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Fierce obsession at the Front Gallery

Go.Take a leap. Gallery Hop: Art, open to the streets FREE • NEWS | VIEWS | MUSIC | FILM | ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT • SEpTEMbER 8, 2011 • VOLUME 8 • ISSUE 36 • CHATTANOOGApULSE.COM


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The Pulse | Volume 8, Issue 36 | September 8, 2011 | www.chattanoogapulse.com


Nightfall 2011 - Friday Night! Ollabelle

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VOLUME 8, ISSUE 36 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

Want to watch a video of this week's Nightfall headliner? Download the FREE "QR Reader" on your smartphone and scan this code.

“Hoppers follow a map that flows from the district’s North Shore core on Frazier Avenue, jumps the river into the heart of downtown and winds its way down East Main to the growing enclave of studios and galleries sprouting up as a result of economic incentives offered to artists who relocate to the city’s once downtrodden Southside.”

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Cover illustration "To The Critics" by Miki Boni. Contents page "Minotaur" by Lauren Hill.

www.chattanoogapulse.com | September 8, 2011 | Volume 8, Issue 36 | The Pulse

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NEWS Chattanooga’s Weekly Alternative President Jim Brewer, II Publisher Zachary Cooper Contributing Editor Janis Hashe News Editor Gary Poole Director of Sales Rhonda Rollins Advertising Sales Rick Leavell, Michelle Pih Contributors Gustavo Arellano, Rob Brezsny Jonathan M. Cook, Chuck Crowder Michael Crumb, John DeVore Janis Hashe, Matt Jones D.E. Langley, Kelly Lockhart Ernie Paik, Bill Ramsey Alex Teach, Tara V Art Director Bill Ramsey Photography Amy Johnson, Josh Lang Louis Lee, Lesha Patterson Editorial Cartoonist Rick Baldwin Editorial Intern Beth Miller Contact Info: Phone (423) 265-9494 Fax (423) 266-2335 Email Inquiries info@chattanoogapulse.com Calendar Submissions calendar@chattanoogapulse.com The Pulse is published weekly and is distributed throughout the city of Chattanooga and surrounding communities. The Pulse is available free of charge, limited to one copy per reader. No person without written permission from the publishers may take more than one copy per weekly issue. The Pulse may be distributed only by authorized distributors.

The Pulse is published by

Brewer Media 1305 Carter Street Chattanooga, Tennessee 37402 Letters to the editor must include name, address and daytime phone number for verification. The Pulse reserves the right to edit letters for space and clarity. Please keep letters within 300 words in length.

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Pulse Beats

“We have 60 days for the mayor to finish writing the proposal and then it goes to the state where it will be evaluated and will come back to us, thumbs up or thumbs down, in January.”

Chattanooga Deals With Aftermath Of Lee The remnants of Tropical Storm Lee saturated much of the Tennessee Valley on Monday, shattering a rainfall record that had stood since the 1880s. Combined with weeks of dry weather, the sudden deluge (more than nine inches in 24 hours) not only flooded dozens upon dozens of areas within the metro region, but also loosened the soil around a large number of trees which caused them to fall on roads, yards and houses. Area fire departments were kept very busy responding to numerous weather-related emergencies. Most involved getting stranded motorists out of their flooded vehicles. Far too many drivers gambled with their lives when they decided to drive through a flooded street. “Turn Around, Don’t Drown” is a good motto for motorists to remember when they encounter a flooded road. And it wasn’t just flooded roads that caused problems. EPB reported Tuesday morning that 32,000 homes were without power. As a result, many people turned to portable generators, which are fine to use, if they are used correctly. If not used correctly, though, serious problems, even death may occur. Case in point: Immediately after the severe storms in April, a couple died from carbon monoxide poisoning when they placed a generator in their attached garage. To help out those of you who remain without power, or have a generator handy for the next power outage, the National Fire Protection Association has some common-sense advice.” • Always use generators outside away from doors, windows, and vents. Never use generators inside buildings or partially enclosed areas, even with ventilation. • Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for use. • Keep the generator dry. Place the generator on a dry surface under an open, cano-

The Pulse | Volume 8, Issue 36 | September 8, 2011 | www.chattanoogapulse.com

— Hamilton County School Superintendant Rick Smith on a proposal to build a science, technology, engineering and math school, better known as a STEM school.

py-like structure. • Dry your hands before touching the generator. • Plug appliances directly into the generator or use a heavy-duty outdoor-rated extension cord. Make sure the entire extension cord is free of cuts or tears and the plug has all three prongs; especially a grounding pin. • Never plug the generator into a wall outlet. This can cause utility workers and others using the same transformer to receive a shock and die because of the electricity. • If you must connect a generator to house wiring, have an electrician add the appropriate equipment. Your utility company may be able to put in an appropriate transfer switch as well. • Before refueling the generator, turn it off and let it cool. Fuel spilled on hot engine parts could burst into flames. • Store fuel outside of living areas in clearly labeled, non-glass containers, away from fuel-burning appliances. • Put battery-operated or plug-in (with battery backup) carbon monoxide alarms in your home, following the manufacturer’s instructions. Test carbon monoxide detectors often and replace batteries when needed. One of the best ways to protect yourself and your family is to have a working smoke alarm that can sound fast for both a fire that has flames, and a smoky fire that has fumes without flames. It is called a “Dual Sensor Smoke Alarm.” A smoke alarm greatly reduces your chances of dying in a fire. And prepare an escape plan and practice it often making sure everyone in your family knows at least two escape routes from their bedrooms. Planning can make all the difference between discomfort and disaster.

News Briefs • Weekend fights at downtown nightspots led to verbal fights at the Chattanooga City Beer Board last week. Over protests of roughly a dozen residents, the board buckled to legal objections from the attorney of the Fire and Ice club, where two melees had broken out recently. Chattanooga Police Chief Bobby Dodd was frustrated, saying some bar owners push everyone outside and expect the police to deal with the problems. The city was considering creating an “entertainment district” that would require better security before legal issues tabled the idea, at least for the moment. • They spent hundreds of dollars on flyers and signs, but in the end a Sale Creek family credits a pet psychic for helping them find their lost dog, Kipper. The Torbett family panicked when they were visiting a sick friend at Northpark Hospital and Kipper bolted from their car back on August 20. They searched tirelessly, yet fruitlessly, for the pooch, but after a pet psychic told them to look at the Chattanooga State Campus or in the Riverpark, they were able to find their missing dog. The Torbetts celebrated by bringing Kipper for his favorite treat, a McDonald’s hamburger.


NEWS

Opinion

How Green Is Green Power? I would caution anyone regarding the TVA’s definition of “clean and green” energy as TVA’s executives claim nuclear power is clean [“It’s Pretty Easy Being Green”, Shades of Green]. TVA’s generation partners support nuclear power, nuclear power is not clean and it kills. TVA’s “Green Power Switch Program” is very misleading. 1) $4 extra for each block of so called “green power?” Power the TVA is required by law to provide and paid for by ratepayers. The “Green Power” you are paying for is more likely to be coal fired or nuclear power, not the so called “Green Power.” 2)Money or generated power is a general mix item, there is no such item within the TVA system as a customer receiving “green power,” unless the customer generates the power themselves. 3) The TVA Office of the Inspector General has investigated complaints concerning the “Green Power Switch Program.” They point out the TVA states that the money and all electrical power provided to customers goes into a “general mix,” there is no one which receives TVA’s so called “green power.” However, TVA receives your money with open arms and utilizes part of your “green power” money to fund advertising so that more unaware customers will send more money. Garry Morgan

Send all letters to the editor and questions to

info@chattanoogapulse.com We reserve the right to edit letters for content and space. Please include your full name, city and contact information.

Dealing With Death The Dark Man is walking very close to you, it seems, Officer Teach [“Shouldering The Weight”, On The Beat]. I am sorry for the cold breath of mortality you feel. Friends, like family, are our hostages to fortune; they carry something of ourselves with them, and we feel

their impending death a close reminder of our own. That great pain is involved (I had a friend who died of bone cancer; awful) makes the prospect so much worse. I have a great regard for words, but sometimes they fall short. Yours do not. Felix Miller East Lake Courts Violence Never have guns around younger children [“Arrest Made In Shooting Of Teen In East Lake Courts’]. It’s just not cool. Everyone always losing their lives or getting hurt because of ignorant things. I’m just tired of it. Neisha Baynes Safe Driving And Storms I was amazed this week after all the storms to see people drive right past barricades. Do these people just not understand that a “few inches of water” often disguise much deeper pools or water, submerged debris or worse? And I even saw one man get out of his truck and move a barricade out of the road! It’s bad enough that some idiots decide to endanger themselves, but they have no right to put the rest of us at risk. A delay of a few minutes to take another route won’t be the end of the world, people. Cynthia Hardison www.chattanoogapulse.com | September 8, 2011 | Volume 8, Issue 36 | The Pulse

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NEWS

Politics & Crime A weekly roundup of the newsworthy, notable and often head-scratching stories gleaned from police reports from the Chattanooga Police Department, the Hamilton County Sheriff’s Office, the Bradley County Sheriff’s Department and the Dalton Police Department.

Here is one of the agenda items to be discussed at the Tuesday, September 13 meeting of the Chattanooga City Council.

13. Recognition of Persons Wishing to Address the Council on Non-Agenda Matters.

At the end of every council meeting, anyone can have three minutes to address the entire body about anything on their mind, as long as it wasn’t something already covered in the agenda for that meeting and is an issue that falls under the purview of the council. If you have a complaint, compliment, suggestion or even a beef with the city, this is your time to get the undivided attention of all nine council members (and the city attorney, to boot). Even better, the heads of the various city departments—ranging from the Police Department to Public Works to Neighborhood Services and a good dozen other agencies—are usually present at the meetings, which can be very beneficial. The Chattanooga City Council meets each Tuesday at 6 p.m. in the City Council Building at 1000 Lindsay St. For more information on the current agenda, and past minutes, visit www.Chattanooga.gov/City_Council

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• It’s fairly common to see a robber on TV or in the movies wearing a pair of pantyhose over his head during a hold-up. But police will tell you that in the “real world”, pantyhose is not a very common disguise of choice. Then again, apparently no one told that to a pizza-store robber in Hixson over the weekend, who donned a pair of the female undergarments and walked into the restaurant demanding money. Even though he never showed a weapon, store employees complied with his demands and handed over an undetermined amount of cash. The man, described as a white male with short salt-and-pepper hair and very tan skin, between 40 and 50 years old, around six feet tall and 190 pounds, was also wearing a white T-shirt, olive green cargo pants, and white tennis shoes. Unfortunately for police, that description matched a large number of men out and about over the holiday weekend enjoying their time off. • Coming home from vacation was sadly made a bit worse for a Bradley County family, who returned to find their home had been broken into. The residents of a Craigmiles Street home called 911 when they discovered that someone had made a forced entry into their home while they were gone. What really upset the family was what was discovered purloined from the home: their one-and-a-

The Pulse | Volume 8, Issue 36 | September 8, 2011 | www.chattanoogapulse.com

half month old brownand-black Chihuahua. To make matters more confusing, the only other thing taken during the break-in was a 12-pack of soft drinks. Nothing else was determined to be missing. Even so, Bradley County detectives with the Criminal Investigations Division are investigating and are asking the public to help by calling (423) 7287336 if anyone has any further information. • Last week a purse-snatcher led police— and a Good Samaritan witness—on a highspeed chase through the north end of town. The criminal ended up getting away after ramming a police cruiser, when officials decided in the interest of public safety to call off pursuit. They mentioned at the time they felt confident the suspect would turn up sooner than later, and they were right. The man was taken into custody in Dalton over the weekend after he, once again, tried to flee from police. This time, however, he started with a car but ended up on foot, which proved to be not as successful an escape method as the one used previously. The man faces charges in Dalton that include reckless driving, driving too fast for conditions, and fleeing to elude a law enforcement officer along with a raft of charges in both Chattanooga and

Hamilton County related to the early burglary and high-speed escape. • A report from the Hamilton county concurrent Grand Jury has made some observations—even some “fashionable” ones. While the report, for the most part, was complimentary to the Silverdale Workhouse, County Jail, and Juvenile Justice Center, it gave some fashion recommendations as well: Pull your pants up! That, to Silverdale inmates as the grand jury recommended to the staff to, “enforce strict inmate appearance, especially male inmates should not walk around with pants down around their lower hip areas.” It’s a matter of respect, they said, for staff, visitors, and fellow inmates. Besides, they noted, “Slothful appearance in society will not assist former inmates in acquiring gainful employment upon leaving the facility.”


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The Fine Art of Hopping AVA’s annual free tour of downtown galleries and studios brings art face-to-face with the community • By Bill Ramsey

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onfronting art can be a challenge. Most meet visual art in the look-butdon’t touch, library-quiet confines of museums, where brief placards, docents or pre-recorded introductions leave one to dutifully nod in understanding or arch a quizzical eyebrow in confusion. The gift shop is usually the fun part. Galleries can be slightly less formal, but the art-for-sale element can present a potent distraction for the casual observer. Not so during Gallery Hop, the annual daylong, pressurefree—and free—tour of downtown Chattanooga galleries and artist’s studios designed to both demystify and delight. Much has been written about the city’s burgeoning arts community and the Hop connects the loosely defined district. Hoppers follow a route that flows from the district’s North Shore core on Frazier Avenue, jumps the river into the heart of downtown and winds its way down East Main to the growing enclave of studios and galleries sprouting up as

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a result of economic incentives offered to artists who relocate to the city’s once downtrodden Southside. “It’s the only time of year when every gallery and studio gets a marker on a map,” says Katie Boerema of the Association for Visual Arts (AVA), which introduced the event six years ago as the Chattanooga arts community began to take shape downtown. “There’s a real social aspect. It’s an interactive experience you can share with friends.” Indeed, developing an “arts district” has been central to the cultural and economic success of inner-city revitalization in communities across the country. Where art and artists thrive, an air of rejuvenation seems to follow, creating a social center and restoring a sense of place in cities where the tentacles of urban decay once spread like cancer. “Most people experience art at public festivals such as 4Bridges,” says AVA’s Executive Director Anne Willson, where, she says, the cautiousness of entering a museum is removed. “People experience art all the time in their everyday lives,” she says—they just don’t make the connection, and the Hop helps cement that link. “This is art not on the streets, but it’s open to the streets.”

LESHA PATTErSoN

This is not art on the streets, but it’s open to the streets. Anne Willson AVA executive director

The Hop is not unlike a pub crawl—sans the alcohol-induced exhaustion—a light, fun, focused excursion where inclusion usurps pretension, there’s no hard sell and people have the opportunity to encounter the relationship between art and their community. Participants vary from year to year, but no fewer than 18 galleries will open their doors from 2 to 9 p.m. on Saturday in an open invitation to explore a variety of media, from paintings, photographs and sculpture to crafts, pottery, furniture, jewelry and blown glass. Most galleries and studios are offering refreshments and snacks, and this year’s new AfterHop party at Good Dog (adjacent to AVA on Frazier) awaits avid art mavens who want to extend the evening and discuss the day’s discoveries. “Last year at the end of the Hop, lots of folks ended up on the North Shore,” says AVA’s Jerry Dale McFadden, director of the annual 4Bridges Arts Festival. “There was a lot of energy and they weren’t ready to stop, so we added the AfterHop as a central gathering place to end the day.” But before you jump to conclusions, you need gather the


BrICKS BrICKS • Amy Johnson of Chattanooga • Amy Johnson of Chattanooga is among the artists featured in is among the artists featured in “Fresh” at the AVA Gallery “Fresh” at the AVA Gallery from Sept. 10-Oct. 14. from Sept. 10-Oct. 14.

Now in her third year in ChatNow in her third year in Chattanooga, Boni says it takes time—a tanooga, Boni says it takes time—a good two or three years, she reckgood two or three years, she reckons—before an artist becomes ons—before an artist becomes settled and established in a new settled and established in a new community, and events such as community, and events such as the Gallery Hop help artists and the Gallery Hop help artists and the community form a bond. the community form a bond. “A lot of it is pioneering,” she “A lot of it is pioneering,” she says. “There wasn’t always a big arts says. “There wasn’t always a big arts community here, and I’m a pioneer community here, and I’m a pioneer from way back. As long as people are from way back. As long as people are willing to work, put that extra time willing to work, put that extra time in to be part of a group, that’s when in to be part of a group, that’s when the magic starts to happen.” the magic starts to happen.” Bill Ramsey is the art diBill Ramsey is the art director of The Pulse. rector of The Pulse. LeSHA PATTeRSON LeSHA PATTeRSON

I’m I’m aa visible visible kind of kind of girl, girl, and the and the Hop Hop gives us gives us aa lot lot of of visibility. visibility. Miki Miki Boni Boni Artist Artist

evidence. Grab a map (in print evidence. Grab a map (in print at AVA or online at avarts. at AVA or online at avarts. org), don your ears (if the spirit org), don your ears (if the spirit strikes) and, well, take a leap. strikes) and, well, take a leap. The Hop’s logical jumping-off The Hop’s logical jumping-off pad is AVA’s own gallery on Frazier pad is AVA’s own gallery on Frazier Avenue, when its annual “Fresh” Avenue, when its annual “Fresh” exhibit debuts on Saturday. “Fresh” exhibit debuts on Saturday. “Fresh” is a competitive, juried exhibit is a competitive, juried exhibit designed to showcase artists that designed to showcase artists that display artistic promise, commitdisplay artistic promise, commitment to their work and fresh ideas. ment to their work and fresh ideas. Among these emerging artists Among these emerging artists is Amy Johnson, a 27-year-old is Amy Johnson, a 27-year-old Virginia native and graduate of Virginia native and graduate of the University of the South in Sethe University of the South in Sewanee who has called Chattanooga wanee who has called Chattanooga

home for the past two years. home for the past two years. “It’s exciting to be able to work “It’s exciting to be able to work on my own and the AVA exhibit is on my own and the AVA exhibit is a great opportunity,” Johnson says. a great opportunity,” Johnson says. “Aside from school, this is my first “Aside from school, this is my first opportunity to show my work. I’ve opportunity to show my work. I’ve done the Hop for the past few years done the Hop for the past few years and it’s one of my favorite events.” and it’s one of my favorite events.” The opportunity to meet artists The opportunity to meet artists in their studios is another “doesn’t in their studios is another “doesn’t happen every day” element of happen every day” element of the Hop that takes visitors behind the Hop that takes visitors behind the gallery walls and allows them the gallery walls and allows them to “take down the Wizard’s curto “take down the Wizard’s curtain,” as AVA’s Boerema puts it. tain,” as AVA’s Boerema puts it. “It’s an opportunity to meet “It’s an opportunity to meet working artists,” adds Willson. “It deworking artists,” adds Willson. “It demystifies the process, breaks down mystifies the process, breaks down the rules and lets you ask questions.” the rules and lets you ask questions.” Miki Boni, an artist who took Miki Boni, an artist who took advantage of an ArtsMove grant advantage of an ArtsMove grant three years ago transplanting three years ago transplanting her from Bradenton, Fla., where her from Bradenton, Fla., where she operated an open studio, is she operated an open studio, is among the five artists who will pull among the five artists who will pull back that curtain to give Hopback that curtain to give Hoppers an opportunity to peek into pers an opportunity to peek into the rabbit hole, so to speak. the rabbit hole, so to speak. “I was in an artist colony in Bra“I was in an artist colony in Bradenton and my studio was part of denton and my studio was part of

AMY JOHNSON AMY JOHNSON

I’ve I’ve done done the the hop for the hop for the past past few few years years and it’s one and it’s one of of my my favorite favorite events. events. Amy Amy Johnson Johnson Photographer Photographer

my gallery,” says Boni. “I was always my gallery,” says Boni. “I was always painting in the gallery when people painting in the gallery when people would walk in, so I’m used to that. would walk in, so I’m used to that. In Chattanooga, I decided that my In Chattanooga, I decided that my studio is more of a showroom. I don’t studio is more of a showroom. I don’t paint on the night of a showing, but I paint on the night of a showing, but I do take a work-in-progress and share do take a work-in-progress and share the process. You’d be surprised how the process. You’d be surprised how many people give you good ideas.” many people give you good ideas.” Boni, an outgoing person who Boni, an outgoing person who helped organize the Southside Arts helped organize the Southside Arts Stroll, says she loves the Hop and Stroll, says she loves the Hop and the opportunity to meet the public. the opportunity to meet the public. “I’m a visible kind of girl,” “I’m a visible kind of girl,” she says, “and the Hop gives she says, “and the Hop gives us a lot of visibility.” us a lot of visibility.”

AVA GAllery Hop AVA GAllery Hop • 2-9 p.m, Saturday, Sept. 10 • 2-9 p.m, Saturday, Sept. 10 The sixth annual Gallery Hop offers The sixth annual Gallery Hop offers the opportunity for the public to the opportunity for the public to explore the rich offerings of more than explore the rich offerings of more than 20 Chattanooga art galleries and artist 20 Chattanooga art galleries and artist studios free of charge. Refreshments studios free of charge. Refreshments will be provided at most venues. New will be provided at most venues. New this year is the AfterHop, a special this year is the AfterHop, a special post-hop gathering at Good Dog post-hop gathering at Good Dog restaurant for “hoppers” to discuss the restaurant for “hoppers” to discuss the local art scene over food, drink and local art scene over food, drink and music provided by DJ Flux308. music provided by DJ Flux308. AfterHop AfterHop • 9 p.m., Good Dog, 34 frazier Ave. • 9 p.m., Good Dog, 34 frazier Ave. $20 (includes food and drink for $20 (includes food and drink for the evening) at the door or online at the evening) at the door or online at avarts.org avarts.org

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COVER COVERSTORY STORY

chris mosey IgnIS glaSS

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I am enamored with glass as a workable medium. Its ability to freeze motion and to appear liquid in a solid state intrigues me. My driving motivation to work with glass is the process: the heat, the smoke and the team work. Chris Mosey


COVER STORY COVER STORY

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT “dance party” • KaThLEEn MaCK “UntItLed” • LaURa JaCQUES “renIta apart” • MaRTIn aRnOLd “SHOcK” • JESSYE McdOWELL

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COVERSTORY STORY COVER Galleries

• 1800 Main, 1800 E. Main St. Interior and exterior home decor, pieces by local and well-known artists. Online: Facebook/1800 Main • area 61, 61 E. Main St. Featuring handcrafted furniture, works in wood, paintings, photography, mixed media, pottery and jewelry by Tennesseebased artists and craftsmen. Online: Facebook/area 61 • association for Visual arts, 30 Frazier Ave. AVA is a nonprofit organization for professional and emerging artists and the community-at-large. The AVA Gallery & Landis Student Gallery feature a variety of juried shows from local, regional and national artists, as well as nonjuried shows featuring the works of AVA members and local art students. Online: avarts.org • Gallery 1401, 1401 Williams St. The gallery’s collection reflects a full spectrum of contemporary realism, impressionism and classical styles of works on paper, canvas, board, sculpture and glass. Artists offer

a range of original watercolors, oils, collage, drawings, bronze, hand-blown glass and photography. Online: gallery1401.com • Hanover Gallery, 111 Frazier Ave. Featuring new work, including oils and watercolors as well as a selection of gifts. Refreshments and snacks. Online: hanovergallery.com • H*art Gallery, 110 E. Main St. Offers homeless and other nontraditional artists an opportunity to create and sell their artwork. Online: hartgallerytn.com • ignis Glass studio and Gallery, 1800 Rossville Ave., Ste. 4. Studio is a production glass-blowing studio specializing in hand-blown art glass. Online: ignisglass.com • in-Town Gallery, 26A Frazier Ave. Founded in 1974, In-Town is one of the oldest cooperative galleries in the United States, featuring a wide range of original artwork from more than 30 local artists. Online: www.intowngallery.com • My Color image Boutique and Gallery, 330 Frazier Ave.,

St. 100. Featuring exclusively local artists, My Color Image displays original artwork, custom jewelry, sculptures and other gift ideas. Online: Facebook/My Color Image Boutique & Gallery • Plum Nelly, 330 Frazier Ave., Ste. B. Plum Nelly began as an outdoor art show on Lookout Mountain in 1947. Today, the shop offers jewelry, house collections, giftware and a bridal registry. Online: plumnellyshop.com • river Gallery, 400 E. Second St. River Gallery exhibits paintings, sculptures and fine crafts by local, regional and national artists. Online: river-gallery.com • shuptrine’s Gold leaf Designs, 2646 Broad St. Shuptrine’s hosts fine American art in all mediums, specializing in handcrafted frames and mirrors, gold-leaf restoration and art conservation. The gallery is celebrating its 26th year by launching a new website at shuptrines.com. • smart Furniture studio,

313 Manufacturers Road, Ste. 107. A pioneer of web-based design tools, Smart Furniture’s Design on Demand system allows customers to design their own furniture and spaces quickly and easily. Online: smartfurniture.com • Tanner Hill Gallery, 3069 S. Broad St., Ste. 3. Opened in 1994, Tanner-Hill exclusively featured contemporary southern outsider art, placing major pieces in private, corporate and museum collections. In 2004, Tanner-Hill broadened its scope to incorporate emerging and mid-career sculptors and painters as well as their earlier core of self-taught artists. Online: tannerhillgallery.com • Townsend atelier, 201 W. Main St., Ste. 102 (entrance on Williams Street). Townsend Atelier marks its first anniversary at its Main Street location with a non-juried exhibition of artwork by students and instructors. Online: townsendatelier.com • UTC Cress Gallery of art, UTC Fine Arts Center, 752 Vine St. Featuring exhibitions

colorful artist’s shirts, jewelry and gift items. Come and meet “Wow,” the character in her book, Wow, I Am Special.

sTUDiOs

WiNDer BiNDer

of work by leading contemporary artists of national reputation as well as UTC art students and faculty and the Cress Permanent Collection. Online: cressgallery.org • Winder Binder Gallery and Bookstore, 40 Frazier Ave. Regional folk art gallery and bookstore representing more than 80 artists. Featured artist for Gallery Hop 2011 will be new selections from R. Michael Wimmer’s “Cultural Fragments” collection. Online: winderbinder.com • Yada Yada, 112 Woodland Ave. Yada Yada offers whimsical art by Sylvia McCollum, aka YaYa,

• anderson Morris Bailey, 509 E. Main St. (in Velo Coffee). Functional porcelain pots. Online: theandersonbailey.com • alan shuptrine, 2644 Broad St. Shuptrine is a nationally acclaimed artist in watercolor, oil and a master of one-of-akind frames and water gilding techniques. Shuptrine will be featured in an exhibit at the Vero Beach Museum of Art in Florida in October. Online: alanshuptrine.com • Chenoweth • Halligan, 1800 Rossville Ave., Stes. 1-2. Sculpture, 3-D mixed media, painting. Online: janchenoweth. com, rogerhalligan.com • island avenue studios (ellyn Bivin), 102 Island Ave. Painting, printmaking, mixed media. Online: ellynbivin.com • Miki Boni, 1611 Mitchell Ave. Whimsical paintings and oddments. Online: mikiboni.com

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BE AFRAID. BE VERY AFRAID.

THE PULSE • HALLOWEEN GUIDE 2011 • SEPT. 29-OCT. 20 HALLOWEEN ISSUE • OCT. 27

CALL 423.265.9494 TO ADVERTISE

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ARTS

Feature

On the Art Front at the Front Gallery By Michael Crumb, Pulse Arts Writer

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he first anniversary show at the Front Gallery features two accomplished women artists. Linda McCune resides in South Carolina, and her work has been highly praised. Ann Rowles has her studio space in Atlanta, but much of her work has been produced outside of her studio. Jan Chenoweth remarks on “a sense of obsessiveness” with both artists. All of the works presented show great intricacy in their methods. Chenoweth also points out that sometimes both artists’ works contain “a layering of visual elements” in that whatever surface presents one perceives other details beneath that surface. Both these artists share a duality in their presentations. We may see in both a relentless realism expressed some of their works, but neither artist confines herself solely to this mimetic impulse. While Rowles pushes her sculptures into abstractions at times, McCune develops expressionist constructions of complex intricacy that call attention to their discourses. Rowles’ primary medium involves crochet that often mimics the organs of the human body. Sometimes she presents crochet in complex abstraction. There’s an intense irony here since material that we are often used to seeing as clothes or accessories adapts to represent bone and muscle. Chenoweth also explains how the units of stitches are analogous to cell units. Employing crochet as an art medium imbues its objects with a soft tactility, which differs greatly from more typical sculptural media. Still, this familiar tactility acquires a distancing effect as well, especially when turned into abstract forms that invite contemplation of intricate nuances. Rowles’ use of crochet has bold elegance. Her determina-

“There’s an intense irony here since material that we are often used to seeing as clothes or accessories adapts to represent bone and muscle.”

tion to render lace as vertebrae as in “Porosity” or even denser pelvic bone as in “Cradle” impresses. Her avid engagement in producing organs with surreal accents suggests humor as well as complexity in such pieces as “Dreads” and “Pouch.” It should be noted that a number of Rowles’ pieces are mixed media, even though their appearance remains crochet. Her movement into abstraction can be denotative as in “conjunction” which features two weird pieces joined, and it can also articulate through strange associations with “Dervish,” “Complications,” and “Albatross.” “Albatross” presents a particularly complex visuality. As a woman artist, Rowles’ innovation and patience liberate a medium almost exclusively associated with the feminine to assert its more universal application to fine arts. We ought to be elevated. McCune’s works range from presentations of the maddeningly ordinary to the fiercely gothic. Ostensibly, she presents from two series: “Stress”, which are hung mixed media drawings and “Natural and Theological Virtues”, which are expressionist constructions. An additional piece “13th Level of the Goth Pit” is related to one of the other constructions, both “Stress” and “Virtues” are also sometimes related by their subjects. “Stress” is a technical term, and “Stress Series No. 10: Student Files” focuses on vertical stress by showing crowded pages. Technically intricate, its subject veers between the detritus of history and academic ennui, at least to my think-

ing. Its subject also relates to a “Virtue” construction “Fidelity/Faithfulness,” a clear cabinet filled with files and festooned with carved wooden blocks. Andre Breton would be setting dynamite charges. I found much irony in McCune’s work, and I’m unsure about how much irony may be intended. The other “Stress” pieces are multi-directional: “Tangled Vines” and “Shredded Forest.” One is natural, and the other is furious. There is little irony in didacticism. The construction “Virtue: Forbearance,” on the other hand, seems very ironic by suggesting oppression/repression with its title suggesting complicity. A related drawing “Ropes” suggests something hidden by the many hanging ropes. The other “Virtues” include “Generosity” and “Love.” These are complex constructions of wood and images with text. The gothic reliquary of “Love” massively dominates the gallery floor. It should be seen, and the hellish hanging “13th Level of the Goth Pit” of concrete, wood, and found objects appears to be derived from one of “Loves” drawings. What artistic ambition drives such fierce works? dis. embodiment Front Gallery, 1800 Rossville Ave. Closing reception: September 30 Call (423) 243-3778 for further information.

www.chattanoogapulse.com | September 8, 2011 | Volume 8, Issue 36 | The Pulse

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ARTS

Arts & Events Calendar FRIDAY

THURSDAY

Art + Issues Series: The Sounds of Silence City Councilwoman Carol Berz uses art to explore people’s silence in the face of injustice. $9.95 (includes museum admission) 6 p.m. Hunter Museum, 10 Bluff View (423) 267-0968. www.huntermuseum.org

Thursday

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Friends of the Library Book Sale 9 a.m. Eastgate Town Center, 5600 Brainerd Rd. (423) 757-5310. Dynamo of Dixie Downtown Tour 10 a.m. Sheraton Read House, 827 Broad St. (423) 228-0448. www.chattanoogasidewalktours.com Athens Community Artist League Opening Reception 5 p.m. Reflections Gallery, 6922 Lee Hwy. (423) 892-3072. Art + Issues: “The Sounds of Silence” 6 p.m. Hunter Museum of American Art, 10 Bluff View. (423) 266-0944. www.huntermuseum.org Bluff and Bridges Downtown Tour 7 p.m. Walnut Street Bridge, 1 Walnut St. (423) 228-0448. www.chattanoogasidewalktours.com A Slight Discomfort 7 p.m. Humanities Theatre, Chattanooga State, 4501 Amnicola Hwy. (423) 697-3246. Mystery of the TV Talk Show 7 p.m. Vaudeville Café, 138 Market St. (423) 517-1839. www.funnydinner.com The Pulse | Volume 8, Issue 36 | September 8, 2011 | www.chattanoogapulse.com

Brian Regan Live 7:30 p.m. Tivoli Theatre, 709 Broad St. (423) 757-5050. www.chattanooga.gov The Midnight Swinger 8 p.m. The Comedy Catch, 3224 Brainerd Rd. (423) 629-2233. www.thecomedycatch.com Chattanooga Ghost Tour 8:15 p.m. Walnut Street Bridge, 100 Walnut St. (423) 821-7125. www.chattanoogaghosttours.com

Friday

Friends of the Library Book Sale 9 a.m. Eastgate Town Center, 5600 Brainerd Rd. (423) 757-5310. Dynamo of Dixie Downtown Tour 10 a.m. Sheraton Read House, 827 Broad St. (423) 228-0448. www.chattanoogasidewalktours.com Fresh on Fridays Marketplace 11 a.m. Miller Plaza, 850 Market St. (423) 265-3700. Mystery of Flight 138 7 p.m. Vaudeville Café, 138 Market St. (423) 517-1839. www.funnydinner.com Bluff and Bridges Downtown Tour 7 p.m. Walnut Street Bridge, 1 Walnut St. (423) 228-0448. The Midnight Swinger 7:30, 10 p.m. The Comedy Catch, 3224 Brainerd Rd. (423) 629-2233. www.thecomedycatch.com Lunch Money 7:30 p.m. Ensemble Theatre of Chattanooga, 1918 Union Ave. (423) 987-5141. ensembletheatreofchattanooga.com To Kill a Mockingbird 7:30 p.m. The Colonnade Center, 264 Catoosa Circle, Ringgold, GA. (706) 935-9000. www.colonnadecenter.org

I Wasn’t No Hero: stories from those who fought in World War II 8 p.m. Chattanooga Theatre Centre, 400 River St. (423) 267-8534. www.theatrecentre.com Chattanooga Ghost Tour 8:15 p.m. Walnut Street Bridge, 100 Walnut St. (423) 821-7125. www.chattanoogaghosttours.com Lantern Tour 8:30 p.m. Ruby Falls, 1720 South Scenic Hwy. (423) 821-2544. www.rubyfalls.com Manifest: Art & Soul 2 9 p.m. The CampHouse, 1427 Williams St. (423) 702-8081. Stand Up Comedy! Mike Baldwin 9:30 p.m. Vaudeville Café, 138 Market St. (423) 517-1839. www.funnydinner.com Female Impersonation Show Midnight. Images, 6065 Lee Hwy. (423) 855-8210. www.imagesbar.com

Saturday

Ride to Provide 6:30 a.m. Open Arms Care Support Office, 6711 Mountain View Rd. www.active.com “Walk Me Home” 5K 9 a.m. Chattanooga Riverpark, Amnicola Hwy. The Battle of Tunnel Hill Civil War Reenactment 9 a.m. Tunnel Hill Heritage Center, Tunnel Hill, GA. (706) 876-1571. www.tunnelhillheritagecenter.com Friends of the Library Book Sale 9 a.m. Eastgate Town Center, 5600 Brainerd Rd. (423) 757-5310. Dynamo of Dixie Downtown Tour 10 a.m. Sheraton Read House, 827 Broad St. (423) 228-0448. www.chattanoogasidewalktours.com

Emma Bell Miles Symposium of Southern Appalachian Culture and Nature

Two-day event starts today, with exhibits, panels, music, quilts, food. Free, but registration appreciated 9 a.m. -8 p.m. Various locations, most on UTC campus lib.utc.edu/emmabellmiles Brainerd Farmers Market 10 a.m. Grace Episcopal Church, 20 Belvoir Ave. (423) 458-6281. Chattanooga River Market 10 a.m. Tennessee Aquarium, 1 Broad St. (423) 648-2496. www.chattanoogamarket.com Art till Dark Noon. 40 Frazier Ave. (423) 413-8999. www.arttildark.com Doggie Paddle Pool Party Noon. Warner Park, 1254 East Third St. (423) 305-6500. www.mckameyanimalcenter.org Lunch Money 2 p.m. Ensemble Theatre of Chattanooga, 1918 Union Ave. (423) 987-5141. ensembletheatreofchattanooga.com AVA Gallery Hop 2 p.m. Various locations throughout Chattanooga. www.avarts.org/galleryhop Mystery at the Nightmare Office Party 5:30 p.m. Vaudeville Café, 138 Market St. (423) 517-1839.


ARTS

Arts & Events Calendar

SATURDAY

Prairie Home Companion Summer Love Tour

Garrison Keillor and the gang from Lake Woebegone regale us with tales. $38- $68 7:30 p.m. Memorial Auditorium, 399 McCallie Ave. (423) 642-8497. chattanoogaonstage.com Manifest Presents 6:30 p.m. Create Here, 55 E Main St., Ste. 105. Bluff and Bridges Downtown Tour 7 p.m. Walnut Street Bridge, 1 Walnut St. (423) 228-0448. Garrison Keillor’s A Prairie Home Companion Summer Love Tour 2011 7:30 p.m. Memorial Auditorium, 399 McCallie Ave. (423) 757-5156. www.chattanooga.gov The Midnight Swinger 7:30, 10 p.m. The Comedy Catch, 3224 Brainerd Rd. (423) 629-2233. www.thecomedycatch.com To Kill a Mockingbird 7:30 p.m. The Colonnade Center, 264 Catoosa Circle, Ringgold. (706) 935-9000. www.colonnadecenter.org I Wasn’t No Hero: stories from those who fought in World War II 8 p.m. Chattanooga Theatre Centre, 400 River St. (423) 267-8534. www.theatrecentre.com Mystery at the Redneck-Italian Wedding 8 p.m. Vaudeville Café, 138 Market St. (423) 517-1839.

SUNDAY

Lantern Tour 8:30 p.m. Ruby Falls, 1720 South Scenic Hwy. (423) 821-2544. www.rubyfalls.com Chattanooga Ghost Hunt 9:30 p.m. Patten Chapel, 615 McCallie Ave. (423) 821-7125. www.chattanoogaghosttours.com The Midnight Swinger 10 p.m. The Comedy Catch, 3224 Brainerd Rd. (423) 629-2233. www.thecomedycatch.com Stand Up Comedy! Mike Baldwin 10:30 p.m. Vaudeville Café, 138 Market St. (423) 517-1839. www.funnydinner.com Female Impersonation Show Midnight. Images, 6065 Lee Hwy. (423) 855-8210. www.imagesbar.com

Sunday

The Battle of Tunnel Hill Civil War Reenactment 9 a.m. Tunnel Hill Heritage Center, Tunnel Hill, GA. (706) 876-1571. www.tunnelhillheritagecenter.com Freedom Festival 9 a.m. Hog’s Pen, 1018 Salem Rd. Rossville, GA. (706) 861-4647. Dynamo of Dixie Downtown Tour 10 a.m. Sheraton Read House, 827 Broad St. (423) 228-0448. www.chattanoogasidewalktours.com Chattanooga Market 11 a.m. First Tennesee Pavilion, 1826 Reggie White Blvd. www.chattanoogamarket.com Friends of the Library Book Sale Noon. Eastgate Town Center, 5600 Brainerd Rd. (423) 757-5310. Wings, Wheels, and Water Noon. The Hixson Museum of Flight, 1824 East Crabtree Rd. (423) 718-6407.

Lunch Money 6:30 p.m. Ensemble Theatre of Chattanooga, 1918 Union Ave. (423) 987-5141. ensembletheatreofchattanooga.com Bluff and Bridges Downtown Tour 7 p.m. Walnut Street Bridge, 1 Walnut St. (423) 228-0448. www.chattanoogasidewalktours.com Pearl White Gala 7:30 p.m. Chattanooga Convention Center, 1150 Carter St. (423) 698-2611. The Midnight Swinger 8 p.m. The Comedy Catch, 3224 Brainerd Rd. (423) 629-2233. www.thecomedycatch.com Movie Night 8 p.m. Sluggo’s North Vegetarian Cafe, 501 Cherokee Blvd. (423) 752-5224. Chattanooga Ghost Tour 8:15 p.m. Walnut Street Bridge, 100 Walnut St. (423) 821-7125. www.chattanoogaghosttours.com

Monday

Friends of the Library Book Sale 9 a.m. Eastgate Town Center, 5600 Brainerd Rd. (423) 757-5310. Dynamo of Dixie Downtown Tour 10 a.m. Sheraton Read House, 827 Broad St. (423) 228-0448. www.chattanoogasidewalktours.com The Southern Circuit Film Series: “Concrete, Steel & Paint” 6 p.m. Loose Cannon, 1800A Rossville Ave. Bluff and Bridges Downtown Tour 7 p.m. Walnut Street Bridge, 1 Walnut St. (423) 228-0448. www.chattanoogasidewalktours.com Chattanooga Ghost Tour 8:15 p.m. Walnut Street Bridge, 100 Walnut St. (423) 821-7125.

Lunch Money

Original “investigative theatre” piece about bullying. $10 6:30 p.m. Ensemble Theatre of Chattanooga, St. Andrews Center, 1918 Union Ave. (423) 987-5741.

Tuesday

Songwriter’s Line-up 7 p.m. The CampHouse, 1427 Williams St. (423) 702-8081. Lee University Presidential Concert Series 7:30 p.m. Lee University, 1120 N Ocoee St., Cleveland, TN. (423) 614-8000. www.leeuniversity.edu Chattanooga Ghost Tour 8:15 p.m. Walnut Street Bridge, 100 Walnut St. (423) 821-7125. www.chattanoogaghosttours.com

Wednesday

Dynamo of Dixie Downtown Tour 10 a.m. Sheraton Read House, 827 Broad St. (423) 228-0448. www.chattanoogasidewalktours.com Main Street Farmers Market 4 p.m. Main St. at Williams St. www.mainstfarmersmarket.com Bluff and Bridges Downtown Tour 7 p.m. Walnut Street Bridge, 1 Walnut St. (423) 228-0448. www. chattanoogasidewalktours.com Chattanooga Ghost Tour 8:15 p.m. Walnut Street Bridge, 100 Walnut St. (423) 821-7125. www.chattanoogaghosttours.com www.chattanoogapulse.com | September 8, 2011 | Volume 8, Issue 36 | The Pulse

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MUSIC

Feature

Adding to the Chattanooga Musical Family

“We may have lost the fairy godmother in Parkway Billiards, but eight months ago we were given a godchild, The Honest Pint.”

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By Tara V, Pulse Music Writer

O

K, so we all know it has been an eventful summer in Chattaboogie. Our aunts and uncles of Nightfall and Riverfront Nights along with our beloved stepchild Riverbend have packed up or only have a couple more weeks to go, and and I wonder about locals who will still be here when the leaves turn and the tourism settles down. We know our big brother at Rhythm & Brews, new sister-in-law Track 29, dirty uncle at JJ’s and many cousin venues around town will keep it in the family, providing entertainment—as well as our family member over on Patten Parkway. We may have lost the fairy godmother in Parkway Billiards, but eight months ago we were given a godchild, The Honest Pint. Not totally music, not totally bar, not totally restaurant, but like a toddler ready to take

The Pulse | Volume 8, Issue 36 | September 8, 2011 | www.chattanoogapulse.com

that step from crawling to running, we have watched The Honest Pint show that even though the world is a big place, there is room for everyone. We have already seen some great shows in these newly decorated doors and there is no sign of stopping. For those who may have not been getting the family emails, this newer addition has grown to show we can be proud to have them at the dinner table. Especially if they are providing the Pomme Tots. So wipe your tears from being ever-so-moved by my Chattanooga musical family analogy and get your T-shirt or heels, ID, and whatever accessory you need to make the chandeliers twinkle in your draft-filled eyes. Just wait a few weeks for those ugly turtlenecks...please. On Thursday, September 8,: we remember Haiti with Tap-Tap It Up for Haiti. Our local reggae rastas Milele Roots, along with Spoon and BRANDO, will put down the sound as we raise funds for Epple Seed and Beyond The Borders. You can find out more about the programs at www.eppleseedarts.com. People in Haiti still need our help, and by investing in their future through art you can give in your own unique way. There will be a Haitian Gallery, drink specials and Power 94’s lovable Eric Foster hosting the mic. On Sunday, September 11, the weekly Irish Music Session continues its comfortable ambiance for dinner as well as a chance for those interested in traditional Irish music to

sit and learn—and maybe even take part in the sound of these truly talented local gems. After the weekly session, a band hailing from Nashville, The Fells, return to bring a more alternative taste to the Irish tradition. Each Wednesday and Thursday hold a special place for local and regional acts. With only a $3 cover and drink specials, you can have your music and dinner all while being able to get up in the morning for work. On Wednesday, September 14, The New Empires, a newer band out of Chattanooga, will intrigue our ears. Self-described as “sophisticated chamber pop” accompanied by angel choirs and a gypsy orchestra, I couldn’t imagine not loving them. Dustin Edge of Colorado will open. Thursday, September 15 will host The Damn Choir, a two-person band out of Chicago. This couple has signed to Wine from The Moon Records and have the sound of a full band. A mix of Modest Mouse and Mumford and Sons with a shot of Belle & Sebastian, it will be another indie styling that we have grown to appreciate. Our own Josh Gilbert of Jettison Never will open. Check regularly as they update the website and add to the Facebook events, because our godchild is growing in front of our eyes, honey darling. Be a part of it. The Honest Pint 35 Patten Parkway (423) 468-4192. www.thehonestpint.com


MUSIC

New Music Reviews

The Caretaker

An Empty Bliss Beyond This World (History Always Favours the Winners)

“The Caretaker draws specific inspiration from Jack Nicholson’s character in the film The Shining.”

A song on its own is just a song, but in the right context, it can be transformed. Imagine hearing a children’s choir. Now, imagine hearing that in the soundtrack of some supernatural horror movie, making it sound creepy as hell. British song manipulator James Leyland Kirby is well aware of this, creating disquieting imaginary film scores by recycling old jazz records for his project The Caretaker. Kirby is also the mind behind V/Vm, responsible for the underground hit “Lady in Red,” which takes the Chris De Burgh recording and warps it, making it sound deeply unsettling and sinister. The Caretaker draws specific inspiration from Jack Nicholson’s character in the film The Shining, the winter season caretaker of a haunted hotel who’s driven to insanity, and Kirby’s use of old easy-listening vinyl evokes the ’20s scenes with ghost flappers lounging in the hotel bar. The project’s latest effort, An Empty Bliss Beyond This World, causes the listener’s concentration to dart back and forth

Black Pus

Primordial Pus (Load)

Aficionados of insane, intense m u sic with c o m pletely unrestrained drumming (and if we need to genre-fy everything, I support calling it “Energy Brothers” music, named after the Saturday Night Live skit poking fun at manic art) may know Brian Chippendale as the furious drummer and vocalist of the Providence, R.I. duo Lightning Bolt. Primordial Pus is the fifth album from Chippendale’s solo project Black Pus, which has an

ultra-distorted, nervous sound that bears similarities to Lightning Bolt, although there are key differences. On Primordial Pus, Chippendale at times samples his drums for loops, atop which he adds choice drum flourishes, unhinged echoing vocals that sound like they’re coming out of a broken cordless phone, and other notes that are fuzzed-up beyond recognition. Where Lightning Bolt at times revealed its classical minimalist influences, a bit like if Philip Glass joined Ruins and took amphetamines, Black Pus goes a step further into the primal direction with its repetition. The opener, “Ha Ha Havoc,” is the album’s most dense, in-the-red track—three minutes of a constant, deranged aural assault; it’s a little disappointing that this level of intensity is not matched on the rest of the album, although it’s clear that Chip-

between two elements: the songs themselves and also the very conspicuous (and probably accentuated) vinyl record surface noise, with those familiar crackles and pops. The John Cage piece 4’33” comes to mind, where the performer plays no music for its duration; the piece isn’t total silence, though—any ambient noises, like, say, an audience member coughing or shifting in his chair, are considered part of the piece. So, the purported background actually comes to the foreground. Ostensibly, the album sounds like Kirby just playing a bunch of old records, but there’s more going on than that. As the album progresses, generally the song excerpts get smaller and less distinct, with more manipulation and stereo effects; the songs get washed away, while the noises drive the mood. It’s an exercise in eerie atmospherics and recontextualization, but you could also borrow your grandparents’ scratchy records and essentially get the same effect yourself. — Ernie Paik pendale is trying to differentiate this material from that of Lightning Bolt. “Police Song” is a tense stream with live drumming—a steadily driving, dirtied-up Krautrock-esque beat— with a sweltering bass-range buzz and a sonic crunchiness. The metronomic “Beneath the Wheel” uses a punishing loop of straight beats, with incomprehensible vocal warbling, very gradually building in forcefulness over eight minutes, like water torture using water balloons instead of drops. The closing “I’ll Come When I Can” is an oddball track, with a sing-songy loop of melodic humming, free-form drumming with more moderation than usual, and Chippendale singing a warped ballad. It’s another weird output channel for Chippendale, also a prolific comic artist, although his best musical material is still saved for Lightning Bolt. — Ernie Paik www.chattanoogapulse.com | September 8, 2011 | Volume 8, Issue 36 | The Pulse

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MUSIC

Concert Calendar

THURSDAY

Whiskey Shivers

“Whiskey Shivers is a rip roarin’ string band cyclone.” $5 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia, 231 E MLK Blvd. (423) 266-1400. myspace.com/jjsbohemia

Thursday

Ben Friberg Trio 7 p.m. Table 2, 232 E. 11th St. (423) 756-8253. Blues Jam with Rick Rushing 7:30 p.m. Market Street Tavern, 850 Market St., #100. (423) 634-0260. Audience Choice Night 7 p.m. McHale’s Brewhouse, 724 Ashland Ter. (423) 877-2124. www.mchalesbrewhouse.com Open Mic Night 7:30 p.m. The CampHouse, 1427 Williams St. (423) 702-8081. www.thecamphouse.com Tip Tap It Up for Haita: Milele Roots, Brand-O, DJ Spoon 8 p.m. The Honest Pint, 35 Patten Pkwy. (423) 468-4192. Billy “Lightning” Hopkins 8 p.m. Southside Saloon & Bistro, 1301 Chestnut St. (423) 757-4730. Jimmy Harris 8 p.m. The Coconut Room at The Palms at Hamilton, 6925 Shallowford Rd., #202. (423) 499-5055.

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The Pulse | Volume 8, Issue 36 | September 8, 2011 | www.chattanoogapulse.com

FRIDAY

Queen B & The Well Strung Band 8 p.m. The Lounge at The Palms at Hamilton, 6925 Shallowford Rd., #202. (423) 499-5055. Hap Henniger 9 p.m. The Office (inside Days Inn), 901 Carter St. (423) 634-9191. Strung Like a Horse, Whiskey Shivers 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia, 231 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 266-1400. Archnemesis 10 p.m. Rhythm & Brews, 221 Market St.

Friday

Johnny Cash Tribute Band 5 p.m. Chattanooga Choo Choo Victorian Lounge, 1400 Market St. (423) 266-5000. www.choochoo.com/localevents Jimmy Harris 6:30 p.m. The Coconut Room at The Palms at Hamilton, 6925 Shallowford Rd., #202. (423) 499-5055. The Dismembered Tennesseans 7 p.m. Nightfall Concert Series, Miller Plaza. www.nightfallchattanooga.com Corey Smith, American Aquarium, Canaan Smith 8 p.m. Track 29, Chattanooga Choo Choo Campus, 1400 Market St. (423) 266-4323. www.track29.co Amber Fults, Sabrina 8 p.m. The CampHouse, 1427 Williams St. (423) 702-8081.

Ollabelle 8 p.m. Nightfall Concert Series, Miller Plaza. www.nightfallchattanooga.com Dana Rogers 8 p.m. Palms Patio at The Palms at Hamilton, 6925 Shallowford Rd. #202. (423) 499-5055. www.thepalmsathamilton.com Todd Weaver 9 p.m. Raw, 409 Market St. (423) 756-1919. Soul Survivor 9 p.m. Sugar’s Ribs, 507 Broad St. (423) 508-8956. www.sugarsribs.com Stop n Stare 9 p.m. Southside Bistro & Saloon, 1301 Chestnut St. (423) 757-4730. Nim Nims 9:30 p.m. Lindsay Street Hall, 901 Lindsay St. (423) 755-9111. www.lindsaystreethall.com Dirty Marquee, Dark Riders, Very, Very Sneaky 10 p.m. Sluggo’s North Vegetarian Café, 501 Cherokee Blvd. (423) 752-5224. Bluegrass Pharoahs 10 p.m. Market Street Tavern, 850 Market St., #100. (423) 634-0260. Roger Alan Wade 10 p.m. T-Bones, 1419 Chestnut St. (423) 266-4240. www.tboneschattanooga.com Abbey Road Live: The Sounds of The Beatles 10 p.m. Rhythm & Brews, 221 Market St.

Ollabelle

Close out Nightfall this year with new-folk from New York City. Free 8 p.m. Nightfall, Miller Plaza, 850 Market St. nightfallchattanooga.com

Saturday

Steve Brehm 10 a.m. Chattanooga River Market, Tennessee Aquarium, 1 Broad St. (423) 265-0698. www.tnaqua.com Johnny Cash Tribute Band 5 p.m. Chattanooga Choo Choo Victorian Lounge, 1400 Market St. (423) 266-5000. Jimmy Harris 6:30 p.m. The Coconut Room at The Palms at Hamilton, 6925 Shallowford Rd., #202. (423) 499-5055. The Suite C featurng Telemonster & Emily Blaising 7:30 p.m. The CampHouse, 1427 Williams St. (423) 702-8081. www.thecamphouse.com Eric Heatherly 8 p.m. Riverfront Nights, 200 Riverfront Pkwy. www.riverfrontnights.com Troy Underwood 8 p.m. Charles & Myrtle’s Coffeehouse, Christ Unity Church, 105 McBrien Rd. www.christunity.org


MUSIC

Concert Calendar

SATURDAY

Eric Heatherly

“Chattanooga’s own country music star.” Free 7 p.m. Riverfront Nights, 100 Riverfront Parkway www.riverfrontnights.com Towe Jam 8 p.m. Palms Patio at The Palms at Hamilton, 6925 Shallowford Rd. #202. (423) 499-5055. www.thepalmsathamilton.com Drive By Truckers, The Shakes 9 p.m. Track 29, Chattanooga Choo Choo Campus, 1400 Market St. (423) 266-4323. www.track29.co Stevie Moncie Band 9 p.m. Raw, 409 Market St. (423) 756-1919. Joe Tucker 9 p.m. The Office (inside Days Inn), 901 Carter St. (423) 634-9191. Blake Morrison 9 p.m. Southside Bistro & Saloon, 1301 Chestnut St. (423) 757-4730. southsidesaloonandbistro.com Soul Survivor 9 p.m. Sugar’s Ribs, 507 Broad St. (423) 508-8956. www.sugarsribs.com DJ and Dancing 9 p.m. The Lounge at The Palms at Hamilton, 6925 Shallowford Rd., #202. (423) 499-5055.

SUNDAY

Amber Fults 10 p.m. Market Street Tavern, 850 Market St., #100. (423) 634-0260. www.marketstreettavern.com Dirty Marquee, Dark Riders, Very, Very Sneaky 10 p.m. Sluggo’s North Vegetarian Café, 501 Cherokee Blvd. (423) 752-5224. Satisfaction: A Tribute to The Rolling Stones 10 p.m. Rhythm & Brews, 221 Market St. www.rhythm-brews.com

Sunday

Kate Klim Noon. Chattanooga Market, First Tennessee Pavilion, 1829 Carter St. www.chattanoogamarket.com Pat Anderson 2 p.m. Chattanooga Market, First Tennessee Pavilion, 1829 Carter St. www.chattanoogamarket.com Irish Music Session 3 p.m. The Honest Pint, 35 Patten Pkwy. (423) 468-4192. www.thehonestpint.com Free Range Mystics 3 p.m. Pasha Coffee and Tea, 3914 St. Elmo Ave. (423) 475-5482. www.pashacoffeehouse.com The Fells 7 p.m. The Honest Pint, 35 Patten Pkwy. (423) 468-4192. www.thehonestpint.com Karaoke with DJ Salt 9:30 p.m. Bud’s Sports Bar, 5751 Brainerd Rd. (423) 499-9878.

Monday

Big Band Night 8 p.m. The Coconut Room at The Palms at Hamilton, 6925 Shallowford Rd., #202. (423) 499-5055. Mountain Music 7 p.m. Market Street Tavern, 850 Market St., #100. (423) 634-0260. www.marketstreettavern.com Southside Casual Classics 8 p.m. The CampHouse, 1427 Williams St. (423) 702-8081. www.thecamphouse.com Karaoke with DJ Salt 9:30 p.m. Bud’s Sports Bar, 5751 Brainerd Rd. (423) 499-9878. www.budssportsbar.com

Tuesday

Karaoke with DJ Salt 9:30 p.m. Bud’s Sports Bar, 5751 Brainerd Rd. (423) 499-9878. www.budssportsbar.com Josh Hoges Whiskey Jam 9 p.m. Rhythm & Brews, 221 Market St. www.rhythm-brews.com

Wednesday

Jimmy Harris 6:30 p.m. The Coconut Room at The Palms at Hamilton, 6925 Shallowford Rd., #202. (423) 499-5055. Phil Vassar 7 p.m. Chattanooga Billiards Club East, 110 Jordan Dr. (423) 499-3883.

The Fells

Alt-Celt at the Pint. $5 7 p.m. The Honest Pint, 35 Patten Parkway (423) 468-4192. www.thehonestpint.com Ben Friberg Trio 7 p.m. Market Street Tavern, 850 Market St., #100. (423) 634-0260. www.marketstreettavern.com Open Mic Night 8 p.m. Acoustic Café, 61 RBC Dr., Ringgold. (706) 965-2065. www.ringgoldacoustic.com Prime Cut Trio 8 p.m. The Lounge at The Palms at Hamilton, 6925 Shallowford Rd., #202. (423) 499-5055. www.thepalmsathamilton.com DJ ScubaSteve hosts Jenntastic Wednesdays 9 p.m. Holiday Bowl, 5518 Brainerd Rd. (423) 899-2695. www.holidaybowlbrainerd.com Tinsley Ellis 9 p.m. Rhythm & Brews, 221 Market St. www.rhythm-brews.com Got a gig coming up that you want to tell the world about? Email the particulars to us at calendar@chattanoogapulse.com at least ten days before the event. www.chattanoogapulse.com | September 8, 2011 | Volume 8, Issue 36 | The Pulse

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OPINION

On The Beat

The Theater of Distracted Driving I

notice. He panicked and over-corrected t was early afternoon on the kind of to the right, which day that made you mad you were at work has a tendency to instead of poolside, or better yet, on the cause cars to fishtail deck of a boat. Which was, in fact, where slightly…and “slightly” our driver was headed. is a difficult word to He was driving a Ford Focus; it was a use when it involves sensible vehicle that was far too small losing control of your for police work, but cheap enough for government to force it into service as such car at 65 MPH. He avoided both a despite any of those kind of facts. Most Focus drivers don’t have boats, but he had rollover and collision and instead of getting access the best kind of all (as most boat religion (as most owners would agree): Someone Else’s. people do temporarily While the car’s steering was tight, the after near-death experiences), he focused six-lane highway he was on was rarely at only on wondering where he dropped his capacity and this made both driving and phone, acting as if nothing happened… texting a breeze. All he had to do was and such was the devotion to the HTC keep the keypad at eye level above the wheel and his peripheral vision would keep smartphone that nearly killed him, he didn’t even realize the big white car he him safe and he could keep abreast of the veered into was a marked patrol car that latest developments in his friends’ lives; began to intermittently bleat its siren. after all, how would you know your highIncredibly, the siren was sounding school buddy finished building their patio because he was now staring at the deck, or how cute your neighbor’s kid floorboard instead of the phone itself; he looked when he ate a pack of permanent didn’t see the blue lights in his rearview markers? (“OMG, IK, R?”.) He had it any more that he had seen anything under control, and this was true in every else in the last five minutes that didn’t case. (RIGHT up to the point of the have “Facebook” over inevitable crash that it. Pretty impressive, occurs by way of an “He avoided he, like so many ignored stop sign or red both a rollover really; others, was driving a few light, or the traffic ahead and collision thousand pounds of car that came to a stop while while functionally deaf, you were LOL’ing your and instead of blind and dumb. BFF.) getting religion, “Oh, God,” he In his case, he suddenly he focused only thought as the cruiser became annoyed when pulled in behind him. his tires interrupted his on wondering Did he actually tap the concentration by making where he cop car? He was so a “bumping” sound dropped his screwed. while he was battling Time stretched autocorrect on his latest phone.” out; what was the cop update. (I mean, really?!) doing there behind him? “Oh, God,” He was actually grimacing and ready to he repeated to himself. Why was he voice his complaint when he discovered keeping him waiting? NOW this was that the bumps were actually the becoming bullshit. Fear was turning into reflectors glued to the dotted lines that self-righteous indignation as it does in the separate lanes, and he was veering into recently caught, and he was now entering the side of a big white car he had failed to

Alex Teach

the “back-alley lawyer” phase faster than most. “He can’t keep me here for more than 20 minutes! I can just leave,” he thought, “and he can’t—” He was interrupted mid-thought as the cop suddenly appeared at his window. Had he paid attention to ANYTHING that day? Oh well… he could handle this. “Hello,

officer.” “Hi,” the cop said through gritted teeth. He was shaking a little. Something was wrong. “You got this, partner?” the cop said… but through only one side of his mouth, as a child would when attempting ventriloquism. The cop even glanced to his right and now, with full use of his lips, said “No, but hang close.” “Sure thing!” he answered himself back. Our driver cocked his head in confusion, and his adrenalin glands were squeezed yet again as, to his horror, he watched the cop’s right hand come into view with a sock on it. Crude eyes were dotted on top, and what appeared to be actual lipstick ringed its “mouth”. “I gotch’yer back, partner. This one looks twitchy,” the sock said as it appeared to be sizing up the inside of the vehicle, as cops tend to do, before pulling back out. Indignation suddenly reverted back to fear, and as if it couldn’t get any worse, he at last noticed something other than a death wish all day: The Officer had the same model of phone as his on his belt. (Our Driver began to cry before it got really weird.) When Officer Alexander D. Teach is not patrolling our fair city on the heels of the criminal element, he is an occasional student, carpenter, boating enthusiast, and spends his spare time volunteering for the Boehm Birth Defects Center. Follow him on Facebook at www.facebook.com/alex.teach www.chattanoogapulse.com | September 8, 2011 | Volume 8, Issue 36 | The Pulse

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Dining Out In Chattanooga

Five Guys Does Burgers the Right Way By D.E. Langley, Pulse Food Reviewer • Photography by Josh Lang

really was a revelation, a The first thing I nocompletely new take on ticed when I walked in what a fast-food burger the new Five Guys locacan be. tion on Broad Street was After a couple of quethe décor, or perhaps, the ries, I found out what lack thereof. There are no makes those flavors so bells and whistles—a simpronounced. There are ple red-and-white scheme absolutely no freezers at fills the space. The walls any Five Guys restaurant. are adorned with signs From the meat, handbearing quotes from variformed into patties each ous media outlets, both morning, to the tomalocal and national, protoes, again, freshly sliced claiming the chain’s virevery morning, the ingretues. The most noticeable dients are what make a feature, in fact, is the Five Guys burger a Five aroma, which I’m sure is Guys burger. The same no accident. The walk up applies to the grilled onto the counter includes a ions you can add to your saunter alongside a stack burger, and the lettuce, of sack upon sack of potapulled leaf by leaf from toes, and when you reach full heads every single the register, you’ll see a day. Each bun is specially made simple sign hanging above, bear“From the meat, hand-formed into patties each to exacting specifications, withing their full menu. morning, to the tomatoes, freshly sliced every out chemicals or preservatives. Options? Burgers, burgers, hot morning, the ingredients are what make a Five You can really, truly, taste the dogs, fries, and burgers. Oh, and difference. drinks. That is what really sets Guys burger a Five Guys burger.” The same care is taken with Five Guys apart. You won’t find the fries. Remember those chicken nuggets, fish sandwiches, or milkshakes. As simple as it sounds, specific choices (such as A.1. Steak Sauce, monstrous stacks of bags of potatoes I menit’s a fantastic recipe for success: Do what barbecue sauce, and hot sauce), they’re on tioned earlier? They’re busted open each you do, do it well, and don’t bother with the house. I chose my favorite fixings, filled day, sliced that morning (Are you sensing a my drink, and waited for my number to be trend yet?), and double-fried in 100 percent anything else. peanut oil, a costly step that means their Burgers are available in the standard form, called. What I was handed delivered a sense of beautifully crisp potatoes have no trans fats. comprising two patties, and a “little version,” with a single patty, each with a variety nostalgia before even opening the bag. A Five Guys does not cut corners. A regular of toppings. They also offer “Kosher Style” brown bag, flecked with oils from the over- portion spills from its cup, covering the foilhot dogs, which you can choose to make un- flowing portion of fries, let me know I was sheathed treat waiting at the bottom of the kosher by adding cheese and/or bacon, just in for a taste of something wholly different paper bag. As I said, a successful business does what like their burgers. Fries are available in two than the average fast food meal, and it didn’t versions: Five Guys style, and a spicy, Cajun disappoint. The burger, unwrapped from the it does, does it well, and doesn’t bother with anything else. Five Guys fits that formula to embrace of its foil apparel, was terrific. style. All burgers at Five Guys are cooked well- a T. Give them a visit, and see why people I chose a bacon cheeseburger and a regular order of Cajun fries. As with any burger done, which is usually not my style, but near and far are singing their praises. Five Guys Burgers and Fries, 401 Broad or hot dog at Five Guys, all toppings beyond mine was unbelievably juicy, with the meat cheese and bacon are free—all 15 of them, and fresh toppings melding together in a Street. Open 7 days a week, 11 a.m. to 10 in fact. From the expected (such as ketch- beautifully messy way that required no less p.m. Call (423)531-8267 or visit fiveguys. up, pickles, tomatoes, etc.), to more taste- than six napkins to keep my shirt clean. It com for more information. www.chattanoogapulse.com | September 8, 2011 | Volume 8, Issue 36 | The Pulse

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SCREEN

Film Feature

Asking Us to Ask Questions in Another Earth

“Another Earth wants to embolden audiences, encouraging them to imagine the very nature of infinite possibility.”

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By John DeVore, Pulse Film Critic

I

’m frequently accused of being unable to enjoy a film, or any entertainment that doesn’t in some way challenge me intellectually. This isn’t strictly true; I could make a fairly lengthy list of dumb movies, movies without any real redeeming qualities, which I can watch over and over again. I do feel, however, that good art causes complex emotional reactions or intense thought experimentation, no matter what the medium. I crave those types of experiences. Humans are curious, thinking creatures. Our default setting, once immediate needs are met, is one of inquisitive desire. I am baffled when people tell me that they want to see films or read books that discourage active thought. It seems inconsistent with our very nature. How many people went to see Shark Night 3D this weekend? How many of them went hoping to turn off their minds in favor of watching teenagers get mutilated by sharks? Probably more than I’m comfortable with. While scores

The Pulse | Volume 8, Issue 36 | September 8, 2011 | www.chattanoogapulse.com

of moviegoers flocked to a slaughter film about large fish devouring America’s youth, I sat alone in a theater, watching an existential drama unfold, one where the characters have feelings, where actions have consequences, and where questions have ambiguous answers. Another Earth wants to embolden audiences, encouraging them to imagine the very nature of infinite possibility. Rhoda is a promising 17 year old who has been accepted to MIT. She wants to study the stars. She celebrates her successes recklessly, as young people are apt to do. While driving home in an inebriated state, she learns of the recent discovery of an Earth-like planet, one that is close enough to view with the naked eye. Rhoda drunkenly looks out her car window, searching the heavens for signs of life, and abruptly ends the lives of a pregnant young mother and son. The father is put into a coma; his entire world is shattered in an instant while a new one hangs precariously and improbably overhead. Rhoda is convicted of a felony and given four years in prison to think about what she’s done. When she is released, everything has continued as it does, just without Rhoda; time passes no matter where you are. The most noticeable change is the enormous Earth 2, which now dominates the skyline, without appearing to have any significant effect on the tides or rotation of the Earth. The backdrop of this film is the mysterious new planet that appears to mirror our own, down the continents, oceans, rivers, cities, and even individual people. It is covered through news reports, radio interviews, and media commentary. The real story focuses on the characters. Like all of us, they must live with their choices and accept their circumstances. Scientific breakthroughs don’t usually happen dramatically. Even when they do, the sun rises and sets. People continue with their lives. Moments don’t stop the world. Rhoda wants to set

things right with the man whose life she destroyed, but through weakness, becomes entangled in sadness she can’t comprehend. She wants closure, but doesn’t feel she deserves it. Despite the lost years, her thinking is still rooted above the clouds. If Earth 2 is truly a mirror, are individual choices mirrored as well? Does mere observation change the outcome of our lives here one Earth 1? The answers may be hidden the same box as Schrödinger’s cat. Another Earth is full of tense, character driven interaction. The film itself suffers a bit from the independent budget. There are long shots of pigeons, interspersed with quick cuts to seemingly unrelated images. The writers, however, have crafted a story that exists on many different levels. The characters struggle with very real, plausible concerns, at times ignoring the elephant in the room because the chairs have such fine texture. People are like that. History may be changing, universally understood conceptions may be fragmented, but our own tiny worldview must remain intact. Grand events pale in comparison to personal drama. Another Earth is a film that warrants further discussion, late at night, with like-minded friends. It does what science fiction is meant to do: encourage quiet reflection and paradoxical understanding. This is no space opera. There are no invasions or aliens with nonsensical motives. It explores what people are and where they want to be, despite themselves. It questions without presuming. It is unconventional, and just by merit alone, worth your time. Another Earth Directed by Mike Cahill Starring Brit Marling, William Mapother, Matthew-Lee Erlbach Rated PG-13 Running time: 1 hour, 32 minutes


SCREEN

New In Theaters

Doctor, I Feel A Little Sick to his father, an alcoholic former coach, for guidance is tough enough, but his chosen path also is putting him on a collision course with his older brother, a former mixed martial artist and current struggling parent. Writerdirector Gavin O’Connor (Miracle, Pride and Glory) dives into the fast-growing popularity of the mixed martial arts world and displays a deft touch in casting by giving the leads to a pair of non-Americans as well as the incredibly world-weary Nick Nolte as the former coach. Sure, it looks an awful lot like The Fighter, but that is not necessarily a bad thing. That film resonated well with both critics and audiences alike. Starring Tom Hardy, Nick Nolte, Joel Edgerton Directed by Gavin O’Connor

Contagion The Center for Disease Control dispatches an international team of doctors to stop an airborne virus from spreading around the world. Director Steven Soderbergh takes on the nottoo-uncommon “nasty disease outbreak” plot that has been the basis of everything from straight thrillers and political potboilers to zombie movies and not one but two Stephen King mini-series. His twist? Shoot it as a horror movie with more action than dialog. Also, recruit Kate Winslet to play a doctor, Jude Law as an intrepid blogger (the modern replacement for the ’70s newspaper reporter character) and then toss in a whole raft of major stars including Matt Damon and Gwyneth Paltrow, the latter of whom doesn’t seem to have much of a future, at least as seen in the trailers. The last “A-List” attempt at a film of this nature, 1995’s Outbreak, brought together Dustin Hoffman, Rene Russo and Morgan Freeman and grossed nearly $190 million worldwide. We’ll see if Soderbergh can duplicate or even exceed Wolfgang Petersen’s film in today’s more jittery post-9/11 world. Starring Matt Damon, Kate Winslet, Jude Law Directed by Steven Soderbergh Warrior A former Marine returns to his hometown of Pittsburgh to train for a mixed martial arts tournament with a major cash prize. Looking

Bucky Larson: Born to Be a Star After learning that his parents were porn stars in the 1970s, a nerdy guy leaves his home in northern Iowa for Hollywood, hoping to follow in their footsteps. He’s taken in by a down-and-out director who sees a bright future for him and the kid. Last week we had a movie centered around an orgy. This week it’s all about porn. Are Hollywood scriptwriters and director becoming a bit too obsessed with tawdry sex? And considering the fate of Zack and Miri Make a Porno, who at Columbia Pictures thought greenlighting this film was a good idea? Sure, Tom Brady directed Rob Schneider’s only good movie but he’s also had a hand in a series of box-office bombs that led to the demise of Fox Atomic. Even adding in audience favorites like Don Johnson and Christina Ricci might not be enough to elevate what appears to be another film directed squarely at Beavis and Butthead. No, not the fans of Beavis & Butthead, but Beavis and Butthead themselves (or at least those who share their cartoon sensibilities). Starring Nick Swardson, Christina Ricci, Don Johnson Directed by Tom Brady Kevin Hart: Laugh at My Pain A stand-up performance from comedian Kevin Hart’s popular 2011 tour. Let us get this straight: There’s a talented young comedian who’s both hot enough to fill theaters and score his own feature film, but hasn’t yet had his own sitcom? Is Hollywood slipping? This makes no sense. Oh, and Hart is pretty damn funny, too. Starring Kevin Hart Directed by Leslie Small www.chattanoogapulse.com | September 8, 2011 | Volume 8, Issue 36 | The Pulse

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ENTERTAINMENT

Free Will Astrology

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Until this year, Nigerian religious leader Mohammadu Bello Abubakar had 86 wives. Then an Islamic council ordered him to divorce all but four of them. He was reluctant at first—many of his 170 children were born of wives he’d have to separate from—but since the alternative was punishment by death, he ultimately agreed. From the standpoint of your own evolution, Virgo, this year will be an excellent time to draw inspiration from Abubakar. I encourage you, in other words, to cull the excess and chaos from your love life. If you’re single, narrow your focus down to a couple of fantasies rather than a wide variety. If you’re in a committed relationship that’s worth working on, swear off any possibility of cheating or escaping. In either case, perform an exorcism of all the ghosts that might threaten to distort your long-term romantic future. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “It takes a lot of time to be a genius,” said author Gertrude Stein. “You have to sit around so much doing nothing, really doing nothing.” I agree with her statement, which is why I have high hopes that you’re going to tap into more of your dormant genius in the coming days. The cosmic rhythms are nudging you to enjoy a time of profound slack, and I think there’s a good chance you’ll agree to that. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): If you’re an artist and you want to get steadily better at your craft, you need to continually refine your approach to telling the truth. The novelist Willa Cather said that. Now I’m here to invite you to adopt that strategy this year, whether you’re an artist or simply a person who wants to live your life artfully. The coming months will be one of the best times ever for you to penetrate to the heart of the truths you aspire to live by and become highly skilled at expressing them in every little thing you do. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): When gasoline prices soared a couple of years ago, a Christian group called Pray at the Pump organized vigils at gas stations, where they prayed for God’s intervention. No one knows if their efforts were the cause, but the cost of gas did begin to plummet soon afterward. Inspired by their work, I have asked my team of non-denominational Prayer Warriors to gather in your behalf. Every evening for the next ten days, they will be calling on their connections with the Divine Wow to help you Sagittarians come up with smart and practical long-term plans for your financial well-being. On your end, you can supercharge their efforts by doing the appropriate research and meditation. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Please don’t wear a Tshirt that says what I saw on the canary yellow T-shirt of the Japanese tourist at JFK airport: “Sorry, I’m a loser.” I also beg you not to read Ethan Trex’s book How to Seem Like a Better Person Without Actually Improving Yourself. It’s very important, in my astrological opinion, that you not demean or underestimate yourself in the coming days. In fact, I’ll go so far as to say that you have a sacred duty to exalt your beauty and exult in your talents. Now go read Walt Whitman’s Song of Myself, and periodically murmur the first line all week long: “I celebrate myself, and sing myself.” AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): While loitering on a sidewalk outside a nightclub in San Francisco on a September night back in 1994, I found the cover of a booklet lying in the gutter. Written by Marilena Silbey and Paul Ramana Das, it was called “How To Survive Passionate Intimacy with a Dreamy Partner While Making a Fortune on the Path to Enlightenment.” Unfortunately, the rest of the text was missing. Over the years, I’ve tried to hunt down a copy of the whole thing, hungry for its wisdom, but have never had any success. I’m hoping that maybe you will consider writing your own version of the subject in the coming year, Aquarius. With the luck I expect you to have, you

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The Pulse | Volume 8, Issue 36 | September 8, 2011 | www.chattanoogapulse.com

might actually be up to the task. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Now and then you may be able to whip up a wonderful breakthrough in the blink of an eye. But more often it’s the case that beauty and truth and love and justice emerge in their full glory only over the course of a painstaking, step-by-step, trial-and-error process. “All that I made before the age of 65 is not worth counting,” wrote renowned Japanese painter Hokusai. “At 73 I began to understand the true construction of animals, plants, trees, birds, fishes, and insects. At 90 I will enter into the secret of things. At 110 everything—every dot, every dash—will live.” At this juncture in your personal evolution, Pisces, it’s a perfect time to re-commit yourself to your life-long work. ARIES (March 21-April 19): During his time in the Senate, former U.S. presidential candidate John McCain has been a strong advocate for Native Americans. As chairman of the Indian Affairs Committee, he sponsored or co-sponsored seven bills in support of Indian rights. And yet Native Americans voted overwhelmingly for McCain’s opponent, Barack Obama, who has no such track record. When asked why, Native American author Sherman Alexie said that unlike most other groups, Indians don’t vote merely for their own narrow self-interest, but rather for the benefit of all. They felt Obama would be the best president for America. That’s the standard I urge you to use in the coming weeks, Aries. Stretch yourself as you work hard for the greater good, not just your own. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Hope “is not the conviction that something will turn out well,” wrote Czech writer and politician Vaclav Havel, “but the certainty that something makes sense, regardless of how it turns out.” That’s the kind of hope I suggest you invoke during your current adventures, Taurus. Be hungrier for meaning than for any specific outcome. If you do that, ironically, the outcome is more likely to be one you feel pretty good about. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Describing my writing, one critic said that I was “like a mutant love-child of Anais Nin and Jack Kerouac.” That also happens to be an apt description of the spirit you should bring to life in the coming weeks. So be like the memoirist Anais Nin: a collector of secrets, a connoisseur of intimacy, a fiercely sensitive alchemist who knows her own inner terrain better than anyone else knows their inner terrain. And also be like the novelist Jack Kerouac: a free-wheeling, fast-talking, wide-open traveler in quest of the spirit as it makes its wild plunge into matter. CANCER (June 21-July 22): In giving the Nobel Prize for literature to French writer Jean-Marie Gustave Le Clézio, the award committee praised him as an “explorer of a humanity beyond and below the reigning civilization.” I suggest you consider doing some of that kind of exploring yourself this year, Cancerian. According to my reading of the astrological omens, you will generate rich benefits for yourself by learning from people and influences that are beneath the notice of the mainstream, whether they’re outside the box, off the grid, under the radar, or immune to the taint of the collective delusions. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “Obstacles are a natural part of life, just as boulders are a natural part of the course of a river,” notes the ancient Chinese book the I Ching. “The river does not complain or get depressed because there are boulders in its path.” I’d go so far to say—this is not in the original text, but is my 21st-century addition—that the river gets a sensual thrill as it glides its smooth current over the irregular shapes and hard skin of the rocks. It looks forward to the friction, exults in the intimate touch, loves the drama of the interaction. Sound like a pleasure you’d like to cultivate, Leo? It’s an excellent time to try it.


ENTERTAINMENT

Jonesin' Crossword — "Crank Up The AC" Across 1 Amazement 4 One A in AMA 8 “Peachy keen!” 13 It’s nothing, really 14 “That’s right” 16 Person in the delivery business? 17 551, to Nero 18 “Earth Girls Are Easy” star Davis 19 Rest in a nest 20 What escorts are usually paid to do? 23 France’s longest river 24 Samson’s love 28 Agreement between nations to stretch borders further? 32 Free plaything that’s actually in the Toy Hall of Fame 33 Dietary restriction for some 34 President pro ___ 37 “Not ___ care” 39 Last mo. with just 30

days 40 Star of “Vicky Cristina Barcelona,” in tabloids 43 ___! at the Disco 46 Birds who get busy right up to April? 51 Actress Dawson 52 Like horror movie music 53 Cockney and French, when I’m entertaining people at parties? 57 Up and about 60 Spaghetti western composer Morricone 61 “Just as I suspected!” 62 Tea at the movies 63 Kidney-related 64 “Toy Story” costar 65 Author Fannie 66 “___ Luck Chuck” (2007 romcom) 67 Summer, in St. Tropez Down 1 “Let’s go!” to Speedy Gonzalez 2 “Laugh and the world

laughs with you” poet Ella Wheeler ___ 3 Bring out 4 Add to 5 Fox News anchor Smith 6 Stadium where Jim Bunning pitched a perfect game 7 Former senator Sam 8 Electric shaver company 9 Dialect in 1990s news 10 “It was 20 years ___ today...” 11 Detmer and Cobb 12 Mich. neighbor 15 “Papa” of classical music 21 Miner’s finds 22 Definition 25 Occasion of interest? 26 “Alice’s Restaurant” singer Guthrie 27 One way to get the big picture 29 Putdown from The Fonz

30 “___ liebe dich” 31 Animal that looks halfgiraffe, half zebra 34 Pre-1917 Russian ruler 35 ___ Domani (wine brand) 36 Apples, often 38 M&M hue 41 Charge for some mobile phone usage 42 Work with what you have 44 Frigid 45 Canadian prairie residents 47 Loom (over) 48 Intricately decorated 49 Hip 50 Bagel variety 54 Blood type, for short 55 The A of A.D. 56 Cremona closing 57 TV character who ate cats 58 Salt, in Quebec 59 “I’ve come ___ decision”

Jonesin' Crossword created By Matt Jones. © 2011 Jonesin’ Crosswords. For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+ to call. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #0536

www.chattanoogapulse.com | September 8, 2011 | Volume 8, Issue 36 | The Pulse

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OPINION

Life In The ‘Noog

Car 54, Where Are You? T

30

he recent crime wave that’s crashed through downtown has residents like me concerned about the safety of performing simple routines, like taking out the trash or checking the mail. Two armed robberies within a block of my home and several stories of mayhem at three mid-city bars within the past couple of weeks have me asking police officer and fellow columnist Alex Teach “Where da po-po at?” I live in a nice four-square-block area of the Southside neatly nestled within “the hood.” While everything around me consists of newer construction, three blocks in any direction will find one in a proverbial “no man’s land” where gin is still distilled in bathtubs, sex is for sale and better yet, on sale, drugs are as easy to get as payday loans and gangs are bangin’ whatever it is they bang. Speaking of, therein lies the recent problem around my house. Alex Teach will surely confirm that police suspect, allege and/or guess with educated fashion that a gang has set up camp in the seedy motel behind the gas station on 20th Street, just two blocks from my house. In an effort to recruit new members, the older bangers are sending the young wanna-bes across the street to my neighborhood to earn the “armed robbery” stripes needed for initiation by jacking poor unsuspecting whitey for his Rolex as he’s walking the dog around his townhouse. Regardless, my neighbors are more than scared. They’re pissed. Without so much as a covered-dish supper meeting, we’ve bonded together to become vigilant about our neighborhood. We’re constantly looking out the window to check on our own as they go about their business out of doors. We’re slowly following suspicious people as we’re driving through until they leave our streets. And, we’re even giving them the V-finger “I’m watching you” signal that we all learned from Robert DeNiro in Meet The Fockers. We’re fed up and we’re not going to take it anymore. And once we feel safe again, we will surely have that potluck dinner party— right in the middle of someone’s carport. Speaking of parties, there seems to be a lot of raucous partying happening at three

The Pulse | Volume 8, Issue 36 | September 8, 2011 | www.chattanoogapulse.com

Chuck Crowder “The slimy attorney who was able to slip two of the establishments past the board isn’t nearly as shady in my mind as the other respectable attorney who’s allowing one of those establishments to operate in a building she owns.” downtown clubs located smack dab in the city center. Seems the folks from that seedy motel and a lot of their friends like to hang out in clubs on either end of the half-million-dollar-a-condo complex that used to be a family-owned department store. Every night, or should I say morning, around 3 a.m. police-proclaimed “pandemonium” breaks out and there’s fighting in the streets around the condos, banks and jewelry stores surrounding the establishments. The Beer Board is trying hard to take appropriate action, but it seems the course of punishment they currently have on the books is outdated and, if you have a lawyer with you, easy to slide past. I know club owners have rights as well, but if you can’t control a crowd you’ve liquored up, then

you have no business taking their money. The slimy attorney who was able to slip two of the establishments past the board isn’t nearly as shady in my mind as the other respectable attorney who’s allowing one of those establishments to operate in a building she owns. Shame, shame everybody knows your name(s). Over on the North Shore, measures taken to alleviate more crime near a freakin’ children’s carousel include lighting up Frazier Avenue and Coolidge Park like Christmas trees with industrial-strength warehouse-style thousand-watt bulbs topping our once quaint little street lampposts. The whole area looks like a demilitarized zone where you expect to hear an air raid horn at any moment. But guess what? No more crime, although there is a cost. To me, allowing this sort of “animation” downtown is counter-productive to the millions-upon-millions of dollars the “power structure” and others have invested in making our town one of the most livable mid-size cities in America. It’s also counterproductive to attracting the tourists we rely on so heavily for the hotel/motel tax dollars that help pay for further improvements. Hell, it’s counter-productive to $10 I spent today on lunch at a locally owned downtown establishment. Taking the Disneyland aspect of our shining downtown out of the equation is just bad for everyone—and pretty stupid, I might add. It makes me wonder what happened to Brainerd and Hixson? We gave you thugs those neighborhoods years ago. And you’ve still got East Lake, Glenwood, Bushtown and half of Highland Park to play around in. Why are you coming back downtown? Miss us? Well, we don’t miss you. In fact, you’re bothering us like little gnats we just want to swat out of the way and squash. So please, gather up your weapons, drugs, do-rags and hookers and take that shit somewhere real, like the ATL. We ain’t buyin’ it around here. Chuck Crowder is a local writer and general man about town. His opinions are just that. Everything expressed is loosely based on fact, and crap he hears people talking about. Take what you just read with a grain of salt, but pepper it in your thoughts.


www.chattanoogapulse.com | September 8, 2011 | Volume 8, Issue 36 | The Pulse

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The Pulse - Vol. 8, Issue 36