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JULY 19, 2018

CHATTANOOGA'S WEEKLY ALTERNATIVE

ROADTRIPPING TO THE FUTURE LOOKING AHEAD INTO OUR AUTOMOTIVE CRYSTAL BALL


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INSIDE THIS ISSUE VOLUME 15, ISSUE 29 • JULY 19, 2018

BREWER MEDIA GROUP Publisher James Brewer, Sr. FOUNDED 2003 BY ZACHARY COOPER & MICHAEL KULL

EDITORIAL Managing Editor Gary Poole Assistant Editor Brooke Brown Music Editor Marc T. Michael Film Editor John DeVore Contributors David Traver Adolphus • Rob Brezsny Alex Curry • Steven W. Disbrow Matt Jones • Mike McJunkin Tony Mraz • Ernie Paik Rick Pimental-Habib Michael Thomas • Jenn Webster Editorial Interns Libby Gillies • Olivia Haynes Design Intern Kenzie Wrightsman Cover Photo Lesha Patterson Cartoonists Max Cannon • Jen Sorenson Tom Tomorrow

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Roadtripping To The Future In the beginning, there was a free-for-all. Would cars have tillers or wheels, and would you steer from the front, back or side, and which side? How many wheels would they have? Would they run on gas, electric, or steam?

ADVERTISING Director of Sales Mike Baskin Account Executives Rick Leavell • Libby Phillips Ivan Rochelle • Danielle Swindell

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THE FINE PRINT: The Pulse is published weekly by Brewer Media and is distributed throughout the city of Chattanooga and surrounding communities. The Pulse covers a broad range of topics concentrating on music, the arts, entertainment, culture and local news. The Pulse is available free of charge, limited to one copy per reader. No person without written permission from the publisher may take more than one copy per weekly issue. The Pulse may be distributed only by authorized distributors. Contents Copyright © 2018 by Brewer Media. All rights reserved.

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A NOT SO BIZARRE BAZAR

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Chef Rebecca Barron sits at the helm of Chattanooga’s food world. The esteemed St. John’s Restaurant is undoubtedly a pillar of the culinary happenings of the Scenic City.

CONTACT Offices 1305 Carter St., Chattanooga, TN 37402 Phone 423.265.9494 Email info@chattanoogapulse.com Website chattanoogapulse.com Facebook @chattanoogapulse

PUSHING CULINARY BOUNDARIES

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The Tomorrow Building is an appropriate name for the structure that houses one of Chattanooga's newest and most exciting art galleries.

A HELL OF A FILM DEBUT

Sorry to Bother You is about a lot of things. It’s the type of film that can be endlessly dissected over the course of many viewings. Each scene, each detail, each character choice, design, and detail add up to something profound.

HE'S OUT OF HIS HEAD

Paul Collins is famous, like, really famous. Well, he’s famous if you’re a fan of Indie Rock before anyone called it that, otherwise, maybe you haven’t heard of him.

5 CONSIDER THIS

17 ART OF BUSINESS

24 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

9 JUST A THEORY

20 MUSIC CALENDAR

25 JONESIN' CROSSWORD

11 NEW IN THEATERS

22 THE LIST

25 THE COMIX

14 ARTS CALENDAR

23 MUSIC REVIEWS

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BEGINNINGS · CITY LIFE

Pushing Culinary Boundaries Chef Rebecca Barron shares her lifetime passion with food By Alex Curry Pulse contributor

If I’m happy with what I’ve done and someone else likes it, that’s the best reward I could hope for.”

C

HEF REBECCA BARRON SITS AT THE HELM OF CHATtanooga’s food world. The esteemed St. John’s Restaurant is undoubtedly a pillar of the culinary happenings of the Scenic City. Ooohs and ahhhs abound when you share the news of dining at the gastro-powerhouse. For four years, Chef Barron has driven the cuisine of St. John’s. She is a multi-faceted culinarian with a lifelong passion for cuisine as both an art form and a vehicle for sustainability. In her 20’s, it was her goal to be an Executive Chef by age 30. With three months to spare, she upgraded the title on her chef’s coat and took the driver’s seat. Rebecca had big shoes to fill. Her predecessor, Daniel Lindley received three nominations for the James Beard

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Award. Chef Barron honed her knife skills and culinary tact under Chef Hiroshi at his once thriving Main Street sushi restaurant. She studied the process of making food not only delicious, but visually stunning. Over those four years, Barron has filled and outgrown those shoes. Her comestible prowess has kept St. John’s in the spotlight as a front-runner of the Southeast’s exploding food revolution. Rebecca immerses herself in her passion. Her interests extend past her

own kitchen. She recently spent four weeks in Thailand and India eating her way through some of Asia’s best and most exotic flavors. As Executive Chef, Rebecca is responsible for writing the ambitious and constantly changing seasonal menu. “The only thing I can do is be my best. I can’t be someone else’s best. If I’m happy with what I’ve done and someone else likes it, that’s the best reward I could hope for,” she says. Food is a sensory experience for Chef Barron. “I aim to be delicate. I don’t like when something doesn’t make you feel good. I want my food to evoke all of your senses.” She is constantly excited about food and the process of creating dishes. “I’ll walk around and see what we have. I’ll typically order seasonally fresh products from farmers without necessarily having a direction for them. I like to walk around and touch the food and try to find out what it wants to be.” One of Rebecca’s favorite offerings, St. John’s prepares wine dinners where the chef works with Sommelier Michelle to create unique wine-focused dinners. The restaurant recently received a Best of Award of Excellence from Wine Spectator. Rebecca also has an eye for responsibility in her work. She prepares dinners at the Tennessee Aquarium to support sustainability in seafood. She also loves the challenge: “It’s fun to cook in a place that has no kitchen. It pushes me to be really creative.” Chef Barron has a long run of success in the kitchen. After everything that she’s learned, a simple and inspiring idea came to her in the middle of a 14 hour bus ride, deep in the Himalaya, sick from food poisoning, yet determined to strive on. “You don’t have to go searching for peace. It’s already inside you.”


Cons ider This w ith Dr. Rick

“When you blame others, you give up the power to change yourself.”

We're Kitten Our Yoga On Yoga and kittens come together to help all animals Kittens and yoga; I seriously don’t think there could be a better combination. I’m really going to have to refrain from using too many cat puns about this, but you’ve cat to be kitten me right meow. The Humane Educational Society and Barley Taproom are teaming up to make this experience happen. Don’t worry, it’s all levels of yoga so if you’re really going for the cats, no one will judge you.

All of the kittens doing yoga will be available for adoption through the Humane Society and Barley Taproom will be donating ten percent of their sales to these kittens plus other animals in the shelter. Let’s get this straight: kittens, yoga, and you can adopt one? Sounds like heaven to me. Even if you aren’t feeling up to yoga, stay “pawsitive” because you can have beer instead. Barley will still donate ten percent of your

sales to the Humane Educational Society. Just make sure to let them know that you’re there for this cause to help out. If you want to do the downward dog with a kitten instead, make sure to get your tickets for this coming Wednesday at the Barley Taproom on E, MLK Blvd. If you want more information, you can visit their website at chattanoogabarley.com or call (423) 682-8200. — Libby Gillies

Taking responsibility for your actions can be tricky. I mean, who wants to be responsible for their own hardships…relationship difficulties, illness, personal and family problems, etc. You may think you’ve done it, but there are subtleties that may elude your attention. You may find yourself thinking and saying things like, “Well, if he had only been …” Or, “She was so rude it made me …” Or, “I wouldn’t have done that if he hadn’t …” These are not the comments of someone taking full responsibility for their life. And that’s the point—full responsibility. Remember the butterfly effect? Everything you think, say and do has energy, has meaning, has a result. If you realize, and accept, that all your experiences are a result of this, you are closer to taking responsibility, and taking charge. Don’t give up the power for your own life to others. Consider this, a Buddhist philosophy: “Don’t take revenge. Let Karma do all the work.” — Rick Pimental-Habib, Ph.D.

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COVER STORY

Roadtripping To The Future Looking ahead into our automotive crystal ball By David Traver Adolphus Pulse contributor

120 years after Alexander Winton made the first retail car sale in America, we’re going to make our way step by step 120 years into the other direction.”

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N THE BEGINNING, THERE WAS A FREE-FOR-ALL. WOULD cars have tillers or wheels, and would you steer from the front, back or side, and which side? How many wheels would they have? Would they run on gas, electric, or steam? Nothing was taken for granted. It took about fifteen years and the 1908 introduction of the Model T Ford to coalesce the four wheels, steering-wheelon-the-left form and shape of the car, and another twenty to settle the gassteam-electric debate. After that, though, things settled down into a long, slow period of evolution. You might think electric cars are new and disruptive but they’re not, they’re just making a minor comeback, and I do mean minor, accounting for 0.45 percent of US car sales last year. Change is gradual and after more than 125 years of car history, looking

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at the past of automotive evolution allows us to make clear predictions. So this month, 120 years after Alexander Winton made the first retail car sale in America, we’re going to make our way step by step 120 years into the other direction. 10 YEARS FROM NOW The biggest change in a decade will be gas averaging $8.77 a gallon, thanks to the Baltic Blockade. We may have a curiously friendly relationship with Russia right now, but it’s not going to last and when that whole house of cards comes crashing down, they

cut off oil and gas supplies to Europe, which currently gets about 30 percent of its fossil fuels from there. With the Chinese Green Revolution well underway and Middle Eastern production increasingly absorbed by India, there’s little capacity to spare. The US, meanwhile, is just starting to rebuild green industries crushed during the late 2010s and early 2020s during Recession Part Deux: Electric Recessionoo. Assorted tariffs and lingering trade wars have left electric cars for the rich, as batteries and electric motors are prohibitively expensive. The hottest tickets are used economy cars, so hold onto your Civics and Mazda3s. Fortunately for drivers, clean air protections haven’t kicked back in yet, so aside from coastal states, burn ‘em if you got ‘em. Highway privatization is underway, however, so expect to pay ex-


South America by road. City sprawl has begun to reclaim outer suburbs while simultaneously retreating from the coasts, edging up against the Stack Farms that are found around most megapolises. The solution: Expand horizontally along the TransPod tunnels. Residents, the Mole Rats, wear their subterranean badge proudly, coming to the surface as little as possible.

tra for the fast lane. Saddled with never-ending recalls, Fiat is in the process of unloading Chrysler onto a Tata-Hongqi joint venture, giving both India and China their first real foothold in the American market. And after 111 years, Ford has finally pulled the plug on Lincoln. 25 YEARS FROM NOW 2043 and mass manufacture of biofuels has reinvigorated the internal combustion engine. Rare earth elements are scarce and landfills are being reprocessed for yttrium, scandium and neodymium. China and Japan are involved in a simmering war over seafloor deposits, so what production there is goes into consumer electronics, and not vehicles. Gasahol, grown in vast vat farms, is only usable in late-model cars, causing a large gulf between those who can and can’t afford them. Car ownership, at 92 percent of US households in 2018, has crashed to under 40 percent, with corresponding rural flight. Vast swathes of countryside are now empty, and several thousand small towns, and even some isolated cities, have gone bankrupt and are to varying degrees empty. Those who do ply the highways find them geared toward commercial autonomous road trains. Passenger vehicles, with a few exceptions, are fully autonomous and limited to the right lane. On-the-ground traffic enforcement is non-existent, so outlaw gangs in jailbroken cars have begun to roam the vast deserted distances. More than half of European cities are now completely car-free by law, in distinct contrast to the swarming masses of cheap Reunified Korean and ThaiLaoNamese runabouts that clog the megacities of sub-Saharan Africa. Countries including India, Philippines, Brasil, Chile and most of Central America are signatories to the Car Free 2040 compact, although actual

75 YEARS FROM NOW

Increasingly divided, California signs a permanent trade and cooperation agreement with the CAF and joins the Australasian Economic Consortium against the wishes of Washington.”

implementation varies. Edsel Ford IV is named president of Ford Motor Company. 50 YEARS FROM NOW The gasahol revolution is 20 years in the past and a fifth golden age of performance has begun. Micro turbineelectrics give up to a thousand miles of range and for the first time in over 60 years, car ownership rates are increasing, while average owner age is decreasing. Telepresence racing puts not only the drivers into the actual, six-foot-long Formula Life vehicles, but allows spectators to ride piggyback and feel every bump and scrape as though it was their own bodies. Speeds approaching 600 mph and 15-minute races are the centerpiece of a series that one in every four people on earth vibes into.

The outlaw gangs of the Forties coalesced into quasi-autonomous Road Units, controlling the entire center of the continent from their base in Des Moines. An uneasy detente between The Road Union, the Eastern and Western US State Blocks, Texasco, Canada and the Central American Federation allows cross-cross continental trade to continue, but at a price. Increasingly divided, California signs a permanent trade and cooperation agreement with the CAF and joins the Australasian Economic Consortium against the wishes of Washington. The Cancun-Cuba bridge is completed over the rubble of the Mujeres Tunnel, linking the Florida Causeway to the Yucatan (passing over Key West National Undersea Monument), and making it possible for produce from the farms of Newfoundland and Labrador to reach

Out of chaos a new order has arisen. The Road Kings of Des Moines, allies with Los Chupacabras, The Moose People and Die wilden Flieger, are supreme on three continents, opposed only by groups of Mole Rats who continue to expand, deep below the earth. All law is administered by Justices, a power unto themselves screaming across the seared deserts surrounded by caravans a thousand strong. Sacred Technicians from BMW Group, Toyhondbaru and Buick are the High Priests of Metal, printing and extruding ever more baroque creations for the all-powerful masters. Stack Farms, powered with isotopes harvested from the depths of the earth’s workings, now stretch over a mile into the sky and cheap human labor has taken over previously automated jobs. A lucky few have escaped to the Colonies or the Belt, but life there, while free, is dangerous and more often than not, short. Rumbles of discontent are brewing, however, deep inside the walled cities where even the Justices dare not drive. Racing has grown stale and vicarious thrills, no matter they are indistinguishable from life, lack the immediacy of death. Rebels of all ages cram into deeply camouflaged, repurposed Formula Ls to streak out of pop-up garages and dice it up with the Kings and other Owners of the Roads. Increasingly or>> continued on page 8

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COVER COVERSTORY STORY

ganized, the reach of the cities has begun to grow. The iPhone XCVIII is released. 120 YEARS FROM NOW Pouring out of their tunnels, the Morats emerged into the surface world 15 years ago astride their flame-belching, fission-powered Hellblades, to put an end to the endless cycle of war. Cities, outposts, countries—all fell in hours as the neverending hordes visited their wrath upon the surface dwellers. Some, like the slaves shackled to their food plots deep in the farms, were freed; others, like the Justicars and Technomonogists, were herded into the deeps and never seen again. Communications were reestablished with Mars and the Belt, and once again life-giving quinjo flowed to earth. While the Morats returned to their precious subterranean warrens almost as soon as order was restored, their strange companions did not. The Elder Ones had been awakened from their millenias-long slumber and strode the land as colossi, enforcing whatever unknowable dictums their masters left behind. Many of the mighty were laid low and many of the humble were elevated, but the rea8 • THE PULSE • JULY 19, 2018 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

sons were never known. Work gangs of displaced people from all over the globe are now hard at work reclaiming materials from the shallow coastal seas, spurring new settlements along the shorelines. Guided by the Elder Ones, city dwellers are put to work in road crews to rebuild infrastructure. Long neglected vehicles are found stashed away and join the flow of bizarre personalized creations being snapped together out of prefab parts, or just drawn into being with a printing wand. It is no utopia, however, as the great beings that dominate life are no respecters of it, slouching casually through humanity like bacteria. Nano diamond runnels are constructed to preserve some sense of normalcy, and the great offworld migration has begun in earnest. The Space Truckers Union grows exponentially in size and power. And Henry Ford the Twelfth is crowned King of All Earth and Sky. David Traver Adolphus is a freelance automotive researcher who quit his full time job writing about old cars to pursue his lifelong dream of writing about old AND new cars.


COLUMN · JUST A THEORY

Getting Started With Science Our science guru shows the way for youth to explore science

R Steven W. Disbrow Pulse columnist

I began to give him a crash course in the basics of science. We also looked at some of the wilder things from the bleeding edge of scientific research, all of which he seemed to enjoy.”

Steven W. Disbrow is the proprietor of “Improv Chattanooga” on the South Side of town. He also creates e-commerce systems and reads comic books when he’s not on stage acting like a fool.

ECENTLY, MY NEPHEW CAME to stay with us for a few weeks. We hadn’t seen each other in over a decade and he is at the age (17) where he’s deciding what to do with his life. A couple of his pursuits, music and the theater, were very gratifying to hear about. But, beyond those things, he seemed slightly adrift. He’s a staggeringly intelligent young man (handsome too!), so I asked, “What about programming? Or engineering?” “What about them?,” he responded. I came to learn that, where he lives, the sciences aren’t really given much consideration or pushed much in schools. So, I began to give him a crash course in the basics of science. We also looked at some of the wilder things from the bleeding edge of scientific research, all of which he seemed to enjoy and be inspired by. So, dear reader, if you too would like to inspire a young person to learn more about Science, here are some resources you can share with them. TV SHOWS

Cosmos (Seasons 1 and 2). The first season of Cosmos, hosted by Carl Sagan, was originally broadcast on PBS and is what made all the puzzle pieces fall into place for me. I loved Star Trek and science fiction, but I really didn’t understand the “Science” part of “Science Fiction.” The second season, hosted by Neil deGrasse Tyson is now on Netflix, and, while not quite as compelling, is definitely worth a family viewing. MythBusters during the Adam Savage and Jamie Hyneman years. Yes, they blow stuff up. But, no show in my lifetime has better exemplified the scientific method in a manner that’s so easily digestible by the general public. They literally take urban legends and myths and test them scientifically to de-

termine if they are real or not. And then, usually, they push it to the point where it literally explodes. Add to this Adam Savage’s childlike glee with just about every part of the process, and you have one of the best “back door” science shows ever. BOOKS Contrary to popular belief, many young people actually do love to read. So, here are some books go get them thinking in a more critical manner: “The Demon Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark” by Carl Sagan. This is a favorite of mine. In it, Sagan works to show the reader how science is the best tool we’ve got for separating fact from fiction, myth from reality and hard truth from wishful-thinking. Published over 20 years ago, it is, unfortunately, all too relevant to today’s world. “On the Origin of Species” by Charles Darwin. Yes, this is a little denser than a “normal” book, but it’s the king when it comes to laying out a hypothesis and proving it step by step and point by point. A tour de force of the scientific method. THE INTERNETS While books are still popular with some of “the kids,” the internet is where most of the youths get their information from these days. With that in mind, here are a couple of excellent science series you’ll find online. “Kurzgesagt—In A Nutshell” videos. At first glance, this series of videos (which has its own YouTube channel), seems pretty lightweight. But, once you get beyond the birdlike mascot and simple animations, you’ll find yourself learn-

Carl Sagan

ing quite a bit about some of the meatier topics in Science. In addition to covering simple things like, “How Big is the Moon?”, these videos also tackle cutting edge (and somewhat speculative) topics like “How to Build a Space Elevator” and my personal favorite, “The Most Efficient Way to Destroy the Universe.” This video, about the terrifying prospect of “Vacuum Decay,” explains how the Universe might already be ripping itself apart at the speed of light. Morbidly fascinating, and definitely worth 6 minutes of your time. “PBS Space Time” videos. Currently hosted by Astrophysicist Matt O’Dowd, these longish videos (about 15 minutes each), tackle some very complex topics in depth. The thing I like about them is they never talk down to the viewer, and they aren’t afraid to challenge you. Save these videos for later, when your youngster is looking for something beyond the basic materials suggested above. There are, of course, more introductory science resources out there (*cough* The Library *cough*). But these six should help ignite the desire to learn more about Science in kids of all ages.

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FILM & TELEVISION

Long Live Princess Mononoke Longtime readers of The Pulse will have picked up on the not-so-subtle fact that we are really big fans of Japanese animation, known as anime. Part of the love is the animation itself. Animation houses such as Studio Ghibli have been creating rich, detailed and often aweinspiring animated features for decades, with a uniquely Asian style and sensibility. But even more than the animation, we have long been fascinated with the intricate storytelling. Take, for example, Academy Awardwinning director Hayao Miyazaki and his masterpiece Princess Mononoke, which is showing this coming Monday (dubbed) and Tuesday (subtitled) at both East Ridge 18 and Hamilton Place 8 at 12:55 and 7 p.m. respectively. Inflicted with a deadly curse, the young warrior Ashitaka heads west in search of a cure. There, he stumbles into bitter conflict between Lady Eboshi, the proud people of Iron Town, and the enigmatic Princess Mononoke, a young girl raised by wolves, who will stop at nothing to prevent the humans from destroying her home and the forest spirits and animal gods who live there. Princess Mononoke is an epic masterpiece that has dazzled audiences worldwide with its breathtaking imagination, exhilarating battles and deep humanity. You owe it to yourself to see it on the big screen. — Michael Thomas

A Hell Of A Film Debut Rapper Boots Riley is never Sorry To Bother You By John DeVore Pulse Film Editor

Sorry to Bother You is entertaining as can be, with a surreal alternate reality that is too close to our reality for comfort.”

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S

ORRY TO BOTHER YOU IS ABOUT A LOT OF THINGS. It’s the type of film that can be endlessly dissected over the course of many viewings. Each scene, each detail, each character choice, design, and detail add up to something profound, but elusive. The film isn’t challenging in its message, necessarily, but in its construction. The ideas on display of racial identity, of American consciousness, of corporate recklessness and greed are nothing new. It strange how our art can hammer out the same ideas across generations, how people can agree about things across socioeconomic lines, yet power continues to be concentrated in the same places. It’s always the same struggle, the same kings, the same serfs. Just the

vocabulary changes. Sorry to Bother You is entertaining as can be, with a surreal alternate reality that is too close to our reality for comfort. It’s a film that has no chance for success among the summer fare—it’s too strange for wide appeal—but is an absolute gem for someone other than the casual movie goer. It’s original, it’s fresh, it’s topical, it’s funny, and there are no superheroes or cartoon franchises in sight. Sorry to Bother You won’t be


a giant financial success, but it’ll be far more lasting than the films that are. Cassius Green (Lakeith Stanfield) is down on his luck. He’s unemployed, lives in his uncle Sergio’s (Terry Crews) garage with girlfriend where he’s four months behind on his rent, and drives a beat up loaner car that looks ready to fall apart at any moment. Not that anyone else is doing much better. His uncle is behind on his mortgage payments and about to lose his house. His artist girlfriend Detroit (Tessa Thompson) is a sign twirler. The neighborhood is littered with advertisements for employment with a corporation called WorryFree, where employees sign lifetime contracts for a chance to have three meals a day and a place to sleep at night. Cassius isn’t interested in that life, though. He’s got an interview with RegalView, a telemarketing company. After a rocky start, he soon learns that RegalView will hire anyone that can read a script. Cassius’ job is to call as many people he can, all day long for commission. If he does well enough, he can become a power caller and move upstairs to where the real money

The film shines in dozens of ways and at least glimmers in most others. There isn’t much to criticize here—it’s a solid film with a lot to say.”

is. But as with most movies, he soon learns not everything is as it seems. Success in this world means standing on the neck of other people. Sorry to Bother You is one hell of a debut film for rapper and producer Boots Riley. Riley is better known as the lead vocalist for The Coup and Street Sweeper Social Club. He doesn’t have any other director credits beyond a short film for The Coup, and Sorry to Bother You is his only writing credit. For him to have created a film like this one right out of the gate is astounding. The film can, at times, be slightly unfocused. Riley has a lot of narrative threads stretched throughout the movie and anyone of them might have lead somewhere interesting. However, very few will expect the film to end up where it does. The struggle with focus is lessened by the performances of the actors. LaKeith Stanfield, better known from the excellent FX series

Atlanta, has impeccable comic timing while Tessa Thompson always delivers. But the film shines in dozens of ways and at least glimmers in most others. There isn’t much to criticize here—it’s a solid film with a lot to say. What the film has to say on the whole, as I mentioned, is harder to nail down. Riley’s version of America is fully realized, but maybe not quite as surreal as he thinks. It’s not hard to imagine Amazon offering lifetime contracts to workers and having them live on site. It’s not hard to imagine Congress being completely okay with it. What the film offers is a lot of complex, difficult problems without easy answers. In that way, it’s the most realistic film of the year. As one character says, “If you show a person a problem and they have no idea how to control it, they just learn to ignore it.” I can’t think of anything that represents today’s world better.

✴ NEW IN THEATERS ✴

Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again In this sequel to Mamma Mia!, Sophie learns about her mother's past while pregnant herself. Director: Ol Parker Stars: Lily James, Amanda Seyfried, Meryl Streep, Dominic Cooper

The Equalizer 2 Robert McCall serves an unflinching justice for the exploited and oppressed, but how far will he go when that is someone he loves? Director: Antoine Fuqua Stars: Denzel Washington, Pedro Pascal, Bill Pullman, Melissa Leo

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Embodied Bodies In The River Do you love art and small caves? Are you interested in the work of Karen LaMonte? Do you lack a healthy fear of the Tennessee River? If you answered yes to at least two out of three of those questions, then you might enjoy this month’s installment of the Nature of Art: Swimming in Art this Saturday at 10 a.m. The Hunter Museum of American Art and Reflection Riding Arboretum collaborate each month to explore the outdoors and visual art together, and this month that entails a 30 minute “leisurely” swim in the Tennessee River from Maclellan Island, during which you can expect to encounter a discussion of the Hunter’s current Karen LaMonte exhibit and “a small cave” . For those of you who aren’t already wellversed in the work of Karen LaMonte, here’s a quick overview of what you may discuss while swimming. LaMonte’s current exhibition at the Hunter, Embodied Beauty, uses glass forms of kimonos to show the female form without the female, hauntingly depicting the way the fabric of the kimono clings to the form. Her sculptures embody through the absence of a body a perception of the impact of clothing and fabric on what it means to be female or feminine. — Olivia Haynes

A Not So Bizarre Bazar Going behind the scenes at the Bazar Odditorium By Tony Nraz Pulse contributor

The Bazar Odditorium is a boutique style gallery that focuses on the art of women and other historically marginalized groups.”

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T

HE TOMORROW BUILDING IS AN APPROPRIATE name for the structure that houses one of Chattanooga's newest and most exciting art galleries.

Situated within the Palace Theater, the Bazar Odditorium is a boutique style gallery that focuses on the art of women and other historically marginalized groups. The space features the work of local, regional, and national artists. A progressive gallery that showcases work which has traditionally been discriminated against by the art establishment might seem like a risky business endeavor, but Bazar has encountered nothing but success. This is largely due to the efforts of their curator, artist and entrepreneur Alecia Vera Buckles. A native Chattanoogan and

graduate of UTC's Fine Art Department, Buckles organizes a constantly rotating exhibition of work by over 30 artists from all over the country. Her aim is to highlight local artists while bringing in work that you don't typically see in the south. The gallery currently shows work by New York based artists Kenneth Kudulis, Gaby Caloca, and Heidi Vasterling; Los Angeles based Katie Holden; Rome, Georgia's Amera Skullfield; Nashville based Beizar Aradini; Atlanta's Spacewaste; and they will soon be adding new work from the Pacific Northwest. Featured local artists are Bean


& Bailey, Caley & Jillian, Meri Wright, Alana Questell, Clay Hardwick, Loretta Schools, Friendly Funny Face, Lucy White, Sweet Sue, Brass and Pebble, Erica Scoggins, Heather Marie, Ady Caloca, Sarah Malone, Morgan Koch, Ashley Hamilton, Tara Hamilton, Adara Bauman, Maudlyn, Jerett Offut, and Buckles herself. Bazar started during the transformation of re-opening The Palace Theater. “We started batting back and forth ideas of having a gallery in the lobby,” Buckles explains. “The owner, Rose, asked me if I would be interested in curating. It was something I had never done before. I said 'Yes, I definitely want to try.' We just rolled with it, and I happened to know enough people to make it work.” She continues, “In my mind, I have always had the idea of running a shop. My eventual goal is to move into retail and wholesale of various artists—to still highlight the fine art element, but make it more of a market for artists who are focusing on production, rather than just a gallery space.” They are letting the gallery unfold the way it is, and spending time creating events to bring people in to see the work that is on the walls—sculpting events to grow the space in general, to bring in new clientele. “We're just gonna let it be this organic thing,” she says. “We have it up

We have it up and running, and now I'm taking time to mingle in the community and reach out to artists in different places.”

and running, and now I'm taking time to mingle in the community and reach out to artists in different places.” Talking about her curating process, she tells us, “We sell most of our work during events, and you can purchase it right off of the wall. That has been the biggest challenge for me as a curator. When you curate the work, you position it in a certain way that looks good, but when a piece comes off the wall, there's a blank space. I have been keeping a back stock of people's work, so as soon as something is sold, I can replace it with another piece.” Buckles is constantly putting new work on the walls, and constantly featuring new work by the artists. “I change things out frequently so that everything is a little bit different for every event, so it doesn't get stale,” she says. “Even though we don't have rotating shows, the walls kind of start to shift and change, when pieces are purchased or picked up. I leave it up to the artist how long they want to leave their work with us. The work

might be taken down for a bit, then re-introduced based on new work that comes in and what looks good.” The price point for original art ranges from $1 for a temporary tattoo, to thousands of dollars for pieces that have been featured on a national level. There is a range of style and content, a little something for everybody. “Whether you want to see some local craft art, or just fine art in general, we encompass that diversity,” Buckles explains. Bazar's main goal is to create revenue for the artists, which is why the prices vary so much. They are focused on creating sustainable careers for artists, and in the future they will be showing more work on shelves, making it a 50/50 retail space and gallery. Artists who are interested in exhibiting can contact Buckles on Facebook @BazarArtHouse, on Instagram @ bazar_odditorium, via email at aleciabuckles@gmail.com, or by visiting the gallery at 818 Georgia Ave, #118.

THU7.19

FRI7.20

SAT7.21

Rivers to Oceans

Play On!

"Hello, Dolly!"

A special evening with ocean explorer Fabien Cousteau, grandson of the legendary JacquesYves Cousteau. 6 p.m. Tennessee Aquarium 1 Broad St. tnaqua.org

A madcap comedy about the mishaps of theater productions, which brings to life "What could possibly go wrong?" 8 p.m. The Mars Theater 117 N. Chattanooga St. backalleyproductions.org

The classic musical tale of a arly 20th-century New York matchmaker and all of her (many, many) trials and tribulations. 8 p.m. Chattanooga Theatre Centre 400 River St. theatrecentre.com CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • JULY 19, 2018 • THE PULSE • 13


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT CALENDAR

PSC Presents Photographer Tom Wilson

THURSDAY7.19 Trail Chats 4 p.m. Oddstory Brewing Co. 336 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 682-7690 oddstorybrewing.co Taste & SEE 5 p.m. Gallery 1401 1478 Market St. (423) 265-0015 gallery1401.com Rivers to Oceans: An Evening with Fabien Cousteau 6 p.m. Tennessee Aquarium 1 Broad St. (423) 265-0695 tnaqua.org Civics 101: The State of Tennessee Government 6 p.m. The Edney Innovation Center 1100 Market St. (423) 413-8978 thechattery.org PSC Presents Tom Wilson 7 p.m. St. John’s United Methodist Church 3921 Murray Hills Dr. (423) 892-2257 chattanoogaphoto.org "Hello, Dolly!" 7 p.m. Chattanooga Theatre Centre 400 River St. (423) 267-8534

14 • THE PULSE • JULY 19, 2018 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

theatrecentre.com "Honk! The Musical!" 7:30 p.m. Barking Legs Theater 1307 Dodds Ave. (423) 624-5347 barkinglegs.org David Scott 7:30 p.m. The Comedy Catch 1400 Market St. (423) 629-2233 thecomedycatch.com Summer Lovin’ Tour 9 p.m. First Draft Theater 1800 Rossville Ave. (423) 843-1775 improvchattanooga.com

FRIDAY7.20 CHA720 9 a.m. Chattanooga Neighborhood Enterprise 1500 Chestnut St. (423) 756-6214 cneinc.org Finding Your Zen in a Corporate World 11:30 a.m. Chattanooga Workspace 302 W. 6th St. (423) 413-8978 thechattery.org Out On 8th 5 p.m. West Village 802 Pine St.


(423) 424-1831 westvillagechattanooga.com AVA’s Art Auction 6 p.m. AVA Gallery 30 Frazier Ave. (423) 265-4292 avarts.org Intimate Chronicles: Love and Lust 7 p.m. Stone Cup Cafe 208 Frazier Ave. (423) 521-3977 stonecupcafe.com David Scott 7:30, 9:45 p.m. The Comedy Catch 1400 Market St. (423) 629-2233 thecomedycatch.com "Honk! The Musical!" 7:30 p.m. Barking Legs Theater 1307 Dodds Ave. (423) 624-5347 barkinglegs.org The Hunchback of Notre Dame 7:30 p.m. The Colonnade Center 264 Catoosa Cir. (706) 935-9000 colonnadecenter.org "Hello, Dolly!" 8 p.m. Chattanooga Theatre Centre 400 River St. (423) 267-8534 theatrecentre.com "Shrek the Musical" 8 p.m.

Signal Mountain Playhouse 301 Rolling Way smph.org Improv Movie Night: Children’s Animated Movie 8 p.m. First Draft Theater 1800 Rossville Ave. (423) 843-1775 improvchattanooga.com Play On! 8 p.m. The Mars Theater 117 N. Chattanooga St. (706) 996-8350 backalleyproductions.org Ruby Falls Lantern Tours 8:30 p.m. Ruby Falls 1720 S. Scenic Hwy. (423) 821-2544 rubyfalls.com Improv Showdown 10 p.m. First Draft Theater 1800 Rossville Ave. (423) 843-1775 improvchattanooga.com Poetry After Dark: Midnight Sessions 11:11 p.m. Palace Theater 818 Georgia Ave. (423) 803-6578 chattpalace.com

SATURDAY7.21 Dog Hike with PPC Dogs 9 a.m.


Battlefield Bicycle Tour Pet Placement Center 5975 Dayton Blvd. (423) 877-0738 petplacementcenter.com Battlefield Bicycle Tour 9:30 a.m. Chickamauga Battlefield 3370 Lafayette Rd. (706) 866-9241 nps.gov Nature of Art: Swimming in Art 10 a.m. The Hunter Museum of American Art 10 Bluff View (423) 267-0968 huntermuseum.org Red Wolf Feeding and Talk Noon Reflection Riding Arboretum 400 Garden Rd. (423) 821-1160 reflectionriding.org Jewelry Making: Leather Cuff 1 p.m. Chattanooga Workspace 302 W. 6th St. (423) 413-8978 thechattery.org "Honk! The Musical!" 2:30 p.m. Barking Legs Theater 1307 Dodds Ave. (423) 624-5347 barkinglegs.org African-American Potter Dave McDowell One-Man Show 3 p.m. The Houston Museum 201 High St.

(423) 267-7176 thehoustonmuseum.org Q ‘n Brew 6 p.m. Chattanooga Zoo 301 N. Holtzclaw Ave. (423) 697-1322 chattzoo.org Summer in West Village 6 p.m. West Village 802 Pine St. westvillagechattanooga.com David Scott 7:30, 9:45 p.m. The Comedy Catch 1400 Market St. (423) 629-2233 thecomedycatch.com The Hunchback of Notre Dame 7:30 p.m. The Colonnade Center 264 Catoosa Cir. (706) 935-9000 colonnadecenter.org "Hello, Dolly!" 8 p.m. Chattanooga Theatre Centre 400 River St. (423) 267-8534 theatrecentre.com "Shrek the Musical" 8 p.m. Signal Mountain Playhouse 301 Rolling Way smph.org Week in Review 8 p.m. First Draft Theater 1800 Rossville Ave. (423) 843-1775

improvchattanooga.com Play On! 8 p.m. The Mars Theater 117 N. Chattanooga St. (706) 996-8350 backalleyproductions.org Chatt Talk Tonight Episode 4: The Arts 9 p.m. Palace Theater 818 Georgia Ave. (423) 803-6578 chattpalace.com Improv vs Standup 10 p.m. First Draft Theater 1800 Rossville Ave. (423) 843-1775 improvchattanooga.com

SUNDAY7.22 Peach Festival 11 a.m. First Tennessee Pavilion 1801 Carter St. (423) 266-4041 Free Fiddle School 2 p.m. Fiddlers Anonymous 2248 Dayton Blvd. (423) 994-7497 African-American Potter Dave McDowell One-Man Show 2 p.m. The Houston Museum 201 High St. (423) 267-7176 thehoustonmuseum.org

The Hunchback of Notre Dame 2:25 p.m. The Colonnade Center 264 Catoosa Cir. (706) 935-9000 colonnadecenter.org "Hello, Dolly!" 2:30 p.m. Chattanooga Theatre Centre 400 River St. (423) 267-8534 theatrecentre.com Play On! 2:30 p.m. The Mars Theater 117 N. Chattanooga St. (706) 996-8350 backalleyproductions.org David Scott 7:30 p.m. The Comedy Catch 1400 Market St. (423) 629-2233 thecomedycatch.com

MONDAY7.23 Wieners & Losers--Competing in a Hot Job Market 5:30 p.m. The Edney Innovation Center 1100 Market St. (423) 413-8978 thechattery.org Summer Belly Dance Session 5:45 p.m. Movement Arts Collective 3813 Dayton Blvd. (423) 401-8115 movementartscollective.com CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • JULY 19, 2018 • THE PULSE • 15


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT CALENDAR

Wake Up & Run

TUESDAY7.24

with

Gary, Beth & Eric

Wake Up & Run 6 a.m. Fleet Feet Sports 307 Manufacturers Rd. (423) 771-7996 fleetfeetchattanooga.com Tennessee Aquarium Conservation Institute Tour 4 p.m. Tennessee Aquarium Conservation Institute 175 Baylor School Rd. (800) 262-0695 tnaqua.org Science on Tap! 5 p.m. Barley Chattanooga 235 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 682-8200 #SorryNotSorry--Conflict and Crafts 5:30 p.m. The Edney Innovation Center 1100 Market St. (423) 413-8978 thechattery.org Tuesday Night Chess Club 6 p.m. Downtown Library 1001 Broad St. (423) 643-7700 chattilibrary.com

Barley Chattanooga 235 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 682-8200 heschatt.org Sundae Funday 5:30 p.m. The Edney Innovation Center 1100 Market St. (423) 413-8978 thechattery.org Let’s Make a Commercial! 6:30 p.m. First Draft Theater 1800 Rossville Ave. (423) 843-1775 improvchattanooga.com Naughty Knights Chess Meetup 7:30 p.m. The Bitter Alibi 825 Houston St. (423) 362-5070 thebitteralibi.com Untold History: Volume 2 7:30 p.m. Barking Legs Theatre 1307 Dodds Ave. (423) 847-2170 barkinglegs.org Open Mic Comedy 8 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 266-1400 jjsbohemia.com

WEDNESDAY7.25 Kitten Yoga 5 p.m.

16 • THE PULSE • JULY 19, 2018 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

Map these locations on chattanoogapulse. com. Send event listings at least 10 days in advance to: calendar@chattanoogapulse.com


THE ART OF BUSINESS

Going Green With Sustainable Living Grace Frank Group is leading the way with NextGen homebuilding Brooke Brown

Pulse Assistant Editor

I’m an expert on downtown real estate, but the twist is that I have a serious passion for sustainability and ensuring that I practice what I preach.”

The Scoop Grace Frank Group Real Estate Partners, LLC 525 W. Main St. (423) 355-1538 Monday - Friday 9am - 5pm gracefrankgroup.com

S

USTAINING OUR ENVIRONment’s resources is something we should all be interested in, not tomorrow or next week, but now. Whether that’s doing your part by recycling, adding solar panels to your home, or shrinking your carbon footprint, our earth will thank you for your service towards its future - and so will your wallet. Chattanooga has progressively done more and more to encourage sustainability and one individual at the helm of such progress is Grace Frank, MBA, a sustainability-focused realtor and chairman of the board for green|spaces, a non-profit organization focused on the sustainability of living, working, and building in Chattanooga. “I’m an expert on downtown real estate, but the twist is that I have a serious passion for sustainability and ensuring that I practice what I preach,” says Frank, her eyes lighting up as she begins to discuss her organic farm. “We have solar panels, rainwater collection, a passive solar greenhouse where we raise vegetables with hydroponics, raise organic eggs, and we’re working to bring back the Red Wattle, a nearly extinct pig that produces the leanest meat back to the market.” Tying her passion for sustainability into her realty business is something that sets Grace Frank aside from other realtors in town. Among new projects, Frank works with construction teams to support their ‘green construction’ practices. And because of her knowledge of sustainability, Frank is the go-to for clients interested in understanding their return on investment thanks to such sustainable features. Green construction can be broken into levels, with the simplest green construction utilizing Energy Star appliances. All new builds in Chattanooga must have a HERS rating to detail how energy efficient the whole structure is, helping people

understand their home’s energy efficiency in a way they would have been unaware of in the past. One example, EPB’s Smart Build homes are at least ten to twenty percent more energy efficient than standard homes, reducing costs for the homeowner and benefiting the community by reducing the need for power. green|spaces demonstrated with their NextGen Homes a series of cost-effective strategies to get to net-zero energy so that a house can produce as much energy as it uses annually. On the efficiency side, many investments like LED lighting pay for themselves in the first year. Renewable energy pays for itself in about 10 years. green|spaces also has recommendations for water efficiency, stormwater, and sustainable healthy materials and can work with any builder to incorporate these green building strategies. Depending on how in-the-know you are with such sustainable incentives, Grace Frank’s team all have different areas of expertise. And with their systematic approach, they’ll be able to properly lead you to the perfect home that not only benefits you as a homeowner, but Chattanooga as a whole. Whether you’re interested in a home downtown, in the surrounding area, or you’re looking for a bit more space out in East Brainerd, Ooltewah, or North Georgia, Frank’s team will have you covered. Frank is highly experienced in both residential realty or commercial property and can assist you in purchasing cash flow commercial properties, marinas, and more. “I learned this from my grandfather: you only make your money one time… when you buy,” says Frank. “If you over-

pay or if there are extra costs, you can never sell well. You’ll only make your money when you buy right and at Grace Frank Group we really try to work with individuals to make them understand that everything is an investment. “Whether you’re buying it or renting it, it’s an investment. It’s the biggest purchase you’ll make and while it’s an emotional process purchasing a home to spend your life in, it’s not to your financial benefit to get emotionally involved. You have to stay focused on the numbers, so you can build your wealth. If you buy right, you can sell right.” While the internet is full of helpful information concerning realty, check out Frank’s recommended websites to educate yourself prior to making the leap. “We try to be a trusted educational source,” says Frank. “We want people to understand more about real estate. Educated, informed decisions are very important and we want to help.” Simply go to chattanoogahomevalues. house, which will check the value of the home and can be followed up by an extensive evaluation by Frank and her team. Also, gracefrankgroup.com contains a great deal of information, educational and investor workshops, as well as an easy, accurate search of all properties for sale in the Chattanooga and surrounding area.

CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • JULY 19, 2018 • THE PULSE • 17


THE MUSIC SCENE

Going Deep Underground With EDM Electronic dance music (better known as EDM) has grown more popular over the years with groundbreaking artists like Avicii, Diplo, Steve Aoki, Daft Punk, Deadmau5, Skrillex, and so forth. From dubstep to disco to ambient, there are so many types of electronic music to listen to. There may be a type for everyone. Velocity of Sound was involved with the first people to bring EDM to Chattanooga. Back in the ‘90s, everyone was about two hours away which made Chattanooga the heart of electronic dance music fans. “We were part of the birth of the rave movement in the early ‘90s,” says owner Victor Serene. Velocity of Sound was also the first ever after hour club, making time for party goers. At the time they formed, they also went by the name Dimensions of Sound or DOS. This Friday and Saturday, Velocity of Sound is throwing an Underground Weekend event at The Music Box @ Ziggy’s. There are different line ups for each night with diverse genres to give the crowd a nice taste of true EDM. If you’re interested in jamming out at this event, Music Box @ Ziggy’s can be reached at their website ziggysbarandgrill.net or by phone at (423) 265-8711. — Libby Gillies

Collins Is Out Of His Head Paul Collins hits it out of the park with latest release By Marc T. Michael Pulse Music Editor

A hundred thousand words or more have already been written about who he is, what he’s done, and who he’s influenced.”

18 • THE PULSE • JULY 19, 2018 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

P

AUL COLLINS IS FAMOUS, LIKE, REALLY FAMOUS. Well, he’s famous if you’re a fan of Indie Rock before anyone called it that, otherwise, maybe you haven’t heard of

him.

His career is long enough and storied enough that I could simply recount its highlights here without ever mentioning his latest work, but what’s point of that? A hundred thousand words or more have already been written about who he is, what he’s done, and who he’s influenced and it’s all readily available, so anything but the lightest recap here is time and space that could be spent talking about his phenomenal new album. The Nerves, The Breakaway, The Beat (under a few name variants) are all Paul Collins’ vehicles and his work with those groups, as well as his extensive solo work, has earned

him a cult status second to none. Most often described as “power pop,” his better known titles include, “Hanging on the Telephone,” made famous by Blondie, and “Walking Out on Love,” popular in its own right but re-invigorated by a Green Day cover in their American Idiot Broadway musical production. Collins began his solo career in 1979, releasing 11 studio albums to date, the latest being Out of My Head. The opening track, “In and Out of My Head,” is at once vintage and timeless. It’s a song equally at home in 1966 or today, driven by vintage distortion and minor chords. Part


Byrds, part Tom Petty, part Roy Orbison, it is an instantly catchy tune occupying a very particular niche in popular music. The follow up track, “Go,” confirms the power pop description of Collins’ work while reinforcing the instrumental arrangements as the sort of naked, trebly guitar and straightforward drums that defined the better part of a decade a long, long time ago. There are shades of Elvis Costello, young Elvis Costello anyway, in the delivery of this song. “Kind of Girl” delivers up the same groove as “Go.” Collins’ superior lyrical skills set this music far beyond the realm of bubblegum, but his sound is what so much bubblegum tried to imitate. I’ve already referenced Elvis Costello once, but “Just Too Bad You’re Leaving,” the fourth track on the album, sounds like the Nick Lowe/Elvis collaboration that never happened but should have. I cannot say whether Collins is a nostalgic fellow or not, but there is a very clear love for vintage pop evident and underlying every track on the album. “Emily” could very well be an Everly Brothers song, verse, chord structure, background vocals, and all. There are no ten dollar adjectives

I cannot say whether Collins is a nostalgic fellow or not, but there is a very clear love for vintage pop evident and underlying every track on the album.”

necessary for this tune, it’s enough to say it is pretty, and sweet, in the best possible way those two words can be applied. “Midnight Special” is an original tune (not the familiar old standard) that perhaps demonstrates either a personal evolution on the part of Collins or the actual historical evolution of the genres that influenced. The vocals are a little growlier, the guitar is ever so slightly meaner; it’s still well within the realm of power pop, but it is edgier than the first half of the album, gently pushing the envelope. There are five more tracks on the album, ranging from the lush, dynamic “Killer Inside” to the Twin Peaks-esque “Beautiful Eyes.” Collins’ work is fascinating in that it may be taken at face value, as simple, sweet, nostalgic tunes, and a fine representation of those values and traits, but

one cannot help but feel there is more going on under the surface. I strongly suspect that the seemingly straightforward approach to pop music masks a much deeper, well informed and thoughtful approach to song craft which is there for the appreciation of folks inclined to find such things. What I can say for certain is that whether you choose to take it as it is or delve for the sublime, it is very satisfying music. Out of My Head is available now, a beautiful album by a gentle giant of the genre, and I defy you to listen to its entirety without involuntarily smiling and swaying to the tunes. I’m no audiophile. I have some experience recording, going far enough back to have laid down some tracks on reelto-reel, but I honestly can’t claim the kind of ability to recognize the difference.

Chattanooga Girls Rock Showcase Now in its third year, Chattanooga Girls Rock, the week-long all-things-rock-and-roll camp for girls, is stronger than ever. The non-profit group gives girls aged nine to seventeen the opportunity to spend a week at a summer day camp where they select the instrument of their choice and receive instruction in playing and songwriting, form bands, create media and merchandise in the form of ‘zines, flyers and associated materials, and ultimately cap-

off the week with live performances of their original material. This year’s end of the week showcase and revue is happening this Saturday from 2 to 4 p.m. at Songbirds with tickets available from EventBrite on sale now. It is an all ages event designed to give the up and coming rockers an opportunity to display their skills in a professional environment on a real stage, replete with sound engineers and lighting. Proceeds go to support future camps. — MTM

THU7.19

FRI7.20

SAT7.21

Kofi Mawuko

The Fritz

The Danberrys

A local drumming legence, Kofi Mawuko has been entertaining audiences for years with his up-beat African drumming shows. 7 p.m. Pilgrim Church 400 Glenwood Dr. pilgrim-church.com

With music that range from hard driving soul to progressive rock, the members of The Fritz are masters of improvisation. 7 p.m. Miller Plaza 850 Market St. nightfallchattanooga.com

Songs rich in pastoral imagery, about overcoming demons, being washed clean and starting anew, and love in its many forms. 9 p.m. HiFi Clyde’s 122 W. Main St. hificlydeschattanooga.com CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • JULY 19, 2018 • THE PULSE • 19


LIVE MUSIC CALENDAR

River Whyless with Adam Torres

THURSDAY7.19 Melissa Ellis 5:30 p.m. 1885 Grill 3914 St. Elmo Ave. 1885grill.com James Crumble Trio 6 p.m. St. John’s Meeting Place 1278 Market St. stjohnsrestaurant.com Amber Fults 6:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Jimmy Dormire 6:30 p.m. Westin Dorato Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Kofi Mawuko 7 p.m. Pilgrim Church 400 Glenwood Dr. pilgrim-church.com Open Mic Night 7 p.m. Stone Cup Cafe 208 Frazier Ave. stonecupcafe.com Toby Hewitt 7 p.m. Backstage Bar 29 Station St. backstagechattanooga.com Open Mic Night 7 p.m. Moccasin Bend Brewing Co.

20 • THE PULSE • JULY 19, 2018 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

3210 Broad St. bendbrewingbeer.com Cyptodoira 7 p.m. Music Box @ Ziggy’s 607 Cherokee Blvd. ziggysbarandgrill.net Jesse James & Tim Neal 7:30 p.m. Mexi-Wing VII 5773 Brainerd Rd. (423) 296-1073 Bluegrass Thursdays 7:30 p.m. The Feed Co. Table & Table 201 W. Main St. feedtableandtavern.com Mother Legacy 8 p.m. Rumors 3884 Hixson Pike (423) 870-3003 Keepin’ It Local 8 p.m. The Social 1110 Market St. publichousechattanooga.com Open Mic Night with Jonathon Wimpee 9 p.m. The Office @ City Cafe 901 Carter St. citycafemenu.com

FRIDAY7.20 Summer Music Weekends 11 a.m. Rock City Gardens 1400 Patten Rd.

seerockcity.com Connection 27 6 p.m. Cambridge Square 9453 Bradmore Ln. publicmarkets.us Ryan Oyer 6:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Maria Sable 6:30 p.m. Westin Dorato Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com The Fritz 7 p.m. Miller Plaza 850 Market St. nightfallchattanooga.com Beckett Honiker 7 p.m. The Tap House 3800 St. Elmo Ave. taphousechatt.com River Whyless with Adam Torres 7 p.m. Songbirds North 35 Station St. songbirdsguitars.com Courtney Holder 7 p.m. Southern Belle Riverboat 201 Riverfront Pkwy. chattanoogariverboat.com Lew Card 7 p.m. OddStory Brewing Company 336 E. MLK Blvd.

oddstorybrewing.co Rick Rushing and The Blues Strangers 7:30 p.m. The Foundry 1201 Broad St. chattanooganhotel.com Drakeford 9 p.m. Puckett’s Restaurant 2 W. Aquarium Way puckettsgro.com Behold The Brave, Sweettalker, Brother Lee & The Leather Jackals 8 p.m. Sluggo’s North Vegetarian Café 505 Cherokee Blvd. (423) 752-5224 Barefoot Nellie 8 p.m. Moccasin Bend Brewing Co. 3210 Broad St. bendbrewingbeer.com Audio X, Dorian & Dascal, Johnny Z, & Victor Serene 9 p.m. Music Box @ Ziggys 607 Cherokee Rd. ziggysbarandgrill.net Cecil Allen Moore with Dallas Walker 9 p.m. Songbirds South 41 Station St. songbirdsguitars.com Slim Pickins 9 p.m. Tremont Tavern 1203 Hixson Pike tremonttavern.com


The Get Right Band South Hill Banks 9 p.m. HiFi Clyde’s 122 W. Main St. hificlydeschattanooga.com Jambalaya 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. jjsbohemia.com Misfit Toyz 10 p.m. SkyZoo Chattanooga 5709 Lee Hwy. (423) 521-2966 VooDoo Slim 10 p.m. Bud’s Sports Bar 5751 Brainerd Rd. budssportsbar.com

SATURDAY7.21 Summer Music Weekends 11 a.m. Rock City Gardens 1400 Patten Rd. seerockcity.com Restorative Sound Immersion 11 a.m. Purple Sky Healing Arts 625 E. Main St. purpleskyhealingarts.com Bluegrass Brunch Noon The Honest Pint 35 Patten Pkwy. thehonestpint.com The Pea Pickin’ Hearts 12:30 p.m.

Tennessee Aquarium Plaza 1 Broad St. publicmarkets.us Chattanooga Girls Rock Showcase 2 p.m. Songbirds South 41 Station St. songbirdsguitars.com Good Rockin Tonight 2 p.m. White Lightening Harley-Davidson 7720 Lee Hwy. whitelightningharley-davidson.com Binji Varsossa 6 p.m. Cancun Mexican Restaurant 1809 Broad St. (423) 266-1461 Megan Howard 6:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Preston Ruffing 6:30 p.m. Westin Dorato Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Athena McIntyre 7 p.m. Charles & Myrtle’s Coffeehouse 105 McBrien Rd. christunity.org Courtney Holder 7 p.m. Southern Belle Riverboat 201 Riverfront Pkwy. chattanoogariverboat.com The Get Right Band,

Natural Habitz 7 p.m. Ross’s Landing Park 100 Riverfront Pkwy. (423) 643-6311 Danimal 7:30 p.m. The Foundry 1201 Broad St. chattanooganhotel.com Suits and Montgomery 8 p.m. Moccasin Bend Brewing Co. 3210 Broad St. bendbrewingbeer.com Jess Goggans Band Presents A Tribune to Janis Joplin 9 p.m. Songbirds South 41 Station St. songbirdsguitars.com Shawnessey Cargile 9 p.m Puckett’s Restaurant 2 W. Aquarium Way puckettsgro.com The Danberrys 9 p.m. HiFi Clyde’s 122 W. Main St. hificlydeschattanooga.com Ghetto Blasters, Old Paints 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. jjsbohemia.com VooDoo Slim 10 p.m. Bud’s Sports Bar 5751 Brainerd Rd. budssportsbar.com

SUNDAY7.22 Summer Music Weekends 11 a.m. Rock City Gardens 1400 Patten Rd. seerockcity.com Marcus White Piano Brunch 11 a.m. Westin Dorato Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com I Can Japan 11 a.m. Flying Squirrel Bar 55 Johnson St. flyingsquirrelbar.com The Pea Pickin’ Heart 12:30 p.m. First Tennessee Pavilion 1826 Carter St. publicmarkets.us Kofi Mawuko 12:30 p.m. Tennessee Aquarium Plaza 1 Broad St. publicmarkets.us Emily Kate Boyd 1:30 p.m. Flying Squirrel Bar 55 Johnson St. flyingsquirrelbar.com Emily Earle 2 p.m. First Tennessee Pavilion 1826 Carter St. publicmarkets.us Free Fiddle School 2 p.m. Fiddlers Anonymous CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • JULY 19, 2018 • THE PULSE • 21


The List Most Popular Vehicles Considering this week is our annual automotive issue, we thought we'd check with the good folks at Car and Driver to find out what we Americans most like to drive. Surprisingly, the list isn't all trucks and SUVs. We apparently really like sedans, too. 1. Ford F-series 2. Chevrolet Silverado 3. Ram Pickup 4. Toyota RAV4 5. Nissan Rogue 6. Toyota Camry 7. Honda CR-V 8. Honda Civic 9. Toyota Corolla 10. Honda Accord How does this list compare to the rest of world? According to Forbes, the five best-selling vehicles worldwide are: 1: Toyota Corolla 2: Honda Civic 3: Volkswagen Golf 4: Toyota RAV4 5: Honda CR-V So, as you can see, we're not that much different from the rest of world, other than our love for all things pickup.

LIVE MUSIC CALENDAR

Michael McDonald 2248 Dayton Blvd. fiddlersanonymous.com Mark Andrew 3 p.m. 1885 Grill 3914 St. Elmo Ave. 1885grill.com Bluegrass Jam 4 p.m. Fiddlers Anonymous 2248 Dayton Blvd. (423) 994-7497 Open Mic with Jeff Daniels 6 p.m. Long Haul Saloon 2536 Cummings Hwy. (423) 822-9775 Mathis & Martin 7 p.m. Backstage Bar 29 Station St. backstagechattanooga.com Maria Sable 8 p.m. Southside Social 1818 Chestnut St. thesouthsidesocial.com Sweet Sweet 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. jjsbohemia.com

MONDAY7.23 John Carroll 6 p.m 1885 Grill 3914 St. Elmo Ave. 1885grill.com Maria Sable 6:30 p.m.

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Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Monday Nite Big Band 7 p.m. The Palms at Hamilton 6925 Shallowford Rd. thepalmsathamilton.com Open Air with Jessica Nunn 7:30 p.m. The Granfalloon 400 E. Main St. granfalloonchattanooga.com Very Open Mic with Shawnessey Cargile 8 p.m. The Well 1800 Rossville Blvd. #8 wellonthesouthside.com Open Mic Night 9 p.m. The Honest Pint 35 Patten Pkwy. thehonestpint.com

TUESDAY7.24 David Bingaman 6 p.m. 1885 Grill 3914 St. Elmo Ave. 1885grill.com Courtney Holder 6 p.m. Mexi-Wing 9 6925 Shallowford Rd. (423) 468-3366 Papa Sway & Songbird 6:30 p.m. Southern Belle Riverboat 201 Riverfront Pkwy. chattanoogariverboat.com

Zach Bridges 6:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Danimal 6 p.m. Backstage Bar 29 Station St. backstagechattanooga.com Open Mic Jam Session 7 p.m. Crust Pizza 3211 Broad St. crustpizza.com Kim Walker-Smith 7 p.m. City Church Chattanooga 7122 Lee Hwy. thecitychurch.cc Michael McDonald 8 p.m. Walker Theatre 399 McCallie Ave. tivolichattanooga.com Open Mic with Mike McDade 8 p.m. Tremont Tavern 1203 Hixson Pike tremonttavern.com

WEDNESDAY7.25 Matt Downer 6 p.m. 1885 Grill 3914 St. Elmo Ave. 1885grill.com No Big Deal 6 p.m. SpringHill Suites 495 Riverfront Pkwy.

springhillsuites.com Shawnessey Cargile 6:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Erik Kirkendoll 6:30 p.m. Westin Dorato Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Jesse James Jungkurth 7 p.m. Backstage Bar 29 Station St. backstagechattanooga.com Jazz In The Lounge: East Lake Jazz Combo 7 p.m. Barking Legs Theater 1307 Dodds Ave. barkinglegs.org Priscilla & Little Rickee 8 p.m. Las Margaritas 1101 Hixson Pike (423) 756-3332 Black Pussy 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. jjsbohemia.com Prime Cut Trio 9 p.m. The Palms at Hamilton 6925 Shallowford Rd. thepalmsathamilton.com

Map these locations on chattanoogapulse.com. Send event listings at least 10 days in advance to: calendar@chattanoogapulse.com


ERNIE PAIK'S RECORD REVIEWS

Here Lies Man You Will Know Nothing (RidingEasy)

I

n an alternate universe, it could have been a premise for a Big Brother-type reality show: let’s put the members of Black Sabbath, Fela Kuti and Carlos Santana in an apartment for a week and see what wackiness ensues. However, in our universe, the Los Angeles band Here Lies Man might sound like the output of a productive session with those figures, mixing throbbing, fuzzed-out ‘70s hard-rock riffs, West African grooves and a bit of psychedelic rock. Multi-instrumentalist Marcos Garcia (a.k.a. Chico Mann) and drummer Geoff Mann (the son of jazz flutist Herbie Mann), both of whom have played in the Afrobeat band Antibalas, continue as

Ben LaMar Gay Downtown Castles Can Never Block the Sun (International Anthem) the group’s core duo on its second album, You Will Know Nothing. Immediately, the album’s heavy riffs grab the listener, appealing to a compelling gut feeling, and soon afterwards, there’s the realization that something interesting is going on with the rhythms that’s not typical in rock; it’s perhaps an easier sell for those coming from the hard-rock world rather than from the West African music world. While Here Lies Man’s creative strategies might sound novel, it admits that it builds upon traditions rather than claiming to be something totally new; that said, it does underscore the benefit of looking beyond our continent for

rhythmic inspiration in a rock context. While You Will Know Nothing is heavy on drums and distorted guitars, sinister keyboard accents and conga beats vitally contribute to its personality, and when lyrics are present, they’re just a few words, repetitively chanted as if some kind of incantation. One only needs to listen to a few seconds of “Animal Noises,” with its call-and-response riffage and close-up and dry drums, to discern whether or not it’ll appeal to the listener’s tastes. However, the album isn’t all in-your-face rock—“Floating on Water” has a relaxed tempo and a slowburn approach, with watery-sounding vocals, and the closing “You Ought to Know” is a genuinely gorgeous track. While the debut was a beast of an album, wisely, You Will Know Nothing stretches its arms out and mixes up the moods, expanding fruitfully upon its premise.

M

usic history is peppered with auspicious debuts; an egghead might point out that, well, every artist has to start with a first album, and statistically speaking, some of them will be excellent.

But, consider that an artist can take as much time and effort as they want before that debut album comes out; then the clock starts ticking for a follow-up—a “sophomore slump,” if deemed disappointing. A lackluster debut will simply be ignored. It’s hard to ignore the debut album from Chicago musician Ben LaMar Gay; in the last seven years, he has recorded seven albums worth of material that remained unreleased until he picked 15 selections to comprise Downtown Castles Can Never Block the Sun—a sprawling, impressive, glorious mess of an album that darts between styles relentlessly. The only apparent cohesion is its lack of cohesion. Gay’s roots are in jazz, as a cornetist and participant in the venerable AACM (Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians) that fostered numerous avant-garde legends, and his track “Muhal” serves as a tribute to the late AACM co-founder and pianist Muhal Richard Abrams; it’s a fascinating, driving track, with envelope-treated synths, delicate reeds, an assertive bass clarinet, sharp rhythmic outbursts and a percussive tension, with the listener being poked and prodded from all

directions. “Music for 18 Hairdressers: Braids & Fractals” is Gay’s nod to Steve Reich’s minimalist masterpiece “Music for 18 Musicians” with note patterns and metallic sounds (perhaps the snip of scissors) weaving in and out in a sort of precise industrial choreography. Vocals vary from the wordless, breezy singing on “Uvas” (enhanced with a trio of female singers) to lyrical numbers that delve into cooking (“A Seasoning Called Primavera”), an anthropomorphized forest (“7th Stanza”) and the neo-Beat speak/sing poetry of “Swim Swim.” Once the listener thinks they might have a grasp on what’s going on—with elements of jazz, funk, soul, electronic music, lounge, hip-hop and classical in the mix—along comes a track like “Miss Nealie Burns” that channels Eastern European folk music, with insistent banjo strums and a swift 2/4 beat. Gay’s intriguing debut requires multiple listens and doesn’t seem to be the result of a short attention span— ideas are fleshed out with care, here; instead, it’s more like Gay has a lot of ideas and a lot to say, so buckle up— you’re going to hear it all.

CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • JULY 19, 2018 • THE PULSE • 23


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY stable. The reason I’m revealing these clues ahead of time is because now is a good time to get a foreshadowing of how to proceed. You can glean insights on where to begin your work.

ROB BREZSNY CANCER (June 21-July 22): Selfdescribed skeptics sometimes say to me, “How can any intelligent person believe in astrology? You must be suffering from a brain dysfunction if you imagine that the movements of planets can reveal any useful clues about our lives.” If the “skeptic” is truly open-minded, as an authentic skeptic should be, I offer a mini-lecture to correct his misunderstandings. If he’s not (which is the usual case), I say that I don’t need to “believe” in astrology; I use astrology because it works. For instance, I have a working hypothesis that Cancerians like myself enjoy better-than-average insight and luck with money every year from late July through the month of August. It’s irrelevant whether there’s a “scientific” theory to explain why this might be. I simply undertake efforts to improve my financial situation at this time, and I’m often successful. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Here are some of the fine gifts you’re eligible for and even likely to receive during the next four weeks: a more constructive and fluid relationship with obsession; a panoramic look at what lies below the tip of the metaphorical iceberg; a tear-jerking joyride that cracks open your sleeping sense of wonder; erasure of at least 20 percent of your self-doubt; vivid demonstrations of the excitement available from slowing down and taking your sweet time; and a surprising and useful truth delivered to your soul by your body. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): During the last three months of 2018, I suspect you will dismantle or outgrow a foundation. Why? So as to prepare the way for building or finding a new foundation in 2019. From next January onward, I predict you will reimagine the meaning of home. You’ll grow fresh roots and come to novel conclusions about the influences that enable you to feel secure and

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LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): A reader asked Libran blogger Ana-Sofia Cardelle, “How does one become more sensual?” I’ll ask you to meditate on the same question. Why? Because it’s a good time to enrich and deepen your sensuality. For inspiration, here are some ideas that blend my words with Cardelle’s: “Laugh easily and freely. Tune in to the rhythm of your holy animal body as you walk. Sing songs that remind you why you’re here on earth. Give yourself the luxury of reading books that thrill your imagination and fill you with fresh questions. Eat food with your fingers. Allow sweet melancholy to snake through you. Listen innocently to people, being warm-hearted and slyly wild. Soak up colors with your eager eyes. Whisper grateful prayers to the sun as you exult in its gifts.” SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “If people aren’t laughing at your goals, your goals are too small.” So says bodybuilder Kai Greene. I don’t know if I would personally make such a brazen declaration, but I do think it’s worth considering—especially for you right now. You’re entering into the Big Bold Vision time of your astrological cycle. It’s a phase when you’ll be wise to boost the intensity of your hopes for yourself, and get closer to knowing the ultimate form of what you want, and be daring enough to imagine the most sublime possible outcomes for your future. If you do all that with the proper chutzpah, some people may indeed laugh at your audacity. That’s OK! SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): This mini-chapter in your epic life story is symbolically ruled by the fluttering flights of butterflies, the whirring hum of hummingbird wings, the soft cool light of fireflies, and the dawn dances of seahorses. To take maximum advantage of the blessings life will tease you with in the coming weeks, I suggest you align yourself with phenomena like those. You will tend to be alert and receptive in just the right ways if you cultivate a love of fragile marvels, subtle beauty, and amazing grace. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): I swear the astrological omens are telling me to tell you that you have license to make the following requests: 1.

Homework: Tell a story about the time Spirit reached down and altered your course in one tricky, manic swoop. Freewillastrology.com People from your past who say they’d like to be part of your future have to prove their earnestness by forgiving your debts to them and asking your forgiveness for their debts to you. 2. People who are pushing for you to be influenced by them must agree to be influenced by you. 3. People who want to deepen their collaborations with you must promise to deepen their commitment to wrestling with their own darkness. 4. People who say they care for you must prove their love in a small but meaningful way. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): You will never find an advertisement for Nike or Apple within the sacred vessel of this horoscope column. But you may come across plugs for soul-nourishing commodities like creative freedom, psychosexual bliss, and playful generosity. Like everyone else, I’m a salesperson—although I believe that the wares I peddle are unambiguously good for you. In this spirit, I invite you to hone your own sales pitch. It’s an excellent time to interest people in the fine products and ideas and services that you have to offer. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Would you do me a favor, please? Would you do your friends and loved ones and the whole world a favor? Don’t pretend you’re less powerful and beautiful than you are. Don’t downplay or neglect the magic you have at your disposal. Don’t act as if your unique genius is nothing special. OK? Are you willing to grant us these small indulgences? Your specific talents, perspectives, and gifts are indispensable right now. The rest of us need you to be bold and brazen about expressing them. ARIES (March 21-April 19): “Take a lover who looks at you like maybe you are magic.” Whenever that quote appears on the Internet, it’s falsely attributed to painter Frida Kahlo. In fact, it was originally composed by poet Marty McConnell. In any case, I’ll recommend that you heed it in the coming weeks. You really do need to focus on associating with allies who see the mysterious and lyrical best in

you. I will also suggest that you get inspired by a line that Frida Kahlo actually wrote: “Take a lover who looks at you like maybe you are a bourbon biscuit.” (If you don’t know what a bourbon biscuit is, I’ll tell you: chocolate buttercream stuffed between two thin rectangular chocolate biscuits.) TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Here’s what author Franz Kafka wrote in his diary on August 2, 1914: “Germany has declared war on Russia. I went swimming in the afternoon.” We could possibly interpret his nonchalance about world events to be a sign of callous self-absorption. But I recommend that you cultivate a similar attitude in the coming weeks. In accordance with astrological omens, you have the right and the need to shelter yourself from the vulgar insanity of politics and the pathological mediocrity of mainstream culture. So feel free to spend extra time focusing on your own well-being. (P.S.: Kafka’s biographer says swimming served this role for him. It enabled him to access deep unconscious reserves of pleasurable power that renewed his spirit.) GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Am I delusional to advise a perky, talkative Gemini like yourself to enhance your communication skills? How dare I even hint that you’re not quite perfect at a skill you were obviously born to excel at? But that’s exactly what I’m here to convey. The coming weeks will be a favorable time to take inventory of how you could more fully develop your natural ability to exchange information. You’ll be in robust alignment with cosmic rhythms if you take action to refine the way you express your own messages and receive and respond to other people’s messages. Rob Brezsny is an aspiring master of curiosity, perpetrator of sacred uproar, and founder of the Beauty and Truth Lab. He brings a literate, myth-savvy perspective to his work. It’s all in the stars.


JONESIN' CROSSWORD

THE COMIX

“Urban Sprawl”—this town needs more room! ACROSS 1 Childhood illness with swollen glands 6 Goes on and on 11 Some NFL All-Pros 14 Actor Ulrich 15 Tibet’s neighbor 16 Questionable Twitter poster, perhaps 17 They read a lot of stories out loud 19 Historical division 20 French vineyard classification 21 Feeling not-so-great 22 Be blustery 23 Ruler who lost her head in 1793 28 St. crosser 29 Cone or Cat preceder 30 Ripken of the Orioles 31 Stamp for an incoming pkg. 33 Football broadcaster Collinsworth 36 Purplish flower 40 Food and wine publication that went completely

online in 2009 43 Cosmetician Lauder 44 Orange-roofed chain, familiarly 45 Nefarious 46 Genesis craft 48 “You’ve Got Mail” company 50 Addams Family cousin 51 Phrase often seen after a married or professional name 57 Passable 58 Battery option 59 Nest egg, initially 60 Cleveland player, for short 61 Got out, or followed the same path as the theme answers? 66 Gibbon, for one 67 Tooth type 68 Spine-tingling 69 Pot top 70 Goes after flies 71 Bottom-of-thebottle stuff DOWN 1 Web portal with a butterfly logo

2 Plucked instrument 3 “Give me some kitten food” 4 Joe of “Home Alone” 5 Long looks 6 Party org. gathering last held in 2016 in Philadelphia 7 Take another swing at 8 Speed skater ___ Anton Ohno 9 Flavor for some knots? 10 Mercedes roadsters 11 Orange character from the ‘80s who appears in “Wreck-It Ralph” 12 Sacha Baron Cohen character 13 Music festival area 18 Subtle meaning 22 English-speaking country of Central America 23 Selma’s sister 24 Some Chevy hatchbacks 25 Director’s option 26 Part of WNW 27 “The Lion King” heroine

32 Fanciful 34 “As I see it,” in a text 35 He cohosts “America’s Game” 37 Bon Jovi’s “___ on a Prayer” 38 Novelist Loos 39 Boston team, briefly 41 Paltry 42 Any of the kids searching for One-Eyed Willy in a 1985 flick 47 Onetime capital of Poland 49 Domineered, with “over” 51 Like the main point 52 Giraffe relative with striped legs 53 Was delirious 54 Undefeated boxer Ali 55 Pester with barks 56 Word after smart or mineral 61 Text type 62 7, on a rotary phone 63 Cinnabar, e.g. 64 Costume shop purchase 65 “Castlevania” platform

Copyright © 2018 Jonesin’ Crosswords. For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents perminute. Must be 18+ to call. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle No. 893 CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • JULY 19, 2018 • THE PULSE • 25


FOOD & DRINK · SUSHI & BISCUITS

No Jackfruited Thugs Here Our world-traveling chef takes on one of the stranger fruits out there

J Mike McJunkin Pulse columnist

Those who try to fruit shame it with meat-centric labels like ‘vegan pulled pork’ or ‘vegetarian animal flesh substitute’ do a disservice to the millions of hard working jackfruit that died for your dinner.”

Mike McJunkin is a native Chattanoogan currently living abroad who has trained chefs, owned and operated restaurants. Join him on Facebook at facebook.com/SushiAndBiscuits

ACKFRUIT DOESN’T TASTE LIKE pulled pork. It just doesn’t. And anyone who tries to tell you that it does is not your friend and the truth is not in ‘em. To be fair though, if you put enough barbeque sauce on it, jackfruit might remind you of a freshly microwaved Hungry Man dinner, but no card-carrying Southerner would ever betray their heritage with such an atrocity. Don’t get me wrong though. Even though jackfruit doesn’t taste like pulled pork, it’s freaking delicious and can be used to make both savory and sweet dishes. In fact, it can be prepared in a way that gives it a sort-of meatlike texture, which is one of the main reasons the vegetarian and vegan communities have gotten worked into a frenzy over this gigantic ball of spikes and possibilities. Jackfruit are the absurd looking behemoths of the fruit world. They can grow to the size of a toddler, are covered in hundreds of cone shaped nubs and generally look like something Theodor Geisel dreamt up after a rugged dose of Mrs. Winslow’s Soothing Morphine Syrup. If you manage to find fresh ones at your favorite Asian market, you may see what looks like two different types, but they’re the same fruit—one is ripe and the other is young. Picking the right one for the dish you’re making can make the difference between eating something new and delicious or eating something that tastes like you’ve been teabagged by Willy Wonka’s gobstoppers. You can avoid the guesswork by buying canned jackfruit, which is clearly labeled as either green/young for unripe, or ripe for, well, the ripe stuff. Canned is

26 • THE PULSE • JULY 19, 2018 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

easier to work with, but just like any fruit or vegetable—fresh is better. Young jackfruit is used in the cuisines of many Asian countries. It’s usually boiled and used in curries, salads or as a vegetable in a variety of main course and side dishes. Young, unripe jackfruit has a mild, almost bland taste that takes on any flavors you throw at it. Its texture is a bit stringy, which is why it’s being touted as this year’s meat replacement de jour, but I prefer to let jackfruit just be jackfruit. Those who try to fruit shame it with meat-centric labels like “vegan pulled pork” or “vegetarian animal flesh substitute” do a disservice to the millions of hard working jackfruit that died for your dinner. Ripe jackfruit, on the other hand is very sweet with a pronounced fruity flavor. Where young jackfruit is a blank starch canvas ready to take on other flavors, ripe jackfruit is yellow, sweet and tastes like a pineapple had sex with a mango and made a bubble gum baby. Its similarity with the flavor of chewing gum, particularly Juicy Fruit, is so pronounced that there’s a persistent myth that ripe jackfruit’s flavor inspired the flavor of Juicy Fruit gum. In actuality, Juicy Fruit smells like jackfruit because they both contain a chemical called isoamyl acetate, a common ingredient in bubble gum that jackfruit produces as it ripens. If you get your mitts on a fresh, young jackfruit, you’ll need to take some precautions before preparing it. First, cover your work surface with newspaper. Jackfruit contains natural latex that is really,

really hard to remove, so slather your hands and the blade of your knife (serrated works best) with vegetable oil to keep the latex from sticking. Slice it into large chunks, slice off the skin and drop it into boiling water for about 40 minutes or until the flesh is soft and stringy. Pro tip: if you use a pressure cooker, cooking only takes about 10 minutes. Once it’s cooked remove the seeds, dig out the pods and all that stringy, fleshy stuff between the pods. Now it’s ready to use. If you are stuck using canned young jackfruit, it’s already been boiled, so just drain, rinse, squeeze the excess moisture out, and cook it according to your recipe. Ripe jackfruit in the can is yellow, springy, a little fibrous, and super sweet. It can be made into ice cream, chips, jelly, candy; you can slice it into a fruit salad or on top of ice cream; you can even eat it straight out of the can or buy a fresh one and eat it straight from the pod. Personally, I’m more of an unripe jackfruit guy, so I recommend a savory dish like Thai curry. Bonus gift: I’m including a recipe on our website at chattanoogapulse.com for red curry paste that will make you swear off the store-bought stuff. Happy jackfruiting!


CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • JULY 19, 2018 • THE PULSE • 27


The Pulse 15.29 » July 19, 2018  

Chattanooga's Weekly Alternative

The Pulse 15.29 » July 19, 2018  

Chattanooga's Weekly Alternative