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July 18, 2013

Vol. 10 • No. 29

Chattanooga’s Weekly Alternative

speakingout storytellers and poets sound off around chattanooga

MUSIC noir rock alex teach the verdict politics a transparency problem

FINAL ROUND OF COMPETITION

JuLy 24

th

@ rhythm & Brews 221 Market Street

Contestants compete for a $100,000.00 National Grand Prize info: kris@catcountry953.com

the texaco Country Showdown is designed to find the most promising country music talent in america and give aspiring artists a chance to launch their professional careers.

2 • The Pulse • july 18-JULY 24, 2013 • chattanoogapulse.com

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THIS WEEK JUly 18-JULY 24 IN THE PULSE EDITORIAL

MAchines are people too

Managing Editor Mike McJunkin Contributing Editors Janis Hashe • Gary Poole

saturday,july 20 @ jj's bohemia for all this week's live music P12-13

Contributors Rich Bailey • Rob Brezsny • Cody Maxwell T.J. Greever • John DeVore • Janis Hashe Matt Jones • Mike McJunkin • Ernie Paik Gary Poole • Alex Teach • Marc Michael Photographer Josh Lang Cover Photo Megan Hollenbeck Cartoonists & Illustrators Max Cannon Interns Keeli Monroe • Carson O'Shoney Founded 2003 by Zachary Cooper & Michael Kull

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Offices 1305 Carter St., Chattanooga, TN 37402 Phone 423.265.9494 Fax 423.266.2335 Website chattanoogapulse.com Email info@chattanoogapulse.com Calendar calendar@chattanoogapulse.com THE FINE PRINT: The Pulse is published weekly by Brewer Media and is distributed throughout the city of Chattanooga and surrounding communities. The Pulse covers a broad range of topics concentrating on music, the arts, entertainment, culture and local news. The Pulse is available free of charge, limited to one copy per reader. No person without written permission from the publisher may take more than one copy per weekly issue. We’re watching. The Pulse may be distributed only by authorized distributors. © 2013 Brewer Media. All rights reserved.

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LIVE MUSIC & DJs EVERY WEEKEND FRI & SAT• JULY 19/20 Stereotype $1 beer 10-11pm LIVE MUSIC STARTS @ 10:30pm FRIDAY & SATURDAY NIGHTS DJ REGGIE REG 2nd Floor 9:30pm-3am FRIDAY & SATURDAY NIGHTS

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TWO FLOORS • ONE BIG PARTY • LIVE MUSIC • DANCING • 409 MARKET ST • 423.756.1919 open 7 days a week » full menu until 2am » 21+ » smoking allowed chattanoogapulse.com • july 18-JULY 24, 2013 • The Pulse • 3

BOWL

THE

Annual Honey Harvest

You Really Need to Bee There Honey is one of nature’s little miracles; whodathunk that something so sticky could have so many useful applications? And yet it does. We put it in our lip balms, lotions, conditioners, and other moisturizers, we use it to add just that little touch of sweetness to a recipe or to make honey butter and hot toddies (yum!). We even use it as a more natural alternative to remedy various ailments, such as hay fever or a nasty cough. Honey, in and of itself, is a great thing…but we must give credit

chattanooga’s weekly alternative NEWS • COMMENTARY • BULLETINS & PUSH NOTIFICATIONS AT DIAL-UP SPEED facebook/chattanoogapulsE • TWITTER @CHATTAPULSE EMAIL LOVE LETTERS, ADVICE & TRASH TALK TO INFO@CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

where credit is due. As much as some people might dislike them, the only reason we have honey is because of honey bees. In addition to supplying us with the deliciously sweet nectar we’ve grown to love, honey bees also pollinate something like one-third of the food we eat (an industry worth about $200 billion dollars a year). So, if you like honey and/or eating, listen up: Honey bees, for reasons mostly unknown to scientists, are dying. If this news alarms you, you should consider rounding up the family (or flying solo) to attend the 13th Annual Honey Harvest at the Creative Discovery Museum on Saturday, July 27 and Sunday, July 28 from noon to 4 p.m. Those attending the event will have the opportunity to meet a

© 2013 SketchCrowd, LLC / www.sketchcrowd.com

beekeeper from the Tennessee Valley Beekeeper Association who will teach you about different kinds of bees and different types of honey. You’ll be able to participate in a live honey extraction, and will even get a chance to make your own honey lip balm, beeswax candles, and honey soap to take home. Those who tend to be more foodoriented gat a chance to learn about differe n t meals that can be m a d e using honey from 212’s chef Nick Goeller. Visi t cdmfun.org for more information, or call (423) 648-6043. —Keeli Monroe

hot fun in the summer

Throw Another Shrimp On The Boil Chattanooga may not, technically, quite constitute the “low country,” but that certainly doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy a savory low country shrimp boil— especially when it benefits a spectacular cause. The event in question is Hot Fun In The Summertime — A Low-Country Shrimp Boil, hosted by the Lookout Mountain Conservancy. The LMC’s mission is to protect Lookout Mountain’s scenic, historic and ecological resources for current and future generations through conservation, advocacy, recreation, and education. The fundraiser will take place on Thursday, July 18 from 6-10 p.m. at The Crash Pad, Chattanooga’s trendy new hostel/hotel at 29

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Johnson St. on the Southside. Tickets are $35 in advance, or $40 at the door. In addition to stuffing your face for a good cause with food catered on-site by St. Elmo’s 1885 Grill, the first 50 people to buy tickets will be entered into a drawing to win an Extreme Sock Drawer Makeover valued at $200 from Goodhew and Sockwell socks. Local bands Hot Damn and Three on a Trio will provide live music. If the thought of waiting until 6 p.m. for such a great event seems unbearable, fret no further! Shruptine’s Gold Leaf Designs gallery, one of the fundraiser’s sponsors, is hosting a pre-shrimp boil party from 4 - 6 p.m. Stop by, have a beer or glass of wine, and view the conservancy and restoration efforts of the gallery. For more information, or to purchase tickets, visit lookoutmountainconservancy.org or call (423) 266-4453. —K. M.

lionel collectors

Track Down Model Trains at the Choo Choo What do Neil Young and model railroads have in common? Quite a lot, actually. Not only has Young been an avid fan of Lionel toy trains since the ’70s, he

also helped invent a new control system and sound system for Lionel in 1992 that changed model railroading forever. The sound system brought realistic sounds to model trains, while the control system allowed the trains to be operated by remote control. He even eventually became part of an ownership group that would buy Lionel just a few years later. His minority shareholder status ended in 2004, but he still remains a consultant for the company. What does all of this have to do with Chattanooga? Well, if you’re an avid model railroader, you already know that there’s a Lionel convention happening at the Chattanooga Choo Choo this week. But if you’re not in the loop, and want to see what all the fuss is about, you can come to the Lionel Collectors Club of American Trading Hall, a free and open to the public event happening at Track 29 on the last day of the convention, July 20. Running from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m., the Trading Hall will contain approximately 150 tables full of model trains, parts and accessories for sale, including rare and in-demand items. Collectors often bring their wish lists to trading hall events, hoping to find pieces they’ve been searching for, perhaps for years. If you’re a collector, the Track 29 Trading Hall might be your lucky day. While the event is free, donations will be accepted to benefit Erlanger Children’s Hospital. Even if you’re not into model trains now, you might just find a newfound interest—or at least, you can try to figure out why Neil Young is so infatuated with these tiny trains.  —Carson O'Shoney

LIST

Lord Subliminal performs Saturday at Sluggo's

THE

pulse » PICK of the litter

pulse » PICKS

• A curated weekly selection of picks from the Chattanooga Live and Arts & Entertainment calendars by Pulse staffers.

THU07.18 SUMMER MUSIC Summer More Than Others, Oak Creek, Josh Gilbert • A jazz-infused, tropical-flavored, jamband from Atlanta. Tasty summer fun. 9 p.m. • The Honest Pint, 35 Patten Pkwy. (423) 468-4192, thehonestpint.com

TANTALIZING TALK All-American Summer Presents: Spoken Word Showcase with Christian Collier • A whole lot of talking going on, when a whole lot of things need to be said. 6 p.m. • Hunter Museum of American Art, 10 Bluff View Ave. (423) 267-0968, huntermuseum.org

FRI07.19

SAT07.20

LOUD AND PROUD

MUSIC SHOWCASE

Leaky Sockets 2013

Sluggo’s Rap/Hip Hop Showcase: Lord Subliminal, FalconTrent, Nerdork

• A celebration of loud sounds and ugly attitudes. Come experience the beauty and wonder of staring into the void. 6 p.m. • Barking Legs Theater, 1307 Dodds Ave. (423) 624-5347, barkinglegs.org

Tales of Our Town

BOOKS, BOOKS, BOOKS

SOUTHERN FRIED HUMOR

Friends of the Chattanooga Public Library Book Sale

Josh Phillips

All Southern towns are steeped in stories, none more so than our own. Pulse contributor Cody Maxwell has just published “Chattanooga Chronicles,” in which he details some of the least publicized but most fascinating. Meet Cody and buy the best present your history-loving family member will ever get.

• After being laid off from the Teat Lightning Caffeinated Milk factory in March of '98, Phillip was forced to take up comedy. Or so he claims. 7, 9:30 p.m. • The Comedy Catch, 3224 Brainerd Rd. (423) 629-2233. thecomedycatch.com

“Chattanooga Chronicles” Booksigning 2 – 4 p.m. Saturday, July 20 Winder Binder Gallery and Bookstore, 40 Frazier Ave. (423) 413-8999

• They've got books, You like to read. It's a match made in literary heaven (and it all goes to support the public library). 9 a.m. - 7 p.m. • Eastgate Library Branch, 5600 Brainerd Rd. (423) 757-5310. friendsofthelibrary-chattanooga.com

• Some of the best rap and hip hop artists in the city come together. 10 p.m. • Sluggo’s, 501 Cherokee Blvd. (423) 752-5224.

American

A REMEMBRANCE CONCERT FOR TIMOTHY HENRY

The

Pink Floyd Rhythm & Brews • Aug. 8th • 9pm • $10 at the door

chattanoogapulse.com • july 18-JULY 24, 2013 • The Pulse • 5

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POLITICS

Cliff Hightower

Cloudy, With A Chance of Transparency Mayor Andy Berke promised transparency, but we’re still looking

Go talk to department heads. You won't be able to. Why? Because they are under orders not to talk to anyone unless given approval from up the chain of command.

A little more than a year ago, a popular Democratic state senator walked inside a pavilion at Coolidge Park and proclaimed he would run for mayor. The crowd swelled and cheered as he laid out his platform. He wanted to focus on education. He would deal with public safety. Finally, he was going to have a transparent government. The problem? The administration of nowMayor Andy Berke isn't so transparent. As a matter of fact, far from it. And there does not seem to be much interest in turning this around any time soon in City Hall. For the most part, the administration of Berke seems to be stepping back in time and taking an old “political circle” approach. It's nothing new and innovative. It's simple: Keep your friends close and your friend's friends closer. From the outset, Berke made sure he would be running a different type of campaign, with limited media access and public comment. Candidate Berke promised the largest grassroots

campaign in the history of the city. He delivered, and in a big way. He recruited a host of 20-somethings to knock on doors across town and the Berke army handed out fliers. So, what did the public find out about the mayoral candidate? He likes education, public safety and transparency. What else? He also likes "Star Wars" and he loves Bruce Springsteen. Let's emphasize that he loves Bruce Springsteen. He really loves Bruce Springsteen. What did the public learn about his politics? That he likes to say he loves transparency. So, how transparent is his new government? Just weeks before the election, a series of stories came out revealing that his father and uncle owned land throughout the inner city and also owned crime-ridden rental properties. His answer was to put out a small statement on the matter, and then dismiss it. Since his administration has taken office, that has been the modus operandi. When a question comes in, put out a statement. Go talk to department heads. You won't be able to. Why? Because they are under orders not to talk to anyone unless given approval from up the chain of command. A recent nugget of transparency came from the city just weeks after the Berke administration and the new city council took office. The council decided the public should be allowed to

view the committee and regular council meetings live, so a live stream is now available on the city's website. So far, that is about the only glimpse of transparency the new city government has shown. Yet within weeks of becoming mayor, Berke completely changed city government, merging, and in some case, eliminating departments. There are now new departments, including Youth and Family Development, the Department of Transportation and Economic and Community Development. But what do these departments do—specifically? What are you, the taxpayer, spending your money on? There are yet to be any defined roles of these jobs spelled out anywhere. A reporter recently asked to speak about the paving budget with the Department of Transportation administrator—and was then told paving still fell under Public Works. The reporter was then told the Transportation Department would be more in charge of planning than operations. So, taxpayer dollars are now being spent on someone that plans to pave the bumpy roads throughout the city. Or perhaps the Transportation Department is planning on putting more of the failing bicycle stations across the city. Or perhaps it is planning on putting up more wayfinding signs. We don't know, because they aren't telling us. Hard to see clearly if something is opaque—not transparent.

Where locals have been going for over thirty years...

1012 Market Street (423) 266-1103

chattanoogapulse.com • july 18-JULY 24, 2013 • The Pulse • 7

theartof

speakingout A spoken-word artist spells out the story of the scene by christian j. collier

T

here’s a certain feeling that washes over you when you set foot onto a stage, position yourself behind a microphone, look out into the faces of the people in an audience, and just let go. How does it feel to use your voice, body, and words to transport a crowd to wherever you wish them to go? In a word, amazing. I know this because for more than 12 years now, this is what I have been fortunate to do. My start as a performance poet and spoken-word artist came when I was just 17, and that first experience in May of 2001 truly changed my life. It just so happened to have occurred in (of all places) a Barnes & Noble bookstore in Chattanooga, TN. While the Scenic City is far from being an arts hub of the stature of New York or Chicago, it is becoming more and more known for its arts community. During the past four years, the local spoken-word scene has grown and diversified, giving both storytellers and poets further opportunities to network, present their talents, and become a genuine artistic community. In the summer of 2009, I had the opportunity to start a weekly poetry/spoken-word open-mic called The Speakeasy. I honestly had no idea what to expect, or who, for that matter, would at-

Christian J. Collier • Photo by Ace Harney

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tend. To my pleasant surprise, each week we had writers and performers from all across the board come out: teenagers, grandparents, gays, straights, gangstas, emcees, academic poets—you name it. I learned very quickly that Chattanooga had a unique, diverse population of authors who, regardless of class, race or gender, desired the same thing—to be heard and to hear others. Since then, I’ve witnessed a wealth of camaraderie in the local spoken-word scene. It’s quite common to catch the same poet or storyteller who blew you away at one show seated in the audience at another simply showing support. I asked Marsha Mills, known as the Poetic Diva, and who is also the current president of the Rhyme-N-Chatt Interactive Poetry Organization, what drew her in to performing her works publicly, and her response is indicative of the way a number of local writers feel. She told me, “I got involved because I enjoyed being around people who were like me. For years, I wrote poetry and had no platform in which to share it. Rhyme-N-Chatt gave me and others that opportunity, and I wanted others to find out about it and get involved.” One of the primary elements at the heart of Chattanooga’s spoken-word community is just that—involvement. For those who have never been to a slam or any kind of show where poets recite, you probably assume that the cliches of finger snaps and fauxBeatnik cool prevail. However, that it is not the case. We have come a long way from there, dear friends. For people actively in the scene who write and perform, it is all about being involved on a deeper level and sharing, not just the art, but their individual stories and truths.

Connection also plays a vital role in the equation. The local spoken-word community is still growing and developing, which means that a lot of people who have never experienced anything like it are slowly, but surely, being indoctrinated. I have repeatedly seen people get drawn in by someone’s performance and moved by it. They are connecting with the words and reacting to them. In 2010, I started the MANIFEST series, which was a monthly event whose primary goal was to provide a large outlet for artists to perform, network, and further promote themselves. Many of the shows that I organized were based in the world of spokenword. One of the things I’ve most enjoyed over the past few years has been watching poets who are just beginning to find themselves on the stage become both more confident and comfortable. To see the sheer joy, excitement, and exhaustion in their bodies after a lively performance is always gratifying, because they have truly connected to the essence of their work. They are not just artificially telling the audience about their triumphs, failures, and struggles. Rather, they are actually reliving those things, experiencing those feelings anew, and taking the crowd along on the journey with them. The artists who make up the local spoken-word community represent the present landscape of Chattanooga, as well as the direction the city is heading. There is a stunningly varied array of voices here whose works are both enthralling and brave, and they are offering valuable and distinct artistic perspectives. For instance, there are currently more open and active LGBT spokenword artists in the area than ever before. While the Scenic City remains a very conservative place, this fact alone is indicative of how some of the cultural leanings are shifting into more accepting and progressive territory. As a whole, spoken-word is still largely considered to be a new art form. But, over the past 17 years, it’s become more of a legitimate art form nationally. What’s interesting to note about this is that the oral tradition of reciting songs, stories, and poems is actu-

The South has always given its wordsmiths their share of material. If you are a Southerner, there are words resting in your throats. Christian J. Collier ally a great deal older than written language. However, everything in life is truly cyclical, and, if enough time passes, old standards tend to get rediscovered, re-branded with renewed fervor, and become new again. Given that the national understanding and appreciation of the art is evolving, Chattanooga has

much to be proud of, and should be immensely optimistic about the future cultivation of the craft. A good number of our spokenword artists are doing great work that should inspire anyone who has a pen, a voice, and enough drive to bring their passion to fruition. Storyteller Jim Pfitzer has been touring his Aldo Leopold show all across the country. A story slam has been taking place for more than six months where participants tell stories in five minutes, and a winner is declared at the end of the night. I recently finished a spoken-word EP. The South has always given its wordsmiths their share of material. If you are a Southerner, there are words resting in your throats. More and more people in our city are realizing this, and on any stage, on any given night, they are stepping behind microphones, opening their mouths, and allowing their voices to sing.

Spoken word events in Chattanooga To check out what Chattanooga’s spoken-word scene has to offer, make sure to mark these events on your calendars! Barnes and Noble Poetry Open-Mic Night, hosted by K.B. Ballentine When: The last Friday of every month, 7:30 p.m. Where: Barnes & Noble in Hamilton Place Mall Admission: Free Wide Open Floor, hosted by Marcus Ellsworth What: An open-mic that is open to poetry, dance, experimental art, and nearly anything else you can think of.

When: The first Friday of every month. Doors open 7:30 p.m. Where: Barking Legs Theater, 1307 Dodds Ave. Admission: Free for performers. $5 for non-performers The River City Sessions What: A collaboration of poets, authors, storytellers and musicians whose work honors Southern life and culture.

When: The second Friday of every month, 7:30 p.m. Where: The Camp House, 1427 Williams St. Admission: $5 Camp House Open-Mic Competition, hosted by Christian J. Collier What: A weekly open-mic geared towards singer-songwriters, poets, etc. The winning act receives a cash prize and is entered into the quarterly final bout. When: Every Thursday (unless noted otherwise). Sign-ups start 7 p.m. and the event starts 8 p.m. Where: The Camp House, 1427 Williams St. Admission: $2

Story Slam, hosted by Ben Schnell What: Dubbed,“True stories without notes in 5 minutes.” The theme for the next slam is the inexplicable.

When: July 30, 7:30 p.m. Where: The Camp House, 1427 Williams St. Admission: Free All-American Summer at The Hunter Museum, featuring Christian J. Collier What: Poet and musician Christian J. Collier brings a spoken-word showcase to The Hunter’s All-American Summer concert series. A cash bar will be open and food will be available from Good Dog. When: July 18, 6 p.m. Where: Hunter Museum of American Art, 10 Bluff View Admission: Included with regular Hunter Museum admission, $9.95 adults Sourne Korvid • Photo by Christian J. Collier

chattanoogapulse.com • july 18-JULY 24, 2013 • The Pulse • 9

Music

marc michael

The Dead Testaments Rock Noir What started as a side project is now a band to watch

A popular ’80s guitarist once offered some insight about his attitude towards songwriting. He compared it to making cheeseburgers, suggesting that once you figured out the right recipe you didn’t stray from it much, you just got down to the business of making good cheeseburgers and if people liked them, they’d buy them. The Dead Testaments is the brainchild of Isaac Houck, guitarist and singer for Elk Milk. It started about a year ago when Houck began developing some ideas during some down time, ideas that were not necessarily Elk Milk material but were, in Houck’s words, a therapeutic exercise—music that just had to come out. The result was a set of tunes too good not to share, so Houck swiftly assembled a pickup band of members of Elk Milk and Moonlight Bride (including the always lovely Matt Livingston) and Allie Stafford of Forest Magic to play a one-off show at JJ’s Bohemia. The show was so well received that the decision was made to record an EP, as of yet untitled, but consisting of five rough tracks that show the kind of promise that will make The Dead Testaments an immediately respected player in the region.

honest music

Crisp black and white, full of shaded eyes, smoldering cigarettes and half empty bottles of Scotch.

Rough tracks or not, the EP already displays exemplary cohesion. Each tune is a genuinely unique expression, but certain elements are common to all. The vocals are low and growly, a mysterious stranger relating dark and menacing anecdotes over a background of lush instrumentation, ethereal, atmospheric, foreboding. More than anything else I’ve heard recently, this collection of tunes exhibits a mastery of mood and tone. It’s ear candy for those who can appreciate the macabre. This is “noir rock” in crisp black and white, full of shaded eyes, smoldering cigarettes and half empty bottles of Scotch. Frankly, it seems like less of an EP and more of a precursor to a fullblown concept album and a damn fine one at that. Houck is very forthcoming about the influence of Leonard Cohen while writing this music, and I think fans of Cohen (the man is a living legend) will recognize it, particularly in track two, “Walking Backwards.” The key word here, of course, is “influenced,” which should in no way be taken to mean “derivative.” These tunes are wholly fresh and original; the nod to Cohen is just that—a nod. In fact, I think the

Jeremy Southern

best way to convey the overall sound of the EP is this: Based on the skill of the players and the quality of the compositions (lyrically and musically), The Dead Testaments could work up covers of Cohen’s “Everybody Knows,” Tom Waits’ “Black Wings,” and Nick Cave’s “Red Right Hand” and integrate them seamlessly into the set, turning an EP into an album instantly. The tracks are that good. If sinister storytelling tickles your fancy, do not miss the opportunity to see them live at

Sluggo’s on August 2. The EP is scheduled for release in late fall. While this all may have started as a side project, it is by unanimous decision that The Dead Testaments’ work is now the sole focus of everybody involved. Which is proper; work of this quality and potential demands nothing less. The Dead Testaments are Isaac Houck, Dave Maki, Matt Livingston, Jeremy Southern and Allie Stafford. If you are a music lover of any stripe, an evening spent with The Dead Testaments is an evening well spent.

local and regional shows

American Honey [$3] Summer More Than Others with Oak Creek [$5] Turchi with Que Sera! Sera! and Iron Fez [$5] Fighting for Tomorrow with The Van Lears [$5]

Wed, July 17 Thu, July 18 Wed, July 24 Thu, July 25

9pm 9pm 9pm 9pm

Sundays: Live Trivia 4-6pm followed by Live Music July 21 - Pints For Autism Benefit Show featuring Ashley and the X’s, Saving Farris, Scenic, Get Hot or Go Home, Dead Freight, and many more [$5 donation]

10 • The Pulse • july 18-JULY 24, 2013 • chattanoogapulse.com

Full food menu serving lunch and dinner. 11am-2am, 7 days a week. 35 Patten Parkway * 423.468.4192 thehonestpint.com * Facebook.com/thehonestpint

Between the Sleeves

record reviews • ernie paik

From Mali to Romania Innovative music percolates worldwide

Bassekou Kouyaté & Ngoni Ba Jama Ko (Out Here)

B

assekou Kouyaté of the west African nation Mali has described himself as being “apolitical,” but during the recording of the album Jama Ko last year with his band Ngoni Ba, he couldn’t help but be affected by his country’s turbulent politics and violent conflict, driven by Muslim extremists in northern Mali. On the first day of studio recording, Mali experienced a coup d'état, throwing the nation into uncertainty with things like curfews and power outages affecting daily life, in addition to the continued offensive by the rebel troops. The attitude on much of the hour-long album Jama Ko expresses Kouyaté’s intense frustration, and the album’s title, translated as “large gathering of people,” is a call for unity in crisis. Kouyaté is a virtuoso on the ngoni—a centuries-old lute-like stringed instrument— and he plays an electric version of it here with a jaw-dropping surgical precision and an im-

Rodion G.A. The Lost Tapes (Strut)

possibly swift tempo. The epitome of Kouyaté’s mood is heard on “Ne Me Fatigue Pas” (“Don’t Wear Me Out”) which has a furious pace over relentless drum pitter-patters, with his frenzy of whirlwind acrobatic ngoni playing, just a few paces away from being full-on shredding. Supplemented by his wife, lead singer Amy Sacko, plus his two sons, the first half of Jama Ko is marked with impassioned singing and breathtaking ngoni runs with a seemingly limitless energy and light wah-wah inflections. This writer believes that even the most jaded listeners of guitar-god pyrotechnics will be unconditionally awed by Kouyaté’s performing skills and clarity. The second half of the album changes in spirit, shifting to a more smoldering, less wild type of anger, and the vibrant track “Segu Jajiri” even demonstrates a jubilance. One diversion is the number “Pove 2,” which features the guest star Taj Mahal on vocals and

electric guitar, delivering a dose of sauntering electric-blues; although it works, it seems out of place here. Nevertheless, Jama Ko is one of the most potent and impressive musical expressions of discontent this critic has heard in recent times.

I

t’s odd to think that more than a decade before the overthrow and execution of Romanian President Nicolae Ceaucescu, he was actually considered one of the more popular Communist figures through the eyes of the first world, demonstrating an uncommon openness toward the U.S.A. and western Europe. Eventually, though, there was a cultural clamp-down in Romania, even with a ban on singing in English, in addition to unbearably severe austerity policies in the ’80s; however, during the years of openness, one Romanian music enthusiast Rodion Ladislau Rosca enjoyed visits to Hungary to add to his

impressive record collection. This D.I.Y. sound-tech whiz also accumulated reel-to-reel tape machines and electronic sound-making devices, which he would use in his band Rodion G.A., ripe for rediscovery among western audiences thanks to this compilation of obscure and unreleased recordings. These tracks, recorded in the late ’70s and early ’80s, bear influence from electronic pioneers such as Kraftwerk but also bring to mind various acts like Suicide, Hawkwind and TONTO’s Expanding Head Band, often using primitivesounding artificial drum beats and a dark, pulsing synth vibe that’s seemingly a weird amalgam of post-punk, new wave, space rock and psychedelia. Only a few songs feature vocals, including the lo-fi garage rock “Disco Mania,” atypically featuring an acoustic drum kit and chipmunk-style vocals with swaggering guitar licks; synths are the dominant instruments, often sounding both sick and piercing like on “Imagini Din Vis” with envelope effects, channeling the sci-fi rock of Chrome, although wailing guitars occasionally step up alongside the synths, like on “Caravane.” The closing “In Linistea Noptil” is an outlier, featuring a maudlin tone and piano notes, slightly dialing down the synths and evoking composer JeanClaude Vannier. The Lost Tapes features music that isn’t amorphous yet not fully baked and focused, but its dirty synth-rock aesthetic may appeal to fans of adventurous underground ‘70s music from Krautrock to electronic post-punk.

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chattanoogapulse.com • july 18-JULY 24, 2013 • The Pulse • 11

Chattanooga Live

CHATTANOOGA

Thu 07.18

LIVE MUSIC

JULY

LUELLA AND THE SUN THU 9:30p 18 with AMBER FULTS

19 SAT BOOMBOX 10p 20 COUNTRY SHOWDOWN WED 8p 24 DAVID RYAN HARRIS THU 8:30p 25 FLY BY RADIO

FEMALE FRONTED ROCK AND ROLL

FRI 10p

ONE OF THE COOLEST SHOWS AROUND

THE FINALS hosted by Cat Country 95.3

with special guest LATICIA WOLF

7.26 JORDAN HALLQUIST & THE OUTFIT 7.27 COSMIC CHARLIE 7.31 THE PAPER BIRD ALL SHOWS 21+ UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED • NON-SMOKING VENUE

221 MARKET STREET

HOT MUSIC • FINE BEER • GREAT FOOD BUY TICKETS ONLINE • RHYTHM-BREWS.COM

BACKYLAERD GRIL

ROCKIN’ IN FRONT, SMOKIN’ OUT BACK

NO SMOKING • ID REQUIRED • $5 COVER BAND NIGHTS LIVE MUSIC 7:30-11 P.M. • DRINK SPECIALS • BIKES WELCOME! Friday July 19 Saturday July 20

Soul Survivor Bad Habit

No cover • 21 & over after 9pm

8:00pm - 11:00pm 8:30pm Midnight

E $11.95 RIB EY E IV DINNER ON LTS! MUSIC NIGH 4021 HIXSON PIKE “WE SMOKE IN OUR BACKYARD”

BETWEEN ACCESS ROAD & ASHLAND TERRACE

423.486.1369 • BACKYARDGRILLECHATTANOOGA.COM

Hot Damn and Three on a Trio 6 p.m. The Crash Pad, 29 Johnson St. (423) 648-8393, crashpadchattanooga.com The Loop 7 p.m. Sugar’s Ribs, 507 Broad St. (423) 508-8956, sugarsribs.com Open Mic 7 p.m. The Camp House, 1427 Williams St. (423) 702-8081, thecamphouse.com Jimmy Harris 7 p.m. The Coconut Room at The Palms at Hamilton, 6925 Shallowford Rd., #202. (423) 499-5055, thepalmsathamilton.com Open Mic with Hap Henninger 9 p.m. The Office, 901 Carter St. (inside Days Inn). (423) 634-9191, facebook.com/ theoffice.chatt QUEERWULF, ft. Sandal Stomp, Xanax Squaredance 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia, 231 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 266-1400, jjsbohemia.com Summer More Than Others, Oak Creek, Josh Gilbert 9 p.m. The Honest Pint, 35 Patten Pkwy. (423) 468-4192, thehonestpint.com Luella and the Sun, Amber Fults 9 p.m. Rhythm & Brews, 221 Market St. rhythm-brews.com American Aquarium 9 p.m. Tremont Tavern, 1203 Hixson Pike. (423) 266-1996, tremonttavern.com

Fri 07.19 Keelan Donovan 4 p.m. The Camp House, 1427 Williams St. (423) 702-8081, thecamphouse.com

12 • The Pulse • july 18-JULY 24, 2013 • chattanoogapulse.com

MUSIC CALENDAR Matt Chancey & The Lady Killers 6 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia, 231 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 266-1400, jjsbohemia.com Smooth Dialects 6 p.m. NightFall Music Series, River City Stage at Miller Plaza, 850 Market St. nightfallchattanooga.com. Leaky Sockets 2013 6 p.m.-12:30 a.m. Barking Legs Theater, 1307 Dodds Ave. (423) 624-5347, barkinglegs.org Allen Stone 7 p.m. Nightfall Music Series, River City Stage at Miller Plaza, 850 Market St. nightfallchattanooga.com. Jimmy Harris 7 p.m. The Coconut Room at The Palms at Hamilton, 6925 Shallowford Rd., #202 (423) 499-5055, thepalmsathamilton.com Hugh Allen 7 p.m. Magoo’s Restaurant, 3658 Ringgold Rd. (423) 867-1351, facebook.com/MagoosTN Nate Currin with Keelan Donovan 7:30 p.m. The Camp House, 1427 Williams St. (423) 702-8081, thecamphouse.com Soul Survivor 8 p.m. Backyard Grille, 4021 Hixson Pike. (423) 486-1369, backyardgrillechattanooga. com The Erin Hill Band 8 p.m. Acoustic Café, 61 RBC Dr., Ringgold, Ga. (706) 965-2065, ringgoldacoustic.com Blues Hammer 8:30 p.m. The Foundry, 1201 Broad St. (423) 756-3400, chattanooganhotel.com. Smooth Dialects, Luella and the Sun 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia, 231 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 266-1400, jjsbohemia.com Jordan Hallquist 9 p.m. Bart’s Lakeshore,

• Take a bit of jazz, a touch of Sade, the musicianship of Steely Dan and toss in a sprig of Edie Brickell and what you have is the always original and inventive stylings of Chattanooga's own Dana Rogers. For the past 15 years, Dana has logged many a mile touring the region (and even heading down under to Australia), all to appreciative audiences. Saturday, 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Chattanooga Incline Railway, 3917 St. Elmo Ave. (423) 821-4224, ridetheincline.com

5600 Lakeshore Dr. (423) 870-0777, bartslakeshore.com Marc Michael 9 p.m. The Office, 901 Carter St. (inside Days Inn). (423) 634-9191, facebook.com/ theoffice.chatt Erin Hill 9 p.m. Acoustic Café, 61 RBC Dr., Ringgold, Ga. (706) 965-2065, ringgoldacoustic.com Scenic City Soul Revue 9:30 p.m. Sugar’s Ribs, 507 Broad St. (423) 508-8956, sugarsribs.com Ryan Oyer, Rick Rushing and the Blues Strangers 9:30 p.m. Lindsay Street Music Hall, 901 Lindsay St. (423) 755-9111, lindsaystreethall.com Convertibull 9:30 p.m. Pokey’s Sports Bar, 918 Sahara Dr., Cleveland. (423) 476-6059 Sterotype 10 p.m. Raw, 409 Market St. (423) 756-1919, facebook. com/raw.chattanooga Fly By Radio

10 p.m. Rhythm & Brews, 221 Market St. rhythm-brews.com Aunt Betty 10 p.m. Bud’s Sports Bar, 5751 Brainerd Rd. (423) 499-9878, budssportsbar.com

Sat 07.20 Dana Rogers 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Chattanooga Incline Railway, 3917 St. Elmo Ave. (423) 821-4224, ridetheincline.com Hill City Fest featuring Acoustic Mayhem & Guests 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. St. Mark’s Church Northshore, 701 Mississippi Ave. (423) 267-5530, stmarkschattanooga.com Josh Gilbert 12:30 p.m. Chattanooga River Market, Tennessee Aquarium Plaza, 1 Broad St. (423) 402-9960, chattanoogarivermarket.com Tennessee Schmaltz Klezmer Band 2 - 4 p.m. Creative Discovery Museum, 321 Chestnut St.

Chattanooga Live (423) 756-2738. cdmfun.org Encounters, Face All Fears, Adelaide, East Old Topside and Aurora 7 p.m. Warehouse Cleveland, 260 2nd Street NE., Cleveland. warehousevenue.com Jimmy Harris 7 p.m. The Coconut Room at The Palms at Hamilton, 6925 Shallowford Rd., #202. (423) 499-5055, thepalmsathamilton.com Function 7 p.m. Brewhaus, 224 Frazier Ave. (423) 531-8490, brewhausbar.com Gary Virtue, Chris Crunk, Game Time, Boys 7:30 p.m. Cloud Springs Deli, 4097 Cloud Springs Rd. (706) 956-8128. cloudspringsdeli.com The Collins Brothers Band 8 p.m. Acoustic Café, 61 RBC Dr., Ringgold, Ga. (706) 965-2065, ringgoldacoustic.com Billie in the Woods 8 p.m. The Crash Pad, 29 Johnson St., (423) 648-8393, crashpadchattanooga.com Big Mike Mic 8 p.m. Mocha Restaurant & Lounge, 3116 Brainerd Rd. (423) 531-4154, mochajazz.net Zach Dylan & D-Railed 8 p.m. Pokey’s Sports Bar, 918 Sahara Dr., Cleveland. (423) 476-6059. Collins Brothers Band 8 p.m. Acoustic Café, 61 RBC Dr., Ringgold, Ga. (706) 965-2065, ringgoldacoustic.com Bad Habit 8:30 p.m. Backyard Grille, 4021 Hixson Pike. (423) 486-1369, backyardgrillechattanooga. com One Night Stand 9 p.m. SkyZoo, 5709 Lee Hwy. (423) 468-4533, skyzoochattanooga.com Machines Are People Too, Maserati 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia,

901 Carter St (Inside Days Inn) 423-634-9191

MUSIC CALENDAR 231 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 266-1400, jjsbohemia.com Cordbread 9 p.m. The Gypsy Rose, 1682 S. Lee Hwy., Cleveland. (423) 476-0050. Lickity Split 9 p.m. Tavern Sports Bar & Grill, 12130 Dayton Pike, Soddy Daisy, (423) 401-7234. facebook.com/ Standing Room Only 9:30 p.m. Sugar’s Ribs, 507 Broad St. (423) 508-8956, sugarsribs.com Big Al & the Heavyweights 9:30 p.m. Pokey’s Sports Bar, 918 Sahara Dr., Cleveland. (423) 476-6059. Jack Kirton 10 p.m. The Office, 901 Carter St. (inside Days Inn). (423) 634-9191, facebook.com/theoffice.chatt Boombox 10 p.m. Rhythm & Brews, 221 Market St. rhythm-brews.com Stereotype 10 p.m. Raw, 409 Market St. (423) 756-1919, facebook. com/raw.chattanooga Aunt Betty 10 p.m. Bud’s Sports Bar, 5751 Brainerd Rd. (423) 499-9878, budssportsbar.com Sluggo’s Rap/Hip Hop Showcase: Lord Subliminal, FalconTrent, Nerdork 10 p.m. Sluggo’s, 501 Cherokee Blvd. (423) 752-5224. Wasted 10 p.m. The Coliseum, 1515 W. Walnut Ave., Dalton, Ga., (706) 529-9813.

Sun 07.21 The Possum Hunters Bluegrass Band 11 a.m. Chattanooga Market, First Tennessee Pavilion, 1829 Carter St. chattanoogamarket.com. Bluetastic Fangrass 12:30 p.m. Chattanooga Market, First Tennessee

Pavilion, 1829 Carter St. chattanoogamarket.com. Slim Pickins Bluegrass 2 p.m. Chattanooga Market, First Tennessee Pavilion, 1829 Carter St. chattanoogamarket.com. Bobby Denton Band Jam 2 p.m. Cheap Seats Sports Bar, 2925 Rossville Blvd. (423) 629-5636. Chattanooga Traditional Irish Music Session 5 p.m. Moccasin Bend Brewing Company, 4015 Tennessee Ave. (423) 821-6392, bendbrewingbeer.com Pints for Autism III: Get Hot or Go Home, Scenic, Desert Sirens, Saving Ferris 7 p.m. The Honest Pint, 35 Patten Pkwy. (423) 468-4192, thehonestpint.com Comrades, Tir Asleen, The Bear Comes Home, Good Thief, Jeremy Campbell 7 p.m. Warehouse Cleveland, 260 2nd Street NE., Cleveland. warehousevenue.com Don Coyote, Fullmoon Crazies, Lily and the Tigers 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia, 231 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 266-1400, jsbohemia.com

Mon 07.22 Call 2 Arms 6 p.m. Cloud Springs Deli, 4097 Cloud Springs Rd. (706) 956-8128, cloudspringsdeli.com Monday Night Big Band 7 p.m. The Coconut Room at The Palms at Hamilton, 6925 Shallowford Rd., #202. (423) 499-5055, thepalmsathamilton.com

Tue 07.23 Tim Starnes & Friends 7 p.m. Sugar’s Ribs, 507 Broad St. (423) 508-8956, sugarsribs.com

Wed07.24 Ryan Oyer 7 p.m. The Honest Pint, 35 Patten Pkwy. (423) 468-4192, thehonestpint.com Dan Sheffield 7 p.m. Sugar’s Ribs, 507 Broad St. (423) 508-8956, sugarsribs.com Jimmy Harris 7 p.m. The Coconut Room at The Palms at Hamilton, 6925 Shallowford Rd., #202. (423) 499-5055, thepalmsathamilton.com She She Dance 7 p.m. Magoo’s Restaurant, 3658 Ringgold Rd. (423) 867-1351, facebook.com/MagoosTN Turchi, Que Sera! Sera!, Iron Fez 8 p.m. The Honest Pint, 35 Patten Pkwy. (423) 468-4192, thehonestpint.com John Sharpe 8 p.m. Acoustic Café, 61 RBC Drive, Ringgold, Ga. (706) 965-2065, ringgoldacoustic.com Texaco Country Showdown Finals 8 p.m. Rhythm & Brews, 221 Market St. rhythm-brews.com PeeWee Moore 8 p.m. Jack A’s Chop Shop Saloon, 742 Ashland Terrace. (423) 713-8739, jackaschopshopsaloon.com Josh Lewis 9 p.m. Bud’s Sports Bar, 5751 Brainerd Rd. (423) 499-9878, budssportsbar.com 2nFRO & Frenz 9 p.m. Pokey’s Sports Bar, 918 Sahara Drive, Cleveland. (423) 476-6059

Thursday, July 18: 9pm Open Mic with Hap Henninger Friday, July 19: 9pm Marc Michael of the Molly Maguires Saturday, July 20: 10pm Jack Kirton of Endelouz Tuesday, July 23: 7pm

Server/Hotel Appreciation Night $5 Pitchers $2 Wells $1.50 Domestics ●

All shows are free with dinner or 2 drinks! Stop by & check out our daily specials! Happy Hour: Mon-Fri: 4-7pm $1 10oz drafts, $3 32oz drafts, $2 Wells, $1.50 Domestics, Free Appetizers

Facebook.com/theoffice.chatt

Hot Music • Hot Times • Hot Food

Smoke Free • 742 Ashland Terrace

19 Queen Lightning SAT Jul 20 Robert & Sims WeD Jul 24 Tim & Reece FRI Jul

HAPPY HOUR

3P-7P • MON-FRI Map these locations on chattanoogapulse.com. Send event listings at least 10 days in advance to: calendar@ chattanoogapulse.com.

BIKE NIGHT EVERY

WEDNESDAY

(423) 710-8739

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chattanoogapulse.com • july 18-JULY 24, 2013 • The Pulse • 13

Arts

michael crumb

Novels At The World’s End Not-so-light summer reads The recent LibertyCon featured sessions on “doom.” Current films with apocalyptic overtones include both World War Z and Pacific Rim. Zombies have a special symbolism with regard to the apocalypse: “the dead rise up;” but they are also Gothic constructs connected to voodoo. The question arises: Why all the concern about the world’s end? A glib answer may be that a dysfunctional culture expects its own end, entertaining itself with possible scenarios. I am reminded of a remark by Tennessee Williams, “The question one hears most frequently about writers of the Gothic school is this little classic, “Why do they write about such dreadful things?’” Williams was writing an introduction for Carson McCullers’ Reflections in a Golden Eye, a novel sufficiently “Gothic” and one focused on endings. One witness to her intensity was John Huston, whose film adaptation featured both Marlon Brando and Elizabeth Taylor. I believe Williams suggests that the paths of genre writing and literature intersect in brilliant illumination. The labels have less relevance than does this accomplishment. Novels about the end of the world are inherently fantastic— after all, the world is still here. It may be that the question about how the world ends relates to the question about how the world persists. Two important novels involved with these questions include John Crowley’s Daemonomanioa and Terry Pratchett’s and Neil Gaiman’s Good Omens. These novels appeared around ten years apart and relatively on time for the current millennium. Although they are apparently different in tone, they possess significant qualities in common, including

some “Gothic” devices, at times with unexpected twists. While Good Omens satirizes its way through history to approach the dread end—an elegant farce in all the best senses—Daemonomanioa explores the paradox of the marvelous and the mundane in its journey to the turning point. Both novels deeply engage the reader, though Crowley’s book contains about twice as many words. To return to Williams’ remarks: “The great difficulty of understanding, and communication, lies in the fact that we who are asked this question [see above] and those who ask it do not really inhabit the same universe.” For example, consider the collaboration that became Stanley Kubrick’s Doctor Strangelove. No doubt, this film has lots of satirical humor, but it also explores some very disconcerting subtexts, including “Gothic” overtones, until it reaches its dreadful conclusion. The point here involves artistic evolution. The writer may well be driven to a strange complexity, while readers may seek comfort in the familiar. Defamiliarization has remained a significant modernist’s theme. Doctor Strangelove has a relevant connection to Good Omens. They both rush through their satirical adventures while casting insight on institutional history. For example, Good

14 • The Pulse • july 18-JULY 24, 2013 • chattanoogapulse.com

It may be that the question about how the world ends relates to the question about how the world persists.” Omens brings a casual explanation of the English monetary system that is simply priceless. Also, of much interest, the reader may recognize the seeds of what will eventually become Gaiman’s American Gods. Both of these novels are driven through unusual narrative structures. Good Omens, though it reaches way back in time, essentially organizes itself around the time when the world ends. Crowley divides Daemonomania into three

sections corresponding to astrological houses. His novel extends between Fall Equinox and Winter Solstice, essentially the season of autumn. Crowley also crosscuts between contemporary times and early 17th century Prague. Significantly, at this earlier time in history, many also thought the world was about to end. Another common dimension of these novels’ structures involves books about the end of the world. In Good Omens, the book is old (17th century?), while the protagonist of Daemonomania composes a book about the end of the world. This shows fine literary expressionism when the subject and the story share an identity. Some great novels employ a significant literary device that involves a fantastic coincidence leading to recognition. Melville’s Pierre, Penn Warren’s All the King’s Men, Pynchon’s Gravity’s Rainbow, and Flaubert’s Salammbo develop great intensity through such a device. In Crowley’s novel, the contemporary story and the Prague

story are quite connected by a physical link. Good Omens develops a fantastic romantic connection. An important difference between these novels involves levels of literary ambitions. Good Omens as a collaboration—a first collaboration—nails its targets, like institutional religion with an appetite for death and eccentric accuracy. For Crowley, this novel has connections to earlier significant works of his own and, likely, to later ones as well. His novel contains an intense erotic dimension alongside deeply fantastic passages that compare well to the best of fantastic precedents. Crowley also has his satirical turns. Significantly, both novels shown an inclusiveness of characters, ranging from children to supernatural beings, and this inclusiveness reflects a kind of integrated perspective of this world. The real value of reading these great writers has to do more with the level of insight that they can present. The mode of these novels concerning the end of the world functions as a vehicle for this kind of inclusiveness, for literary integration and perceptive insight. Readers seeking more of this fare would do well to check out Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake (2003). This satirical dystopic novel brings together a poetic style with mad science and with wild allusive play. By examining eugenics, Atwood shows how paradigms transform our world. When the best writers deploy to approach a similar theme, the world’s end, I do recall a phrase: “Everything that rises must converge,” attributed to Flannery O’Conner. Enjoy reading!

Tech

WEDNESDAYS

MONSTER

rich bailey

Gig Tank: Bigger Is Better Three startups use Chattanooga’s Gig speed to the max

W

hat do falling seniors, failing industrial machines and frustrated shoppers have in common? As far as three companies in this summer's Gig Tank startup accelerator are concerned, the answer is better prevention through Big Data. Sensevery: Monitoring for the Elderly

Sensevery's product manages the health of elderly people using a wrist monitor that collects data to detect and predict health risks. Sensevery's smart wrist band collects data 24/7 on a senior's movement, sleep activity, body temperature, and heart rate, then applies predictive algorithms and uses a mobile app to alert caregivers when unusual behavioral data indicates immediate danger like a fall or suggests a pattern of deteriorating health. The payoff, founders say, is in timelier health care, reduced hospital admissions, and reduced stress on caregivers. The company's two cofounders, Bentley Cook and Parth Suthar, came to the Gig Tank as "specialists," individual participants who can attach to a team or float among teams, and then formed a team during the summer. "Parth came to me with an idea, and we decided to put our brains together and make a run of it," said Cook, who graduated from Sewanee in 2011 with degrees in computer science and Russian. "Our focus now is building the cloud-based monitoring service," said Suthar, a veteran of two previous startups, with 12 years experience designing connective devices. "We're still aiming for the same Demo Day. We're going

to present what the data looks like when someone is moving, sleeping, or experiencing a fall."

Hutgrip: Predicting Machinery Failure

Hutgrip, cofounded by a pair of Bulgarians with connections to Chattanooga through another startup program in Silicon Valley, adds a layer of cloud-based software processing on top of a manufacturer's existing equipment and sensors to manage equipment failures. "We use artificial intelligence to analyze the data, to identify normal parameters [for temperature and humidity, for example], identify anomalies, and predict when the machine will fail," said cofounder Ivan Dragoev. "Once we apply our magic to the data, we can send you a text message that says 'Hey, you need to check your temperature on this bearing,’ for example." Mira: Bringing Data to the Storefront

Anyone shopping online has access to a wealth of informa-

tion, like reviews, recommendations, and social media conversations. Likewise, online retailers have abundant metrics like time spent on the site, what is bought, what is looked at, and the conversion rate at which browsers become buyers. "In a physical store, all this information is lacking, for both sides," said Sunny Feng, CEO and cofounder of Mira. "We are a retail tech company that is focused on changing the in-store shopping experience by connecting all the online information from web, mobile, and social media into the physical storefront." Mira will do that by placing large monitors equipped with motion sensing software —users don't even need to touch the screen—in key locations in stores and pulling existing online content along with flash specials just for in-store customers. The company will also provide brick-and-mortar retailers with the kind of metrics now available only with online shopping. Big Data

What all three of these startups have in common is that capturing and processing massive amounts of data is at the heart of their services. Processing happens in the cloud, and the raw and crunched numbers go back and forth via high-bandwidth Internet connection. These services would not even be possible without a big data pipe like Chattanooga's Gig. Dragoev explained why Big Data is a must for Hutgrip: "Imagine you have one machine with 10 sensors, sending data once per second. We have

predictive analytics running in the cloud each second, analyzing data from the last six seconds. If you want to be real time, if you want to accurately predict failure, you have to have reliable infrastructure. Chattanooga has this fiber network, which is big and reliable." "What Hutgrip is doing with machines, we're doing with people," added Suthar of Sensevery. His cofounder explained the significance of Big Data by comparing it to personal weather prediction. "If you think 'It's kind of cloudy, looks like I should get an umbrella because it's gonna rain,' you're using data you've been collecting all your life," said Cook. "Now we can place sensors and collect data in whole new places where there is opportunity to optimize that sort of interaction. Whether it's failures of a machine or failures of a human body, it’s data analytics." Products like these are exactly what CO.LAB had it mind for this year's Gig Tank recruits: commercial services that need gig-speed bandwidth for development, testing, and delivery. Sooner or later, ultra-fast Internet is going to be as ubiquitous as the plain old fast variety is today. The Gig Tank startup accelerator is built on the idea that the more Chattanooga can attract product development companies like this, the better the city will be positioned for the gig-speed economy that's on the way. For more information on these Gig Tank startups, visit: sensevery.com hutgrip.com shopwithmira.com

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chattanoogapulse.com • july 18-JULY 24, 2013 • The Pulse • 15

atop Lookout Mountain

Arts & Entertainment Thu 07.18

The perfect place to take in the 7 states view at Rock City Gardens while feasting on delicious modern Southern cuisine. Café 7 is also the best place to enjoy the traditional mountain music of the Old Time Travelers during Summer Music Weekends. Café 7 and Summer Music Weekends are just two of a host of reasons to get a Rock City Annual Pass. Seating available Thur.–Sun. 11am-4pm

Local, Fresh, Seasonal for more info call 706.820.2531

See RockCity.com

MCON13 Millennial Impact Conference 2013 8:30 a.m. - 9 p.m. Chattanooga Public Library, 1001 Broad St. (423) 757-5310, lib.chattanooga.gov Friends of the Chattanooga Public Library Book Sale 9 a.m. - 7 p.m. Eastgate Library Branch, 5600 Brainerd Rd. (423) 757-5310. “The Fair Game Project” 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Bessie Smith Cultural Center, 200 E. Martin Luther King Blvd. (423) 266-8658, bessiesmithcc.org “Natural Collections” 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. River Gallery, 400 E. 2nd St. (423) 265-5033, river-gallery.com “Whitfield Lovell: Deep River” 10 a.m. - 8 p.m. Hunter Museum of American Art, 10 Bluff View Ave., (423) 267-0968, huntermuseum.org “AVA All-Member Salon Show” 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. AVA Gallery, 30 Frazier Ave. (423) 265-4282, avarts.org Rock City Raptors 11 a.m. - 3 p.m. Rock City, 1400 Patten Rd., Lookout Mtn, Ga. seerockcity.com Ooltewah Farmer’s Market 2 p.m. - 5 p.m. Ooltewah Nursery & Landscape, 5829 Main St. (423) 238-9775, ooltewahnursery.com “Hot Fun” Celebration 4-6 p.m. Shuptrine’s Gold Leaf Designs, 2646 Broad St. (423) 266-4453, shuptrines.com All-American Summer Presents: Spoken Word Showcase with Christian Collier 6 p.m. Hunter Museum of American Art, 10 Bluff View Ave. (423) 267-0968, huntermuseum.org Hot Fun in the Sun: A LowCountry Shrimp Boil

16 • The Pulse • july 18-JULY 24, 2013 • chattanoogapulse.com

EVENTS CALENDAR

6 p.m. The Crash Pad, 29 Johnson St. (423) 648-8393, crashpadchattanooga.com River Gorge Sunset Paddle 6:30 - 9:30 p.m. TVA Raccoon Mtn. Boat Launch. (423) 643-6888. Naked Ladies Party 7-9 p.m. Homespun Parties + Events, 1110 Market St. (423) 377-6684, homespunparties.com “Mystery of the Redneck Italian Wedding” 7 p.m. Vaudeville Café, 138 Market St. (423) 517-1839, funnydinner.com “Legally Blonde the Musical!” 7 p.m. Chattanooga Theatre Centre, 400 River St. (423) 267-8538, theatrecentre.com “Balconies” 7:30 p.m. Ensemble Theatre of Chattanooga, 5600 Brainerd Rd. (423) 987-5141. Josh Phillips 7:30 p.m. The Comedy Catch, 3224 Brainerd Rd., (423) 629-2233, thecomedycatch.com “Bus Stop” 7:30 p.m. Ringgold Playhouse, 155 Depot St., Ringgold, Ga. (706) 935-3061

Fri 07.19 Friends of the Chattanooga Public Library Book Sale 9 a.m. - 7 p.m. Eastgate Library Branch, 5600 Brainerd Rd. (423) 757-5310. “The Fair Game Project” 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Bessie Smith Cultural Center, 200 E. Martin Luther King Blvd. (423) 266-8658, bessiesmithcc.org “Natural Collections” 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. River Gallery, 400 E. 2nd St. (423) 265-5033, river-gallery.com Whitfield Lovell: Deep River 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Hunter Museum of American Art, 10 Bluff View Ave. (423) 267-0968,

huntermuseum.org “AVA All-Member Salon Show” 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Ava Gallery, 30 Frazier Ave. (423) 265-4282, avarts.org Rock City Raptors 11 a.m. - 3 p.m. Rock City, 1400 Patten Rd., Lookout Mtn, Ga. seerockcity.com Over the Edge Fresh on Fridays 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. Center Park, 850 Market St. Muse of Fire Show 7 p.m. Chattanooga Public Library, 1001 Broad St. (423) 757-5310, lib.chattanooga.gov “Mystery of the Nightmare Office Party” 7 p.m. Vaudeville Café, 138 Market St. (423) 517-1839, funnydinner.com “Balconies” 7:30 p.m. Ensemble Theatre of Chattanooga, 5600 Brainerd Rd. (423) 987-5141. Josh Phillips 7:30, 9:30 p.m. The Comedy Catch, 3224 Brainerd Rd. (423) 629-2233, thecomedycatch.com “Bus Stop” 7:30 p.m. Ringgold Playhouse, 155 Depot St., Ringgold, Ga. (706) 935-3061 “Spring Awakening” 7:30 p.m. Memorial Auditorium, 399 McCallie Ave. (423) 757-5156 “Legally Blonde the Musical!” 8-10 p.m. Chattanooga Theatre Centre, 400 River St. (423) 267-8538, theatrecentre.com Friday Night Ballroom Dance Party 8:30 - 10:30 Ballroom Magic Dance Center, 4200 N. Access Rd., Hixson (423) 771-3646. Live Stand-Up Comedy with Danny Browning 9:30 p.m. Vaudeville Café, 138 Market St. (423) 517-1839, funnydinner.com

Sat 07.20 North Market Market 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. Green Door Trading Co., 11 W. Peak St., (423) 305-9441, facebook.com/ greendoortradingco Downtown Kayak Adventure 9 - 11:30 a.m. Outdoor Chattanooga, 200 River St. Friends of the Chattanooga Public Library Book Sale 9 a.m. - 7 p.m. Eastgate Library Branch, 5600 Brainerd Rd. (423) 757-5310. Tai Chi Workshop 9:30 - 10:30 a.m. Northgate Public Library. (423) 870-0635. Chickamauga Battlefield Bicycle Tour 9:30 a.m. Chickamauga & Chattanooga National Military Park, Lafayette Rd. and Battlefiend Parkway, Fort O., Ga.(706) 866-9241, nps.gov/chch Hill City Fest 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. St. Mark’s Church Northshore, 701 Mississippi Ave. (423) 267-5530, stmarkschattanooga.com “Natural Collections” 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. River Gallery, 400 E. 2nd St. (423) 265-5033, river-gallery.com “AVA All-Member Salon Show” 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. AVA Gallery, 30 Frazier Ave. (423) 265-4282, avarts.org Rock City Raptors 11 a.m. - 3 p.m. Rock City, 1400 Patten Rd., Lookout Mtn, Ga. seerockcity.com “The Fair Game Project” Noon - 4 p.m. Bessie Smith Cultural Center, 200 E. Martin Luther King Blvd. (423) 266-8658, bessiesmithcc.org “Whitfield Lovell: Deep River” 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Hunter Museum of American Art, 10 Bluff View Ave. (423) 267-0968,

Arts & Entertainment huntermuseum.org Magnificent Raptors 1 - 2:30 p.m. Outdoor Chattanooga, 200 River St. (423) 643-6888. outdoorchattanooga.com Booksigning: Cody Maxwell signs “Chattanooga Chronicles” 2 – 4 p.m. Winder Binder, 40 Frazier Blvd. (423) 413-8999. winderbinder.wordpress.com Tennessee Schmaltz Klezmer Band 2 - 4 p.m. Creative Discovery Museum, 321 Chestnut St. (423) 756-2738, cdmfun.org Saturday Cinema 2:30 – 4 p.m. Eastgate Public Library, 5705 Marlin Rd. (423) 757-5310 “Mystery of Flight 138” 5:30 p.m. Vaudeville Café, 138 Market St., (423) 517-1839, funnydinner.com Josh Phillips 7, 9:30 p.m. The Comedy Catch, 3224 Brainerd Rd. (423) 629-2233, thecomedycatch.com “Balconies” 7:30 p.m. Ensemble Theatre of Chattanooga, 5600 Brainerd Rd. (423) 987-5141. “Spring Awakening” 7:30 p.m. Memorial Auditorium, 399 McCallie Ave. (423) 757-5156. onstagechattanooga.com “Mystery of the Facebook Fugitive” 8 p.m. Vaudeville Café, 138 Market St. (423) 517-1839, funnydinner.com “Legally Blonde the Musical!” 8 p.m. Chattanooga Theatre Centre, 400 River St. (423) 267-8538, theatrecentre.com Movies in the Park 9 p.m. Coolidge Park, 150 River St. (423) 693-1355 Live Stand-Up Comedy with Danny Browning 10:30 p.m. Vaudeville Café, 138 Market St.

EVENTS CALENDAR

(423) 517-1839, funnydinner.com

Sun 07.21 Downtown Kayak Adventures 9 - 11:30 a.m. Outdoor Chattanooga, 200 River St. (423) 643-6888. outdoorchattanooga.com Magic Tree House traveling exhibit 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Creative Discovery Museum, 321 Chestnut St. (423) 756-2738, cdmfun.org Rock City Raptors 11 a.m. - 3 p.m. Rock City, 1400 Patten Rd., Lookout Mtn, Ga. seerockcity.com Chattanooga Market 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. Chattanooga Market, First Tennessee Pavilion, 1829 Carter St. chattanoogamarket.com “Whitfield Lovell: Deep River” Noon - 5 p.m. Hunter Museum of American Art, 10 Bluff View Ave. (423) 267-0968, huntermuseum.org Friends of the Chattanooga Public Library Book Sale Noon - 6 p.m. Eastgate Library Branch, 5600 Brainerd Rd. (423) 757-5310. “Natural Collections” 1 - 5 p.m. River Gallery, 400 E. 2nd St. (423) 265-5033, river-gallery.com “Balconies” 2:30, 7:30 p.m. Ensemble Theatre of Chattanooga, 5600 Brainerd Rd. (423) 987-5141. “Legally Blonde the Musical!” 2:30 p.m. Chattanooga Theatre Centre, 400 River St. (423) 267-8538, theatrecentre.com Josh Phillips 7:30, 9:30 p.m. The Comedy Catch, 3224 Brainerd Rd. (423) 629-2233, thecomedycatch.com

“Spring Awakening” 7:30 p.m. Memorial Auditorium, 399 McCallie Ave. (423) 757-5156. onstagechattanooga.com

Mon 07.22 Friends of the Chattanooga Public Library Book Sale 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Eastgate Library Branch, 5600 Brainerd Rd. (423) 757-5310. “The Fair Game Project” 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Bessie Smith Cultural Center, 200 E. Martin Luther King Blvd. (423) 266-8658, bessiesmithcc.org “Natural Collections” 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. River Gallery, 400 E. 2nd St. (423) 265-5033, river-gallery.com Magic Tree House traveling exhibit 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Creative Discovery Museum, 321 Chestnut St. (423) 756-2738, cdmfun.org Whitfield Lovell: Deep River 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Hunter Museum of American Art, 10 Bluff View Ave. (423) 267-0968, huntermuseum.org

Tue 07.23 “The Fair Game Project” 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Bessie Smith Cultural Center, 200 E. Martin Luther King Blvd. (423) 266-8658, bessiesmithcc.org “Natural Collections” 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. River Gallery, 400 E. 2nd St. (423) 265-5033, river-gallery.com Magic Tree House traveling exhibit 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Creative Discovery Museum, 321 Chestnut St. (423) 756-2738, cdmfun.org “Whitfield Lovell: Deep River”

10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Hunter Museum of American Art, 10 Bluff View Ave. (423) 267-0968, huntermuseum.org “AVA All-Member Salon Show” 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. AVA Gallery, 30 Frazier Ave. (423) 265-4282, avarts.org

Wed 07.24 Alla Prima Painting with James Courtenay James 9 a.m. Townsend Atelier, 201 W. Main St., Suite 107. (423) 266-2712. townsendatelier.com “The Fair Game Project” 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Bessie Smith Cultural Center, 200 E. Martin Luther King Blvd. (423) 266-8658, bessiesmithcc.org “Natural Collections” 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. River Gallery, 400 E. 2nd St. (423) 265-5033, river-gallery.com Magic Tree House traveling exhibit 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Creative Discovery Museum, 321 Chestnut St. (423) 756-2738, cdmfun.org AVA All-Member Salon Show 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. AVA Gallery, 30 Frazier Ave. (423) 265-4282, avarts.org Whitfield Lovell: Deep River 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Hunter Museum of American Art, 10 Bluff View Ave. (423) 267-0968, huntermuseum.org Rapid Learning to Chester Frost 6 - 8 p.m. Chester Frost Park, 2318 Gold Point Cir., Hixson. hamiltontn.gov/parkrec

Map these locations on chattanoogapulse.com. Send event listings at least 10 days in advance to: calendar@ chattanoogapulse.com.

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Screen

john devore

And You Thought Your College Was Scary “Monsters University” is cheerful summer fun

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T

he reputation for high quality that Pixar have movies is well deserved. Even after Pixar merged with Disney, its films have managed to maintain a robust balance of emotion and humor and a strong combination of style and substance. The company just makes good films. Pixar films exemplify the notion of collaborative effort. There is no standout person within the company—it is interested in promoting the films, not company personalities. More often than not, the famous actors who voice the iconic characters disappear

18 • The Pulse • july 18-JULY 24, 2013 • chattanoogapulse.com

in the roles so completely you might forget you’re listening to Tom Hanks or Billy Crystal. Even Pixar sequels, which in the case of most franchises tend to suffer in quality, at times exceed the original film. “Toy Story 3” was one of the most heartwarming films to come out of Hollywood in recent years. And so, this summer, Pixar has released “Monsters University,” a prequel to “Monsters, Inc.” And it’s good, because of course it is, it’s Pixar. The film is visually stunning, surprisingly deep, and sure to please fans of the series. While “Monsters

University” may not have the same emotional resonance of some of the previous Pixar films, it’s still far better than anything else playing at most local theaters right now. “Monsters University” takes place before the first film, giving the audience more insight in the world of monsters that exists just on the other side of our closet door. This film focuses more on Mike Wazowski, the short, green eyeball with feet voiced by Billy Crystal, showing us the beginnings of his childhood dream to be a “scarer.” Screams are what power this parallel uni-

verse, and monsters harvest them from the bedrooms of children across the world. Of course, monsters believe that children are toxic, so they are as just as scared of the kids as the kids are of them. Monsters have to learn how to properly scare children, however, in order to harvest the most power from each session. The best school to learn how to scare is Monsters University. Most of the film is a send-up of the typical tropes of the college/ teenage coming of age film. It’s part “Animal House,” part “Revenge of the Nerds,” with a »P 19

Comix

»P 18 dash of “Carrie” thrown in somewhere in the middle. The monster world mirrors the human world, just slightly more absurd. Overall, the film is fun and light, much like the first one. As for the depth, there is a certain twist towards the end of the film that isn’t exactly unpredictable—unless you think about the target audience. My four-yearold son was sitting next to me in the theater, cheering along at the appropriate times, emotionally involved and enjoying the experience as a child might. He’s seen enough movies at this point to know how things go, and expects them to go a cer-

There is a certain twist towards the end of the film that isn’t exactly unpredictable—unless you think about the target audience.

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tain way. “Monsters University” turned his expectations slightly on its ear. Again, for most movie-goers, nothing that happens in the film is unexpected. But for a child, the twist might be somewhat shocking. These moments are where Pixar shines—the films are not afraid to challenge even the youngest members of their audience. Actions have consequences and characters are expected to live with them. It’s a good lesson for kids and sets up a sort of evolutionary process that will eventually lead to better experiences with higher-level movies. Growing up with Pixar can only be a good thing for future film enthusiasts. “Monsters University” doesn’t reach the level of films like “Up” or “Toy Story 3.” Part of this is because the universe these characters occupy is too otherworldly. Remember, these are monsters that get their power from terrorizing children. But as an expansion on the original film, it is effective and entertaining. There is a lot to see in the film, enough emotion to make it seem special, and it’s clever enough to keep most audiences from being bored. A lot of action-movie blockbusters out right now can’t even manage half of that. “Monsters University” may the best this summer has to offer. chattanoogapulse.com • july 18-JULY 24, 2013 • The Pulse • 19

Victorian Lounge

Free Will Astrology

rob brezsny

CANCER

can discern. In the immediate future, though, I hope you will be a specialist in analyzing the details and mastering mundane mysteries. I’ll be rooting for you to think small and be precise. Can you manage that? I expect there’ll be a sweet reward. You will generate good fortune for yourself by being practical, sensible, and earthy.

(June 21-July 22): We keep million-dollar works of art in well-guarded museums. Paintings created hundreds of years ago are treated with reverence and protected as if they were magical treasures. Meanwhile, beautiful creatures that took nature eons to produce don’t get the same care. At least 5,000 animal and plant species are going extinct every year, in large part due to human activities. Among the recently lost works of art are the Madeiran Large White butterfly, West African black rhinoceros, Formosan clouded leopard, golden toad, and Tecopa pupfish. I’m asking you not to allow a similar discrepancy in your own life, Cancerian. The astrological omens say that now is a perfect moment to intensify your love for the natural world. I urge you to meditate on how crucial it is to nurture your interconnectedness with all of life, not just the civilized part.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Is it a

river or a creek? Is it a mountain or a hill? It’s important for you to decide questions like these—preferably on the basis of the actual evidence rather than on wishful thinking. I’m not saying that the river is better than the creek or that the mountain is better than the hill. I simply want you to know that it’s important to be clear about which it is. The same principle applies to other experiences you’ll soon have. Is the catalytic person you’re dealing with a temporary friend or a loyal ally? Is the creation you’re nurturing just a healthy diversion or is it potentially a pivotal element in transforming your relationship with yourself? Is the love that’s blooming a transient pleasure or a powerful upgrade that’s worth working on with all your ingenuity?

LEO

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(July 23-Aug. 22): Hurry up, please. It’s time. No more waffling or procrastinating. You really need to finish up the old business that has dragged on too long. You really should come to definitive decisions about ambiguous situations, even if they show no sign of resolution. As for those nagging questions that have yielded no useful answers: I suggest you replace them with different questions. And how about those connections that have been draining your energy? Re-evaluate whether they are worth trying to fix.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “This morning I walked to the place where the street-cleaners dump the rubbish,” wrote painter Vincent van Gogh in one his letters. “My God, it was beautiful.” Was he being ironic or sarcastic? Not at all. He was sincere. As an artist, he had trained himself to be intrigued by scenes that other people dismissed as ugly or irrelevant. His sense of wonder was fully awake. He could find meaning and even enchantment anywhere. Your next assignment, Virgo —should you choose to accept it—is to experiment with seeing the world as van Gogh did. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): I believe you will undergo a

kind of graduation in the next four weeks, Libra. Graduation from what? Maybe from a life lesson you’ve been studying for a while or from an institution that has given you all it can. Perhaps you will climax your involvement with a situation that has made big demands on you. I suspect that during this time of completion you will have major mixed feelings, ranging from sadness that a chapter of your story is coming to an end to profound gratification at how much you have grown during this chapter.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): What’s your favorite

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sin, Scorpio? I’m talking about the mischievous vice or rebel tendency or excessive behavior that has taught you a lot. It may be the case that now and then this transgressive departure from normalcy has had redeeming value, and has even generated some interesting fun. Perhaps it puts you in touch with a magic that generates important changes, even if it also exacts a toll on you. Whatever your “favorite sin” is, I’m guessing that you need to develop a more conscious and mature relationship with it. The time has come for it to evolve.

20 • The Pulse • july 18-JULY 24, 2013 • chattanoogapulse.com

ARIES (March 21-April 19): The 19th-

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): The Sagittarian

writer and artist William Blake (1757-1827) made drawings of many eminent people who had died before he was born. Julius Caesar was the subject of one of his portraits. Others included Dante, Shakespeare, and Moses. How did Blake manage to capture their likenesses in such great detail? He said their spirits visited him in the form of apparitions. Really? I suppose that’s possible. But it’s also important to note that he had a robust and exquisite imagination. I suspect that in the coming weeks you, too, will have an exceptional ability to visualize things in your mind’s eye. Maybe not with the gaudy skill of Blake, but potent nevertheless. What would be the best use of this magic power?

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): How close do you

really want to be to the people you care about? I invite you to think about this with unsentimental candor. Do you prefer there to be some distance between you? Are you secretly glad there’s a buffer zone that prevents you from being too profoundly engaged? I’m not saying that’s a bad thing. It might be correct for who you are right now. I merely want to suggest that it’s important for you to know the exact nature of your need for intimacy. If you find that you actually do want to be closer, spend the next four weeks making that happen. Ask your precious allies to collaborate with you in going deeper.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): I love your big, energetic thoughts. I enjoy watching as your wild intuitive leaps lead you to understandings that mere logic could never produce. I have benefited many times from the Aquarian tribe’s ability to see angles no one else

century Italian composer Gioachino Rossini was a prolific creator who produced 39 operas. Renowned for his lyrical melodies, he was sometimes referred to as the “Italian Mozart.” So confident was he in his abilities that he bragged he could set a laundry list to music. I trust you will have comparable aplomb in the coming weeks, Aries, since you will be asked to do the equivalent of composing an opera using a laundry list for inspiration. This will be a different challenge than making lemonade out of lemons, but it could be even more fun and interesting.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20):

Is the grass really greener on the other side of the fence? Or is its more vivid hue just an optical illusion caused by your inability to see the situation objectively? Judging from my analysis of your current astrological omens, I suspect that you’re not deluded. The grass really is greener. But it’s important to note the reason why this is true, which is that there’s more manure over on the other side of the fence. So your next question becomes: Are you willing to put up with more crap in order to get the benefits of the greener grass?

GEMINI

(May 21-June 20): You know the voice in your head that’s kind of a sneaky bastard? The voice that sometimes feeds you questionable advice and unreliable theories? Well, I suspect that this voice might be extra active in the coming week. But here’s the weird thing: It might actually have a sound idea or two for you to consider acting on. For once, its counsel may be based on accurate intuition. So don’t completely lower your guard, Gemini. Maintain a high degree of discernment towards the sneaky bastard’s pronouncements. But also be willing to consider the possibility that this generator of so much mischief could at least temporarily be a source of wisdom.

Homework: Confess your deepest secrets to yourself. Say them out loud when no one but you is listening. Testify at Freewillastrology.com.

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“Magnetic Spin”--they’re polar opposites. Across 1 Baseball hat 4 Sportscaster Collinsworth 8 Nearsighted 14 ___-de-la-Cite (Notre Dame locale) 15 Eugene O’Neill’s actress/daughter 16 State of southern Mexico 17 Beats the clock? 19 Attic dust collector 20 What the phone ID tells you about Nolte? 22 ___ buco (Italian entree) 23 Half a pay period, often 24 “___ Like Alice” (Peter Finch film) 26 They pop up here and there 27 Body work, for short? 28 Consumed 31 Beloved Blume 34 To ___ mildly 35 Rock venue? 36 “Damned dirty” creature

37 Comes up with a plea, for short? 39 Rhubarb or blueberry 40 DeLuise in Burt Reynolds outtakes 41 Words before remember or relax 42 Leader of pre1917 Russia 43 Experimental musician Brian 44 Private investigators, for short 45 Afr. neighbor 47 “___ Ninjas” (Nickelodeon show with George Takei) 49 Gut response 53 Long-winded diatribe 55 Ancient Roman building where pigs made noises in pairs? 57 Revealing swimsuit 59 Folk singer’s accompaniment 60 Like stadium seating 61 Angry moods 62 Trapeze artist’s safety 63 Ruined

64 First part of a news story 65 Trick finish? Down 1 Big name in routers 2 Edgar ___ Poe 3 “Key & ___” (Comedy Central show) 4 Mimicked 5 Betsy and Diana, for two 6 How contracts are signed 7 ___-Flush (bathroom brand) 8 Shirley Temple, for example 9 Blocking Ming 10 “The ___ Incident” (Henry Fonda movie) 11 Name for a petfriendly brewpub? 12 Applies frosting to 13 ___ San Lucas (Baja resort) 18 Super Bowl XXXIII MVP 21 Defiant response 25 School bus driver

on “The Simpsons” 27 Family tree members 29 Vegas Strip hotel 30 Driving hazards 31 Green stone 32 Immediately following 33 A good band pic on the CD, songs that will appeal to music producers, etc.? 34 Movie with a shower scene 37 :// preceder 38 Numbers after 1 42 Dare alternative 45 Overacted 46 Engaged in rioting 48 “In ___” (Nirvana album) 49 Acclimate 50 Former “Weekend Edition Sunday” host Hansen 51 Less doubtful 52 Bad dashboard reading 53 Quartet after Q 54 Neat as ___ 56 Hit the seas 58 Lion’s place

Copyright © 2013 Jonesin’ Crosswords. For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+ to call. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle No. 0632

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On the Beat

alex teach

A Cop’s-Eye View of “The Verdict” A

"dumb bomb" is a primitive explosive device, often dropped from an airplane. The bomb is considered "dumb" because it simply falls to the ground without actively steering itself; needless to say, it's some feat precisely hitting a target with this type of weapon. A bomber might have to drop dozens, or even hundreds of dumb bombs to take out a target effectively.

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"Smart bombs," by contrast, control their fall precisely in order to hit a designated target dead on. All of which, of course, leads me to the topic of postZimmerman-trial America. We know the verdict. We don’t know the court details, but we do know the media accounts, so who needs details? Some of us don’t agree, but that’s mainly because we have no idea of how the court system really works. At the end of a sequence of events that I don’t feel the need to repeat, George Zimmerman was arrested and tried for the second-degree murder of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin. The first thing we learned about Trayvon was that apparently no pictures exist of the 6-foot tall youth beyond the age of 12, giving the impression we have of George Zimmerman creeping into infants’ rooms everywhere and just smothering and/or beating the crap out of the little guys. But that’s OK as far as misleading pictures go, and it’s certainly not a first. I of course refer my Chattanooga readers to the name Alonzo O’Kelley Junior, the 15-year-old who was interrupted while shooting into a crowded moving car from a sidewalk, and subsequently killed by a police officer when

22 • The Pulse • july 18-JULY 24, 2013 • chattanoogapulse.com

he pointed the same gun at him while vigorously being asked to stop doing such. The photo of him used was from the fifth grade, thus again promoting a baby-killing atmosphere. (Why they didn’t use a picture of the cop from when he or she was in the fifth grade to even up the perception, I will never know, but I’m floating the idea to a few local outlets.) Where was I? Ah. George Zimmerman confronted a young man in a gated community and asked him what he was doing there. There is corroborated court evidence that he, in fact, established the contact that resulted in this tragedy, and did so against the advice of a civilian 911 operator. This is immediately where people began conserving energy by not thinking again. In response to the question (“What are you doing here?”), his fans apparently feel that Trayvon was justified in throttling him to the ground and beating his head onto

the concrete sidewalk. Ask a question, have your head beaten against concrete. With that, the “dumb bombs” are now raining down about us, and it’s disconcerting to say the least; you see, that last bit is what the trial was about, not the first bit. Did George Zimmerman put himself in an unnecessary position? Yup. Did Trayvon Martin make a poor choice when he attacked Mr Zimmerman? Yuuuuup. But that’s where the public’s thoughts stop, because this was racial. “Whitey” killed a baby boy. When America found out “Whitey” had a Hispanic parent, and didn’t look any more Aryan than the president does? Why, a new ethnic group was created from thin air called “White Hispanics,” because once stoked, the fires of propaganda must be tended, after all. In the end, it turned out that attempting to kill someone (and let me beat your head into the ground to see if you really doubt this) was reason enough to be shot, and Zimmerman was acquitted amidst threats of rioting and against his life. But the unrealized tragedy? Our own lawmakers and “leaders.” The case was so weak that the local Sanford district attorney refused to bring charges against Zimmerman.

That is why, on the orders of the governor, an outside district attorney, Angela Corey, had to be brought in to handle it.  Sanford Police Chief Bill Lee was fired because he also refused to charge Zimmerman with a crime, and the lead detective on the case told the jury he believed Zimmerman's version of the events. Charges were still brought and we still have the same result. There wasn’t a case. Just anger. And that’s not justice. If Jackson, Sharpton and the NAACP hadn’t jumped on the Trayvon Martin case and made it into a racial matter, nobody would have heard of it. His death would have gone unnoticed just like the more than 500 black youths who were murdered in Chicago in black-on-black violence last year, and how has THAT not sparked national outrage? In short? The attention on the Zimmerman trial is not about justice for Trayvon; it’s about intimidation and dividing the American people along race. Evidence? It’s only news if it’s “white on black” crime. And when “white” turns out to be Hispanic? New ethnicities are created to fit the rage. We need to start getting tired of this, and start getting tired of it now. And by “we,” I mean ALL of us, all races, all ethnicities. Focus less on the hyphenations and the blame, and more on progress. Just a radical thought… which probably makes me a “racist.”

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The Pulse 10.29 » July 18, 2013