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APRIL 26, 2018

CHATTANOOGA'S WEEKLY ALTERNATIVE

COMMERCE WITHOUT CASH HOW THE “BARTER ECONOMY” IS STILL ALIVE AND WELL

A ROOM WITH A VIEW • THE SANKOFA ARTS & MUSIC FESTIVAL • CHATTANOOGA MARKET


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INSIDE THIS ISSUE VOLUME 15, ISSUE 17 • APRIL 26, 2018

BREWER MEDIA GROUP Publisher James Brewer, Sr. FOUNDED 2003 BY ZACHARY COOPER & MICHAEL KULL

EDITORIAL Managing Editor Gary Poole Assistant Editor Brooke Brown Music Editor Marc T. Michael Film Editor John DeVore Contributors David Traver Adolphus Adam Beckett Rob Brezsny Jessie Gantt-Temple Matt Jones Mike McJunkin Ernie Paik Rick Pimental-Habib Michael Thomas Addie Whitlow Editorial Interns Adrienne Kaufmann Austin M. Hooks Cartoonists Max Cannon • Rob Rogers Jen Sorenson • Tom Tomorrow

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Commerce Without Cash Moola. Loot. Pesos. Paper. Coin. Bank. Clams. Bread. Dough. Cheddar. Greens. Bringing home the bacon. No matter what you call it, with an ever fluctuating economy, the value of the dollar holds different value for everyone.

ADVERTISING Director of Sales Mike Baskin Account Executives Rick Leavell • Cindee McBride Libby Phillips • Danielle Swindell

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CONTACT Offices 1305 Carter St. Chattanooga, TN 37402 Phone 423.265.9494 Email info@chattanoogapulse.com Website chattanoogapulse.com Facebook @chattanoogapulse THE FINE PRINT: The Pulse is published weekly by Brewer Media and is distributed throughout the city of Chattanooga and surrounding communities. The Pulse covers a broad range of topics concentrating on music, the arts, entertainment, culture and local news. The Pulse is available free of charge, limited to one copy per reader. No person without written permission from the publisher may take more than one copy per weekly issue. The Pulse may be distributed only by authorized distributors. Contents Copyright © 2018 by Brewer Media. All rights reserved.

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A SOUTHSIDE TRADITION

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MINING NOSTALGIA FOR PROFIT

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Since 2001, one of the Southside’s most popular destinations has been the Chattanooga Market. Tens of thousands of locals and visitors alike come to the Southside every Sunday.

When it comes to Hollywood, if you wait long enough for something, it will eventually happen. Everything has an audience somewhere. You can guarantee that in some small corner of the internet, there’s a hardcore fan base.

SEEING WHAT CAN BE SEEN

If you’ve ever had the misfortune (or pleasure, depending on how you look at it) of staying in a hotel, then you likely understand the importance of having a nice view from your room.

ART & MUSIC JOIN TOGETHER

“Sankofa, a word from the Akan tribe of Ghana in West Africa, means ‘go back to your roots’ or ‘go and retrieve from your past’,” said percussionist and dancer Kofi Mawuko. “I grew up with this symbol.”

5 CONSIDER THIS

15 NEW IN THEATERS

21 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

7 AIR BAG

18 MUSIC CALENDAR

21 JONESIN' CROSSWORD

20 MUSIC REVIEWS

22 SUSHI & BISCUITS

12 ARTS CALENDAR

CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • APRIL 26, 2018 • THE PULSE • 3


BEGINNINGS · CITY LIFE

A Southside Tradition Returns The Chattanooga Market is back for another season By Michael Thomas

Pulse contributor

Spring will feel official as the Chattanooga Market will open for its 2018 season and the celebration will be taking place all weekend long.”

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INCE 2001, ONE OF THE SOUTHSIDE’S MOST POPULAR destinations has been the Chattanooga Market at the First Tennessee Pavilion. Tens of thousands of locals and visitors alike (many driving from hours away) come to the Southside every Sunday throughout the spring and summer, enjoying the combination farmers market, craft fair, arts and musical festival. Come this weekend, spring will finally feel official as the Chattanooga Market will open for its 2018 season, and the celebration will be taking place all weekend long. Normally, the well-known Chattanooga tradition takes place each Sunday, but this weekend the season opener will be held on both Saturday (10 a.m. to 5 p.m.) and on Sunday (11 a.m. to 5 p.m.). The local artists and farmers market features producer-only vendors from

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nearby areas. This means that everything sold has been created or grown by the vendors themselves—a principle the Market has upheld since its inception 18 years ago. In early spring, herbs, flowers, plants and trees will take center stage, with strawberries arriving shortly. Every Sunday also boasts plenty of artists specializing in photography, painting, wood-working, jewelry, and more. Over 200 vendors are expected for

opening weekend, and many are new. Just about every category of craft can be found—there is something for everyone. Regulars come to enjoy lunch at one of the several dozen food truck eateries: Asian, BBQ, grilled cheese, fried chicken, Greek, Mexican...or, folks can grab a fresh baked pretzel to nosh while shopping and connecting with friends. And for those interested in gathering the makings for fresh meals, meats, cheeses and baked goods are always a staple. Plus, every Sunday live music takes the EPB Stage for two free concerts, one at 12:30 p.m. and the second at 2 p.m. This weekend kicks off with Sweet Georgia Sound on Saturday (both shows) and then on Sunday, longtime local favorite Jennifer Daniels takes the stage at 12:30 p.m., followed by Martin Rodriguez at 2 p.m. But what makes the Chattanooga Market so special? It’s because the organizers truly understand what it means to be part of the community. Each weekend, they feature a special event that supports one of a multitude of local charities, including (but not limited to) the Erlanger Foundation, Collegedale Tomorrow Foundation, Chambliss Children’s Home and the Chattanooga Food Bank. In many cases they provide the platform for the charities’ annual fundraising efforts, which have become signature community events, with an annual charitable contribution of over $200,000. So whether you’re a seasoned veteran or a visitor to our fair city, the place to be this weekend is at the First Tennessee Pavilion on Carter St. (across from Finley Stadium). Just make sure you get there early: there’s so much to do, you want to make sure you have time to see, taste, and hear it all.


Cons ider This w ith Dr. Rick

“Unless you learn to face your own shadows, you will continue to see them in others, because the world outside is only a reflection of the world inside you.” — Carl Jung

Breaking Your Funny Bone Preacher Lawson knows how to bring the funny The funniest, most likable, avantgarde comedian to ever crash the scenic city: Preacher Lawson. A stand-up comedian who gained fame on America’s Got Talent in 2017, Lawson has several degrees in wit, imitation, and the best of all, a riotous knack for the unexpected and ocassionally obscene. In fact, Lawson is best left self-described as “a stand-up comedian, actor, singer, human, and professional black guy.” For Lawson, it all began when he made a bet with his mother at the

age of sixteen, then took the stage at seventeen, winning the bet. Since that time, Lawson has been gaining popularity and was dubbed the “Funniest Comedian in Florida” in 2015. Whether he’s on tour or making special appearances on NBC’s Last Call with Carson Daly, Lawson is preaching good times and good laughs to his audience. Lawson considers his decision to pursue comedy as “the best decision of his life” and wants all aspiring artists to remember, “don’t

follow your dreams, lead them.” So come join Lawson as he demonstrates all the finest qualities of a great comedian: clean prose, relatable scenarios, and a distinct, onstage personality. You can catch this show at the Comedy Catch, located at 1400 Market St., this Friday at 7:30 and 10 p.m. as well as Saturday at 5 p.m. (all ages show), 7:30 p.m. and 10 p.m. For more information, visit thecomedycatch.com or call (423) 629-2233. — Austin M. Hooks

Our demons are around to teach us something, and they keep popping their heads up to remind us that the lesson isn’t learned yet. They tip us off with thoughts like, “Why does this keep happening to me?” Or, “Why do I keep getting stuck in this same relationship pattern?” Or, “Here I am again…this feels all too familiar.” Award-winner writer, poet and philosopher Emily Maroutian puts it like this: You’re not stuck. You’re just committed to certain patterns of behavior because they perhaps helped you in the past. Now those behaviors have become more harmful than helpful. The reason why you can’t move forward is because you keep applying an old formula to a new level in your life. Change the formula to get a different result. — Rick Pimental-Habib, Ph.D.

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COLUMN · AIR BAG

51 Used Cars Come Marching In Our car guy is trying to talk his wife into becoming a two-car family

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David Traver Adolphus Pulse columnist

Like any responsible future-investor, I have responsibly been making exhaustive lists of potential used cars and making my wife look at them.”

David Traver Adolphus is a freelance automotive researcher who quit his full time job writing about old cars to pursue his lifelong dream of writing about old AND new cars. Follow him on Twitter as @proscriptus.

N A LOT OF WAYS I’M A VERY frustrated car enthusiast. I’ve owned a bunch of old cars, but never because they were old cars—it’s just that an exhighway department $500 1971 Chevy C/K 10 was all I could afford. Same for my $500 ‘73 Dodge Power Wagon with a Ford 351W in it, and my $500 ‘79 Corolla. For a while I owned a pair of 1973 BMW Bavarias (they cost me $500), but I never got either of them running and I eventually sold them for scrap. I got $500 for them. This winter, I started a new day job, because paying for health insurance out of pocket is no fun. Between the driving the job requires and two kids playing Little League, transportation is now a real hassle. Meanwhile, my wife is reveling in two regular paychecks coming in and frittering it all away on things like paying off the credit cards and “saving for the boys’ education”, whatever that means. I’m of the thought that the single best investment we can possibly make in our future is an interesting second car. Like any responsible future-investor, I have responsibly been making exhaustive lists of potential used cars and making my wife look at them. So far, the only thing that’s aroused even a glimmer of interest is a 1994 Volvo 850 wagon, probably because the asking price is approximately that of a set of old tires, and it’s maybe overpriced. It does kind of scratch my interesting cars itch, as it comes with a five-speed and in refrigerator white it’s definitely a car only a car lover can love. I’d buy it,

too, if Craigslist hadn’t decided that a car 120 miles away was in my 85-mile search radius. The way I see it, however, there are lots of ways to get into a reliable used car that will get the job done, which in this case means being able to put the kids in it, so the Porsche Boxsters and V-8 swapped Mazda Miatas of the world are off the table. My current list has 51 cars on it, starting with a 1940 Plymouth sedan, which sounds absurd but people used to drive these things everywhere, every day. At the other end is a 2014 Volkswagen GTI Drivers Edition, the final year for the Mk. VI GTI in the top trim level. Maybe neither of those are going to happen, the Plymouth because my wife is not a crazy person and the GTI because, sadly, they’re asking more than I can afford. There are some real gems in

there, though. There’s a gorgeous twotone brown Lexus LS400 with 54,000 miles at $8,000 and a 2006 Saab 9-3 Aero wagon with 82,000 miles for $3,750, each special in their own way. I found a 2004 Mercedes-Benz S430 4MATIC with 38,000 miles going for $11,000, a little steep for my purposes but then, it was probably over $80,000 new. Maybe my wife wants something thriftier than a V-8 Mercedes. How about a 2002 Honda Civic Si, with a one-owner Carfax, 53,000 miles and going for $8,491? No? Like I said, I have 51 of them. Actually, that’s not true. While I was looking up the details for these cars, I may have found a few more. The list is now 53. Okay, 55. Okay, 60. Honey? Can I show you a few cars?

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COVER STORY new ways to expand their income to include more than just a hard earned dollar. This modern approach to an antiquated system of bartering is now providing more opportunities to those who are low on cash but who have an abundance of skill and talent. This intangible economy is finding new ground and taking root in Chattanooga in several forms. “Your Money’s No Good Here”

Commerce Without Cash How the “barter economy” is still alive and well By Jessie Gantt-Temple Pulse contributor

The practice of barter is recognized by the IRS and every trade dollar earned should reported like cash...should be.”

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OOLA. LOOT. PESOS. PAPER. COIN. BANK. CLAMS. Bread. Dough. Cheddar. Greens. Bringing home the bacon. No matter what you call it, with an ever fluctuating economy, the value of the dollar holds different value for everyone.

The budding farmer may not feel as passionate about growing that 401K as much as growing a team of farm hands and paying them in produce. The graphic designer may need an editor to review the children’s book in which she is getting paid to draw the pictures. The ancient art of bartering, exchanging goods or services for other goods or services, has been around since the beginning. Trade, which I thought meant the same as barter before this article, by definition is a trans-

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action where one buys or sells a good or service. The practice of barter is recognized by the IRS and every trade dollar earned should reported like cash... should be. When a recession hits and money is tight, people will lean more towards a barter economy to assist in supplying some sort of stable way to provide food on their table, or even provide the table itself. With online economy platforms like the controversial Bitcoin or the up and coming Simbi, citizens are looking at

“We toil away for cash and corporations, our lives bought and boxed…it’s time to stop working for salaries and hierarchies and start working for each other.” That’s a quote from Simbi, an online marketplace that connects individuals who need or offer services and are willing to swap for no cash exchanged. “By offering services that bring you joy, our community gives you the opportunity to share your hobbies, skills, and talents in a whole new way.” However, Simbi has their own form of currency with “Simbi Dollars” to add more options to an almost complete barter system, but then, like other cryptocurrencies or in-store credit cards, it is limiting. Let’s get to the real trade dollars we all know and love: the McKay’s yellow trade. Going in with books that have already been read or dusty CD’s that we no longer listen to because of Pandora, then walking out with new-to-us items is a really cool concept (almost as cool as the store itself). I’ve heard negative comments regarding how little value is given for traded in items, but if one really stopped to think, “Where would anyone give me cash for this?”, then any amount of money or trade is invaluable. Another Chattanooga business interested in items you no longer have an interest for and an avid supporter of the trade system is Four Bridges Outfitters in Northshore. Owned and operated by three generations of Bartoletti ladies (Jenny, Lynn and Joann), Four Bridges


When the stars do align and both parties involved agree to need each other’s services or goods, there is a technical term and it is called the Double Coincidence of Wants.”

Outfitters has been offering store credit or consignment for gently used outdoor clothing and equipment. “Consignment is a great way for people to make a little extra money on something they have outgrown or perhaps are no longer interested in doing” said Jennie who was the Farm Manager at Crabtree Farms before partnering with her mom to open Four Bridges in 2012. She understands the need for a business where adaptability is crucial in an ever changing economy and environment. “We are excited to help increase the three R’s (reduce, reuse, recycle) in the retail industry as well as offer an affordable alternative.” When a customer turns in an item for consignment, Four Bridges Outfitters provides two options for payment. The customer can either receive fifty percent cash or sixty percent store credit from the ticketed price. Like McKay’s, the value Jenny places on the price tag is based on age, condition and comparisons from other retail sources, so it may not be the beaucoup bucks one was hoping for but it is better than some other alternatives. Unless hosting a time consuming yard sale or posting on the Facebook marketplace (which may introduce you to a new creepy consumer), then there are really no other outlets to rid oneself of household items. Now, there may be no bartering as you have to take the offer they give you, but again truly consider, who would even consider making you an offer for your old

stuff? I am not a fan of these recently popular clothing swaps because, as I am a large and in charge kind of gal, I rarely ever find anything to fit me, so more often than not my stuff gets gone then I’m left even more empty handed. What I do like and wish I saw more of are seed swaps where gardeners and other dirt diggers get together and trade plants, herbs and the likes. One size fits all on Mother Earth. Sweat Equity So now, for the person who has no tangible item to trade, what is left is just some sweat equity with good old physical labor. Labor is usually what costs the most, just think about your mechanic or hairstylist, and the outdoor workforce can be brutal especially in the heat of mid-July. With the farm to table movement having so much momentum in Chattanooga, local farmers are depending on an allotted amount of regularly, scheduled seasonal volunteers to pitch in and get paid in greens...or collards...or tomatoes. A CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) workshare is a partnership where a person promises to volunteer for a certain amount of set hours for the season in exchange for produce or goods harvested from the farm. Some perks of the workshare program, according to Crabtree Farms’ website is, “It offsets your cost for a share in our CSA program, allows you to build a relationship with your food

by being involved with its production, and is a great way to get a dose of fresh air and step away from your daily pattern.” The farming industry is not the only grassroots business communicating with their neighbors and building a more well-rounded customer base through bartering. Jenny Cate, owner of Vanillr Designs, a freelance graphic design company, did work for Renegade Silver and Rustic House where she received jewelry and candles in exchange for her services. “It’s a great way to support other local businesses and artists,” Cate says as she shows off her custom earrings from Renegade Silver. Tit For Tat Bartering items or work could create an ideal economy but there are a couple hiccups that prevent us from moving forward with that cashless concept. First, how do you find the services that you are looking for? I may be in need of a plumber but that plumber may not want the services or goods that I would trade. When the stars do align and both parties involved agree to need each other’s services or goods, there is a technical term and it is called the Double Coincidence of Wants (wow your friends with that one at the next Trivia night). The creation of Facebook groups such as the “Chattanooga Natural Living Barter and Trade” is one way that has allowed the self-employed to remain sustainable without exchanging money. It’s pinned post states that, “If you grow, cook, or create things, or offer some kind of service and are willing to barter, this group is for you. Let’s share the things we have and cut down on spending and waste while making friends and fostering a community of people who help each other out.” There is no room here for a play-

pen or lawn mower that the seller only wants cash. With less than 300 members, there has been several stories of success within this group including a licensed massage therapist trading her skill for someone’s handmade soaps and a farmer trading her eggs for another homesteader’s elderberry syrup. My Two Cents It’s a sign of hope that larger parts of society are embracing the barter system but when it expands too big, we lose the connection of community that the feeling of barter is supposed to create. How many more online economy programs are going to pop up and fabricate a more restricting system with a broader reach generating a less intimate market? The general population is already so out of touch with where things come from that people can’t even make it to the grocery store to do their own shopping, nevertheless take time to speak face to face with a local business and work out a deal. This should be a challenge for you to see what you can barter this week. Even if it’s a pair of sunglasses for a pint or watching your friend’s kids if they detail your car. I would love to hear what local services or goods were swapped in our eco-conscious, scenic city. Just this week, I traded storage containers for broccoli and cookies for rabbit meat. Get creative and understand that the common denominator in the barter system is discovering, respecting and accepting someone else’s value as well as your own. Dreaming of wanting to be a writer since she could remember, Jessie Gantt-Temple moved here three years ago from the Carolinas with her husband, and has found roots on her farm in Soddy Daisy.

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Turning Cars Into Works Of Art Artburst, a city-wide explosion of color in April, ends this weekend as ART 120 presents the “Art Car Tailgate Party and CruiseIn.” All month long we’ve enjoyed festivals, sculpture burnings, and an array of visuals artists. Now, you’re invited to hand select the best car crafted and decorated by local students. The winner will take home an apparently coveted award, the Golden Gnome and…$500. The event will include a host of costumes, artists, face paintings, and “bubbles galore.” Yet, the real party begins at night, as every art car glows and the local artist’s exuberant attire shifts the night into “The Art Car Fashion Ball.” The evening will go on to feature music, food, and a whole new set of fun, interesting people. Every costume and art car has been created by students with The Howard School Art Department and VWeLAb. Meanwhile, the other theatrical components, hair and makeup, are done by the wonderfully skilled members of The Howard School’s Cosmetology Department. The tailgate starts at 9 a.m. and ends at 3 p.m. this Saturday just outside of Songbirds Guitar Museum on 35 Station St. Expect the evening ball to begin at 7 p.m. and shift in location to the Chattanooga Choo Choo Gardens. For more information, visit art120.org or call (423) 708-2120. — Austin M. Hooks

Seeing What Can Be Seen The CTC brings E.M. Forster's classic play to new life By Addie Whitlow Pulse contributor

Staying in a room with an unpleasing view can alter the entire stay in said hotel, especially if you’re traveling abroad.”

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F YOU’VE EVER HAD THE MISFORTUNE (OR PLEASure, depending on how you look at it) of staying in a hotel, then you likely understand the importance of having a nice view from your room.

Staying in a room with an unpleasing view can alter the entire stay in said hotel, especially if you’re traveling abroad and happen to stay in a room without a view in Italy, like Lucy Honeychurch and her cousin do in the play “A Room with a View,” which opens this weekend at the Chattanooga Theatre Centre. “A Room with a View”, the 1908 novel by E.M. Forster which was later adapted into a play by playwright Christina Calvit, a BBC film, and a 1985 Helena Bonham Carter and Maggie Smith movie, follows the story of Lucy Honeychurch, a young woman who is touring Italy for a week with her cousin and chaper-

one, Charlotte. While staying in Florence, she is introduced to a Mr. Emerson and his son, George, a young man whom Lucy later discovers she has an interest in. The Emersons come to the aid of Lucy and Charlotte in regards to the room without a view scenario, but once back in their home country of England, Lucy must figure out how this meeting with George, someone she may not have originally seen as a potential lover, is going to impact her upcoming marriage and, inevitably, the trajectory of her life. The Chattanooga Theatre Centre’s production, which is directed by Scott Dunlap, features a cast of


11 who portray 22 different characters. The role of the young lovers, Lucy Honeychurch and George Emmerson, is played by Gwynne Jones, a TheatreCentre newcomer, and Jeremy Campbell, who is more experienced with the CTC. Jones explained that playing the role of Lucy Honeychurch has been exciting because much of the action in the performance is centered on Lucy. “She gets to be in almost every scene, so I get to watch a lot of the tomfoolery that goes on. My character gets kind of thrown into all the excitement, so that’s nice,” explained Jones. “There’s a traumatic event that she witnesses, so that’s exciting. It gets me rescued by the knight in shining armor of the play, so that’s almost every girl’s dream, too.” While Jones said that it was exhilarating to play the role of Lucy because of all the excitement, romance, and tomfoolery, she also explained that feeling out Lucy’s character has been challenging as well. Jones has quite a bit of experience in theatre; she’s performed with the Colonnade in East Ridge and with Back Alley Productions before they moved to Lafayette, GA. She started performing at a young age, and immersing herself in the role of different characters has been something Jones truly enjoys. “The biggest challenge for me, which has been this way in multiple plays, is just feeling out the character,” Jones

Honestly, the set is so much fun. There’s a trapeze theme throughout the book, but we’re not acrobats, so I get a swing, and other people get to sit on the swing,” said Jones.

said. “I’m feeling more success in this production than I have in other plays; this play has gone well. But [Dunlap] is so good at directing and allowing me to open up with the character.” “What we’ve been focusing on for all the characters, not just mine, is trying not to change them or interpret them into some funky, new idea. To some degree, that’s going to happen, because we’re all different people,” explained Jones. “But we’re trying to be as true to those characters as possible and really just let them speak.” The cast started rehearsals for the production in mid-March, and Jones explained that they’ve been on a pretty tight rehearsal schedule, practicing nightly Sunday through Friday, with exceptions. However, she said that both the cast and Dunlap have been incredibly nice and welcoming, and they’ve been very enjoyable to work with thus far. Jones also mentioned the set, which she said is quite fanciful and is defi-

nitely something to look forward to. There’s a lot of emphasis on lighting and light projections, and props rise and fall from the ceiling. There are also multiple set themes throughout the show, such as clouds and trapezes. “Honestly, the set is so much fun. There’s a trapeze theme throughout the book, but we’re not acrobats, so I get a swing, and other people get to sit on the swing,” said Jones. “As one of our cast members mentioned, it’s very avant garde. The swing represents a piano half the time (sometimes it’s a dresser), but whenever someone is swinging on it, they’re playing piano.” “A Room with a View” opens Friday night at 8 p.m., and it will be performed each Thursday-Sunday through May 13. If you’ve ever wanted a chance to experience the Edwardian era of British history coupled with the romance and comedy found in “A Room with a View,” then you definitely don’t want to miss the CTC’s performance of this classic.

THU4.26

FRI4.27

SAT4.28

“True West”

Chattanooga Audubon Night

Independent Bookstore Day

Gritty, haunting, intense... those are just a few of the words being used to describe this gripping play. 7:30 p.m. The Ringgold Playhouse 155 Depot St. (706) 935-3061 cityofringgoldga.gov

A give-back-night for Chattanooga's Oldest Wildlife Sanctuaries. 10% of all purchases will be donated. 4 p.m. Bluewater Grille 224 Broad St. bluewaterchattanooga.com

Show your support for independent bookstores with a day of readings from local authors and more. 10 a.m. Star Line Books 1467 Market St. starlinebooks.com

CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • APRIL 26, 2018 • THE PULSE • 11


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT CALENDAR

Art + Issues: On Becoming a Woman

THURSDAY4.26 Furniture Painting with Chalk or Milk 9 a.m. Hunt & Burrow 7443 Commons Blvd. (423) 713-7700 huntandburrow.com Art + Issues: On Becoming a Woman 6 p.m. The Hunter Museum of American Art 10 Bluff View Ave. (423) 267-0968 huntermuseum.org St. Elmo Social with Michael Henry 6 p.m. The Tap House 3800 St. Elmo Ave. (423) 682-8234 taphousechatt.com Sideshow Slideshow 7 p.m. Palace Theater 818 Georgia Ave. palacebazar.com “True West” 7:30 p.m. The Ringgold Playhouse 155 Depot St. (706) 935-3061 cityofringgoldga.gov

FRIDAY4.27 Broad Stroke Artists Exhibit of Harmony 8:30 a.m.

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Exum Gallery 305 W. 7th St. (423) 266-8195 stpaulschatt.org Chattanooga Audubon Night 4 p.m. Bluewater Grille 224 Broad St. (423) 266-4200 bluewaterchattanooga.com Watercolor on Vintage Book Pages 6 p.m. Chattanooga WorkSpace 302 W. 6th St. (423) 822-5750 chattanoogaworkspace.com Paddling by Moonlight 7 p.m. Reflection Riding Arboretum and Nature Center 400 Garden Rd. (423) 821-1160 reflectionriding.org "Vanishing of the Bees" 7 p.m. Unitarian Universalist Church 3224 Navajo Dr. (423) 624-2985 uucc.org Recital and Masterclass by Dr. Katherine Meloan 7 p.m. First-Centenary UMC 419 McCallie Ave. (901) 486-3700 agochattanooga.org “True West” 7:30 p.m. The Ringgold Playhouse 155 Depot St. (706) 935-3061 cityofringgoldga.gov

Preacher Lawson 7:30, 9:45 p.m. The Comedy Catch 1400 Market St. (423) 629-2233 thecomedycatch.com Relay for Life Benefit Show 8 p.m. First Draft Theater 1800 Rossville Ave. (423) 843-1775 improvchattanooga.com “A Room with a View” 8 p.m. Chattanooga Theatre Centre 400 River St. (423) 267-8534 theatrecentre.com Royals 8 p.m. Barking Legs Theater 1307 Dodds Ave. (423) 624-5347 barkinglegs.org Improv Showdown 10 p.m. First Draft Theater 1800 Rossville Ave. (423) 843-1775 improvchattanooga.com

SATURDAY4.28 Art Car Tailgate Party and Cruise-In 9 a.m. Songbirds Guitar Museum 35 Station St. (423) 708-2120 art120.org “Like Leaves Before the Wind” 10 a.m.

Chickamauga & Chattanooga National Military Park 3370 Lafayette Rd. (706) 866-9241 nps.gov Meet Me at the Park 10 a.m. Sterchi Farm 3000 Harrison Pike (423) 643-6888 outdoorchattanooga.com Repticon Chattanooga 10 a.m. Camp Jordan Arena 323 Camp Jordan Pkwy. (423) 490-0078 eastridgeparksandrec.com Independent Bookstore Day 10 a.m. Star Line Books 1467 Market St. (423) 777-5629 starlinebooks.com Chattanooga River Market 10 a.m. Tennessee Aquarium Plaza 1 Broad St. (423) 648-2496 publicmarkets.us Hot Glass with Sherry Nickell 11 a.m. River Gallery 400 E. 2nd St. (423) 265-5033 river-gallery.com Blue Dog Project 2.0: Mixed Media Pets Noon Chattanooga WorkSpace 302 W. 6th St. (423) 822-5750 chattanoogaworkspace.com Sankofa International Music


John Waters Desperate Living and Arts Festival 1:30 p.m. Miller Plaza 850 Market St. facebook.com/ogyaworldmusic “True West” 2 p.m. The Ringgold Playhouse 155 Depot St. (706) 935-3061 cityofringgoldga.gov Spring in West Village 6 p.m. West Village 802 Pine St. westvillagechattanooga.com Preacher Lawson 7:30, 9:45 p.m. The Comedy Catch 1400 Market St. (423) 629-2233 thecomedycatch.com Once a Month Comedy Showcase 8 p.m. Palace Theater 818 Georgia Ave. palacebazar.com “A Room with a View” 8 p.m. Chattanooga Theatre Centre 400 River St. (423) 267-8534 theatrecentre.com Week in Review 8 p.m. First Draft Theater 1800 Rossville Ave. (423) 843-1775 improvchattanooga.com Improv vs. Standup 10 p.m. First Draft Theater

1800 Rossville Ave. (423) 843-1775 improvchattanooga.com

SUNDAY4.29 Repticon Chattanooga 10 a.m. Camp Jordan Arena 323 Camp Jordan Pkwy. (423) 490-0078 eastridgeparksandrec.com Mel’s 2018 Derby Day Lunch Noon The Westin Chattanooga 801 Pine St. (423) 531-4653 westinchattanooga.com Cube of Truth 1 p.m. Walnut Street Bridge 1 Walnut St. anonymousforthevoiceless.org Make and Take: Woven Rain Cloud 1 p.m. Chattanooga WorkSpace 302 W. 6th St. (423) 822-5750 chattanoogaworkspace.com Bellydance Costume Carnival 1 p.m. Movement Arts Collective 3813 Dayton Blvd. (423) 401-8115 movementartscollective.com “A Room with a View” 2:30 p.m. Chattanooga Theatre Centre 400 River St. (423) 267-8534 theatrecentre.com

John Waters Desperate Living and Robert Maier Love Letter to Edie 7 p.m. Palace Theater 818 Georgia Ave. palacebazar.com

MONDAY4.30 Spring Belly Dance Session 5:45 p.m. Movement Arts Collective 3813 Dayton Blvd. (423) 401-8115 movementartscollective.com Palette Knife Painting Class 6 p.m. Townsend Atelier 301 E. 11th St. (423) 266-2712 townsendatelier.com Figure Drawing Class 6 p.m. Art Creations 201 Frazier Ave. (423) 267-0072 art-creations.com

TUESDAY5.1 Wake Up & Run 6 a.m. Fleet Feet Sports 307 Manufacturers Rd. (423) 771-7996 fleetfeetchattanooga.com Tennessee Aquarium Conservation Institute Tour 4 p.m. Tennessee Aquarium

Conservation Institute 175 Baylor School Rd. (800) 262-0695 tnaqua.org Introduction to Portrait Sculpture with Maria Willison 6 p.m. Townsend Atelier 301 E. 11th St. (423) 266-2712 townsendatelier.com Tuesday Night Chess Club 6 p.m. Downtown Library 1001 Broad St. (423) 643-7700 chattilibrary.com

WEDNESDAY5.2 Main Street Market 4 p.m. 522 W. Main St. mainstfarmersmarket.com Beginner Handlettering 6 p.m. Chattanooga WorkSpace 302 W. 6th St. (423) 822-5750 chattanoogaworkspace.com Naughty Knights Chess Meetup 7:30 p.m. The Bitter Alibi 825 Houston St. (423) 362-5070 thebitteralibi.com Map these locations on chattanoogapulse.com. Send event listings at least 10 days in advance to: calendar@chattanoogapulse.com CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • APRIL 26, 2018 • THE PULSE • 13


FILM & TELEVISION

Cinderella Comes To The Opera For the first time ever, Massenet’s sumptuous take on the Cinderella story, Cendrillon, comes to the world famous Metropolitan Opera, and you can see it live in all its highdefinition glory on the big screen. “Glorious,” raved the New York Times when Joyce DiDonato sang the title role of Cendrillon at the Royal Opera in 2011. “Her performance was thoroughly enchanting.” Now, for the first time ever, The Met: Live in HD brings DiDonato’s amazing performance to audiences nationwide. She is paired with mezzo-soprano Alice Coote in the trouser role of Prince Charming, Kathleen Kim as the Fairy Godmother, and Stephanie Blythe as the imperious Madame de la Haltière. Charles Perrault’s 1698 fairy tale, the classic telling of the Cinderella story, is an excellent source for an opera—providing color, romance, and relatable themes for audiences of all ages. The work includes many moments in which Massenet is at his best and most widely accessible, from the pageantry and glowing musical nostalgia for the French baroque in the court scenes to the otherworldliness of the love music to the wit and humor that permeate the work as a whole. Showing Saturday at 12:55 p.m. at the East Ridge 18 and Hamilton Place 8 theaters. — Michael Thomas

Mining Nostalgia For Profit What's old is new again, as always, in Hollywood By John DeVore Pulse Film Editor

Even now, our prime time television is lousy with new versions of old hits like Roseanne, One Day at a Time, Will and Grace, and The X-Files.”

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W

HEN IT COMES TO HOLLYWOOD, IF YOU WAIT long enough for something, it will eventually happen. Everything has an audience somewhere. You can guarantee that in some small corner of the internet, there’s a hardcore fan base for Breakin’ 2: Electric Boogaloo, just waiting for their chance to crowdfund a Breakin’ 3: TBD.

It’s just part of the culture of nostalgia that permeates our society. When a piece of pop culture impacted your life at a young age, it’s easy to wish for that experience again. It seems like every popular movie or show from my childhood has gotten an update in recent years: ThunderCats, He-Man, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Star Wars, etc. The success of these franchises has run the gamete of com-

plete failure to fair-to-middling to wildly popular, often based on the strength of the original material. Even now, our prime time television is lousy with new versions of old hits like Roseanne, One Day at a Time, Will and Grace, and The X-Files. Movie and television shows won’t take a chance on new material because there’s too much money to be collected off the nostalgia of things that were once passé. This week in nostalgia program-


✴ NEW IN THEATERS ✴

ming is Super Troopers 2, the sequel to a seventeen-year-old cult comedy by comedy troupe Broken Lizard. The film is a stale rehash of a movie that worked in 2001 but feels a bit dated now. It’s not any worse than any other Hollywood retread, however. Super Troopers, and Broken Lizard, might be easily forgettable. The original film was only popular with a certain demographic—young, white pot enthusiasts. The film wasn’t especially notable, but got by simply on the likability of the cast. I always had the impression that the writing was solid, but the delivery could have been handled a bit better by a stronger cast. The timing always felt slightly off. The same can be said for subsequent Broken Lizard Films (save Club Dread, which was vastly underrated and overshadowed by Super Troopers). Revisiting the Super Troopers property seventeen years later feels like vanity. The project was crowdfunded initially, raising $2 million dollars in seed money in 24 hours. The demand, it seems, was there. But it doesn’t seem like the Broken Lizard fellas were up to the task. Much of the film features call backs to old jokes in the first, and the new jokes are lazy and Canadian. That’s because the film moves locations slightly, from northern Vermont to southern Canada.

Movie and television shows won’t take a chance on new material because there’s too much money to be collected off the nostalgia of things that were once passé.” The plot of the film involves a border dispute between the U.S. and Canada, ending in the annexation of a Canadian town. The Highway Patrol Boys are back in uniform after having been fired for a ride along incident involving Fred Savage. They are tasked with patrolling the new area, causing them to have run-ins with Mounties, apologetic Canadians, and the French language. It all feels stale and silly, with jokes we’ve all heard and rolled our eyes at before. And yet, by the end of the film, the cast again wins over the audience. The Broken Lizard gang is too charming to be kept down. There’s enough in the film to elicit a few chuckles and smiles—nothing gut busting, but effective and entertaining. The film feels like a long comedy sketch that wears out its welcome, but pulls you back in with a can-do attitude and an unwillingness to give Avengers: Infinity War Not sure how this movie slipped under the radar, but apparently The Avengers and their allies must be willing to sacrifice all in an attempt to defeat the powerful Thanos before his blitz of devastation and ruin puts an end to the universe. Directors: Anthony & Joe Russo Stars: Pretty much everyone in Hollywood (and then some)

up. The characters aren’t going to quit smiling and, by sheer force of will, they keep the audience in their grasp for most of the movie. It’s infuriating and inviting all at the same time. Still, Super Troopers 2 has a similar effect to paying a lot of money for tickets to see your favorite band, only to watch them put your favorite song into the middle of a medley. You’re happy to hear the chorus but resentful when they move on. You can’t help but feel cheated. I can’t recommend seeing Super Troopers 2 in theaters—it’s just not worth the price of admission. Chances are, however, it’ll be streaming somewhere soon. The film is worth a Saturday afternoon on the couch, especially if you can take a nap during the slow parts. You can wake up whenever, assured in the fact that you didn’t miss anything important at all. Kings What do you do when you are opening against a huge Marvel movie? You tell the real-life story of the life of a foster family in South Central Los Angeles, a few weeks before the city erupts in violence following the verdict of the Rodney King trial. Director: Deniz Gamze Ergüven Stars: Halle Berry, Daniel Craig, Lamar Johnson, Kaalan Walker CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • APRIL 26, 2018 • THE PULSE • 15


THE MUSIC SCENE

Art & Music Join Together It's the Sankofa International Music and Arts Festival By Ernie Paik, Pulse contributor

“S

ANKOFA, A WORD FROM THE Akan tribe of Ghana in West Africa, means ‘go back to your roots’ or ‘go and retrieve from your past’,” said percussionist and dancer Kofi Mawuko. “I grew up with this symbol.” The symbol for sankofa is rich with meaning; it’s a bird that has its head turned backwards—looking at the past—while it holds in its beak an egg, representing something to be treasured that can foster progress, growth and life. In a broader sense, sankofa can be interpreted as not leaving anything behind and promoting openness, and it’s a word that Mawuko has appropriately adopted for the Sankofa International Music and Arts Festival (SIMAFEST), a free event that will take place at Miller Plaza this Saturday starting at 1:30 p.m. “I grew up in a multi-culture community in Accra, Ghana,” said Mawuko. “Although we are all Ghanaians, we are from different tribes of language, food, clothing, music and dance.” “This has opened me up to be an open-minded person, to accept diversity as an important way of learning and appreciating others as human as I am,” said Mawuko, who explained that this multi-cultural upbringing was a way of life. As a child in Ghana, Mawuko learned traditional African drumming and dance, and before he was even

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a teenager, he was a master drummer for an international touring company. After moving to the U.S.A. in 1989, Mawuko settled in Chattanooga nine years later and began to work at the Creative Discovery Museum and teach drumming within the school system and elsewhere. SIMAFEST grew out of an idea Mawuko originally had to celebrate the release of the new CD from his band Ogya, but he realized that it could be a much bigger event. “I had a second thought to open it to an International Festival,” said Mawuko. “Chattanooga and its surrounding areas have beautiful, diverse cultures from around the world.” International sounds and local fla-

vors are both represented at SIMAFEST with 13 different acts plus an open drum circle which begins the all-day event. Acts include Esmond, playing Trinidad steel pan (a/k/a. steel drum) music, the duo Crazy Flute which performs material based on traditional Native American songs, The Divine Poetess (Denise Adeniyi) and the Frequency, and the roots-rock/worldbeat


Diversity with an open mind can bring us all together for peace in our communities and around the world,” said Mawuko. outfit Lumbar 5. The quartet Sistren features a trio of women who harmonize on vocals, and jazz pianist Robert Crabtree will perform with his trio; the Ringgold outfit R.A. and the Flames concentrates on blues and funk. Mawuko has been a dancer his whole life, having formerly been a lead dancer for the West Africa-based international touring company Kyirem Cultural Troupe and a dance instructor in London. And with that in mind, he has programmed SIMAFEST with ample dance showcases, including Emerald Hips Bellydance, Mexican dancer Fernando Guadarrama, and Mawre & Co., an African dance group founded by Mawuko with his wife Rebekah. SIMAFEST also has a focus on education, with performances from the East Lake Expression Engine and dance students from the Center for Creative Arts. Mawuko’s group Ogya (pronounced “oh jah”) takes its name from the word for “fire” in the Ewe language spoken in Ghana, and it closes out SIMAFEST with a 10:30 p.m. performance.

The dance-inducing band Ogya is no newcomer to festivals, having played Bonnaroo several times along with a number of other festivals, and it features an assortment of genres, from Afrobeat rhythms to a reggae swagger to funk or even hints of jazz; its dominant theme of togetherness, a natural match with their diverse amalgam of musical styles, is a simple, yet effective one. Mawuko formed Ogya after seeing an opportunity to fill a void and expose people to different cultures and learning experiences, and SIMAFEST can be seen an extension of that devotion. “What I want people to get out of the Sankofa International Music and Arts Festival is that diversity with an open mind can bring us all together for peace in our communities and around the world,” said Mawuko. For curious and open-minded listeners, SIMAFEST is an opportunity to absorb the sometimes overlooked cultural variety that the region has to offer in music and dance; it’s about facing the future, understanding the past and accepting the treasures that one is offered.

Pairing Hops & Opera When was the last time you cracked open a cold beer and turned on some opera? For many people, this combination seems unusual, but at Hops & Opera—“a Chattanooga-born concert style mixing classical singing with locally-brewed craft beer” —this is exactly what you’ll get, and you might be surprised at how well they pair. Hops & Opera is now in its eighth installment since its 2009 debut, and this Saturday’s show will feature singers from local male ensemble Voci Virili along with beer from the Tap House, located in St. Elmo. This uniquely Chattanoogan

experience will include solo arias from classic operas along with Broadway duets and show choruses. Come out and see (and taste and hear) for yourself how a local brew is the perfect match for an internationally acclaimed tune. Along with being a one-ofa-kind experience, the show is also a great deal for beer and music lovers alike. Each $15 ticket includes two free beers, and additional beers are available for $4. The show starts at 7:30 p.m. at the Barking Legs Theatre. Tickets are available at barkinglegs.org. — Adrienne Kaufmann

THU4.26

FRI4.27

SAT4.28

As the Crow Flies

Enruined, Age of Atrocity, The Levitical Task, Beneath The Surface

Heathen Sons

Former frontman for The Black Crowes Chris Robinson has songs he wants to sing, and here is your chance to hear them for yourself. 8:30 p.m. The Signal 1810 Chestnut St. thesignaltn.com

Bring earplugs. Trust us. Loud and in your face rock! 8 p.m. Music Box @ Ziggy’s 607 Cherokee Blvd. ziggysbarandgrill.net

Influenced by Tom Petty, Ryan Adams, Kings of Leon, etc., Heathen Sons is simply an "American" rock-n-roll band. 9 p.m. HiFi Clyde’s 122 W. Main St. clydesonmain.com

CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • APRIL 26, 2018 • THE PULSE • 17


LIVE MUSIC CALENDAR Emily Kate Boyd 9 p.m. Tremont Tavern 1203 Hixson Pike tremonttavern.com Mother Legacy 9:30 p.m. The Brew & Cue 5017 Rossville Blvd. facebook.com/thebrewandcue Rival 21 10 p.m. Bud’s Sports Bar 5751 Brainerd Rd. budssportsbar.com

SATURDAY4.28

The Main Squeeze

THURSDAY4.26 James Crumble Trio 6 p.m. St. John’s Meeting Place 1278 Market St. stjohnsrestaurant.com Country Connection Concert 6 p.m. Chattanooga Convention Center 1 Carter Plz. bethelbiblevillage.org Ryan Oyer 6:30 p.m. Westin Dorato Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Courtney Holder 6:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Toby Hewitt 7 p.m. Backstage Bar 29 Station St. backstagechattanooga.com Jesse James & Tim Neal 7:30 p.m. Mexi-Wing VII 5773 Brainerd Rd. mexi-wingchattanooga.com Symphonie Fantastique 7:30 p.m. Tivoli Theatre 709 Broad St. tivolichattanooga.com Keepin’ It Local 8 p.m. The Social 1110 Market St. publichousechattanooga.com

KlusterfunK Open Jam 8 p.m. Trip’s Tavern 4762 Hwy. 58 (423) 803-5686 As the Crow Flies 8:30 p.m. The Signal 1810 Chestnut St. thesignaltn.com The Main Squeeze 9 p.m. Songbirds South 41 Station St. songbirdsguitars.com Open Mic Night with Jonathan Wimpee 9 p.m. The Office @ City Cafe 901 Carter St. citycafemenu.com MPH, Dirty Deep 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. jjsbohemia.com

FRIDAY4.27 American Dream Concert 6 p.m. Engel Stadium 1130 E. 3rd St. riverbendfestival.com Scenic City Sound 6 p.m. Cambridge Square 9453 Bradmore Ln. cambridgesquaretn.com Cat Man Smothers 6 p.m. Slick’s Burgers

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309 E. Main St. facebook.com/slicksburger/ Erik Kirkendall 6:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com John Carroll 6:30 p.m. Westin Dorato Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Zech Dallas 6:30 p.m. Cadence Coffee Co. 11 E. 7th St. cadencecoffeeco.com Megan Howard 7 p.m. The Tap House 3800 St. Elmo Ave. taphousechatt.com The Brother and The Hayes 7 p.m. OddStory Brewing Company 336 E. MLK Blvd. oddstorybrewing.co An Evening with David Wilcox 7 p.m. Songbirds North 41 Station St. songbirdsguitars.com The Empress—Musical Tribute to Bessie Smith 7:30 p.m. Jazzanooga 401 E. MLK Blvd. jazzanooga.org Rick Rushing and The Blues Strangers 7:30 p.m. The Foundry 1201 Broad St.

chattanooganhotel.com Clutch, The Bronx Red Fang, Fireball Ministry 7:30 p.m. The Signal 1810 Chestnut St. thesignaltn.com Hive Theory, Rendezvous Brothers, Bronzi Blonde 8 p.m. The Spot 1800 E. Main St. facebook.com/1800EMain Callie Hopper 8 p.m. Puckett’s Restaurant 2 W. Aquarium Way puckettsgro.com Enruined, Age of Atrocity, The Levitical Task, Beneath the Surface 8 p.m. Music Box @ Ziggy’s 607 Cherokee Blvd. ziggysbarandgrill.net Denver Attaway & The Other Brothers 9 p.m. The Office @ City Cafe 901 Carter St. citycafemenu.com The Travelin’ Kline w/ Gavin Cooper 9 p.m. HiFi Clyde’s 122 W. Main St. clydesonmain.com Cosmic Charlie: A Tribute to the Grateful Dead 9 p.m. Songbirds South 41 Station St. songbirdsguitars.com

Gregg Erwin Band 11 a.m. Thunder Creek Harley Davidson 7720 Lee Hwy. thundercreekharley.com Sankofa International Music and Arts Festival 1:30 p.m. Miller Plaza 850 Market St. facebook.com/ogyaworldmusic Mike McDade 6:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Preston Ruffing 6:30 p.m. Westin Dorato Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com The Beaters 7 p.m. Songbirds North 41 Station St. songbirdsguitars.com Presley and Taylor 7 p.m. The Camp House 149 E. MLK Blvd. thecamphouse.com TCR feat. Heartstrings 7 p.m. Stone Cup Café 208 Frazier Ave. stonecupcafe.com Hops & Opera 7:30 p.m. Barking Legs Theatre 1307 Dodds Ave. barkinglegs.org Danimal 7:30 p.m.


The Foundry 1201 Broad St. chattanooganhotel.com An Evening with Uncle Lightnin’ 8 p.m. Moe’s Original BBQ 221 Market St. moesoriginalbbq.com Scott Bradlee’s Postmodern Jukebox 8 p.m. Tivoli Theatre 709 Broad St. tivolichattanooga.com Shawnessy Cargile 8 p.m. Puckett’s Restaurant 2 W. Aquarium Way puckettsgro.com Toby Hewitt & The Embellishers 8 p.m. The Casual Pint 5550 Hwy. 153 hixson.thecasualpint.com The Rough & Tumble 8 p.m. Charles & Myrtle’s Coffeehouse 105 McBrien Rd. christunity.org Troubadour Hunter Stone 8 p.m. Trip’s Tavern 4762 Hwy. 58 (423) 803-5686 Anderson East 9 p.m. Songbirds South 41 Station St. songbirdsguitars.com KlusterfunK 9 p.m. The Office @ City Cafe 901 Carter St. citycafemenu.com Heathen Sons 9 p.m. HiFi Clyde’s 122 W. Main St. clydesonmain.com Nosecone Prophets, The Breaks, The Breaknecks 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. jjsbohemia.com Rival 21 10 p.m. Bud’s Sports Bar 5751 Brainerd Rd. budssportsbar.com

Anderson East

SUNDAY4.29 Kyle Nachtigal 11 a.m. Flying Squirrel Bar 55 Johnson St. flyingsquirrelbar.com Lily Rose 1:30 p.m. Flying Squirrel Bar 55 Johnson St. flyingsquirrelbar.com Monthly Jazz Jam 3 p.m. Barking Legs Theatre 1307 Dodds Ave. barkinglegs.org Megan Howard 6:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Jeremy Camp 7 p.m. City Church of Chattanooga 7122 Lee Hwy. thecitychurch.cc Mathis & Martin 7 p.m. Backstage Bar 29 Station St. backstagechattanooga.com Maria Sable 8 p.m. Southside Social 1818 Chestnut St. thesouthsidesocial.com

MONDAY4.30 Jonathan Wimpee

6:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Monday Nite Big Band 7 p.m. The Coconut Room 6925 Shallowford Rd. thepalmsathamilton.com Open Air with Jessica Nunn 7:30 p.m. The Granfalloon 400 E. Main St. granfalloonchattanooga.com Very Open Mic ww 8 p.m. The Well 1800 Rossville Blvd. #8 wellonthesouthside.com Beach House 8:30 p.m. The Signal 1810 Chestnut St. thesignaltn.com Independants, Unsatisfied 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. jjsbohemia.com

TUESDAY5.1 Dustin Concannon 6:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Bill McCallie and In Cahoots 6:30 p.m. Southern Belle 201 Riverfront Pkwy. chattanoogariverboat.com

String Theory: Zorman, Hristova, Lee, O’Neill, Atapine, and Marica 6 p.m. The Hunter Museum of Art 10 Bluff View Rd. huntermuseum.org Danimal 7 p.m. Backstage Bar 29 Station St. backstagechattanooga.com Open Mic Jam Session 7 p.m. Crust Pizza 3211 Broad St. crustpizza.com Open Mic with Mike McDade 8 p.m. Tremont Tavern 1203 Hixson Pike tremonttavern.com Shakey’s Bad Knee 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. jjsbohemia.com

WEDNESDAY5.2 No Big Deal 6 p.m. SpringHill Suites 495 Riverfront Pkwy. springhillsuites.com John Carroll 6:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Alan Wyatt Quartet 7 p.m. Barking Legs Theatre

1307 Dodds Ave. barkinglegs.org Celtic Woman: Homecoming Tour 7 p.m. Tivoli Theatre 709 Broad St. tivolichattanooga.com Jesse James Jungkurth 7 p.m. Backstage Bar 29 Station St. backstagechattanooga.com Jazz In The Lounge 7 p.m. Barking Legs Theater 1307 Dodds Ave. barkinglegs.org Steve & Chris 7 p.m. Bud’s Sports Bar 5751 Brainerd Rd. budssportsbar.com Priscilla & Little Rickee 8 p.m. Las Margaritas 1101 Hixson Pike (423) 756-3332 Prime Cut Trio 9 p.m. The Palms at Hamilton 6925 Shallowford Rd. thepalmsathamilton.com Buckethead 8:30 p.m. The Signal 1810 Chestnut St. thesignaltn.com Map these locations on chattanoogapulse.com. Send event listings at least 10 days in advance to: calendar@chattanoogapulse.com

CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • APRIL 26, 2018 • THE PULSE • 19


ADAM BECKETT'S RECORD REVIEWS

New Music From $hoey, P8R

$hoey Four Two Three (houseshoey.bandcamp.com)

P8R Smile and Wave (peterporker.bandcamp.com)

C

Four Two Three by $hoey, released in early February, is a prime example of Chattanooga based artists joining forces to make first-rate music. The artist is a raw collaboration involving local artists Michael Da Vinci, Chris P, Jace, YGTUT, $hoey, and BbyMutha. The production on the tracks are phenomenal, and the raps compliment them perfectly. The songs all have a crisp sound that demonstrates the stance of Chattanooga, letting the listeners know that the four two three is not playing games in the music world. The state-

hattanooga’s music scene is in full stride. It is exponentially growing and each day it becomes progressively more potent. One thing that separates it from other music cities, is the fact that the artists do not seem to be in any kind of competition. Instead of pitting against one another, they push and feed off each other in a very positive way. It seems like there is a universal Chattanooga mindset from the artists that is on the wavelength of making stellar music. The Hip-Hop/Rap album

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ment album lets the rest of the country know that the Scenic City is united and heading that way. Each artist involved in this album has an individual style and presence, so the album is packed pull of diversity. The unique perspectives, and rhyme styles mix in a powerful way. The whole album is great, there is not a bad song on Four Two Three, but there are a few tracks that standout. “Hotbox”, “Juice”, “Moven Forward”, and “Summa Jam” all are premium examples of solid gold music. It is a glorious thing, when artists can set their egos aside and break out of the “I”, and “Me” mindset to collaborate with other artists for the sake of making relevant and powerful music. I hope to see more artists doing projects like this, and I certainly hope to see more music from this group in the future. Raw, potent music from the four two three, check it out Chattanooga, support local.

S

ome albums are so original and incredible that they are instant classics the minute that they are created, this is true in the case of P8R’s album release of his recent electronic dance music album Smile and Wave. What makes this album so special is the unique blend of sounds, and the artists ability to express himself through his music. It is one of a kind composition, and it is sounds amazing. EDM has so many subgenres, and while it does belong in the category, it is not your typical dance music album. Smile and Wave almost deserves its own style classification, perhaps it should be called something like futuristic eighties time warp. The tracks that make-up the album sound like a combination of 2020 relevant music, however, it also would not be out of place in 1983. P8R is a timeless artist that has some serious soul, and a sound that is seriously sole. It

is just a matter of time before the right person hears his music and takes him to the next level. I love how many different instruments blend in each track to grab a hold of the listener, and how the thought provoking samples that he uses in his music really penetrate ventricles. To completely feel the artists perspective, heart space, and to feel the message that he is trying to convey, it is recommended that it gets listened to by pushing play and hearing it in its entirety; start to finish. Some of the songs are upbeat and uplifting, while others are chill and ambient, it is a good mix of the two. There is not a bad track on the album, but, the standout tracks are “A Song For A Friend”, “Different People”, “Snow Angel”, “Tokyo Driftwood”, and “Hush”. People that need some new, and amazing music in their life should do their self a favor and go listen to this one of a kind, remarkable album by P8R from Bristol, Tennessee.


JONESIN' CROSSWORD

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Imagine you’re one of four porcupines caught in frigid weather. To keep warm, you all have the urge to huddle together and pool your body heat. But whenever you try to get close, you prick each other with your quills. The only solution to that problem is to move away from each other, even though it means you can’t quell your chill as well. This scenario was used by psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud as a parable for the human dilemma. We want to be intimate with each other, Freud said, but we hurt each other when we try. The oftchosen solution is to be partially intimate: not as close as we would like to be, but only as much as we can bear. Now everything I just said, Aries, is a preface for better news: In the coming weeks, neither your own quills nor those of the people you care about will be as sharp or as long as usual. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): The Simpsons is the longest-running American TV sitcom and animated series. But it had a rough start. In the fall of 1989, when producers staged a private pre-release screening of the first episode, they realized the animation was mediocre. They worked hard to redo it, replacing 70 percent of the original content. After that slow start, the process got easier and the results got better. When the program completes its thirtieth season in 2019, it will have aired 669 episodes. I don’t know if your own burgeoning project will ultimately have as enduring a presence, Taurus, but I’m pretty sure that, like The Simpsons, it will eventually become better than it is in the early going. Stick with it. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The coming weeks might be an interesting time to resurrect a frustrated dream you abandoned in a wasteland; or rescue and restore a moldering treasure you stopped taking care of a while back; or revive a faltering commitment you’ve been ignoring for reasons that aren’t very high-minded. Is there a secret joy you’ve been denying yourself without good cause? Renew your relationship with it. Is there a rough prize you received before you were ready to make smart use of it? Maybe you’re finally ready. Are you brave enough to dismantle a bad habit that hampers your self-mastery? I suspect you are. CANCER (June 21-July 22): The Hollywood film industry relies heavily on recycled ideas. In 2014, for example, only one of the ten top-grossing movies—Interstellar—was not a sequel, remake, reboot, or episode in a franchise. In the coming weeks and months, Cancerian, you’ll generate maximum health and wisdom for yourself by being more like Interstellar than like The Amazing Spider-Man

2, Transformers: Age of Extinction, X-Men: Days of Future Past, and the six other top-ten rehashes of 2014. Be original! LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Long ago, in the land we now call Italy, humans regarded Mars as the divine protector of fields. He was the fertility god who ripened the food crops. Farmers said prayers to him before planting seeds, asking for his blessings. But as the Roman Empire arose, and warriors began to outnumber farmers, the deity who once served as a kind benefactor evolved into a militant champion, even a fierce and belligerent conqueror. In accordance with current astrological omens, Leo, I encourage you to evolve in the opposite direction. Now is an excellent time to transmute aggressiveness and combativeness into fecundity and tenderness. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): You sometimes get superstitious when life is going well. You worry about growing overconfident. You’re afraid that if you enjoy yourself too much, you will anger the gods and jinx your good fortune. Is any of that noise clouding your mood these days? I hope not; it shouldn’t be. The truth, as I see it, is that your intuition is extrastrong and your decision-making is especially adroit. More luck than usual is flowing in your vicinity, and you have an enhanced knack for capitalizing on it. In my estimation, therefore, the coming weeks will be a favorable time to build up your hunger for vivid adventures and bring your fantasies at least one step closer to becoming concrete realities. Whisper the following to yourself as you drop off to sleep each night: “I will allow myself to think bigger and bolder than usual.” LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The bad news is that 60 percent of Nevada’s Lake Mead has dried up. The good news—at least for historians, tourists, and hikers—is that the Old West town of St. Thomas has re-emerged. It had sunk beneath the water in 1936, when the government built the dam that created the lake. But as the lake has shrunk in recent years, old buildings and roads have reappeared. I foresee a comparable resurfacing in your life, Libra: the return of a lost resource or vanished possibility or departed influence. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): I hope the next seven weeks will be a time of renaissance for your most engaging alliances. The astrological omens suggest it can be. Would you like to take advantage of this cosmic invitation? If so, try the following strategies. 1. Arrange for you and each of your close companions to relive the time when you first met. Recall and revitalize the dispensation that originally brought you to-

gether. 2. Talk about the influences you’ve had on each other and the ways your relationship has evolved. 3. Fantasize about the inspirations and help you’d like to offer each other in the future. 4. Brainstorm about the benefits your connection has provided and will provide for the rest of the world. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Now is one of the rare times when you should be alert for the potential downsides of blessings that usually sustain you. Even the best things in life could require adjustments. Even your most enlightened attitudes and mature beliefs may have pockets of ignorance. So don’t be a prisoner of your own success or a slave of good habits. Your ability to adjust and make corrections will be key to the most interesting kind of progress you can achieve in the coming weeks. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Capricorn author Simone de Beauvoir was a French feminist and activist. In her book A Transatlantic Love Affair, she made a surprising confession: Thanks to the assistance of a new lover, Nelson Algren, she finally had her first orgasm at age 39. Better late than never, right? I suspect that you, too, are currently a good candidate to be transported to a higher octave of pleasure. Even if you’re an old pro at sexual climax, there may be a new level of bliss awaiting you in some other way. Ask for it! Seek it out! Solicit it! AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Can you afford to hire someone to do your busy work for a while? If so, do it. If not, see if you can avoid the busy work for a while. In my astrological opinion, you need to deepen and refine your skills at lounging around and doing nothing. The cosmic omens strongly and loudly and energetically suggest that you should be soft and quiet and placid. It’s time for you to recharge your psychospiritual batteries as you dream up new approaches to making love, making money, and making sweet nonsense. Please say a demure “no, thanks” to the strident demands of the status quo, my dear. Trust the stars in your own eyes. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): I believe it’s a favorable time for you to add a new mentor to your entourage. If you don’t have a mentor, go exploring until you find one. In the next five weeks, you might even consider mustering a host of fresh teachers, guides, trainers, coaches, and initiators. My reading of the astrological omens suggests that you’re primed to learn twice as much and twice as fast about every subject that will be important for you during the next two years. Your future educational needs require your full attention.

“Elements of Surprise”—it’s all on the table. ACROSS 1 Field official 4 Ensembles 9 Tarzan creator ___ Rice Burroughs 14 NASDAQ newcomer 15 “Gone With the Wind” surname 16 “___ Doone” (1869 historical novel) 17 Phobic of element #4? 20 Transition 21 ___-majesté 22 “Rent” heroine 23 State trees of North Dakota and Massachusetts 25 Feel bad 27 Sign for Daniel Radcliffe and Chris Hemsworth 28 Giant legend Mel 30 Shortened aliases 33 Paddle 35 “Element #33? That’s unlikely!”? 40 “Today” coanchor Hoda 41 Kennel noise 42 Call

44 The odds that it’s element #102? 49 Genre for the Specials 50 Currency in Colombia 51 Hawaiian instrument, for short 52 “Fear the Walking Dead” network 55 Joule fraction 57 “Lucky Jim” author Kingsley 59 Crucifix symbol 61 ‘80s-’90s cars 64 From Bhutan or Brunei 67 Element #53 knew what was up? 70 Concert venue 71 Bring together 72 Barinholtz of “The Mindy Project” 73 Satchel Paige’s real first name 74 Magnet ends 75 “On the Road” narrator Paradise DOWN 1 Barbecue specialty 2 Olympic dueling

weapon 3 Doesn’t remember, as with a task 4 Gary of “Diff’rent Strokes” 5 Minor league rink org. 6 Cruise 7 Answer that won’t get you an F? 8 “The Metamorphosis” character Gregor 9 One of the main players in “Gauntlet” 10 School housing 11 Quest object in a Monty Python movie 12 “Dragon Ball Z” genre 13 Part of NPR 18 Brynner of the original “Westworld” 19 List appearing once each in a supervocalic 24 Hit the slopes 26 Statute 28 Bourbon barrel wood 29 1980s Disney film 31 Smoothie berry

32 Dessert bar option 34 Rapper Flo ___ 36 Recedes 37 “For the life ___ ...” 38 It may require antibiotics to treat 39 Break in illegally 43 Author Harper 45 ___ out a profit 46 Fast-food drink size 47 Civil War side, for short 48 Tributes 52 Standard Windows sans serif typeface 53 He played 007 seven times 54 Computer programmer 56 Arise 58 “... or thereabouts” 60 “The Flintstones” pet 62 “That’s a shame!” 63 Garden material 65 “___ silly question ...” 66 Christmas song 68 Dissenting vote 69 Salt Lake City collegian

Copyright © 2018 Jonesin’ Crosswords. For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents perminute. Must be 18+ to call. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle No. 881 CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • APRIL 26, 2018 • THE PULSE • 21


FOOD & DRINK · SUSHI & BISCUITS

Diving Deep Into Thai Cuisine Our world-traveling chef explores the many varieties of Thailand's laap

“I Mike McJunkin Pulse columnist

There are several varieties, but all laap starts with some sort of minced meat, to which a variety of flavoring ingredients and seasonings are added, depending on the region and type of laap being made.” Mike McJunkin is a native Chattanoogan currently living abroad who has trained chefs, owned and operated restaurants. Join him on Facebook at facebook.com/SushiAndBiscuits

S THIS BLOOD? I DON’T THINK this is what I ordered.” When I first moved to Northern Thailand, I spent the first few months eating everything in sight. I didn’t just want to taste these foods, I wanted to study, cook, and immerse myself in the history and culture that surrounded the ingredients, techniques, and flavors of this spectacular cuisine. During the first few months there were stunningly delicious surprises, ballretractingly terrifying surprises, and a few dishes that challenged food norms I have unquestionably held my entire life—laap is one of those dishes. If you’re a fan of Thai food (and who isn’t a fan of Thai food?) then you’ve probably at least heard of laap. There are several varieties, but all laap starts with some sort of minced meat, to which a variety of flavoring ingredients and seasonings are added, depending on the region and type of laap being made. The two main styles of laap are Lanna, from Northern Thailand and Isan, originating in Northeastern Thailand. The most common style of laap served in American Thai restaurants is Isan— a spicy, citrusy, herby, meat salad made with cooked ground meat (usually pork), chilies, fish sauce, palm sugar, herbs, and toasted rice powder—traditionally served with sticky rice and raw vegetables. When done right, it’s a spectacular face full of flavors that I absolutely love. Not long after we arrived in Chiang Mai, I went out for lunch at a well-known restaurant famous for its laap and confidently pointed at a faded photo on the wall of what I thought was the Isan laap that I loved. Little did I know I had landed square in the middle of Lanna laap country.

22 • THE PULSE • APRIL 26, 2018 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

Within minutes I heard the steady rhythm of knives furiously chopping—a sure sign something delicious was on its way. I peeked around the corner into the postagestamp sized kitchen and saw what looked like an Eli Roth nightmare sequence. The cutting board was covered in finely chopped raw meat, pieces of what looked like kidney, intestines, and fat were piled at the edges of the board and a tiny Thai auntie gave me a friendly smile as she spooned a bit of blood from a large metal bowl onto the chopped, raw meat, followed by a spoonful of green liquid from a small jar that I would later learn was bile. I returned to my seat and began to contemplate my life while my brain frantically sent every escape signal in its arsenal to my feet. I somehow resisted my amygdala’s insistence that I flee immediately as this sweet Thai auntie confidently placed a plate of bloody horror nightmare bits in front of me with a proud smile. Growing up, the idea of eating blood was not just taboo, it was seen as a horrifying, unhealthy, even disturbing concept relegated to National Geographic documentaries and R-rated horror movies. Later in life, I learned that blood is commonly used in many cuisines and deep-end ingredients such as blood tofu and blood broth that are also commonplace here in Northern Thailand. That knowledge, however, did little to blunt the shock of having this crimson-red carnage show up on my plate with virtually no warning. I took my first bite—a spoonful of raw

meat, intestine, a chunk of mystery organ, and a little of the blood gravy— as nonchalantly as possible and was shocked at how good it was. Lanna laap doesn’t adhere to the traditional Thai formula of salty, sour, sweet, and spicy. Instead, those bits of raw meat, cooked offal, and fat were coated in a rich, bloody, gravy-like sauce flavored with cumin, cloves, coriander, cardamom, long pepper, star anise, prickly ash (related to Sichuan peppercorns) and cinnamon. She tossed a handful of fresh herbs in at the last minute and sprinkled crispy fried onions on top for some much needed crunch. The raw meat was surprisingly tender; the overall flavor was herbaceous and moderately spicy with a little bit of a bitter finish. The brightness of the fresh mint, coriander, basil and spring onion was a much needed foil to the richness of the blood and offal, while the diversity of spices added to the complexity of this brain-copulation of a dish. Did I eat it all? No. Did I enjoy it? To a degree, but more than just having an unexpectedly gruesome meal, this was a palette expanding moment that moved blood from the “get that away from me” column into the “this could work” column. Stop cringing and just try it!


CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • APRIL 26, 2018 • THE PULSE • 23


The Pulse 15.17 » April 26, 2018  

Chattanooga's Weekly Alternative

The Pulse 15.17 » April 26, 2018  

Chattanooga's Weekly Alternative