the WBC heavyweight title from 1978-83. His left jab was legendary and he’s one of only five boxers ever to defeat Muhammad Ali. But Pentley, who is soft spoken and shiftily avoids eye contact as he speaks, doesn’t seem like the fighting type. He says he used to experiment by coloring his hair red and blond and people used to call him gay. He sips a cup of tea as he reminisces at the Green Bean in downtown Greensboro, just a few hours before his July 12 show at Little Brother Brewing across the street. He’s reserved but smiles as he talks. “I knew from a young age that I could become something great if wanted to,” Holmes says. “I grew up knowing that my uncle didn’t even graduate high school and he made it to a point where everyone in the world knows his name. I’ve always known that I can do it too.” The musician’s stop in Greensboro was part of a seven-state tour spanning from New Jersey down to Atlanta. He’ll be circling back to North Carolina with stops in Charlotte later this month and Raleigh in early August. During his set, framed by matte-black windows in the front of the brewery, Holmes closes his eyes and rocks back and forth as he strums his guitar. He mixes a few fan favorites by Hozier, Weezer and Johnny Cash in with his original repertoire. His voice undulates as he plays and ends with a bit of twang that sounds like he could have been raised in the South instead of in New Jersey. Nevertheless, Holmes’ palatable combination of folk, pop and soul is the perfect complement to a musty, summer Carolina night. Copies of Holmes’ debut album, Rip Out My Heart, which shows a sketch of an adolescent Holmes on his knees and offering a bloody heart to a girl, lay splayed across the coffee table in front of his stool. The drawing is reminiscent of some-

Pentley Holmes, nephew of former Heavyweight Champion Larry Holmes, stops by Little Brother Brewing on his national tour.

SAYAKA MATSUOKA

thing you might see on someone’s Tumblr or on a shirt at He says that writing down his thoughts, no matter how Spencer’s—it’s a bit emo, and that’s exactly what Holmes is mundane they may seem, ends up fueling his music later. going for. “Lonely,” the first song on the album, was written using “I used to be in the BMX scene and I three pages of notes from his journal. listened to a lot of emo music,” Holmes “You think you’re gonna try and call says. me again,” Holmes croons over soft Find tour dates, music and He says that bands like Taking Back chord progressions. “I showed you my more at pentleyholmes.com. Sunday, Modest Mouse and the Honorheart and you stole it away... I know ary Title heavily influenced and shaped you’re lonely.” the kind of music he makes today. And as the evening wears on, his quiet “I love old-school soul beats with emo apologetic lyrics,” he and awkward nature from earlier in the day gives way to a says. confident, warm musician. Music, he says, has been a way for him to convey his innerHolmes has embraced and even found comfort in his weirdmost emotions. ness. And in the end, isn’t that what we’re all after? “I journal every day,” says Holmes. “That’s my songwriting process; I write about everything.”


July 19 - 25, 2018

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Chestnut Street, Greensboro

July 19 - 25, 2018 Shot in the Triad

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SHOT IN THE TRIAD

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Waiting for rain at the Dunleath Community Garden.

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CAROLYN DE BERRY


“Urban Sprawl”--this town needs more room! by Matt Jones

59 Nest egg, initially 60 Cleveland player, for short 61 Got out, or followed the same path as the theme answers? 66 Gibbon, for one 67 Tooth type 68 Spine-tingling 69 Pot top 70 Goes after flies 71 Bottom-of-the-bottle stuff

Up Front

Answers from previous publication.

41 Paltry 42 Any of the kids searching for One-Eyed Willy in a 1985 flick 47 Onetime capital of Poland 49 Domineered, with “over” 51 Like the main point 52 Giraffe relative with striped legs 53 Was delirious 54 Undefeated boxer Ali 55 Pester with barks 56 Word after smart or mineral 61 Text type 62 7, on a rotary phone 63 Cinnabar, e.g. 64 Costume shop purchase 65 “Castlevania” platform

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Down 1 Web portal with a butterfly logo 2 Plucked instrument 3 “Give me some kitten food” 4 Joe of “Home Alone” 5 Long looks 6 Party org. gathering last held in ©2018 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) 2016 in Philadelphia 7 Take another swing at 24 Some Chevy hatchbacks 8 Speed skater ___ Anton Ohno 25 Director’s option 9 Flavor for some knots? 26 Part of WNW 10 Mercedes roadsters 27 “The Lion King” heroine 11 Orange character from the ‘80s who appears in 32 Fanciful “Wreck-It Ralph” 34 “As I see it,” in a text 12 Sacha Baron Cohen character 35 He cohosts “America’s Game” 13 Music festival area 37 Bon Jovi’s “___ on a Prayer” 18 Subtle meaning 38 Novelist Loos 22 English-speaking country of Central America 39 Boston team, briefly 23 Selma’s sister

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Across 1 Childhood illness with swollen glands 6 Goes on and on 11 Some NFL All-Pros 14 Actor Ulrich 15 Tibet’s neighbor 16 Questionable Twitter poster, perhaps 17 They read a lot of stories out loud 19 Historical division 20 French vineyard classification 21 Feeling not-so-great 22 Be blustery 23 Ruler who lost her head in 1793 28 St. crosser 29 Cone or Cat preceder 30 Ripken of the Orioles 31 Stamp for an incoming pkg. 33 Football broadcaster Collinsworth 36 Purplish flower 40 Food and wine publication that went completely online in 2009 43 Cosmetician Lauder 44 Orange-roofed chain, familiarly 45 Nefarious 46 Genesis craft 48 “You’ve Got Mail” company 50 Addams Family cousin 51 Phrase often seen after a married or professional name 57 Passable 58 Battery option

July 19 - 25, 2018

CROSSWORD

SODUKO Culture Shot in the Triad

Answers from previous publication.

PIZZERIA

©2018 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com)

L’ITALIANO

11

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Good through 8/4/18

Monday – Thursday

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10

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every Tuesday, all day

219 S Elm Street, Greensboro • 336-274-4810

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Large 1-topping pizza

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TCB July 19, 2018 — Under Wraps  

Black hair and other accoutrements at Revolution Mill

TCB July 19, 2018 — Under Wraps  

Black hair and other accoutrements at Revolution Mill

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