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Chattanooga’s Weekly Alternative

Vets and Freaks: Love. Right Now. By Stephanie Smith

FREE • News, Views, Music, Film, Arts & Entertainment • July 1, 2010 • Volume 7, Issue 26 • www.chattanoogapulse.com


President Jim Brewer, II Publisher Zachary Cooper Contributing Editor Janis Hashe News Editor / Art Director Gary Poole

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2010

cover story

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10 VETS AND FREAKS:

Advertising Manager Rhonda Rollins

LOVE. RIGHT NOW.

Advertising Sales Rick Leavell, Leif Sawyer, Townes Webb

By Stehanie Smith Soldiers are hired to do a job—to defend and protect their country. They are human beings who face war, who daily stare death in the face so that we at home don’t have to. And for that, I think they deserve our love and support, regardless of our political beliefs. A small community in Georgia recently set the example for all of us by coming together in support of a soldier.

Graphic Design Jennifer Grelier Staff Photographer Louis Lee Contributing Writers Gustavo Arellano, Rob Brezsny Chuck Crowder, John DeVore, Hellcat Helene Houses, Joshua Hurley Phillip Johnston, Matt Jones Cody Maxwell, Ernie Paik Rick Pimental-Habib, Ph.D. Stephanie Smith, Alex Teach Editorial Cartoonist Rick Baldwin Calendar Editor Kathryn Dunn Editorial Intern Ashley Miller Copy Assistant Bryanna Burns Videography Josh Lang Contact Info: Phone (423) 265-9494 Fax (423) 266-2335 info@chattanoogapulse.com Calendar Submissions calendar@chattanoogapulse.com The Pulse is published weekly and is distributed throughout the city of Chattanooga and surrounding communities. The Pulse is available free of charge, limited to one copy per reader. No person without written permission from the publishers may take more than one copy per weekly issue. The Pulse may be distributed only by authorized distributors.

The Pulse is published by

Brewer Media 1305 Carter Street Chattanooga, Tennessee 37402 Letters to the editor must include name, address and daytime phone number for verification. The Pulse reserves the right to edit letters for space and clarity. Please keep letters within 300 words in length.

ontents

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Chattanooga’s Weekly Alternative

AL O S se NU G T RIE Pul AN IN LLE he GO GA in T E k

JULY

feature stories 14 ERIS IN YOUR LUNGS By Hellcat About two years, ago a rock band emerged on the little scene of Chattanooga, and caused as much discord and chaos as the goddess Eris herself.

20 THE HANGING COURT OF DEMAGOGUERY By Helene Houses Playwright Arthur Miller was called before the infamous House Committee on Un-American Activities and convicted of “contempt of Congress” for refusing to name names of Communists or “Communist sympathizers”.

26 GIVING GROWN-UPS A BAD NAME By John DeVore Grown Ups is just bad. To call it comedy is an insult to the entire genre. In fact, it’s barely a movie. It wants you to believe that it’s a family comedy, an endearing look at aging childhood friends, their children, their dreams for the their families, and their desire to travel back to a simpler time: a time of youth basketball championships, and summer vacation.

news & views 5 6 8 18 24 30

PULSE BEATS BEYOND THE HEADLINES SHRINK RAP LIFE IN THE NOOG ON THE BEAT ASK A MEXICAN

everything else 4 5 7 7 15 16 21 27 28 28 29

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR CITY COUNCILSCOPE POLICE BLOTTER THE LIST NEW MUSIC REVIEWS MUSIC CALENDAR A&E CALENDAR NEW IN THEATERS SPIRITS WITHIN FREE WILL ASTROLOGY JONESIN’ CROSSWORD


Letters to the Editor No New Taxes Mayor Littlefield needs to get a clue no one wants new taxes. The whole country is suffering and all he can think about is more spending. He needs to cut spending and reduce the size of government. He could start by cutting some of the deadwood from his staff. How many “public servants” downtown are making over 100k? Littlefield should concentrate on our neighborhoods that are currently not being taken care of instead of concentrating exclusively on VW. He spent his whole first term traveling on our dime. He promised he would put neighborhoods first. That’s laughable, as now all we see is crime out of control in this city. Susan Nicholas Hot Tempers And Hard Heads I'm sure everyone, in hindsight, could have done a better job at some point in this incident, but only one man was being paid (not much, I'm sure) to exercise judgment and discretion in a noble quest to serve and protect the public. Mr. Wright, if he did act unprofessionally at some point, had reason to do so; Officer Daves did not and judging from the ludicrous charges he filed, let his

emotions overrule his intellect. If veteran cops like Mr. Teach see a situation as obvious as this one and don't realize the error made in filing felony charges, then I don't have much hope for any of us. We over-react because the cop over-reacted. Rodger Ling Crime & Punishment How can the city punish an officer that has not broken any policies or strayed from normal police action? Isn’t it a judge’s responsibility to decide who is guilty or innocent? That is exactly what the officer did. He saw the crime and let the judge handle it. The world is going to be a really bad place when officers cannot even charge people for crimes that they witness! Stephanie Believer Congrats To Riverbend I wanted to publicly thank the Riverbend staff for bringing so much great local talent to the festival this year. Being able to see some of my favorite bands in town on large stages was a real treat. Seeing these acts in local venues is one thing but, having them on stages with completely pro sound is another.

The Cadillac Saints were particularly great. Thank you so much for bringing them in. Paul Wilson New $50 Bill Idea Thank you for this article on Ms. Ida Wells. I was not familiar with her and am so pleased to have learned about her and her story. Cheers for the new $50 should this be decided! I approve. Camille Terranova

Send all letters to the editor and questions to info@chattanoogapulse.com We reserve the right to edit letters for content and space. Please include your full name, city and contact information.

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The Pulse | Vol. 7, Issue 26 | July 1, 2010 | www.chattanoogapulse.com


Pulse Beats

Quote Of The Week:

A rundown of the newsy, the notable, and the notorious...

“It’s more important to do it right, than to open a few weeks earlier.” —Roger Campbell, Costco’s senior vice president for the Southeastern region, after word spread that the company has delayed the opening of their new store in Fort Oglethorpe by two months.

Pops on the River Happens This Saturday Thanks to the last-minute support of the at the intersection of Tremont and River

City of Chattanooga and sponsorships from First Tennessee Bank, as well as Allied Arts and Integrity Automotive, Chattanooga will be able to continue its tradition of celebrating Independence Day with Pops on the River this Saturday. This popular event, held from 8 – 10 p.m., features a free outdoor patriotic concert by the Chattanooga Symphony & Opera at Coolidge Park as well as a large fireworks display over the Tennessee River. The CSO, directed by Robert Bernhardt, will present a program featuring patriotic pieces from Sousa and Tchaikovsky, as well The Armed Forces Salute and selections from Oklahoma, Star Trek Through the Years, and Sing Out America (sing-a-long). Local favorites the Dismembered Tennesseans will also perform a 15-minute set during the show. People are invited to bring lawn chairs and blankets to enjoy a picnic during this concert and fireworks display. Food, beer and non-alcoholic drink concessions will be available on site. A rain date for the concert is scheduled for Sunday, July 4. Coolidge Park will be closing to vehicular traffic at 4:30 p.m. on the day of the show. Attendees are encouraged to enjoy free parking in the Unum parking lots between 4th and 5th Streets, where, beginning at 6 p.m., complimentary busses will shuttle passengers across the river, unloading near the Chattanooga Theatre Centre. Busses will pick up

Streets to return attendees to the Unum parking lots until 11 p.m. Attendees may also park on the south shore of the river and walk across the Walnut Street Pedestrian Bridge to the performance in Coolidge Park. However, no one will be allowed to set up chairs, or remain on the center of the Walnut Street Bridge during the show, as it will be closed beginning at 8:15 p.m. in preparation for the fireworks display. Time for a safe and family-oriented celebration.

Here is one of the more interesting agenda items set to be discussed at the Tuesday, July 6 meeting of the Chattanooga City Council.

Gallery Hop Set For Saturday, September 11 The Association for Visual Arts (AVA) has announced the fifth annual Downtown Chattanooga Gallery Hop will take place on Saturday, September 11 from 2 to 9 p.m. The Gallery Hop will feature more than 30 galleries and artist studios, all open to the public for this one-night collaborative celebration of Chattanooga’s arts community. During the Gallery Hop, the public can meet local artists, watch live art demonstrations and learn about the artists’ creative processes at their studios. Galleries will have special exhibitions on display, and refreshments will be provided at most venues. ”The Gallery Hop has become a quite popular event in Chattanooga,” said AVA’s Jerry Dale McFadden, who organizes the event. “With different art-heavy areas having their own collective gallery openings throughout the year, this is the one time each year when we can combine all of the distinct downtown areas into a citywide celebration of the arts.” On the heels of being named one of the top 25 arts destinations in the country by American Style magazine for the second year in a row, this event will give residents and visitors of Chattanooga a chance to see for themselves the amazing artwork created by local artists. A brochure, which features a map and a listing of gallery and artist descriptions, along with detailed contact information, will be available at all participating galleries. This specially designed guide will enable “hoppers” to create their own route during the event and can also be used by visitors to Chattanooga throughout the year. A special barcode will also be printed on the brochures, so that hoppers can scan the code and be taken directly to the Gallery Hop map on their smart phones. For more information, visit www.avarts.org/galleryhop

5. Ordinances - Final Reading: a) An ordinance, hereinafter also known as “THE FISCAL YEAR 2010-2011 BUDGET ORDINANCE”, to provide revenue for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2010, and ending June 30, 2011; Appropriating same to the payment of expenses of the municipal government; fixing the rate of taxation on all taxable property in the City, and the time taxes and privileges are due, how they shall be paid, when they shall become delinquent; providing for interest and penalty on delinquent taxes and privileges; and to amend Chattanooga City Code, Part I, Chapter 2, Section 2-267, relative to paid leave for ActiveDuty training. Pending any deferrals, this coming Tuesday should see the final approval of the operational part of the next fiscal year budget. The capital portion of the budget is expected approximately two weeks later, though these things often move around quite a bit depending upon circumstance. The Chattanooga City Council meets each Tuesday at 6 p.m. in the City Council Building at 1000 Lindsay St. For more information on the agenda and minutes from past meetings, visit www. Chattanooga.gov/City_Council/110_Agenda.asp

www.chattanoogapulse.com | July 1, 2010 | Vol. 7, Issue 26 | The Pulse

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Beyond The Headlines

Sandy’s Pure-D Miracle S

andy the Flower Man has fallen on hard times. A recent surgery had him in the hospital for a month and subsequent chemotherapy treatments have had him down. Eddie Bridges and the folks at JJ’s Bohemia are planning an all-day benefit show for him on July 18 to help pay some of his medical bills. The past six months have not been good for Sandy and downtown Chattanooga has missed him. By Cody Maxwell

“I don’t want anything from you—no money or anything—but I think you might be my birth father and I just wanted to come to Chattanooga and see where I came from.”

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But it hasn’t all been bad. Something behind the universe always has its hands stirring around in our soupy lives. Sandy’s life was recently stirred up when 25-year-old Angela Tucker came knocking on his mother’s door. Sandy’s mother, Ms. Dorothy Bell, let the girl come inside. Angela held her hands in her lap, smiling nervously around the room. She reached down to pet a cat that was sliding against her leg and looked up at Sandy’s mother. “I came to see you because I wanted to find Sandy,” she said. “I think he’s my birth father.” Ms. Bell leaned back in her chair, looking hard at the girl. She looked at her for a long time, then smiled and said, “No, I don’t think so. Sandy can’t have children.” When asked if she was sure, Ms. Bell replied, “Oh, yes. Sandy fell out of a tree when he was a boy and can’t have children. His brothers always picked on

The Pulse | Vol. 7, Issue 26 | July 1, 2010 | www.chattanoogapulse.com

him for it and he always asks me, ‘How come I’m the only one that don’t have kids?’ No, it can’t be Sandy.” Stunned, Angela thanked Sandy’s mother and soon said goodbye. Ms. Bell smiled at her again and said, “You’re a real pretty girl, though. Good luck.” Angela was born on September 18, 1985 in Chattanooga and was immediately put up for adoption by her mother. She was placed in foster care and lived there for a year until she was adopted by her parents and moved away, eventually settling in Seattle, Washington. But she always wondered where she came from. She had a birth certificate with her birth mother and father’s first names only: her birth father's was Oterious. She knew she was born in Chattanooga—and that was all. An Internet search of the name “Oterious” brought back only five results, one of which was a man who lived in Chattanooga. It didn’t take long for Oterious “Sandy” Bell to pop up, then Sandy the Flower Man appeared on her computer screen. The resemblance was haunting and after a little more research, her entire family booked flights to Chattanooga to find Sandy. This family was gathered anxiously outside Ms. Bell’s apartment building when Angela returned from visiting with her. She was telling them the story of her meeting when Sandy happened by on his bicycle. Somebody called his name. He turned around and Angela was confronted for the first time with the man she believed to be her birth father. Sandy was in top form—black silk vest, black sunglasses, cowboy hat and the smile that’s lit up a thousand nights. Angela smiled and stuttered her way right to the point, holding her hands clasped tight in front of her as she spoke. “You don’t know me—I’m from Seattle but I

was born in Chattanooga but I was adopted and never met my parents. I don’t want anything from you—no money or anything—but I think you might be my birth father and I just wanted to come to Chattanooga and see where I came from.” After about two minutes of silence and staring at each other, Sandy finally spoke. “I’d give you a flower but I don’t have one right now.” Angela laughed and Sandy leaned his bicycle against a tree. The two of them sat on a nearby bench and Angela told him her story. Sandy readily admitted he knew the woman she was speaking of but had no idea he ever had a child. He had always believed he couldn’t have children. Even his doctors told him that, he said, and his brothers had always joked on him for it. “This is a Pure-D miracle,” Sandy told her as they parted, and the two of them planned to meet again later that night. That night’s meeting was a family reunion in true Southern style. Both sides of the family were there, along with all of Sandy’s brothers and sisters—grandchildren included. Sandy said they should take a DNA test to make absolutely sure and Angela agreed. The rest of Sandy’s family said they had already decided. It didn’t matter what the test results were. Angela was family already. Father’s Day at the church the Bell family attends was one of the best days of Sandy’s life. After the service the celebration continued at Ms. Bell’s house. All those brothers and sisters came over with Father’s Day gifts for Sandy and had to find new jokes to crack. Angela couldn’t be there. She had returned to Seattle, but there was a package from her containing pictures of the two of them together, positive DNA test results—and the first Father’s Day card Sandy had ever received.


A weekly roundup of the newsworthy, notable and often head-scratching stories gleaned from police reports from the Chattanooga Police Department, the Hamilton County Sheriff’s Office, the Bradley County Sheriff’s Department and the Dalton Police Department.

arrests and hope to have put a strong dent in auto theft in the area.

Packing For The Beach • Law enforcement officers are fairly accustomed to finding meth labs in unusual places. However, even experienced officers were surprised to discover a pair of floating meth labs this past weekend, one of which was in a canoe. There were extra officers from the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency on the waterways over the past week, all part of Operation Dry Water. The operation is designed to try and keep people from drinking while boating. And while two people were arrested for boating under the influence, the discovery of the meth labs was completely unexpected. • It’s not every day local law enforcement can help break up a multistate car theft operation. But that’s exactly what happened with investigators when the Chattanooga Police Department took 12 people into custody in connection with auto thefts and related crimes. One of the arrestees was a Largo, Florida man whose arrest led to the discovery of a major chop shop operation and the recovery of 50 stolen cars, trucks and motorcycles in Largo. Based on leads obtained during the arrests, investigators expect more

• Everything that glitters is not always gold, and every person with a badge is not always a police officer. Unfortunately for the owner of a Dalton bakery, a man with a very official-looking badge was able to abscond with between $500 and $600 in cash from the business. According to the bakery owner, a man wearing a badge around his neck came into the store and said he needed to see receipts and the bills inside the cash register. The owner complied, and then the suspect said that he needed to examine one of the $100 bills and talk to someone on his car radio. He went outside and did not return, taking with him several hundred dollars. The fake cop was arrested when he tried to pull the same scam in a jewelry store. The suspicious store owner called 911 and a Dalton police officer spotted the suspect and was able to apprehend him as he tried to run out of the parking lot. • It was 1975 the last time Ringgold

Whether you’re going to Lake Chickamauga or flying to the Caribbean, there are certain things one needs to take when going to spend the day at the beach. 1. Towel. Author Douglas Adams had it right: There is nothing more useful in the universe than a towel. 2. Swimsuit. Unless you’re visiting one of the “clothing optional” beaches, bring a proper suit.

needed a new police chief. That’s when Charles Land took the job, and he’s held it ever since. Now, after 35 years, Land has decided to hang up his uniform. It’s believed that three-and-a-half decades is a record for anyone to head a police department in Georgia, but it’s hard to tell, as they didn’t start keeping such records until Land had already been chief for about ten years. Ringgold City Manager Dan Wright said the city is taking applications but hasn’t made a decision on a new chief. Wilborn Dycus has been named interim chief. The Police Blotter would like to extend the best wishes for a happy retirement for Chief Land. We hear the fish are biting well this summer.

3. Proper footwear. A cheap pair of flip-flops can make all the difference. 4. Sunscreen. Let’s repeat that: sunscreen. Lots of sunscreen. 5. Magazine, Book, MP3 player. Trust me, you’ll want something of an entertainment nature with you. 6. Pails and shovels. If you have kids, this is a must. Plus, it's fun! 7. Sweater. You may scoff at the idea, but it can get pretty breezy and even downright chilly on the beach once the sun goes down.

www.chattanoogapulse.com | July 1, 2010 | Vol. 7, Issue 26 | The Pulse

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Shrink Rap

By Rick Pimental-Habib, Ph.D

Celebrate the Little Things As we gear up for celebrating

“If you pause

to think about it, chances are you’ll find you have much to be grateful for, even during hard times. And it’s all worth celebrating.” Dr. Rick Pimental-Habib, Ph.D., is a psychotherapist, minister, and educator, in private practice in Chattanooga, and the author of “Empowering the Tribe” and “The Power of a Partner.” Visit his new wellness center, Well Nest, at www. WellNestChattanooga.com, and his web site at www.DrRPH.com

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our country’s independence on the Fourth of July weekend, I can’t help but think about celebrations in general. And specifically, the ways we celebrate ourselves and each other. As a kid, I remember the excitement I felt when it was time to head over to the beach on the Fourth to watch the fireworks. To this day I like fireworks and thoroughly enjoyed the display down at the river celebrating the conclusion of Riverbend a couple of weekends ago. I thought they were pretty impressive, given that it wasn’t even the Fourth of July yet. I had been at the Theatre Centre that night, and after the show the audience gathered out on the lawn, and, sipping lemonade and munching on cookies (quite the Southern image), we awaited the nighttime display. I think there’s a warm community feeling, a comfort, a happiness, when a bunch of people gather for something that puts smiles on the faces of adults and kids alike. Lots of “oohs” and “ahhs,” and then laughing at ourselves for ooh-ing and ahh-ing. I can see this past weekend, too, through the lens of celebrations. First, I was able to meet several good friends

The Pulse | Vol. 7, Issue 26 | July 1, 2010 | www.chattanoogapulse.com

for various lunches and dinners, and to me there’s nothing quite like laughing and catching up after a long absence from each other’s company due to our (oftentimes overly) busy lives. Especially while enjoying great food and drink. In the process I was able to experience a new restaurant—one of my favorite things to do in Chattanooga—which added to the celebratory feel for me. I also attended my first “summertime social” benefit event on a beautiful farm outside of town. There were new people to converse with, old friends to run into and, again, great food. H'mm… there’s a theme here: great food and celebrating. But I believe we all know that already— just think “holidays”. The weekend concluded with the celebration of the bond between two very dear friends of mine. They’d gotten hitched out-of-town, and this was the intown reception party. These two, being so loved by so many, created a warm, relaxed, happy celebration for their close friends and relatives. This, to me, was the best celebration of all. There’s something pretty wonderful about finding your soul mate, recognizing him or her as your soul mate, and then, sometimes against formidable odds, taking the courageous, thrilling, and vulnerable walk together out to the precipice, to that leap into the unknown

future you’re promising each other. All you know for sure is that you love this person whose hand you’re holding, whose heart you vow to tend. And you trust that that’s enough to weather the storms, and to create your own traditions, your own celebrations. So whether it’s a big group barbeque on the Fourth, or it’s reuniting with one pal. Whether it’s a smooch with your sweetie as you walk out the door in the morning or the first time you venture out of the house after the loss of a loved one. A clean bill of health from the doctor. The wag of your pup’s tail when you come home. The first day back at the gym. The smile on your partner’s face. Want your kid to keep doing well in school? Celebrate that “A” on the report card. If you pause to think about it, chances are you’ll find you have much to be grateful for, even during hard times. And it’s all worth celebrating. Celebrate a little or celebrate a lot, but don’t miss it. Let the Fourth teach us something: Celebrate each other. Celebrate yourself. Whether it’s the Fourth of July or not, send up some fireworks and ooh and ahh all you want. Until next time: “For one moment our lives met, our souls touched.” — Oscar Wilde


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Cover Story

Vets and Freaks: Love. Right Now. By Stephanie Smith

“This whole thing helped me. [Otherwise] we wouldn’t be here talking about the good; I’d be under a bridge fretting about the bad.” 10

The Pulse | Vol. 7, Issue 26 | July 1, 2010 | www.chattanoogapulse.com

Come on people now Smile on your brother Everybody get together And try to love one another right now. — The Youngbloods

Love in a time of war can get

lost somehow. Imagining all the people living life in peace was a fine declaration of the possibilities of humanity but, as we all know, it’s easier said than done. Soldiers are hired to do a job—to defend and protect their

country. They are human beings who face war, who daily stare death in the face so that we at home don’t have to. And for that, I think they deserve our love and support, regardless of our political beliefs. A small community in Georgia recently set the example for all of us by coming together in support of a soldier who had valiantly fought for his country overseas only to lose everything at home. In November 2009, U.S. Army Specialist Jeffrey


Cover Story “It created a diverse audience and performance, where people on both sides of the political divide were at one for an evening in solidarity.” Farmer’s Dade County home was robbed of all of his possessions while he was on active duty in Afghanistan. But something special happened back home. The combined efforts of a VFW and a community arts council served as a wakeup call to people on both sides of the political spectrum. I sat down with members of the community to find out what happened when everyone united for a soldier’s time of crisis. When he heard about the tragedy, Vietnam vet Bill Lockhart volunteered to help by organizing a fundraiser with the Trenton Arts Council. “[Jeffrey’s] a member [of American Legion Post 106],” says Lockhart. “I could only imagine what it would have been like to come back to such devastation. “I saw Bob [Dombrowski] walking down the street—people in his realm really are different than ours. Reaching out to the arts council got us support we wouldn’t be able to get any other way.” “Bill and I met when we did creek cleanups together. He contacted me to do beatnik poetry readings,” says Dombrowski, a local artist and active member of the Trenton Arts Council. “I got into his hair and took over the show.” “We’ve carefully avoided talking politics,” says Lockhart. “We’ve deliberately avoided talking politics,” laughs Dombrowski. Lockhart continues. “One part of the Legion’s work is to serve veterans past and present. This was unique—how often do we have the opportunity to help someone who was violated while overseas? This was unique to us, though maybe not to others. As this was going on, people outside our district and our [tri-state] area found a passion to help with this type of event; it was represented by several states and countries. [The

Legion] hasn’t ever had the opportunity to do something like this. It was not only rewarding for the Legion but also to see all the efforts come from all over.” “Collaboration is community based,” says Dombrowski. “Now we’re accessible to each other.” The fundraising event, “Farmer’s Aid” on February 5, 2010, brought together people from both ends of the political spectrum with a variety of activities, from beatnik poetry readings to a silent auction and an old-fashioned Southern bluegrass picking circle. “For a soldier, you look for people with a lot of patriotism,” says Lockhart. “When people heard there would be bluegrass and beatnik togther, there was a look of puzzlement. It was not a cultural shock, but an awakening. Something most of these people had never experienced.” Farmer asked for a few specific poems, but deciding which original poems to read was an issue for several of the poets, says Dombrowski. “Before the event, poets asked ‘Do I need to limit what I’m reading?’ The issue came up because of the politics. I said to them ‘You’re adults. These are adults. Do not back away because it might strike a different tone in someone other than your own.” He laughs. “But everyone became beatniks [for the evening] because everybody had a connection to it.” “As the communications director of the Trenton Arts Council, I was responsible for marketing and publicity,” says Mary Petruska. “I think this collaboration worked because we found the common ground of helping a fellow human being. We all maintained that focus and pulled support and audience from our respective bases. It created a diverse audience and performance, where people www.chattanoogapulse.com | July 1, 2010 | Vol. 7, Issue 26 | The Pulse

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Cover Story “We weren’t on the same page; now we’re here and it’s time to quit kicking the past and embrace the future. We’re all humans.” on both sides of the political divide were at one for an evening in solidarity. A lot of people there had never and would never go to poetry reading. Maybe now they’re more willing.” In addition to the Beatnik Poets, accompanied by the jazz band, the “Undoctored Originals”, and the bluegrass music provided by the Big Woods Band, the live video feed of Farmer in Afghanistan was the highlight of the evening—especially for Farmer himself. “People were having fun, dancing, smiling, laughing. It was like being a fly on the wall,” says Farmer. “They could definitely hear me very well, and I kept thinking ‘They’re having a good time!’” “We knew we wanted to do it,” says Petruska. “except we didn’t know how to do it and [Kitepilot Wireless] set up all the stuff. They volunteered, along with some technical people from the city and the high school.” “Mary came to me and we facilitated the live feed to Afghanistan,” says Keith Bien from Kitepilot Wireless. “We did this end of it. They currently use our internet at the American Legion. It was a logical fit.” “People stepped up outside of community to help a soldier,” said Lockhart. “It was well worked by the Arts Council—politics were set aside and they were wholehearted about it. It wouldn’t have been what it was [without their help]. They brought with them experiences we could not duplicate, the program, the video live feed, we wouldn’t have thought about a spotlight (Bob did that). The other performers put their heart into it. Jeffrey made friends outside of the military he wouldn’t have made otherwise.” Even though the event lasted from 2

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The Pulse | Vol. 7, Issue 26 | July 1, 2010 | www.chattanoogapulse.com

p.m. to 6 a.m., for Farmer, the festivities were well worth the lack of sleep. Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is practically inevitable for soldiers returning home from war and it requires much understanding by families and support from health professionals in order for the soldiers to successfully transition back to civilian life. Farmer’s trauma is significantly less, thanks to the support of his community. The fundraising event and additional contributions made since have netted more than $10,000 in cash, a pickup truck and tools for Farmer to re-enter his civilian life as an arborist. He also received more than 60 T-shirts and letters from supporters in different states, all due to a Facebook page, which posted pictures of Farmer in the T-shirts and links to the various newspaper articles covering the story. “Two worlds came together for a common goal,” he says. “For those soldiers coming back I would say definitely go to your local Legion, VFW, or veteran service provider and get the mental or physical help you need or just the basic benefits of being a veteran. And support your local arts council. They’re definitely bipolars of the spectrum, but because they were able to set aside their differences they still came together to a common ground. They helped replace stuff from the theft, they helped me remain calm—they definitely prevented a lot of depression.” “Everybody’s pretty happy, happy to see this guy come home and not have the post-trauma he would have had otherwise,” says Lockhart. “It has helped us with more Legion and VFW posts to set up more programs to help veterans. We raised quite a bit of money for Jeffrey. We don’t want to have to, but there is


Cover Story a war and everyone who comes home has a mental issue like [PTSD]; it’s a common thing. “I came back from Vietnam to the resistance of Americans having been at war. Take it with any grain you will; as a Vietnam vet I have detached myself from this artist kind of people because we’re not politically on the same side.” Dombrowski interjects. “But the past can be changed. It’s just a memory.” “But people still hold on to that,” insists Lockhart. “They don’t see that we did what was militarily necessary.” There is a split-second silence before everyone begins talking at once. The politics of the situation, so deliberately squashed for an hour, have suddenly erupted full force into the room. Forced to act as mediator to quell the pandemonium, I ask Farmer to weigh in. “This incident was just a way to show locals how big an audience this little place can reach. I’m just trying to prevent what [Bill] went through. In the [National Guard] you have to choose between your job and the army. People still don’t understand; that resentment and tension is still there. People call you a baby killer, but when a kid is carrying a hand grenade, it’s either you or them. It’s still out there; it’s a kind of racism essentially. “But then I’ll be at the airport eating lunch and the waitress will tell me the meal is taken care of. And all the parades and stuff I get to do when I get back with my home unit is great. I’m sure a lot of that wasn’t there for Bill. This whole thing helped me. [Otherwise] we wouldn’t be here talking about the good; I’d be under a bridge fretting about the bad. “The bottom line is that I have peace of mind,” says Farmer. “There’s a calmness. I’m more accepted into the community. People open themselves up to me. It lets me know that this community ain’t as bad as some people

make it out to be. Maybe this [collaboration] can help get rid of that [stereotype].” “Stereotypes don’t come from nowhere,” says Petruska. “They come from being human.” “I’ll give you another example,” says Dombrowski. “A man I know looked at me working [on a sculpture] one day and he asked ‘Why is that art?’ It sounds sarcastic except that he was really asking. His daughter [a dancer] said ‘Daddy, you don’t ask questions about that.’ But I

felt that because I really wanted to answer that. Dealing with the question of what is art and does it have anything to do with you and life is difficult but stimulating. “My personal experience with war is my brother was in Vietnam and he did not survive the psychological warfare; he thought he was going to become an outcast. Dealing with realities is virtually political in character. As an artist, I’m in essence dealing with cultural strands [of reality].” “There’s one good thing the Vietnam War did,” says Lockhart. “If you go to barracks in Iraq and Iran, they’re full of condiments, supplies, candies—things that make you feel like home—because Americans don’t want this to happen to soldiers again. Hindsight is 20/20. We can’t change the past but we can change the future. We weren’t on the same page; now we’re here and it’s time to quit kicking the past and embrace the future. We’re all humans.” Both the arts council and the Legion continue to do their work in the community of Dade County, serving the tri-state area wherever they are needed. The arts council is planning a “happening” on September 11 (details at www.trentonartscouncil.org) and the Legion is collecting books for and feeding meals to veterans at VA hospitals and clinics in the area. As of now, no future collaborations are planned, but that doesn’t mean there won’t be any, according to Petruska. “Will Bill and Jeffery start going to museums and buying art now? Probably not. “Will I start supporting wars I don’t believe in? Probably not. Can we all work together again in the future? Why not?” Why not indeed?

www.chattanoogapulse.com | July 1, 2010 | Vol. 7, Issue 26 | The Pulse

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Music Feature

Eris In Your Lungs A

By Hellcat

“This band has an undeniable talent that surges through every intricately placed chord and intensely emotive lyric.”

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bout two years, ago a rock band emerged on the little scene of Chattanooga, and caused as much discord and chaos as the goddess Eris herself. The band, consisting of Jason Ewton, Nathan Luttrell, Josh Cannon and Andy Elliott, developed a quick and loyal following of surprisingly diverse fans. The band has been clawing and climbing their way into the scenes of Knoxville, Atlanta, and Nashville ever since. If you have never heard Eris, you are seriously missing out, because this band has an undeniable talent that surges through every intricately placed chord and intensely emotive lyric. I may be a little biased, as I have loved this band’s sound since the very beginning. I would jam out to their tunes, even when I might have wanted to give a member or two the finger. That’s pretty hard proof that the band is good. I couldn’t dislike the music, even if I wanted to. I once described this band as unapologetic rock, and I think that is exactly what I am sticking to. The band has grown a great deal in their time together, as their rock sound seems to come so easily at their live shows. It shows that the band is confident and comfortable with itself. More importantly, they look like they are really having fun and loving their time performing. For me, this can make or break a show, or even a fan.

The Pulse | Vol. 7, Issue 26 | July 1, 2010 | www.chattanoogapulse.com

If you could take a little kid to a rock show, and that kid left that show telling you how they want to be a rock star when they grow up, then that’s a real rock show to me. Eris definitely has that appeal. If you need more convincing, come see for yourself. This weekend will be the band’s CD release of their first album, In Your Lungs, which has been a long time coming. A few “teaser” EPs have been available at previous shows, but this will be the first full length. When I talked to Jason recently, this is what he had to say: Hellcat: How long has this album been in the making? Jason Ewton: If you count before the band was formed, about three years, since I wrote about 70 percent of 80 percent of the songs. HC: And since the band was formed? JE: Two years. HC: How many songs are on the album, and what will the cost be at the show? JE: Seven songs, $10. HC: Who are you having as your opening band? JE: UltraDrive, from Atlanta. We played their CD release at the Hard Rock. HC: How would you describe the album? JE: It’s one take on rock and roll that is commercially viable, without all the cookie cutter. HC: How did you come up with the title, In Your Lungs? JE: It’s really just a simple pun. But it says what I want it to. In your lungs, as in a breath of fresh air. Eris. Air is. Eris in your lungs. Air is in your lungs. Also, Eris = discord, so discord is in your lungs, too. I think I like that accidental pun, too. HC: Are you proud of the album? JE: Yeah, I am proud of it...as much as you

can be. I’m never satisfied with anything I record. I once read a quote from a major software developer: “We don’t finish anything here...we just ship it.” That’s how I feel about this, and every other thing I’ve recorded. Don’t get me wrong. I like it. A lot. It’s just there is never enough time to do every little thing you want, and even if you did, you’d later want to change something anyway. Eventually, you just have to put it down and start a new record or project. HC: So, where do you see Eris going from here? JE: Who knows, really? I suppose if we have more music to write, then we will write it. The music industry isn’t what it used to be. It’s now easier to become established on YouTube than to go out and play bars and so forth. We’ve been at it for about two years now. We’ve made some progress. I suppose it’s something we’ll address after the release. We have some really devoted fans and I’m grateful for that, so rest assured, whatever happens, there WILL be more music, whether it’s from Eris or some other collection of people. Chattanooga’s a small town when it comes to musicians...well, in my experience anyway. So, I personally have ideas for other records I wanna write and record that might not even include other Eris members. You can never really tell until the music starts flowing what direction it will go. For instance, I have an old friend who’s wanting to score a movie. I might try to get in on that.

Eris $7, 10 p.m. Saturday, July 3 Rhythm & Brews, 221 Market St. (423) 267-4644. www.rhythm-brews.com


New Music Reviews

By Ernie Paik

Growing

Tobacco

Pumps!

Maniac Meat

(Vice)

(anticon.)

The Brooklyn outfit Growing seems to have completed a transformation on its latest album, Pumps!, moving from a sound centered on abstract drones, thick synthetic clouds, and echoing sonic elements to one that’s more grounded in strict rhythms and prominent beats. This shift of direction was evident on 2008’s All the Way, and now each song’s pulse is the dominant element, using defined drum machine beats more than shaped sounds to form rhythms. The result is some odd concoction, evoking bits of Animal Collective, Nurse with Wound, and some off-kilter new wave throwback, but it doesn’t quite fulfill its potential and isn’t as attention-grabbing as it probably wanted to be. One of the band’s strengths was to make concentrated sound-meshes that could swallow the listener, but now, the beats are jarring and work again the enveloping forces. One exception is “Highlight”—halfway through it, the rhythm jumps into its hypnotic stride, hitting a nice trance moment among playful, warbling space tones. Using an interesting sample doesn’t automatically make a song interesting, but on Pumps!, there’s a different concern—the vocal samples used, like a woman saying the word “individualism” on “Camera ’84,” just aren’t very remarkable and for the most part aren’t used in terribly compelling ways. The members of Growing are fervent sound manipulators, but some of their warpings might not seem so alien to those who are familiar with effect processor tricks and have played around with a delay pedal or two. The sound-bending is actually a vital part of the group’s identity, embracing electronic artificiality with liberal echoing and pitchshifting. The group’s direction isn’t inherently bad, but the way that the proceedings unfold makes the album seem like a lost opportunity. There’s a huge potential for some killer electro-dance tracks among the building blocks of Pumps!, possibly if the outfit played with dynamics and waves of sound in a more arresting way.

The mysterious Pittsburgh band Black Moth Super Rainbow is known for colorfully weird pop songs drenched with analog synths, trippy beats, and heavily processed robotic vocals singing psychedelic earthy poetry. The group’s front man, Tobacco, uses a similar and recognizable sonic approach on his latest solo album, Maniac Meat, but there are some key differences between the two acts; on Tobacco’s solo material, the mood is a bit more disquieting, with a thick, grimy coating and sticky, gliding fuzz synths, and there’s even a sort of vague sleaziness to the proceedings. After listening to Maniac Meat, it seems fitting that Tobacco named himself after a particularly creepy character from the Troma movie Redneck Zombies. This offering will undoubtedly get a helpful burst of attention due to its guest collaborator, Beck Hansen, who appears on two short put potent tracks, “Fresh Hex” and “Grape Aerosmith.” On “Fresh Hex,” Beck sings nonsensical strings of words that begin with the letter C, like, “color-coordinated cowboy catchphrase,” with the vocals at times choppedup and rearranged like letters in a ransom note. “Heavy Makeup” is another highlight, with a seedy vibe to it, and it manages to be simultaneously entrancing, dubious, and catchy, with a refrain of “You got sick from a lolli-lolli-lollipop / You feel free when you’re killing me”; its tempo slows down for the last minute, conveying an extra-sleazy posturing strut. Maniac Meat evokes disparate sources like old-school hip-hop beats from the ’80s and Moog synth-obsessed records from the ’60s and ’70s, particularly on tracks like “Unholy Demon Rhythms,” which uses manipulated human beatbox samples, and the bloopy, headnod-inducing “Creepy Phone Calls.” Although the album is probably ten minutes longer than it really needs to be, its style, peculiar tone, and unabashedly unsettling execution actually make it a more satisfying release than the last Black Moth Super Rainbow album, Eating Us. It’s a fun and dirty album—the aural equivalent of a ride down a mud-covered Slip ‘N Slide® in a robot costume.

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Music Calendar Thursday Spotlight

Hot New Mexicans, Future Virgins Powerpop/punk from Athens, GA with Hot New Mexicans. $7 10 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia, 231 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 266-1400. www.myspace.com/jjsbohemia

Thursday “Happy Hour Serenade” with Ralph James 4:30 p.m. The Palms at Hamilton, 6925 Shallowford Rd., #202. (423) 499-5055. www.thepalmsathamilton.com Vagabon Tribe 5:30 p.m. The Chattanooga Market, Miller Plaza, 850 Market St. (423) 265-3700. “His Best Works” with Jimmy Harris 7:30 p.m. The Palms at Hamilton, 6925 Shallowford Rd., #202. (423) 499-5055. www.thepalmsathamilton.com Karaoke dance party with DJ Smith 8 p.m. Bourbon Street Music Bar,2000 E. 23rd St. (423) 826-1985. Open Mic 8 p.m. The Riverhouse, 224 Frazier Ave. (423) 752-0066. All Request Video Music with DJ Spicolli and Cat Daddy 9 p.m. Raw, 409 Market St. (423) 756-1919 Gabriel Newell 9 p.m. Market Street Tavern, 850 Market St. (423) 634-0260. www.marketstreettavern.com

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The Pulse | Vol. 7, Issue 26 | July 1, 2010 | www.chattanoogapulse.com

Friday Spotlight

Tim Lewis and Reece Davis 9 p.m. Bart’s Lakeshore, 5600 Lakeshore Dr. (423) 870-0777. www.bartslakeshore.com Hot New Mexicans, Future Virgins 10 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia, 231 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 266-1400. www.myspace.com/jjsbohemia DJ ScubaSteve Fox and Hound Pub & Grille, 2040 Hamilton Place Blvd., #150. (423) 490-1200. DJ Lucky Lucky’s, 2536 Cummings Highway, (423) 825-5145.

Friday “Happy Hour Serenade” with Ralph James 4:30 p.m. The Palms at Hamilton, 6925 Shallowford Rd., #202. (423) 499-5055. www.thepalmsathamilton.com MeloManiacs 6 p.m. Bluff View Art District, Terrazine between Tony’s and Back Inn. Ben Friberg Trio 6:30 p.m. Table 2, 232 East 11th St. (423) 756-8253. Grupo Fantasma (opening act Concerning Lions) 7 p.m. Nightfall, Miller Plaza, 850 Market St. www.nightfallchattanooga.com Rock N’ Roll Spectacular 7:30 p.m. Chattanooga Choo Choo Centennial Theatre, 1400 Market St. (423) 266-5000. “Dinner Time Classics” with Jimmy Harris 7:30 p.m. The Palms at Hamilton, 6925 Shallowford Rd., #202. (423) 499-5055.

Downstream 9 p.m. Bart’s Lakeshore, 5600 Lakeshore Dr. (423) 870-0777. www.bartslakeshore.com Jordan Haloquist 9 p.m. Raw, 409 Market St. (423) 756-1919 Jescoe 9 p.m. Market Street Tavern, 850 Market St. (423) 634-0260. www.marketstreettavern.com Paul Smith and the Bourbon St. Band 9 p.m. Bourbon Street Music Bar, 2000 E. 23rd St. (423) 826-1985. Double Dragon 9 p.m. Market Street Tavern, 850 Market St. (423) 634-0260. www.marketstreettavern.com DJ & Dancing 9 p.m. The Palms at Hamilton, 6925 Shallowford Rd., #202. (423) 499-5055. www. thepalmsathamilton.com Space Capone with Sky Hi 10 p.m. Rhythm & Brews, 221 Market St. (423) 267-4644. www.rhythm-brews.com Young Republicans, Crystal Thomas, Raenbow Station 10 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia, 231 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 266-1400. www.myspace.com/jjsbohemia DJ Spicolli Raw Sushi Bar Restaurant & Nightclub, 409 Market Street, (423) 756-1919. www.myspace.com/jimstriker

Saturday Booker T. Scruggs Ensemble 11 a.m. The Chattanooga River Market, 850 Market St. (423) 265-3700.

Grupo Fantasma Funkiest Latin band on the planet. Opening act Concerning Lions. Free. 7 p.m. opening act 8 p.m. headliner Nightfall, Miller Plaza www.nightfallchattanooga.com New Binkley Brothers Noon. Rock City, 1400 Patten Rd. Lookout Mountain, GA. (706) 820-2531. Vagabon Tribe 2 p.m. The Chattanooga River Market, 850 Market St. (423) 265-3700. MeloManiacs 6 p.m. Bluff View Art District, Terrazine between Tony’s and Back Inn. “Dinner Time Classics” On the Baby Grand with Jimmy Harris 7:30 p.m. The Palms at Hamilton, 6925 Shallowford Rd., #202. (423) 499-5055. www.thepalmsathamilton.com Rock N’ Roll Spectacular 7:30 p.m. Chattanooga Choo Choo Centennial Theatre, 1400 Market St. (423) 266-5000. Vagabon Tribe 8 p.m. Charles & Myrtle’s Coffeehouse, 105 McBrien Rd. (423) 892-4960. www.christunity.org Opposite Box 9 p.m. Raw, 409 Market St. (423) 756-1919 DJ & Dancing 9 p.m. The Palms at Hamilton, 6925 Shallowford Rd., #202. (423) 499-5055. www.thepalmsathamilton.com


Music Calendar

Send your calendar events to us at calendar@chattanoogapulse.com

Saturday Spotlight

Sunday Spotlight

Paul Smith and the Special Moments Band 9 p.m. Bourbon Street Music Bar, 2000 E. 23rd St. (423) 826-1985. Open Mic Night 9 p.m. Mudpie Restaurant, 12 Frazier Ave. (423) 267-9043. www.mudpierestuarant.com Eris 10 p.m. Rhythm & Brews, 221 Market St. (423) 267-4644. www.rhythm-brews.com Dylan Kussman Band 10 p.m. Tremont Tavern, 1203 Hixson Pike. (423) 266-1996. www.tremonttavern.com Blues Warehouse 10 p.m. Market Street Tavern, 850 Market St. (423) 634-0260. www.marketstreettavern.com DJ Spicolli Raw Sushi Bar Restaurant & Nightclub, 409 Market Street, (423) 756-1919. DJ GOP The Palms at Hamilton, 6925 Shallowford Rd., #202. (423) 499-5055.

New Binkley Brothers Noon. Rock City, 1400 Patten Rd. Lookout Mountain, GA. (706) 820-2531. www.seerockcity.com Tadcasters 12:30 p.m. The Chattanooga Market, First Tennesee Pavilion, 1826 Carter St. (423) 648-2496. Vagabon Tribe 2 p.m. The Chattanooga Market, First Tennesee Pavilion, 1826 Carter St. (423) 648-2496. Sweet Georgie Sound 2 p.m. The Chattanooga Market, First Tennesee Pavilion, 1826 Carter St. (423) 648-2496. Open Mic w/Jeff Daniels 4 p.m. Ms. Debbie’s Nightlife Lounge 4762 Highway 58, (423) 485-0966. myspace.com/debbieslounge Convertibull 6:30 p.m. Miss Debbie’s, 4762 Hwy. 58. (423) 635-1591. Irish Music Sessions 6:30 p.m. Tremont Tavern, 1203 Hixson Pike. (423) 266-1996. www.tremonttavern.com Open Mic 8 p.m. Gene’s Bar & Grill, 724 Ashland Terrace, (423) 870-0880. myspace.com/genem14 DJ GOP The Palms at Hamilton, 6925 Shallowford Rd., #202. (423) 499-5055. www.thepalmsathamilton.com

Sunday

Monday

Jennifer Daniels 11 a.m. The Chattanooga Market, First Tennesee Pavilion, 1826 Carter St. (423) 648-2496.

Old Tyme Players 7 p.m. Market Street Tavern, 850 Market St. (423) 634-0260. www.marketstreettavern.com

Eris Killer rock and roll. (see review in Music Feature) $7 10 p.m. Rhythm & Brews, 221 Market St. (423) 267-4644. www.rhythm-brews.com

Paul Lohorn and the Monday Nite Big Band 7 p.m. Lindsay Street Hall, 901 Lindsay Street. (423) 755-9111. Venia, Squathrust!, My War 8 p.m. The Warehouse, 5716 Ringgold Rd., East Ridge. www.myspace.com/warehousetn DJ & Dancing The Palms at Hamilton 6925 Shallowford Rd., #202. (423) 499-5055.

Tuesday Ben Friberg Trio 6:30 p.m. Table 2, 232 East 11th St. (423) 756-8253. www.table2restaurant.com Open Mic with Mike McDade 8 p.m. Tremont Tavern, 1203 Hixson Pike. (423) 266-1996. www.tremonttavern.com Lightning Billy Hopkins 8 p.m. Market Street Tavern, 850 Market St. (423) 634-0260. www. marketstreettavern.com Spoken Word/Poetry Night 8 p.m. The Riverhouse, 224 Frazier Ave., (423) 752-0066. Spicolli-Oke 9 p.m. Raw, 409 Market St. (423) 756-1919 Tim Starnes, Husky Burnette, Jason Newman 9 p.m. Bart’s Lakeshore, 5600 Lakeshore Dr. (423) 870-0777. www.bartslakeshore.com DJ & Dancing 9 p.m. The Palms at Hamilton, 6925 Shallowford Rd., #202. (423) 499-5055. DJ ScubaSteve Fox and Hound Pub & Grille, 2040 Hamilton Place Blvd #150, (423) 490-1200.

Roots, Rock and Reggae With 3052 Dub Collective and Ogya. Free 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. The Incline Lower Station, St. Elmo www.ridetheincline.com

Wednesday Ralph James 4:30 p.m. The Palms at Hamilton, 6925 Shallowford Rd., #202. (423) 499-5055. www.thepalmsathamilton.com Ben Friberg Jazz Trio 6:30 p.m. Market Street Tavern, 850 Market Street, (423) 634-0260. www.marketstreettavern.com Jimmy Harris 7:30 p.m. The Palms at Hamilton, 6925 Shallowford Rd., #202. (423) 499-5055. www.thepalmsathamilton.com Karaoke with Chase 8 p.m. The Office, 901 Carter St. (inside Days Inn) Johnny B and Friends 8 p.m. Bourbon Street Music Bar, 2000 E. 23rd St. (423) 826-1985. Open Mic with Mike McDade 9 p.m. Raw, 409 Market St. (423) 756-1919 Songwriters in the Round 9 p.m. Rhythm & Brews, 221 Market St. (423) 267-4644. www.rhythm-brews.com Twin Tigers, Racing Death 10 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia, 231 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 266-1400. www.myspace.com/jjsbohemia

www.chattanoogapulse.com | July 1, 2010 | Vol. 7, Issue 26 | The Pulse

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Life in the Noog

By Chuck Crowder

All Work And No Nightlife? I

“Why spend your life in solitary confinement when you haven’t done anything wrong? Get out there and enjoy yourself with the rest of us.” Chuck Crowder is a local writer and general man about town. His opinions are just that. Everything expressed is loosely based on fact, and crap he hears people talking about. Take what you just read with a grain of salt, but pepper it in your thoughts. And be sure to check out his popular website www.thenoog.com

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f I’ve said it once, I’ve said it at least that one time, but the fun in life happens after five and on weekends. It may not be politically correct to say, but I like to have a good time most all of the time. And people who deny themselves regular social interaction and the veritable cornucopia of extracurricular entertainment the ‘noog has to offer are missing out on some of the simplest pleasures in life and tend to be, quite frankly, boring. You know the ones, those homies that—like everyone else—answer “nothing” when asked “what have you been up to lately?” Except, these people actually mean nothing…nothing at all. Some are workaholics, some are anti-social, married, have kids, feel too old, “don’t know anyone” or my favorite “don’t wanna be seen out too much.” What? Who the hell cares how much you’re seen out? I’ll tell you who. The girl sitting home watching Dancing with the Stars who desperately wishes she’d meet someone who’d take her out. Oh the irony. The worst excuse of them all is that there’s “nothing to do in Chattanooga.” These people just aren’t trying. The ‘noog has more social events on more days than you could possibly attend. Just check the calendar of this paper or friend the right people and groups on Facebook and there’s an invitation to attend at least one “event” every single day. We’re lousy with cool things to do. One of my favorite things to do is to go see live music. And between JJ’s, Discoteca and Rhythm & Brews, that’s never been a problem. In fact, we get a quality of music

The Pulse | Vol. 7, Issue 26 | July 1, 2010 | www.chattanoogapulse.com

rolling through town that eludes most other cities our size. Some acts even make it big, which means you can say that you saw them way back when—at a small club. Then there are the music festivals—like Nightfall, Three Sisters, Do Ya Hear We and the one we all love to hate—Riverbend. You can tell those who are raving about Riverbend’s “exceptional” musical line-up have never darkened the door of any music establishment in town, let alone the free Nightfall and Three Sisters festivals. I went to see Dan Baird & Homemade Sin at Riverbend this year simply because I love that band, not because I was jonesing for chicken-on-a-stick. After the show I was speaking with guitarist Warner Hodges when another fan came up and thanked him profusely for dragging Dan and the rest of the boys to town for the first time. Warner just looked at him, pointed at me and said, “Well, this guy had us at Nightfall last year, didn’t you see that show?” The “fan” scampered off after that. Go figure. It took a somewhat famous guitarist from Nashville to tell a local what he was missing in his own home town. I read another rave review of the Cadillac Saints’ Riverbend performance and how this enthusiastic newfound fan was looking forward to “following their career.” Well he could’ve started sooner if he realized that the Saints have played here a couple times in the past year or so. But I guess if you don’t “make it into town much,” then you have no idea what you’re missing. I can’t believe there are actually people who don’t come downtown at night unless it’s Riverbend, Pops in the Park or the occasional Lookouts game (if they’re winning). My guess is that many of these people who live in outlying areas such as Hixson, Ooltewah,

Brainerd or Ringgold are also big fans of the Indianapolis Colts for the obvious reason. And what if I told you I regularly see their famous quarterback at (locally-owned) downtown restaurants all of the time? It’s true. Star sightings aside, what other reasons are there to drag me out of my basement home theater on Signal Mountain (one might ask)? Here’s just three. 1.) Pecha Kucha—held at CreateHere every now and then, this interesting concept enables local guest speakers the chance to show 20 slides in 20 minutes, quickly describing the inspiration of each image within the theme that ties them all together. Fun, funny, insightful, and donations benefit a good cause. 2.) Chattanooga Market—every Sunday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.mm.at the First Tennessee Pavilion, you can purchase everything from fresh produce to art, hand crafted goods and even beer. The best people watching in town—and a great way to meet persons of interest. And admission is free. 3.) Chattanooga FC—with all of World Cup excitement of late, don’t forget that we have a top-notch semi-pro team of our own. They’ve got one of the best goalies I’ve ever seen live, $5 admission, $3 beers and an average of 3,000 in attendance each time they play. In fact, they’re at home at Finley Stadium/Davenport Field this holiday weekend. Don’t miss it. Probably the saddest thing about homebodies is their unwillingness to engage in normal, analog contact with the outside world. Why spend your life in solitary confinement when you haven’t done anything wrong? Get out there and enjoy yourself with the rest of us. I’ll save you a seat.


www.chattanoogapulse.com | July 1, 2010 | Vol. 7, Issue 26 | The Pulse

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Arts & Entertainment

The Hanging Court of Demagoguery

By Helene Houses

“The best, and most moving performance of the production is by Shirley Alderman as unjustly accused Rebecca Nurse.”

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P

laywright Arthur Miller was called before the infamous House Committee on Un-American Activities and convicted of “contempt of Congress” for refusing to name names of Communists or “Communist sympathizers”. His response to this was to write The Crucible, which, although it portrays characters concerned in the Salem Witch Trials, is an allegory for another time in American history when hysteria tainted the process of justice. There’s never a time when we can’t profit

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from being reminded how labels—“witch”, “Communist”, “liberal”, “Teabagger”—can cause even usually reasonable people to jump on the bandwagon of demagogues. And therefore I salute the Chattanooga Theatre Centre for reviving this American classic. However, this production, which uses costumes of the ’50s to remind us of the “witch hunt” connection between the two periods, does not resound in the way it could have done to illuminate how demagoguery still holds sway in America today. And that, I think, is a missed artistic opportunity. At a time when Ann Coulter, in her recent book Treason and subsequent interviews, is attempting to repair the reputation of Sen. Joseph McCarthy by disassociating him with “the myth of ‘McCarthyism’...the greatest Orwellian fraud of our times,” this play, which so clearly shows what happens when people like McCarthy are allowed to misuse power to label people at will, destroying their lives in the process, has implications not reached for in the CTC production. That said; let’s turn to its strengths. Chuck Tuttle both directed and designed the set, and the set is one of the show’s strongest attributes. The dark wood of the many doors opening into the central playing area casts a gloomy, brooding spell, and the upper “deck”, from which characters not on stage peer down onto the action taking place below, references both the House chamber and a Roman amphitheatre in which helpless victims are thrown to the lions. All 21 cast members are fully committed to the complex material, but not all of them succeed in mastering it. Standouts include Sheila Wofford, as the slave Tituba, who

appears in only a few scenes but dominates those. Her performance is fierce and haunting, as she descends into madness after being accused and imprisoned. Richard Bonnington as the elderly farmer Giles Corey convincingly conveys a man who is used to speaking his mind without thinking of the possible consequences—and in this case, the consequences are horrible and tragic. That we completely believe, based on Bonnington’s performance, that this man would utter the brave final words attributed to him is a tribute to the actor’s authenticity. The best, and most moving performance of the production is by Shirley Alderman as unjustly accused Rebecca Nurse. From her first entrance, she brings a solid, quiet dignity to the character that only grows as the tale unfolds and her character is faced with death if she refuses to “confess.” As an actor, Alderman, like the two mentioned above, does not “act.” She inhabits the character she portrays, and by doing so, allows the audience a genuine glimpse into the depth of Rebecca Nurse’s courage. For these performances alone, and for the impact The Crucible still has, this production is well worth a visit to the Theatre Centre’s Main Stage.

The Crucible $10 - $20 (No performances July 1-4) Thursday, July 8, 7 p.m. Friday/Saturday, July 9, 10, 8 p.m. Sunday, July 11, 2:30 p.m. Chattanooga Theatre Centre, Main Stage. 400 River Street. (423) 267-8534. wwwtheatrecentre.com


A&E Calendar Highlights Friday

Thursday

Toy Story 3 Beat the heat and see one of the year’s best. Multiple locations.

Send your calendar events to us at calendar@chattanoogapulse.com

4th Annual Patriotic Celebration Concert 7 p.m. Memorial Auditorium, 399 McCallie Ave. (423) 757-5156. www.chattanoogaonstage.com Mystery of the TV Talk Show 7 p.m. Vaudeville Café, 138 Market St. (423) 517-1839. www.funnydinner.com Avatar in 3D 7 p.m. IMAX Theater at the Tennessee Aquarium, 1 Broad St. (800) 265-0695. www.tnaqua.org/imax “Growing up Jewish” Jewish Cultural Center, 5461 N. Terrace Rd. (423) 493-0270. Chattanooga Professional Photography Group Exhibit North River Civic Center, 1009 Executive Dr., Ste. 102. (423) 870-8924. “Fresh Coastal Scenes” Shuptrine Fine Art Group, 2646 Broad St. (423) 266-4453. www.shuptrinefineartgroup.com Smith-Cleary Photography and Printmaking Exum Gallery, 305 W. 7th St. (423) 593-4265.

Reception for “Chasing the Light” and “Raining Cats and Dogs” Two exhibits by realist painter Chuck Frye. Free 5 – 8 p.m. In-Town Gallery, 26-A Frazier Ave. (423) 267-9214. www.intowngallery.com

Saturday

Tatsuya Nakatani Drums, gongs, singing bowls and a jazz sensibility. $10 8 p.m. Folk School of Chattanooga, 250 Forest Ave. (423) 827-8906. www.chattanoogafolk.com

Hubble in 3D 11 a.m., 1, 3, 5, 7 p.m. IMAX Theater at the Tennessee Aquarium, 1 Broad St. (800) 265-0695. www.tnaqua.org/imax “Skins and Skeletons” Team Lump opening reception 5:30 p.m. AVA Gallery, 30 Frazier Ave. (423) 265-1282. www.avarts.org Mystery of the Nightmare Office Party 6 p.m. Vaudeville Café, 138 Market St. (423) 517-1839. www.funnydinner.com Josh Gregory 8 p.m. The Comedy Catch, 3224 Brainerd Rd. (423) 629-2233. www.thecomedycatch.com Avatar in 3D 8 p.m. IMAX Theater at the Tennessee Aquarium, 1 Broad St. (800) 265-0695. Mystery of Flight 138 8:30 p.m. Vaudeville Café, 138 Market St. (423) 517-1839. Female Impersonation Show Midnight. Images, 6065 Lee Hwy. (423) 855-8210. www.imagesbar.com

“The Myth of Mary Gregory” Houston Museum of Decorative Arts, 201 High St. (423) 267-7176. www.thehoustonmuseum.com Terri Zitrick Denny Art My Color Image Boutique and Gallery, 330 Frazier Ave. (423) 598-6202. “Sensations” River Gallery, 400 E. 2nd St. (423) 265-5033. www.river-gallery.com “Southern Journeys” Chattanooga African American Museum, 200 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 266-8658. Cherokee Stone Carvings Bill Shores Frame and Gallery, 307 Manufacturers Rd. (423) 756-6746. www.billshoresframes.com Stephen Rolfe Powell Glass Exhibition Hunter Museum of American Art, 10 Bluff View. (423) 266-0944. “Skins and Skeletons” AVA Gallery, 30 Frazier Ave. (423) 265-1282. Lorrraine Christie Art Gallery 1401, 1401 Williams St. (423) 265-0015.

Sunday Chattanooga River Market 10 a.m. Aquarium Plaza, 1 Broad St. (423) 648-2496. www.tnaqua.org/ Hubble in 3D 11 a.m., 1, 3, 5, 7 p.m. IMAX Theater at the Tennessee Aquarium, 1 Broad St. (800) 265-0695. www.tnaqua.org/imax Red, White and Blue Days 11 a.m. Creative Discovery Museum, 321 Chestnut St. (423) 648-6043. www.cdmfun.org Mosaic Market 11 a.m. 412 Market St. (corner of 4th/Market) (423) 624-3915. Art Til Dark Noon. Northshore, (423) 413-8999. arttildark.wordpress.com Star Spangled Family Picnic 5:30 p.m. Chattanooga Theatre Centre, 400 River St. (423) 267-8534. www.theatrecentre.com Mystery of the Nightmare Office Party 6 p.m. Vaudeville Café, 138 Market St. (423) 517-1839. www.funnydinner.com

Josh Gregory 8 p.m. The Comedy Catch, 3224 Brainerd Rd. (423) 629-2233. www.thecomedycatch.com Pops in the Park 8 p.m. Coolidge Park, 150 River St. (423) 265-0771. Avatar in 3D 8 p.m. IMAX Theater at the Tennessee Aquarium, 1 Broad St. (800) 265-0695. www.tnaqua.org/IMAX Mystery of the Red Neck Italian Wedding 8:30 p.m. Vaudeville Café, 138 Market St. (423) 517-1839. www.funnydinner.com Female Impersonation Show Midnight. Images, 6065 Lee Hwy. (423) 855-8210. www.imagesbar.com “Raining Cats and Dogs” & “Chasing the Light” In-Town Gallery, 26A Frazier Ave. (423)267-9214. www.intowngallery.com “Transformation 6: Contemporary Works in Glass” Hunter Museum of American Art, 10 Bluff View. (423) 266-0944.

Chattanooga Football Club vs. Tulsa FC Futbol is both art and entertainment. $5 7 p.m. Finley Stadium, 1826 Reggie White Blvd. (Carter St.) www.chattanoogafc.com

Red, White and Blue Days 11 a.m. Creative Discovery Museum, 321 Chestnut St. (423) 648-6043. www.cdmfun.org Chattanooga Market 11 a.m. First Tennessee Pavilion, 1826 Carter Street, (423) 648-2496 Independence Day Lunch 11:30 p.m. Jewish Cultural Center, 5461 N. Terrace Rd. (423) 493-0270. First Free Sundays Noon. Hunter Museum of American Art, 10 Bluff View. (423) 266-0944. www.huntermuseum.org Tailgating with the Young Professionals of Chattanooga 6 p.m. Chattanooga Football Club at Finley Stadium, 1826 Reggie White Blvd. (423) 463-4193. www.ypchattanooga.org “Jellies: Living Art” Hunter Museum of American Art, 10 Bluff View. (423) 266-0944. www.huntermuseum.org “Growing up Jewish” Jewish Cultural Center, 5461 N. Terrace Rd. (423) 493-0270.

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A&E Calendar Highlights Monday Red, White and Blue Days 11 a.m. Creative Discovery Museum, 321 Chestnut St. (423) 648-6043. www.cdmfun.org Speak Easy: Spoken Word and Poetry 8 p.m. Mudpie Restaurant, 12 Frazier Ave. (423) 267-9040. Chattanooga Professional Photography Group Exhibit North River Civic Center, 1009 Executive Dr. Ste. 102. (423) 870-8924. “Fresh Coastal Scenes” Shuptrine Fine Art Group, 2646 Broad St. (423) 266-4453. www.shuptrinefineartgroup.com Smith-Cleary Photography and Printmaking Exum Gallery, 305 W. 7th St. (423) 593-4265. “The Myth of Mary Gregory” Houston Museum of Decorative Arts, 201 High St. (423) 267-7176. Terri Zitrick Denny Art My Color Image Boutique and Gallery, 330 Frazier Ave. (423) 598-6202.

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Tuesday Book Discussion with B.J. Coleman 7 p.m. Old Towne Books, 3249 Brainerd Rd. (423) 595-4468. Live Cabaret Show with James Breedwell 9, 11 p.m. Bourbon St. Music Bar. 2000 E. 23rd St. (423) 697-9957. “Sensations” River Gallery, 400 E. 2nd St. (423) 265-5033. www.river-gallery.com “Southern Journeys” Chattanooga African American Museum, 200 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 266-8658. Cherokee Stone Carvings Bill Shores Frame and Gallery, 307 Manufacturers Rd. (423) 756-6746. www.billshoresframes.com Stephen Rolfe Powell Glass Exhibition Hunter Museum of American Art, 10 Bluff View. (423) 266-0944. www.huntermuseum.org “Skins and Skeletons” AVA Gallery, 30 Frazier Ave. (423) 265-1282. www.avarts.org

The Pulse | Vol. 7, Issue 26 | July 1, 2010 | www.chattanoogapulse.com

Wednesday City Share: “Measuring Impact” Noon. Urban League of Chattanooga, 730 MLK Blvd. (423) 648-2195. www.createhere.org Lorrraine Christie Art Gallery 1401, 1401 Williams St. (423) 265-0015. www.gallety1401.com “Raining Cats and Dogs” & “Chasing the Light” In-Town Gallery, 26A Frazier Ave. (423) 267-9214. www.intowngallery.com “Transformation 6: Contemporary Works in Glass” Hunter Museum of American Art, 10 Bluff View. (423) 266-0944. www.huntermuseum.org “Jellies: Living Art” Hunter Museum of American Art, 10 Bluff View. (423) 266-0944. “Growing up Jewish” Jewish Cultural Center, 5461 N. Terrace Rd. (423) 493-0270. “Fresh Coastal Scenes” Shuptrine Fine Art Group, 2646 Broad St. (423) 266-4453

Editor’s Pick: Featured Event Of The Week

Team Lump: “Skins and Skeletons” Artists’ collective from Raleigh, NC, shows art from outside the commercial art world. Reception, Friday, July 2 5:30 – 8 p.m. Free AVA Gallery, 30 Frazier Avenue (423) 265-4282. wwwavaarts.org


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On The Beat

By Alex Teach

Public Perception S

“What other job on Earth could have placed him in the kind of situation in which a man with a large jiggling rubber phallus attached to his head is calling the police to report something suspicious?” When Officer Alexander D. Teach is not patrolling our fair city on the heels of the criminal element, he is an occasional student, carpenter, boating enthusiast, and spends his spare time volunteering for the Boehm Birth Defects Center. To contact him directtly, follow him on Facebook at www.facebook.com/alex.teach

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o this cop answers a call at a gay bar on Halloween night on report of a suspicious person. On the way to the door from his car, he notices what could most politely be described as “lascivious behavior” taking place in at least two vehicles on the parking lot, but first things first: He had to find his complainant to address the situation at hand, whatever it may be. He was almost all the way to the door when a man walked out with a large rubber penis attached to his forehead, just under the edge of a ball cap that had been turned around to better hide the attachments straps. This, it turned out, was the person reporting what he considered to be “suspicious behavior”. He had the officer’s full attention. In the moments ahead the cop learned two very important things: One, that not everyone’s interpretation of a “unicorn” costume is universal (think about the “horn” a second; I hope you aren’t drinking coffee when this finally hits you), and two, what other job on Earth could have placed him in the kind of situation in which a man with a large jiggling rubber phallus attached to his head is calling the police to report something suspicious while people are fornicating under cover of darkness in the parking lot around him? The cop smiled, and took the report. Discussion: Do you think the officer, a card-carrying heterosexual in one of the most testosterone-oriented professions in the world, was in his comfort zone? Do you think he was not capable of revulsion or susceptible to the fight-or-flight reflex of that accompanies

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the violation of such a comfort zone on a primal level? Of course he was…but he wasn’t disgusted or intimidated. He appreciated the situation for its absurdity, not his immediate concession to instinct and fear. The cop is still around, while the bar (once located off Duncan Avenue), mercifully, is not, but I really told you that story about “acceptance versus disgust” so I could segue into this one. I was talking with a very close friend about the recent run-in another officer had with a different kind of queen: A drama queen whose embellishment of facts that made national news turned out to be less than accurate. The conversation centered on the issue that he had instinctively believed this guy from the onset, and to a degree immediately assumed the cop was in the wrong—without ever having heard his side of the story. Sure, his thinking changed after inconvenient video surfaced that eroded the young man’s credibility, but he didn’t hesitate to assume the guy was right and the cop wrong. He had close friends in the Department himself (your Humble Narrator among them) and a penchant for objectivity that bordered on eeriness, so the more he reflected on his own reaction the more it bothered him. Why? At the end of the sit down, we came up with this obvious statement of fact: People have an inherent fear of authority figures. It’s human nature, though; it’s not personal. There have been and always will be bad cops to provide justification for this, despite composing statistically less than 1 percent of every agency in the country, and though the opposite can also be documented, the good ones simply don’t make the news to influence our decision making.

Few remember the Nick Hesses, the Richard Alexanders…or the guys still working that saved lives directly, or didn’t take shots they could have, or adopted the abandoned infants they found into their families, or coached ball for disadvantaged children in their districts in their off-time. I understand this so clearly because in other areas, I’m just as guilty. When a conservative screws up in politics, I don’t disbelieve it, but I am usually quiet. When a liberal screws up, I am more likely to issue a public opinion. It’s my nature. What’s more, I have the same inherent fear and mistrust of those in authority over cops: Politicians. Yet there have been many (truly) noble politicians as well. Somewhat ironic, since we ourselves don’t like being unfairly judged, don’t you think? Authority has always been mistrusted, and rightfully so—as a system of checks and balances put in place by the framers of the Constitution. But even if the police could stop answering 911s and try public relations 24/7, the complaint will remain the same: There will always be a “next Erlanger incident”, a next “Ralph Freeman”, a next tragic vehicle-pursuit crash. My solution? I tend to make the best of it and let it ride, taking care of people and doing the job right in the mean time, and praying the inevitable mistakes are minor ones. We can’t make folks like us...but that’s OK. We Like them. And no cop would ever trade that any more than he would be unable to appreciate the sight of a man with a rubber penis attached to his forehead in the midst of a serious dilemma. (The “visual”, for the record, is free. Enjoy until next week.)


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Film Feature

Giving Grown-Ups A Bad Name G

By John DeVore

“One member is rich. One is black, one is fat, one is short, and one is Rob Schneider.”

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rown Ups is just bad. To call it comedy is an insult to the entire genre. In fact, it’s barely a movie. It wants you to believe that it’s a family comedy, an endearing look at aging childhood friends, their children, their dreams for the their families, and their desire to travel back to a simpler time: a time of Chutes and Ladders, youth basketball championships, and summer vacation. These themes are established within the first ten minutes and repeated every subsequent ten minutes until the credits mercifully roll. I can’t tell you the names of the characters, whose kids belong to who, or even what actually happened in the film. I know I saw the entire movie, given that 107 minutes had in fact passed by the time I left the theatre, but I spent the majority of my time watching my friend play golf on his iPhone and marveling at the middle-aged woman behind me who giggled every time the elderly black lady farted on screen. I understand that comedy is subjective. We laugh based on our own experiences and the absurdities provided by them. Laughter is instinctively human; it is a social construct.

The Pulse | Vol. 7, Issue 26 | July 1, 2010 | www.chattanoogapulse.com

Comedy is an experience that needs to be shared and comedy movies are always better when seen with a crowd. For this reason, among many, many others, Grown Ups falls flat. Adam Sandler, and all of the guys that Adam Sandler usually makes movies with, created a story about close friends, with inside jokes, stories, and memories, and then neglected to include the audience in the experience. What results is nearly two hours of shuffling feet, bored sighs, and twiddled thumbs. It’s like sitting in a restaurant, eating alone, next to the loud table of fraternity brothers gleefully remembering lost times with half-finished stories and raucous laughter. All you want to do is get your food and get out. The plot is paper thin. An old basketball coach has died, and the members of his only championship team have returned to a town on a lake somewhere to honor him with a weekend of family bonding. One member is rich. One is black, one is fat, one is short, and one is Rob Schneider. Adam Sandler wants his kids to stop being spoiled brats. Chris Rock wants something from Maya Rudolf, but I wasn’t ever clear what that was. Kevin James wants to impress his old friends. David Spade is onscreen sometimes while Rob Schneider sucks at being funny. The kids wander in and out of scenes saying things that kids don’t say. Suddenly, there are two hot girls in bikinis. Now the families are inexplicably at a water park, setting up a joke about peeing in the pool. Steve Buscemi has a couple of scenes and one of them is moderately funny, which makes him the movie’s equivalent of Richard Pryor. There might be a funny movie in here. It might be buried underneath the jokes about

bunions, the slow-motion physical comedy, the sappy, “tender” family moments. I know that the top-billed actors (always excepting Rob Schneider) have all had quite a bit of success in their own right. Adam Sandler not only has several good comedies in his portfolio, he has also been very effective in dramatic roles. Chris Rock is one of the funniest comedians in the last 20 years. Kevin James and David Spade have both had great success on television. These guys can be funny. I know it. It was almost as if they all showed up in Vancouver for a weekend with some cameras and beer, and said, “Let’s see what happens.” This might be a good way to make poor but funny decisions and accidentally end up in the emergency room. It is not, however, a good way to make a major motion picture. As an aside, I attended a wedding for a highschool friend this past weekend with many old friends that I see once or twice a year. I have always been convinced that we are the funniest people on the planet. My sides always ache for a week after spending time with them. But that doesn’t mean that we need to make a movie where we all sit around and talk about remaking the “Star Wars” films where every character talks like Jar Jar Binks. It’s really only funny to us. And to my friends Andy, David, and Richard who accompanied me to see this film: I’m sorry. We should have just gone out on the boat.

Grown Ups Directed by Dennis Dugan Starring Adam Sandler, David Spade, Rob Schneider, Chris Rock, Kevin James Rated PG-13 Running time: 107 very long minutes


New In Theaters

By Gary Poole

The Last Airbender Air, Water, Earth, Fire. Four nations tied by destiny when the Fire Nation launches a brutal war against the others. A century has passed with no hope in sight to change the path of this destruction. Caught between combat and courage, Aang (Noah Ringer) discovers he is the lone Avatar with the power to manipulate all four elements. Aang teams with Katara (Nicola Peltz), a Waterbender, and her brother, Sokka (Jackson Rathbone), to restore balance to their war-torn world. Based on the hugely successful Nickelodeon animated TV series, the liveaction feature film The Last Airbender is the opening chapter in Aang’s struggle to survive. It is also the first film from director M. Night Shyamalan since 2008’s disappointing The Happening, and features his first foray into an already well-developed fantasy world. Whether he can bring the fantastic elements of the animated

The Girl Who Played With Fire Mikael Blomkvist, publisher of Millennium magazine, has made his living exposing the crooked and corrupt practices of establishment Swedish figures. So when a young journalist approaches him with a meticulously researched thesis about sex trafficking in Sweden and those in high office who abuse underage girls, Blomkvist immediately throws himself into the investigation. Based on the highly popular series of novels by the late novelist Stieg Larsson. Starring Noomi Rapace, Micheal Nyqvist Directed by Daniel Alfredson

Restrepo Sebastian Junger and Tim Hetherington’s year dug in with the Second Platoon in

story to the live-action big screen is a major question, but he’ll likely benefit from a built-in and very appreciative fanbase. Starring Noah Ringer, Nicola Peltz Directed by M. Night Shyamalan one of Afghanistan’s most strategically crucial valleys reveals extraordinary insight into the surreal combination of back-breaking labor, deadly firefights, and camaraderie as the soldiers painfully push back the Taliban. Directed by Tim Hetherington, Sebastian Junger

Twelve A young drug dealer watches as his highrolling life is dismantled in the wake of his cousin’s murder, which sees his best friend arrested for the crime. Kiefer Sutherland provides the voice of the narrator, while longtime action director Joel Schumacher returns to his drama/ thriller roots. Starring Chace Craford, Emma Roberts Directed by Joel Schumacher www.chattanoogapulse.com | July 1, 2010 | Vol. 7, Issue 26 | The Pulse

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Spirits Within

By Joshua Hurley

A Beer for the Mardi Gras in You With the temeperature in the Valley already reaching 100 degrees, Riley’s would like to offer a Great Buy to cool you off from the scorching heat and damp humidity. “Great Buys” is a weekly special offered to the readership of The Pulse, in which Riley’s Wine and Spirits on Hixson Pike in Hixson picks something special from our large selections of beverages from around the world, lowers the price and discusses its origins. This week’s selection is a refreshing IPA beer from Abita called Jockamo. Jockamo is a beer from the Abita Brewing Company of Abita Springs, Louisiana, which is located about 30 miles north of New Orleans. Abita debuted in 1986, producing 1,500 barrels of beer. Today, the brewery produces more than 80,000 barrels annually. Among its most popular brews are Abita Golden, Abita Amber, Abita Purple Haze, and Abita Turbo Dog. Along with these staples, Abita also has a couple of seasonal brews and a root beer that does quite well on its own. Abita brews all of its beer using water from artesian wells in Abita Springs. In 2005, Stuff magazine named Turbo Dog “Brew of the Year”. Abita’s latest brew is the high-gravity (high alcohol content, above 6 percent alc/vol) IPA (India Pale Ale) Jockamo. IPAs are ales that are amber in color and are usually full of hoppy, malty flavors. IPAs’ origins can be traced back to 18thcentury England. The name “pale” refers to ale brewed from light or “pale” malt, which in turn, comes from lightly roasted barley. When 18th century English journeymen transported barrels of pale ale to India, it was a huge success among Indians, eventually becoming known as India Pale Ale.

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Free Will Astrology CANCER (June 21-July 22): Let’s do a check-in on your progress so far in 2010, Cancerian. The year’s half over, and I’m wondering if you’ve been cashing in on the unique invitations that life has been sending your way. The way I understand it, you’ve been summoned to emerge from your hiding place and go wandering around in exotic and unfamiliar places. Events that in the past may have turned you inward toward thoughts of safety have in recent months nudged you out in the direction of the Great Unknown. Have you been honest enough with yourself to recognize the call to adventure? Have you been wild and free enough to answer the call? If not, I suggest you find it in yourself to do so. The next six months will be prime time to head out on a glorious quest. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The year’s half over, Leo. Let’s take an inventory to see whether you’ve been taking maximum advantage of the special opportunities life has been offering you. Consider these questions: Has the quality of your intimate alliances become especially intense, invigorating, and catalytic in recent months? Have you created lots of small miracles with the people you care about most? Have you been willing to risk more to get the most out of togetherness, even if it means dealing with shadowy stuff that makes you uncomfortable? If there has been anything missing from your efforts in these heroic tasks, get to work. Between now and January 2011, you’ll have a mandate to go even deeper than you have since January 2010.

Abita Jockamo is made much like the original pale ales, utilizing a coke-fired oven. Coke is a by-product of burning low ash and low sulfur coal. It’s a solid, grey, hard, porous substance that produces high levels of heat without gas or smoke, which could affect the taste of the barley. Jockamo (alcohol 6.5 percent) celebrates the fabled “Mardi Gras Indians” who, for more than 200 years, have sung and danced on the streets during Mardi Gras wearing handcrafted suits made from beads and feathers. The Indians celebrate traditions, and it’s with that in mind that Abita has crafted an IPA made much like the first IPAs of 18th century England. Jockamo has a reddish-amber color with a foamy, tan head. It contains aromas of mint, tropical fruit and hops, followed by sweet tastes of caramel and apricot. Overall, this is a refreshing IPA, sweeter and hoppier than most domestics. Riley’s offers Abita’s Jockamo by the six-pack for $9.99, plus tax, or singly for $1.75, plus tax.

The Pulse | Vol. 7, Issue 26 | July 1, 2010 | www.chattanoogapulse.com

By Rob Brezsny Truthrooster@gmail.com CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): What are the toughest pairs of opposites in your life, Capricorn? What are the polarities whose different sides rarely resonate with each other and too often threaten to split you in half? One of the distinguishing characteristics of 2010 is the fact that you are getting unprecedented chances to bring them together in ringing harmony, or at least a more interesting tension. What have you learned so far about how to work that magic? And how can you apply it in even craftier ways during the next six months? AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): You may still be gnawed by a longing for your life to be different from what it is. You might fantasize that you’re missing a crucial element that would, if acquired, usher you into a Golden Age. But I’ve been analyzing the big picture of your destiny, Aquarius, and here’s what I see: This year you’re being offered the chance to be pretty satisfied with the messy, ambiguous, fantastically rich set of circumstances that you’ve actually been blessed with. The first half of 2010 should have inspired you to flirt with this surprising truth. The second half will drive it home with the force of a pile of gifts left anonymously on your doorstep.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): So how is 2010 going for you so far, Virgo? Have you been taking advantage of life’s offers to help you move into a dynamic new phase of your relationship life? Have you been willing to set aside tired old strategies for seeking intimacy so that you can discover approaches you’ve never imagined before? Have you been brave about overcoming the past traumas and hurts that scared you into accepting less than the very best alliances you could seek? I hope you’ve been pursuing these improvements, because this is the best year in over a decade to accomplish them.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): The journal Nature recently marked the tenth anniversary of a great scientific triumph: the complete mapping of the human genome. There was a cloud over the celebration, however, because few practical health benefits have yet to come out of this revolutionary accomplishment. It has proved unexpectedly hard to translate the deciphered code into cures for diseases. I offer this situation as a cautionary tale for you, Pisces. The first part of 2010 has brought you several important discoveries and breakthroughs. In the coming months, even as the novelties continue to flow, it’ll be your sacred duty to put them to use in ways that will permanently improve your day-to-day life. Unlike the case of the human genome, your work should meet with success.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Have you been doing a lot of sweating and grunting from sheer exertion in 2010? Have you thrown yourself conscientiously into the hardest, smartest labor you’ve ever enjoyed? I hope so, because that would suggest you’re in rapt alignment with this year’s cosmic rhythms. It would mean that you have been cashing in on the rather sublime opportunities you’re being offered to diligently prove how much you love your life. The next six months will provide you with even more and better prods, Libra, so please find even deeper reserves of determination. Intensify your commitment to mastering the work you came to this planet to do.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): How well are you capitalizing on this year’s unique opportunities, Aries? Since we’re halfway through 2010, let’s take an inventory. I’m hoping you’re well underway in the heroic task of conquering your past. It has been and will continue to be prime time for you to wean yourself from unresolvable energy-drains. So exorcise irksome ghosts, please! Pay off ancient debts! Free yourself from memories that don’t serve you! You’re finally ready to graduate from lessons you’ve had to learn and re-learn and rere-learn. The coming months will bring you even more opportunities to finish up old business that has demanded too much of your time and energy.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): How’s that project coming, Scorpio? You know, that assignment the universe gave you at the beginning of 2010 to loosen up, play more, and periodically laugh like a tipsy Sagittarius. Have you been taking a sabbatical from the seething complications that in most other years are your rightful specialty? Did you throw some of your emotional baggage off a cliff? Are you dancing more frequently? I hope you’ve been attending to all of this crucial work, and I trust that you’re primed to do even more of it during the next six months. To take maximum advantage of your appointments with relief and release, you’ll have to be even sweeter and lighter.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Now that we’re midway through 2010, it’s time to assess how well you’re taking advantage of this year’s good fortune. So let me ask you, Taurus: Have you been expanding your web of connections? Have you honed and deepened your networking skills? Have you taken bold steps to refine your influence over the way your team or crew or gang is evolving? The first half of the year has been full of encouragement in these areas, and the coming months will be even more so.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Are you a dynamic bastion of stability yet, Sagittarius? Have you been growing deeper and deeper roots as you bloom in your power spot? Are you continuing to build your self-mastery as you draw abundant sustenance from the mother lode? You’re halfway through 2010, the year when these wonders should be unfolding with majestic drama. The best is yet to come, so I recommend that you declare your intention to make the next six months be a time when you come all the way home.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): How well have you been attending to 2010’s major themes, Gemini? Since we’re midway through the year, let’s do a checkin. I hope that by now you are at least 15 percent sturdier, stronger, and braver than you’ve ever been in your entire life, and at least 20 percent better organized and disciplined. I hope that you have outgrown one of your amateur approaches and claimed a new professional privilege. Now write the following questions on a slip of paper that you will leave taped to your mirror for the next six months. “1. How can I get closer to making my job and my vocation be the same thing? 2. What am I doing to become an even more robust and confident version of myself?”


JONESIN’

Across 1 Cape horn? 9 Gaping holes 15 It’s about a quart 16 Type of thermometer 17 What an arrow indicates on e-books 18 Suzuki of the Mariners 19 “Poverty is ___ that obscures the face of greatness” (Kahlil Gibran) 20 Restaurant with a green and red logo 21 More bug-filled 24 Title bee participant in a 2006 movie 25 Make red with blood 27 Part of a Latin boast 28 Goethe play with music by Beethoven 29 Sea eagle 30 Pluot center 33 “I’m ___ home right now...” 34 Sun. talk 35 Calle ___ 37 Makes a big speech 39 Feudal worker

40 Term limits? 45 Dual-purpose 47 It comes before pi 48 Late 1990s Cadillac model 49 Rental agreement 50 Lose personnel, in military-speak 51 Character from Greek myth associated with golden apples 54 Give in 55 Ayn Rand title word 56 Sprinkle in flour 57 Equals Down 1 It calls itself “The Broadband Phone Company” 2 Lopsided 3 Irritating sorts 4 ___ Online (long-running MMORPG created by Lord British) 5 Cable ride 6 Airport guess, for short 7 Turkey serving 8 “We ___ Family”

“Block Party” –no theme, no worries.

9 Bowling league? 10 Anne of HBO’s “Hung” 11 Reach (a goal) 12 Ben and Jerry, for two 13 Singer Faithfull 14 More likely to spill over 22 Seasonal Starbucks drink 23 Unverified 24 Red food coloring source 26 Smidgens 30 A few words from afar 31 Free glass 32 Beat badly 36 Bid 38 Suffering from insomnia 41 Time period that shaped the Great Lakes 42 Sports & Leisure color, in the original Trivial Pursuit 43 Pater ___ (“Our Father” prayer) 44 Golf champ Sam and family 46 Faulty Challenger part 51 Gp. that awards cinematography credits 52 Despite, in poems 53 Radius location

Crossword created By Matt Jones. © 2010 Jonesin’ Crosswords. For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #474.

www.chattanoogapulse.com | July 1, 2010 | Vol. 7, Issue 26 | The Pulse

29


Ask A Mexican!

By Gustavo Arellano

Special Poetry Edition

“If you can meet with an Aztlanista and an Arizonan disaster And treat those two babosos just the same.”

Ask the Mexican at themexican@ askamexican.net, be his fan on Facebook, follow him on Twitter or ask him a video question at youtube.com/askamexicano!

30

Dear Readers, The Arizona pendejas have emboldened hundreds of Know Nothings in the past week to boast to the Mexican that they’re not racist if they support SB 1070 because, according to them, they believe in the law and they have no problems with immigrants as long as they’re legal. Nosotros los buenos know that argument is almost always demonstrably false due to culture, know that Americans were bashing swarthy Sicilians even after the immigration officer at Ellis Island signed them through and shortened their name from Fabruzzo to Faber. But I feel magnanimous this week. Maybe it’s the pre-Fourth of July Herradura, before me, but I’ll indulge the anti-racist protestations of Know Nothings with a test. If—with apologies to Rudyard Kipling—if… If you can keep your cabeza when all about you Is banda and mariachi blaring near you; If you can see six Mexi kids and their pregnant mom in front of you, But make allowance for their tough times too; If you can wait in the emergency room and not be tired by waiting, Or, being lied about a rooster in the backyard, not report to Animal Control those lies, Or, being hated by Mexican soccer fans, don’t give way to hating,

The Pulse | Vol. 7, Issue 26 | July 1, 2010 | www.chattanoogapulse.com

And yet don’t look too good in a sombrero, nor talk like Glenn Beck, who isn’t too wise; If you can dream of Ozzie and Harriet America—and not make sueños your master; If you can think about cars parked on front lawns—and not make thoughts your aim, If you can meet with an Aztlanista and an Arizonan disaster And treat those two babosos just the same: If you can bear to hear the truth about Mexican assimilation others have spoken Twisted no longer by pendejos to make a trap for fools, Or watch our border, broken, And stoop and build it up with humane tools; If you can pool your lifetime winnings And risk it on a business in a barrio where soccer balls get a toss, And lose, and start again at your beginnings And never blame illegals about your loss; If you can force your heart and nervios and sinew To not sell your home long after your white neighbors are gone, And so hold on when the only English speaker is you

Except for those pochos that say to usted: “Hold pinche on”; If you can talk with Mexican crowds and keep your virtue, Or walk with ICE—nor lose the ability to allow a DREAM Act student’s story to touch; If neither George Lopez nor “Press One for English, Two for Spanish” can hurt you; If truly bigoted relatives count with you, but none too much; If your local pool gets disturbed every minute With sixty Mexicans in jeans—and you don’t make them run— You’re not a racist and truly about laws, And—which is more—you’re a chingón, cabrón!


The Pulse - Vol. 7, Issue 26  

The Pulse - Vol. 7, Issue 26

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