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VOL. 16, ISSUE 7 • FEBRUARY 14, 2019

Searching For The Flower Man Sandy Bell has passed on, but his spirit remains with us all CHATTANOOGA'S WEEKLY ALTERNATIVE • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM


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FROM THE EDITOR VOLUME 16, ISSUE 7 • FEBRUARY 14, 2019

BREWER MEDIA GROUP Publisher James Brewer, Sr. FOUNDED 2003 BY ZACHARY COOPER & MICHAEL KULL

EDITORIAL Managing Editor Gary Poole gary@chattanoogapulse.com Assistant Editor Jenn Webster City Editor Alex Curry Music Editor Marc T. Michael Film Editor John DeVore Contributors Rob Brezsny • Matt Jones Sandra Kurtz • Cody Maxwell Ernie Paik • Rick Pimental-Habib Alex Teach • Michael Thomas Brandon Watson • Addie Whitlow Editorial Intern Jason Dale Cartoonists Jen Sorenson • Tom Tomorrow Cover Illustration Jake Eaves Courtesy The Southside Social

ADVERTISING Director of Sales Mike Baskin mike@brewermediagroup.com Account Executives Rick Leavell • Cindee McBride Libby Phillips • John Rodriguez

CONTACT Offices 1305 Carter St. Chattanooga, TN 37402 Phone 423.265.9494 Email info@chattanoogapulse.com Website chattanoogapulse.com Facebook @chattanoogapulse THE FINE PRINT: The Pulse is published weekly by Brewer Media and is distributed throughout the city of Chattanooga and surrounding communities. The Pulse covers a broad range of topics concentrating on music, the arts, entertainment, culture and local news. The Pulse is available free of charge, limited to one copy per reader. No person without written permission from the publisher may take more than one copy per weekly issue. The Pulse may be distributed only by authorized distributors. Contents Copyright © 2019 by Brewer Media. All rights reserved.

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Searching For The Flower Man ‘Tis the season of love, of boxed chocolates and red wine. Single little roses and lipstick kisses. The Bluff View Art District is the romantic heart of Chattanooga, they say, and last Sunday I walked around up there.

BREWS TO LINGER OVER

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WISDOM AND SOUL

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In Chattanooga’s rapidly developing downtown, the only certainty is that something new will appear out of thin air seemingly every time you blink.

I’d like to tell you I was a fan of Camper Van Beethoven in the eighties. I’d like to, but I can’t. My musical tastes then were dictated entirely by what was in easy grasp.

AIMING FOR THE FENCES

Life can be full of unexpected heartbreak, trials, and tribulations, but it’s often in these moments that we find happiness in the simple things.

PLASTIC BLOCKS GO META

Conventional wisdom espoused by film fans is that a sequel is never as good as the original. This rule has been challenged in recent years by several films, although the nature of filmmaking has changed quite a bit.

5 EDITOONS

16 MUSIC CALENDAR

19 JONESIN' CROSSWORD

7 SHADES OF GREEN

18 MUSIC REVIEWS

21 NEW IN THEATERS

19 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

22 GAME ON!

12 ARTS CALENDAR

CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • FEBRUARY 14, 2019 • THE PULSE • 3


CITY LIFE · BETWEEN THE BRIDGES

Brews To Linger Over

Cons ider This w ith Dr. Rick

WanderLinger Brewing Co. serves beer, board games, and a chill atmosphere By Alex Curry Pulse City Editor

“It isn’t where you come from; it’s where you’re going that counts.” — Ella Fitzgerald In this harrowingly divisive moment in history, where are we going? Certainly, we all want reconciliation, harmony and to bring our best selves forward. The following strong, black women have something to say about that. “If you don’t like something, change it. If you can’t change it, change your attitude.” — Maya Angelou “Every time you state what you want or believe, you’re the first to hear it. It’s a message to both you and others about what you think is possible. Don’t put a ceiling on yourself.” — Oprah Winfrey “You can’t make decisions based on fear and the possibility of what might happen.” — Michelle Obama “Every great dream begins with a dreamer. Always remember, you have within you the strength, the patience, and the passion to reach for the stars to change the world.” — Harriet Tubman

Mike proved early on that he was really talented. He brewed in his home for ten years, perfecting his craft and growing in Chattanooga’s local homebrewing community.”

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I

N CHATTANOOGA’S RAPIDLY DEVELOPING DOWNtown, the only certainty is that something new will appear out of thin air seemingly every time you blink. The good thing, unlike in a lot of cities, is that many of these newcomers are really exciting and fantastic. WanderLinger Brewing Company is one of the city’s newest gems, a combination brewery taproom, music venue, and art gallery. Increased competition has raised the stakes of what it takes to be successful, and WanderLinger is more than ready to step up to the plate and knock the ball out of the park. Mike Dial, like so many others, began as an amateur home brewer whose hobby steadily took up more of both his time and his garage space. The difference about Mike? He proved early on that he was really talented. He brewed in his home for ten years, perfecting his craft and growing in Chattanooga’s local homebrewing community. He joined the Barley Mob, a club for brewers in

Chattanooga. “He was surrounded with encouragement, wisdom, and the means to continue to improve his craft,” said his brother and business partner Chris Dial. Mike began entering and winning competitions. These successes led to exponential growth in Mike's ideals and confidence in his abilities. Four years ago, the two brothers began to have serious discussions about opening a brewery. Chattanooga was in the midst of a wonderful growth spurt that left plenty of room to support a new brewery, and it was time to start developing the idea into a reality. Mike and Chris knew they possessed the talent to make it happen. All they had to do


EDITOONS

was the leg work. They signed a lease at King Street Station in 2016, but major remodeling delays pushed their project back for more than two years. What may have proven detrimental to other, less determined entrepreneurs never deterred the Dial brothers from chasing their dreams of owning their own business. They are thrilled to now be serving the beers that they love in a comfortable, communal space. Mike and Chris retain a strong focus on their family. They hired Jarrod Szydlowski as their assistant brewer and have drawn on their sister Andrea Watson’s accounting skills for their bookkeeping. They have garnered financial support and physical help from other family members all around the country. They are proud to call WanderLinger a family business. “WanderLinger as a name came about from Mike and his wife Mandy being avid backpackers and hikers. What do you do in the woods? Wander and Linger!” said Chris, who deals with the administration side of the brewery. He does it all, everything from marketing to sales, management, and social media.

Their great love of the outdoors spills over into their brews. Names such as Appalachian Alt, Mt. Sterling Pilsner, Hillwalker IPA, and King Salamander Stout mingle with their tap handle and brewery designs. Tennessee’s state tree, the tulip poplar, sits proudly as part of their logo. WanderLinger is open Tuesday through Thursday from 4 p.m. to 10 p.m., Friday and Saturday from noon to midnight, and Sunday from 2 p.m. to 10 p.m. WanderLinger is a petfriendly environment, so Francois the French Bulldog is always welcome. It’s also a family-friendly hangout until 8 p.m., with plenty of board games. A food truck is typically out front to fill hungry bellies and guests are welcome to bring food. The walls host a rotating collection of pieces from Chattanooga’s artists, which invokes a sense of pride in Chattanooga’s artistic community. Live music is presented almost constantly. Despite the name, I don’t think WanderLinger will be wandering anywhere. I think they are here to linger for the long haul. CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • FEBRUARY 14, 2019 • THE PULSE • 5


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COLUMN · SHADES OF GREEN

Electric Vehicle Evangelism Need some reasons why you should try an electric vehicle?

S Sandra Kurtz

Pulse columnist

[Electric vehicles] do away with giant amounts of greenhouse gas emissions that come from the transportation sector of the economy.”

Sandra Kurtz is an environmental community activist, chair of the South Chickamauga Creek Greenway Alliance, and is presently working through the Urban Century Institute. You can visit her website to learn more at enviroedu.netw

TEP ON BRAKE. PUSH STARTER button. Press pedal. Quietly move to your destination with zero emissions and little expense. Help reduce climate change impacts, improve public health, and spur new jobs. It’s an electric vehicle. What’s not to like? Talk about improving the local economy…Volkswagen (VW) is promising 1,000 jobs here in Chattanooga to build their electric vehicles! Today one can purchase an electric vehicle (EV) made by Tesla, Chevy, Ford, Kia, and others. In fact, today more than three million electric vehicles are on roads around the world. In 2018, reports say U.S. sales numbered 361,307, up 81 percent over 2017. China leads in sales, but the rest of the world is starting to catch up. VW is jumping on this fast-moving train—er, highway. They expect to sell 150,000 EVs worldwide by 2020. The first VW Chattanooga EV, a Crossover, will roll off the production line in 2022. Perhaps VW will be atoning for their sin of rigged diesel emission testing evasion by producing cars with no emissions. In 2011 Bill and Sue Reynolds purchased their first Leaf electric vehicle. Since then they have replaced it twice and now drive a 2018 model. “We love the quietness; we love the instant get up and go—it really zips,” Bill says. “And there’s no oil change.” When the Reynolds’ Leaf was recently taken in for a 3,500-mile maintenance check, they just rotated the tires. After all, there are few moving parts. There’s no transmission, engine block, pistons, valves, valve guides, engine oil pump, exhaust pipes, exhaust gas re-circulation pump, catalytic converter, muffler, starter, or alternator. There’s no reason for gas emissions testing. We certainly appreciate VW’s decision to provide jobs for our area, but most importantly, from a sustainable point of

view, electric vehicles make a wonderful contribution to meeting climate change targets. They do away with giant amounts of greenhouse gas emissions that come from the transportation sector of the economy. There is argument about how much of an improvement there might be, but that’s because presently fossil fuels pollute while making electricity for each vehicle. Even then, reduced street-level pollution from gas-powered cars means respiratory health improves. A report released by Environment Ohio says adding more electric vehicles to the road would be equivalent to taking 78,000 carbon-emitting trucks and cars off the road by 2025. If we can further decarbonize electricity generation with, say, solar and wind power, we would be much further along in slowing or eliminating climate change impacts. As industry transitions to more electric vehicles it will likely bring some governmental policies supporting advanced information technology and battery research. Would you believe there could be a future ban on the sale of gas vehicles? In fact, the Hainan Province in China has proposed a ban on such sales and has set a goal of 100 percent new energy vehicles across the island by 2030. By now, dear reader, you may have thought of those electric vehicle drawbacks that keep you from a purchase despite all the benefits. What about small range between charges, battery life, and a too-high purchase cost? You will be pleased to know that the range will increase soon, likely to 400

miles. Presently the Chevy Bolt comes in at 238 miles between charges (albeit less for other brands). Daily charging easily meets needs for most and with more charging stations available, a 30-minute stop while traveling further will get you there. Batteries last 8–10 years. Presently most companies offer eight-year warranties. Replacements are expensive, but still the car is cheaper to run overall. VW has not yet determined the Chattanooga EV cost, but it may be around $35,000. However, Forbes says EVs are cheaper over time due to maintenance and electricity costs being cheaper than gas for operation. A quick check of car ads also shows that there are used EVs on the market in the $10,000–$15,000 range. By the way, electric plug-in car purchasers may be eligible for a federal or state tax credit. There is one other way you can save operational money for your EV and help the environment, too: install a solar unit in your house to use for carbon-free home charging or buy into EPB’s Solar Share. Or imagine yourself driving a car clad with solar panels! Prototypes do exist. Aside from riding a bike, an EV is a great deal cost-wise and environmentally…even if you have to replace windshield wipers!

CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • FEBRUARY 14, 2019 • THE PULSE • 7


COVER STORY

Searching For The Flower Man Sandy Bell has passed on, but his spirit remains with us all

‘T

IS THE SEASON OF LOVE, OF BOXED CHOCOLATES and red wine. Single little roses and lipstick kisses. The Bluff View Art District is the romantic heart of Chattanooga, they say, and last Sunday I walked around up there. By Cody Maxwell Pulse contributor

I followed the little cobblestone paths around crooked little corners. The paths are all perfectly made up there. It was all as happy as it could be. Hidden away was a splashing rock pond with little frogs around its edge. They spit water out of their green mouths. Painted tiles around the pond showed peasants working in fields—a man spilling a bag of seed onto the ground and a woman riding a mule. Someone made wishes and dropped coins in the water there. Down old alleys bakers baked behind steamy windows. They rolled and kneaded their breads on floury tables. A slow barge bellowed far off and pushed its load upstream. Everything smelled like roasting coffee, cinnamon breads and the river. There’s a small art gallery up there. It was cold and nearly raining so I pulled open that heavy door. I mostly regretted it when I went inside. I had no money and was afraid to touch anything. I put my hands in my pocket and looked around anyway. Near the counter just inside the door a girl was pointing a young man towards a glass case full of silver jewelry. It’s all handmade, she said. The young man leaned close. He pointed toward a small locket on a silver chain. I went closer to see. The picture in the locket was of a Raphaelite angel in robes playing on an old violin. A dark blue night sky with big stars was all around her. The angel had

bright red hair. White angel wings were behind her and a strange tree grew far off in the distance. The locket looked heavy and was encased in old silver. The girl smiled at the young man through the side of her eyes and took the locket out of the case. But the young man frowned and laughed at her at the same time and said, No, the one beside it. He looked over at me and I left. I walked around the corner to Rembrandt’s and sat at a table in the courtyard there. The day was going by. Towards evening I heard Billie Holiday singing inside the cafe. Her smoky voice rolled out every time someone opened the doors. Behind the windows people drank from cups and laughed at each other. A pretty dark-haired girl in a long coat walked past through the courtyard. She smelled like oranges and rain when she went by. Then the young man from the art gallery came out of the cafe door towards her and she smiled. He pulled the girl close and looked quickly back at me sitting alone, smirking as the old wooden cafe doors closed behind them. A small brown bird flew out of the bushes, snatched a breadcrumb from the ground near my feet then skittered away back into the leaves. I left the courtyard and walked to the street. The boy should have bought the locket, I thought. But those people didn’t really matter. I was looking for some sign of Sandy Bell and only noticed these people because he wasn’t there. Walking back down Vine Street from the art district I passed the ruins of the

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old Stone Lion. I remember seeing Sandy there one Valentine’s Day a long time ago. He was out on the porch and I had been there all night with an old girlfriend. I had just spent my last six dollars playing Tenth Avenue Freeze-Out on the jukebox as many times in a row as I could and nearly got in a fight over it. Some frisbee player got mad when I stood over him singing “Tenff! Tenff! Tenff! Tenff!” and the guy swung on me. Avery threw me out. My girl stayed at the bar. On my way down the sidewalk I heard Bruce’s piano and horn section start up again and Sandy said, “It’s a beautiful night.” And it was. Many years after my glory days at the Stone Lion the first story I ever wrote for this paper was a short piece about Sandy the Flower Man. A little while after that story ran I received an email from a girl named Angela

Tucker in Seattle. She had been given up for adoption when she was a baby and thought Sandy might be her father. She wondered if I would help her find him. That’s obviously not something you can say no to. A few months later, sitting on a concrete bench on the south end of Market Street with Angela and her family, Sandy came coasting up on his bicycle with the perpetual flowers in the handlebar basket. “Is that him?” someone asked, and I said yeah. That day father and daughter met for the first time. Sandy said it was a “pure miracle”. It felt like one and I soon felt out of place and left as quickly as I could. My old man told me later that he remembered Sandy from way back in his day. He dismissed the joy I said Sandy brought to people.


“He’s an old hustler,” my old man said. “He used to steal those flowers out of graveyards.” Hearing this my affection for Sandy the Flower Man was momentarily gone. Maybe he really was just another sidewalk shyster taking advantage of good-natured drunks spilling out of bars. But this notion didn’t last long. It could be true that Sandy began by stealing flowers from flower pots in front of tombstones. This sounds likely. But Sandy wasn’t just another panhandler. He didn’t beg. Yes, Sandy the Flower Man, with his bells and bared chest and black vests, the widebrimmed floppy hats and exclamations of “Oh my!” and “Enjoying this weather!”, was a hustler. He took sad flowers left to wilt in graveyards and through some weird alchemy turned them into star-lit joy and laughter for nearly everyone he peddled them to. You can call him a hustler. He hustled handfuls of flowers against who he was and where he came from and somehow he won. And now, as his daughter Angela said, just like that, he’s gone. The Flower Man has died. I wasn’t going to find him and there’s not much left to say. The mayor dedicated this Valentine’s Day to him. That was nice. Flower memorials sprang up, then disappeared. There’s talk of a statue of Sandy appearing somewhere. We’ll see how that goes. In the end, he’s just gone. Walking down the hill towards downtown everything became colder last Sunday. Chattanooga’s always sleepy on cold Sundays. Not too many people were out. And with Valentine’s Day here it occurred to me that I should probably do something other than looking for things I know I won’t find. I’ve turned into one of those fellas the young punks smirk at when they see me sitting alone somewhere. I take it to extremes and walk by myself through the rain sometimes. There were plenty of other things I should’ve been doing, especially with Valentine’s Day upon us. My old best buddy out in Apison

Sandy the Flower Man and his strange alchemy turned graveyard flowers into laughter. Everything good is made of such madness and magic.” keeps asking me to come see him. He’s one of those people that won’t leave home without a rebel flag displayed somewhere on his clothing. One of them we’re all supposed to hate and try to erase from our world now. I can’t do that. He’s my friend. I could never count the nights we spent riding around through the middle of nowhere with a twelve pack of beer and the radio as loud as it would go. But I can’t go out there again. We started drinking one day when we were fourteen years old and after about twenty years I needed a drink of water. He never stopped and he’s nearly dead now. I don’t want to see it. There’s the orange-haired Quaker girl who invited me to an hour of silent prayer at the Society of Friends meeting house over in Brainerd. I meant to go but found myself walking around downtown looking for Sandy Bell instead. We all have our own meditations. She gardens in her spare time. There’s something ethereal and harsh about the orange-haired girl. I can’t tell if she’s elevated far above the rest

of us or broken like everybody else. Probably both. But one of us is always too busy to find out for sure. There’s the sister of a childhood friend who calls me about three times a week. She was beautiful twenty-five years ago and has only gotten moreso since then. She’s been pregnant for two-and-a-half years, she says, but “high technology” is controlling her body. She hears voices that tell her something we can’t see is out to get her and her baby. I sat with her in the park the other day and she said that all these people that pass us by are not who they say they are. No one had spoken a word to us. I have to find someone to help me, she said, and lit a cigarette. I don’t know how to help her. All I know to do is to keep going. And the days go by and night comes and if you’re walking around this city all roads eventually lead you to the river, that old symbol of life. The river begins at the source and ends at the source, just like everything else. Science knows this. Faith does

too, though we’re not supposed to believe such things anymore. Still, if you stand by the edge of the river at night and look down in the little pools along the slow edges you will see a wavy reflection. It’s too unclear to be certain that it’s a reflection of yourself but you would be forgiven for believing so. And the city lights shine on the water way out there and the wind blows from everywhere. It all does something to you. If you ever go wandering rainy streets and end up standing next to the river alone you should remember that You are the result of a thousand loves, as they say, and laugh at any notion of being alone. Why should you laugh? Because you’re still here and you’d forgotten that you once knew this. Won’t someone think you’re a madman if they hear you laughing in the dark? Probably. For this you should laugh even louder. The poets say that when love is not madness it is not love, and what else are you supposed to do? The least you can do is skip rocks laughing by the river and wait for the universe to make you understand. Sandy the Flower Man and his strange alchemy turned graveyard flowers into laughter. Everything good is made of such madness and magic. This is the only thing that’s true. You’ll know it if you make yourself believe. It’s right there on the outside of everything you think you know. If you stand by the river, it’ll come to you from the source like some foghorn blowing way down around Moccasin Bend and float over the water smelling like old flowers and silver bells and the fog. It’ll sneak up behind you and tap you on your wet shoulder and whisper, “It’s a beautiful night.” Chattanooga resident Cody Maxwell is a longtime contributing writer for The Pulse and is the author of “Chattanooga Chronicles” and “16 Cantos”. Reach him at codymaxwell@live.com

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Aiming For The Fences Hardship and hope in 1950s Pittsburgh

The Life And Death Of Poe Edgar Allan Poe’s life and death were undoubtedly as melancholy as the works he wrote throughout his brief forty-year existence. These works and the characters contained within them help explain why Poe’s mind was as depressive as it was, but what if these characters could speak with the writer himself? That is the aim of “Poe’s Midnight Dreary”, a stage production assembled by Covenant College’s theatre department. The tragicomedy centers around Poe’s final days, depicting him wandering about disconsolately as he comes into contact with the very characters he created. Characters from “The Tell-Tale Heart”, “The Black Cat”, “The Raven” and more appear before Poe’s eyes, and what was once thought to be fiction for the late writer becomes his forlorn reality. These characters come in peace, though, beckoning Poe to reflect upon his life plagued by his own neurosis and disharmony. The play allows audiences to see how Poe’s internal suffering influenced the characters and stories that left a lasting impact on American literature. “Poe’s Midnight Dreary” will be performed February 15, 16, and 22 at 8 p.m. and February 23 at 2:30 p.m. at Sanderson Hall Auditorium in Lookout Mountain, Georgia. For more information and tickets, email boxoffice@covenant.edu or call (706) 419-1051. — Jason Dale

L

IFE CAN BE FULL OF UNEXPECTED HEARTBREAK, trials, and tribulations, but it’s often in these moments that we find happiness in the simple things. It’s the hard times that show us how important the good times are, and that encourage us to keep the ones we love as close as possible.

This is exactly how playwright August Wilson shows us the dynamics of one African American family in Pittsburgh in the ’50s. Through their hardships comes a deeper understanding of life and happiness. The Chattanooga Theatre Centre invites you to experience this heartfelt story on stage with their production of “Fences” beginning

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this Friday night at 8 p.m. The CTC’s production of “Fences” is directed by Ricardo Morris and tells the story of a former Negro league baseball star, Troy Maxson, and how his inability to go professional, based solely on his race in the pre-Civil Rights era, threatens to disrupt his entire life. Troy is forced to abandon his

dream of professional sports in order to provide for his family as a garbage man. When his youngest son Cory becomes active in football, Troy tries to dissuade him before he faces the same unfortunate reality his father did. In the midst of all this are Troy’s wife, Rose, who strives to be a peacekeeper, Troy’s goodnatured son Lyons from a previous marriage, Troy’s brother Gabriel who has returned from war with his own demons, and Troy’s best friend and mentor, Bono. The lead roles of Troy and Rose are played by Mateen Muhammad El and E’tienne Easley. Both have performed with the Theatre Cen-


tre before, but this show is special for them because they share so many similarities with the characters they’re portraying. Easley said she mothers close to 600 children at her job every day, and she strives to be the peacekeeper in her own family. “Everything is changing,” Easley explained of the “Fences” era. “We have backgrounds of sharecropping and farming and things, and we’re trying to move to a bigger city with bigger opportunities. And through that, there’s a lot of trials and tribulations and breakthroughs. And so, in each one of our lives, you’ll see the breakthroughs. You’ll see the secrets unveiled. You’ll see life as it was in the ‘50s for this particular family. There’s a lot of hurt, a lot of joy, and there’s a lot of love there. The reason why it resonates is because it’s the human connection; it’s feelings. You can connect to disappointment and hopes.” The show also deals with many issues that are relevant to today’s society. Gabriel, who comes back from the war with a metal plate in his head, is forced to deal with mental health issues. Easley and Muhammad El explained that mental health can often be ignored or treated as “hush hush,” especially in African American communities. “With me working in the mental health field for a couple of years, I’ve seen it,” Muhammad El explained.

The reason why it resonates is because it’s the human connection; it’s feelings. You can connect to disappointment and hopes.” “I’ve seen families take their children and put them in places where they don’t want people to know that they have them because they’re mentally ill. However, with my brother [Gabriel], I love my brother passionately, and my wife loves my brother passionately, but he wants to do his own thing. He has a different mindset. We gotta let him be free.” The cast of seven started rehearsals back on December 23rd, and they’ve all been extremely dedicated to their roles, especially during the holiday season. “Fences” is going to be the first show in the CTC’s pledge to complete the American Century Cycle, meaning they perform one of August Wilson’s plays every year for 10 years. Easley and Muhammad El explained that the set itself is designed to look like you’re sitting in the Maxson’s backyard and looking into their home and lives, in order to experience the full range of emotions with them. There will also be some interesting sound and light elements. “In the beginning, you can see that all the stuff is laid out on the table.

What the issues are, what the problems are, things of that nature,” Easley said. “But at the same time, you can make a person think, even though I know what’s going on, I can make a difference in how I choose to handle and embrace certain things.” “As it resonates today, based on where we come from, people of all nationalities, races, whatever it may be, are going to get the value of knowing what they had to go through from a standpoint, on a greater magnitude, by seeing us do it,” said Muhammad El. “And that’s what it really does; it gives you an awareness.” The CTC’s production of “Fences” opens Friday night at 8 p.m., and will be performed through March 3rd with both evening and Sunday matinee shows. Tickets are available online, over the phone, or at the Theatre Centre box office. If you’ve ever wanted a chance to experience both the good and bad emotions of one relatable family during a very trying time in history, then you definitely don’t want to miss “Fences” at the Theatre Centre.

THU2.14

FRI2.15

SAT2.16

“Love and Information”

Hairspray, The Musical

Romance at Ruby

This kaleidoscopic play of short scenes addresses issues about knowledge, technology, and our capacity for love. 7:30 p.m. Lindsay Street Hall 901 Lindsay St. 901lindsay.com

A timely message of equality, unity, and inclusion from a group of teenagers who dream of a better world. 7 p.m. Center for Creative Arts 1301 Dallas Rd. cca.hcde.org

Looking for something a bit different for the holiday? Head underground for a very special night of romance. 9 p.m. Ruby Falls 1720 S. Scenic Hwy. rubyfalls.com

CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • FEBRUARY 14, 2019 • THE PULSE • 11


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT CALENDAR 1800 Rossville Ave. (423) 843-1775 improvchattanooga.com

THURSDAY2.14 Urban Farmers Market and Marketplace 3 p.m. Miller Park 910 Market St. millerparkmarket.com Money School After Hours: Avoid the Cycle of Debt 5:30 p.m. Chattanooga Neighborhood Enterprise 1500 Chestnut St. (423) 756-6201 cneinc.org City Sweat 6 p.m. Waterhouse Pavilion 850 Market St. (423) 265-3700 millerparkplaza.com Dale Jones 7:30 p.m. The Comedy Catch 1400 Market St. (423) 629-2233 thecomedycatch.com “Love and Information” 7:30 p.m. Lindsay Street Hall 901 Lindsay St. (423) 894-0115 901lindsay.com “Side Show” 7:30 p.m. Barking Legs Theatre 1307 Dodds Ave. (423) 624-5347 barkinglegs.org Alcoholics Not Anonymous: Comedy Open Mic 8 p.m. Barley Taproom 235 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 682-8200 chattanoogabarley.com Romance at Ruby 9 p.m. Ruby Falls 1720 S. Scenic Hwy. (423) 821-2544 rubyfalls.com

FRIDAY2.15 Out On 8th 5 p.m. West Village 802 Pine St.


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SATURDAY2.16

Video Game Night (423) 424-1831 westvillagechattanooga.com “Fireflies” 6:45 p.m. Signal Crest United Methodist 1005 Ridgeway Ave. (423) 763-7219 smph.org Hairspray, The Musical 7 p.m. Center for Creative Arts 1301 Dallas Rd. (423) 498-7365 cca.hcde.org Valentine’s Day Take II 7 p.m. Hart Gallery 10 E. Main St. (423) 521-4707 hartgallerytn.com “Love and Information” 7:30 p.m. Lindsay Street Hall 901 Lindsay St. (423) 894-0115 901lindsay.com “Side Show” 7:30 p.m. Barking Legs Theatre 1307 Dodds Ave. (423) 624-5347 barkinglegs.org Steve Martin’s “The Underpants” 7:30 p.m. St. Luke United Methodist 3210 Social Cir. (423) 877-6447 stlukechatt.org Dale Jones

7:30, 9:45 p.m. The Comedy Catch 1400 Market St. (423) 629-2233 thecomedycatch.com “Fences” 8 p.m. Chattanooga Theatre Centre 400 River St. (423) 267-8534 theatrecentre.com “Poe’s Midnight Dreary” 8 p.m. Covenant College 14049 Scenic Hwy. (706) 820-1560 covenant.edu Improv “Movie” Night: Romantic Comedy 8 p.m. Improv Chattanooga 1800 Rossville Ave. (423) 843-1775 improvchattanooga.com Video Game Night 8 p.m. Stone Cup Cafe 208 Frazier Ave. (423) 521-3977 stonecupcafe.com Romance at Ruby 9 p.m. Ruby Falls 1720 S. Scenic Hwy. (423) 821-2544 rubyfalls.com Good, Old-Fashioned Improv Show 10 p.m. Improv Chattanooga

Coffee Origins and Varietals 10 a.m. Mad Priest Coffee Roasters 719 Cherry St. (423) 393-3834 madpriestcoffee.com Artful Yoga 1:30 p.m. Southern Soul Yoga 313 Manufacturers Rd. (423) 643-9642 southernsoulyoga.com “Love and Information” 2 p.m., 7:45 p.m. Lindsay Street Hall 901 Lindsay St. (423) 894-0115 901lindsay.com Winter in West Village 6 p.m. West Village 802 Pine St. westvillagechattanooga.com “Fireflies” 6:45 p.m. Signal Crest United Methodist 1005 Ridgeway Ave. (423) 763-7219 smph.org Hairspray, The Musical 7 p.m. Center for Creative Arts 1301 Dallas Rd. (423) 498-7365 cca.hcde.org “Free Solo” 7 p.m. IMAX 3D Theater 201 Chestnut St. (423) 266-4629 tnaqua.org Big Band Fever! 7:30 p.m. Tivoli Theatre 709 Broad St. (423) 757-5580 tivolichattanooga.com “Side Show” 7:30 p.m. Barking Legs Theatre 1307 Dodds Ave. (423) 624-5347 barkinglegs.org Dale Jones 7:30, 9:45 p.m.


The Comedy Catch 1400 Market St. (423) 629-2233 thecomedycatch.com Steve Martin’s “The Underpants” 7:30 p.m. St. Luke United Methodist 3210 Social Cir. (423) 877-6447 stlukechatt.org Your Stories 8 p.m. Improv Chattanooga 1800 Rossville Ave. (423) 843-1775 improvchattanooga.com “Fences” 8 p.m. Chattanooga Theatre Centre 400 River St. (423) 267-8534 theatrecentre.com Mardi Gras Ball 8 p.m. Chatt. Convention Center 1150 Carter St. (423) 756-0001 chattanoogaconventioncenter.org “Poe’s Midnight Dreary” 8 p.m. Covenant College 14049 Scenic Hwy. (706) 820-1560 covenant.edu Romance at Ruby 9 p.m. Ruby Falls 1720 S. Scenic Hwy. (423) 821-2544 rubyfalls.com Improv vs Standup 10 p.m. Improv Chattanooga 1800 Rossville Ave. (423) 843-1775 improvchattanooga.com

SUNDAY2.17 Breaking the Cycle of Discrimination 2 p.m. Jewish Federation 5461 N. Terrace Rd. (423) 493-0270 jewishchattanooga.com “Fences” 2:30 p.m. Chattanooga Theatre Centre 400 River St.

(423) 413-8978 chattanoogaworkspace.com Paths to Pints 6:30 p.m. The Tap House 3800 St. Elmo Ave. taphousechatt.com English Country Dance for All! 7 p.m. Heritage House Arts Center 1428 Jenkins Rd. (423) 855-9474 “The Book of Mormon” 7:30 p.m. Tivoli Theatre 709 Broad St. (423) 757-5580 tivolichattanooga.com

Mardi Gras Ball (423) 267-8534 theatrecentre.com Steve Martin’s “The Underpants” 2:30 p.m. St. Luke United Methodist 3210 Social Cir. (423) 877-6447 stlukechatt.org Bach Choir Cantata Concert 5 p.m. Christ Church Episcopal 663 Douglas St. (423) 266-4263 christchurchchattanooga.org “Free Solo” 7 p.m. IMAX 3D Theater 201 Chestnut St. (423) 266-4629 tnaqua.org Dale Jones 7:30 p.m. The Comedy Catch 1400 Market St. (423) 629-2233 thecomedycatch.com Romance at Ruby 9 p.m. Ruby Falls 1720 S. Scenic Hwy. (423) 821-2544 rubyfalls.com

MONDAY2.18 Winter Belly Dance Session 5:45 p.m. Movement Arts Collective

3813 Dayton Blvd. (423) 401-8115 movementartscollective.com Joggers & Lagers 6 p.m. Chattanooga Brewing Co. 1804 Chestnut St. chattabrew.com Archaeology Museum Lecture 7 p.m. Lynn Wood Hall Chapel Lyn Wood Hall (423) 236-2030 southern.edu

TUESDAY2.19 Wake Up & Run 6 a.m. Fleet Feet Sports 307 Manufacturers Rd. (423) 771-7996 fleetfeetchattanooga.com Chess K-night 5 p.m. Mad Priest Coffee Roasters 1900 Broad St. (423) 393-3834 madpriestcoffee.com Tuesday Night Chess Club 6 p.m. Downtown Library 1001 Broad St. (423) 643-7700 chattilibrary.com No Pressure: Instant Pot 101 6 p.m. Chattanooga Workspace 302 W. 6th St.

WEDNESDAY2.20 Main Street Market 4 p.m. 522 W. Main St. mainstfarmersmarket.com Chattanewbies 5:30 p.m. WanderLinger Brewing Co. 1208 King St. (423) 269-7979 wanderlinger.com Mentoring Expo 6 p.m. The Camp House 149 E. MLK Blvd. (423) 702-8081 thecamphouse.com Dean Napolitano 7 p.m. The Comedy Catch 1400 Market St. (423) 629-2233 thecomedycatch.com Naughty Knights Chess Meetup 7:30 p.m. The Bitter Alibi 825 Houston St. (423) 362-5070 thebitteralibi.com “The Book of Mormon” 7:30 p.m. Tivoli Theatre 709 Broad St. (423) 757-5580 tivolichattanooga.com Map these locations on chattanoogapulse.com. Send event listings at least 10 days in advance to: calendar@chattanoogapulse.com CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • FEBRUARY 14, 2019 • THE PULSE • 13


THE MUSIC SCENE

Wisdom And Soul Camper Van Beethoven alum improves with age

Victoria Priest

From Stage To (Hopeful) Stardom In one of the most genuinely interesting and exciting artistic competitions to come along, The Camp House on MLK Blvd. presents Songwriters Stage 2019 next Tuesday, February 19th. Tuesday's performance is one of a series of five events in the Songwriters Stage series. This time around eight local singer/songwriters will perform for judges and the audience in an elimination format. Two winners—one selected by the judges, the other selected by the audience—will move on to the series finale. This month’s event features a selection of well-known and beloved local artists including Alea Tveit, Alex Volz, Jamal Traub, Joel Harris, Marcy Tabor, Robinson Renard, Stephen Busie, and Victoria Priest, with a halftime performance by special guest MC Katrina Barclay. Doors open at 7 p.m., with the competition commencing at 7:30. If you enjoy local musicians of talent and serious songwriting chops, circle next Tuesday on your calendar. For more information or to register for competition in future installments of the series, email songwritersstage@gmail.com — MTM

By Marc T. Michael Pulse Music Editor

To this day we tend to give a little extra respect to the performers who manage to blend seemingly disparate styles into something new.”

14 • THE PULSE • FEBRUARY 14, 2019 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

I

’D LIKE TO TELL YOU I WAS A FAN OF CAMPER Van Beethoven in the eighties. I’d like to, but I can’t. I wasn’t remotely that cool.

My musical tastes then were dictated entirely by what was in easy grasp, which wasn’t much considering the town I grew up in didn’t have a decent record store until the end of that decade. Still, I knew who they were, I knew they were considered important, and later on I discovered why. To this day we tend to give a little extra respect to the performers who manage to blend seemingly disparate styles into something new, even though it’s not at all uncommon anymore (Brandi Carlile killed

the Grammys this year on just such a platform). It was a rarity then, however, with a few bands like Fairport Convention and Jethro Tull managing to successfully blend folk and rock (though to be honest, Tull actually did quite a bit more than that). Then along came Camper Van Beethoven, a band that combined punk, ska, country, folk, and world music in a way that simply had not been done before. CVB was “alternative” before alternative was a thing. When the band split at the end of the decade, one member


went on to form Cracker, another joined the Counting Crows, and still others, including founding member Victor Krummenacher, formed Monks of Doom. It is Victor who will be our subject this week. Continually active for over three decades, Krummenacher has lent his considerable talent to many projects and pursued a highly regarded solo career, with ten albums to his credit, including the upcoming Blue Pacific. I had a chance to listen to an early release track from that album entitled “Skin and Bones”, and if the single is indicative of what we can expect from the rest of the album, the artist has yet again raised his own personal bar of excellence. We often speak of an artist’s music “maturing”, yet I hate to invoke that term now because it implies there was ever a time when Krummenacher’s music was anything less than mature. That isn’t so. Still, there is something in this track that makes it feel like catching up with a long lost friend. All the familiar qualities are there, but tempered with time, wisdom, and a pronounced graying about the temples. Perhaps “matured” is the right term, but in the same way that a fine scotch, already twelve years in the cask, will

mature after an additional few decades in that self-same container. The dream-like strains of a steel guitar and the joyful chords of what I presume to be a Hammond B3 counterpoint the otherwise straightforward sincerity of a man and his guitar. His vocal style on this track has been compared to Dylan, though I find it far more akin to the comfort and ease of Mark Knopfler, while the song’s structure, its chord progression and instrumental arrangement, is positively Bowie-esque. The song’s theme, as described by the artist, is “self-critical, but not punitive,” and it may be this most of all that keeps bringing me back to the idea of maturity. Honestly, I would think anyone, anywhere could find the beauty and value of this soulful track, but to those of us of a certain age, it resonates in a way few tunes ever do. You can hear the track now at thevi-

nyldistrict.com (just search for “Victor” and “Skin and Bones”) and I will say again, if the rest of the album follows suit (and there’s no reason to assume it won’t) then this upcoming release is a legitimate treasure. You’ll have a chance to hear Victor (along with Monks of Doom) on April 27th at 529 in Atlanta, or April 29th at Supper Club in Nashville, and it seems quite likely that I may see you there at either or both of those shows.

THU2.14

FRI2.15

SAT2.16

Lon Eldridge

Suzy Bogguss

Come relive an allbut-forgotten era of traditional music that's perfect for a special Valentine's night out. 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. jjsbohemia.com

Not all country is big hats, pick-up trucks, and honkey tonks. Some of it is thoughtfull, inightful, and well sung. 7 p.m. Songbirds North 35 Station St. songbirdsguitars.com

Drew Sterchi and Blues Tribe One of Chattanooga's favorite visiting guitarists, Drew brings the musical blues and the heat. 9 p.m. HiFi Clyde’s 122 W. Main St. hificlydeschattanooga.com

CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • FEBRUARY 14, 2019 • THE PULSE • 15


LIVE MUSIC CALENDAR THURSDAY2.14 Danimal & Friends 6 p.m. WanderLinger Brewing Company 1208 King St. wanderlinger.com Nicholas Williams 6:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Toby Hewitt 7 p.m. Backstage Bar 29 Station St. backstagechattanooga.com Road To Nightfall, MizeWell, DJ FrenchKiss 7 p.m. WanderLinger Brewing Co. 1208 King St. wanderlinger.com Katrina Barclay, Brock McGarity, Emily Quinn, Bob DeYoung 7 p.m. Heritage House 1428 Jenkins Rd. chattanooga.gov Robin Grant and The Standard 7 p.m. Songbirds North 35 Station St. songbirdsguitars.com Drakeford 7:30 p.m. Puckett’s Restaurant 2 W. Aquarium Way puckettsgro.com River City Sessions: Nancy Seiters & Friends 7:30 p.m. The Granfalloon 400 E. Main St. granfalloonchattanooga.com Fox Mountain Express 7:30 p.m. The Feed Co. Table & Tavern 201 W. Main St. feedtableandtavern.com North Shore Jazz 8 p.m. Flying Squirrel Bar 55 Johnson St. flyingsquirrelbar.com Michael McDade 8 p.m. The Social

16 • THE PULSE • FEBRUARY 14, 2019 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

9:30 p.m. Tremont Tavern 1203 Hixson Pike tremonttavern.com Amber Fults 10 p.m. The Social 1110 Market St. publichousechattanooga.com Sexy Beast 10 p.m. Bud’s Sports Bar 5751 Brainerd Rd. budssportsbar.com

Travis Greene

SATURDAY2.16

1110 Market St. publichousechattanooga.com Travis Greene & Mosaic MSC 8:30 p.m. The Signal 1810 Chestnut St. thesignaltn.com Open Mic Night 9 p.m. The Office @ City Cafe 901 Carter St. citycafemenu.com Lon Eldridge, 9th St Stompers 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. jjsbohemia.com

FRIDAY2.15 Ryan Oyer 6:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Naomi Ingram 6:30 p.m. Westin Dorato Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Suzy Bogguss 7 p.m. Songbirds North 35 Station St. songbirdsguitars.com Art of the Groove with DJ Tryezz 8 p.m. Barley Taproom

235 E. MLK Blvd. chattanoogabarley.com Pete Gerard 8:30 p.m. Puckett’s Restaurant 2 W. Aquarium Way puckettsgro.com Rumours: A Fleetwood Mac Tribute 9 p.m. Songbirds South 41 Station St. songbirdsguitars.com Randall Adams 9 p.m. The Office @ City Cafe 901 Carter St. citycafemenu.com Over Easy 9 p.m. HiFi Clyde’s 122 W. Main St. hificlydeschattanooga.com Black Magic Flower Power, Pinecone, Genki Genki Panic 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. jjsbohemia.com Lew Card 9 p.m. The Feed Co. Table & Tavern 201 W. Main St. feedtableandtavern.com Captain Midnight Band 9 p.m. WanderLinger Brewing Co. 1208 King St. wanderlinger.com The Dylan Kussman Band

John Caroll 6:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Courtney Holder 6:30 p.m. Westin Dorato Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com EG Kight 7 p.m. Songbirds North 35 Station St. songbirdsguitars.com Beth Snapp 7 p.m. Oddstory Brewing Company 336 E. MLK Blvd. oddstorybrewing.co Genna and Jesse 7 p.m. Charles & Myrtle’s Coffeehouse 105 McBrien Rd. christunity.org Walk The Moon 8:30 p.m. The Signal 1810 Chestnut St. thesignaltn.com The Dirty Doors: A Tribute 9 p.m. Songbirds South 41 Station St. songbirdsguitars.com David 9 p.m. The Office @ City Cafe 901 Carter St. citycafemenu.com Drew Sterchi and Blues Tribe 9 p.m. HiFi Clyde’s 122 W. Main St.


hificlydeschattanooga.com ETC w/ Keiss, Stone, Shiles, Saunders 9 p.m. WanderLinger Brewing Co. 1208 King St. wanderlinger.com The Night Birds & Oweda 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. jjsbohemia.com Zak Baker 9 p.m. Trish’s Sports Bar 4762 Hwy. 58 (423) 269-8400 C-Grimey & The Freedom Riders 9 p.m. Stone Cup Cafe 208 Frazier Ave. stonecupcafe.com SunSap, SLZSLZ 9 p.m. Mayo’s Bar and Grill 3820 Brainerd Rd. mayosbarandgrill.com Heartbreaker Fest 9 p.m. Music Box @ Ziggy’s 607 Cherokee Blvd. ziggysbarandgrill.net Sexy Beast 10 p.m. Bud’s Sports Bar 5751 Brainerd Rd. budssportsbar.com

SUNDAY2.17 Nick & Luke 11 a.m. Flying Squirrel Bar 55 Johnson St. flyingsquirrelbar.com Carl Pemberton 11 a.m. Westin Chattanooga 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Resurrection Mary 1:30 p.m. Flying Squirrel Bar 55 Johnson St. flyingsquirrelbar.com Tim Hughes Quartet 5 p.m. London Calling 715 Cherry St. londoncallingbar.com

Christopher Cross

granfalloonchattanooga.com Open Mic with Mike McDade 8 p.m. Tremont Tavern 1203 Hixson Pike tremonttavern.com Chachuba & STIG 9 p.m. JJ’s Bohemia 231 E. MLK Blvd. jjsbohemia.com

WEDNESDAY2.20

The Other Brothers 5:30 p.m. WanderLinger Brewing Co. 1208 King St. wanderlinger.com Open Mic with Jeff Daniels 6 p.m. Long Haul Saloon 2536 Cummings Hwy. (423) 822-9775

MONDAY2.18 Open Air with Jessica Nunn 6 p.m. The Granfalloon 400 E. Main St. granfalloonchattanooga.com Pete Boubel 6:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Monday Nite Big Band 7 p.m. The Coconut Room 6925 Shallowford Rd. thepalmsathamilton.com Blues Night Open Jam 7 p.m. Songbirds North 35 Station St. songbirdsguitars.com Very Open Mic with Shawnessy Cargile 8 p.m. The Well 1800 Rossville Blvd. #8 wellonthesouthside.com

TUESDAY2.19 Yoga/Sound with Maggie, Danimal & Frenchy 6 p.m. WanderLinger Brewing Co. 1208 King St. wanderlinger.com Eric Kirkendoll 6:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Songwriters Stage 7 p.m. The Camp House 149 E. MLK Blvd. thecamphouse.com Danimal 7 p.m. Backstage Bar 29 Station St. backstagechattanooga.com Space Jam Open Mic with Xll Olympians 7 p.m. Barley Taproom 235 E. MLK Blvd. chattanoogabarley.com Christopher Cross 7:30 p.m. Walker Theatre 399 McCallie Ave. tivolichattanooga.com Live Jam Session with Freddy Mc & Friends 8 p.m. Granfalloon 400 E. Main St.

Stephen Busie 6:30 p.m. Westin Alchemy Bar 801 Pine St. westinchattanooga.com Matt Downer 6:30 p.m. WanderLinger Brewing Co. 1208 King St. wanderlinger.com Jesse James Jungkurth 7 p.m. Backstage Bar 29 Station St. backstagechattanooga.com Jazz in the Lounge: Marquis Dotson 7 p.m. Barking Legs Theater 1307 Dodds Ave. barkinglegs.org Randall Adams 8 p.m. The Office @ City Cafe 901 Carter St. citycafemenu.com Priscilla & Little Rickee 8 p.m. Las Margaritas 1101 Hixson Pike (423) 756-3332 Open Jam Night 8 p.m. Songbirds South 41 Station St. songbirdsguitars.com Matt Thomas 9 p.m. The Palms at Hamilton 6925 Shallowford Rd. thepalmsathamilton.com Map these locations on chattanoogapulse.com. Send event listings at least 10 days in advance to: calendar@chattanoogapulse.com CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • FEBRUARY 14, 2019 • THE PULSE • 17


ERNIE PAIK'S RECORD REVIEWS

Daniel Carter, Tobias Wilner, Djibril Toure, Federico Ughi New York United (577 Records)

T

he double-edged sword of modern music is that if something sounds fresh, there’s the risk of it becoming an over-used trope, and in ten years, it might sound severely dated and forever locked into a specific time period. While New York United is an unconventional free jazz album, where classification almost seems misleading, it’s a studio creation that depends heavily on careful editing and electronic processing; fortunately, it doesn’t feel like a gimmick or some half-assed genre mash-up. Free-playing reedist and trumpeter Daniel Carter has been a creative force since the ‘70s and has frequently played with the likes of bassist William Parker and pianist Matthew Shipp. On New York United, Carter and one of his closest collaborators—drummer Federico Ughi—team up with bassist Djibril Toure (who plays for GZA and Wu-Tang Clan) and Tobias Wilner of Blue Foundation on electronics and studio wizardry. Stuttering synthetic tones and gentle clicks open “Ca-

18 • THE PULSE • FEBRUARY 14, 2019 • CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM

nal Street” as Carter’s flute improvisations join in, and eventually, Ughi’s drums and Toure’s bass enter as a thick and imposing presence with an unhurried funk-inflected pace. Carter switches to a muted trumpet amid a stew of brief vocal samples, glistening synthetics, and rustling beats. On “125th Street”, the electronic repetition, synth menace, sharp blasts of noise and somewhat foreboding mood have a hint of industrial music, enhanced by Ughi’s propelling beats, and Carter’s trumpet floats over the chaos below. The track transforms radically, ending with an unusual amalgam of ambient music, glitchy hip-hop rhythms, and marimba notes; Jon Hassell’s City: Works of Fiction and Tortoise’s TNT come to mind as points of comparison. The interplay at work on “Nostrand Ave” is complicated, with amorphous, sustained tones, repeating synthetics that press forward and Carter’s breathy, wandering reeds; with a ramping tension and intensity, there’s a release halfway through the track, giving way to a sort of floating elegance among the kinetic energy, elevated by Carter’s natural fluidity on sax and freely rolling interactions with Ughi. The album concludes with the three-minute “Flatbush Ave”, sporting a dance beat and Carter’s smoky, cool tone and lithe runs. When considering Wilner’s role, one can’t help but bring up producer Teo Macero and his groundbreaking work with Miles Davis, particularly his late

‘60s and early ‘70s fusion, where Macero’s editing was a vital part of shaping Davis’ albums. If the Macero/Davis trajectory had continued in a steep upward direction, then it could’ve ended up on the asteroid where Wilner operates, exploding the notion of fusion jazz into something even more expansive.

Business of Dreams Ripe for Anarchy (Slumberland)

S

andra Cisneros’ “One Last Poem For Richard” reflects upon an amicable Christmas Eve break-up, recalling good times and bad times and concluding, “I’m willing to admit a part of me, crazed and kamikaze, ripe for anarchy, loves still.” The second album Ripe for Anarchy from Business of Dreams—the solo project of Corey Cunningham, of Magic Bullets, Terry Malts, and Smokescreens—takes its title from Cisneros’ poem, which offers an almost paradoxical attitude; while moving on and having acceptance about a break-up are healthy, there’s a sort of wild abandon that’s a part of facing the uncertain future, open to love and not being defeated. Business of Dreams was created by Cunningham

when coping with the death of his father, and if there’s a unifying theme, it’s to “focus on the moment, be free” as sung on “Chasing That Feeling”, which opens Ripe for Anarchy. Cunningham is comfortable with conveying earnest sentiments in his lyrics, singing in his high, clean voice, and acts such as The Field Mice come to mind in this regard, where feelings are made crystal clear. Musically, Cunningham owes many debts to indiepop forebears; this writer speculates that he is familiar with The Field Mice and other Sarah Records acts, New Zealand pop acts (in particular, David Kilgour’s solo material comes to mind) and American west-coast ‘90s pop bands. A typical song on Ripe for Anarchy features a strummed, three-chord pop progression, drum machine beats, synth flourishes, and a heavy use of reverb. A particular retro obsession with late ‘80s production styles, including the conspicuous synth tones on “Naive Scene”, reveals itself, and an unabashedly bright keyboard melody drives “N.R.E.A.M.” (which stands for “negativity rules everything around me”) with equally unabashed tambourine hits. “Don’t Let Our Time Expire” is a beat-free diversion, moving in its simplicity with a ringing acoustic guitar pattern and a somewhat disquieting high-pitched keyboard tone in the background. While this is not groundbreaking material, it’s wellcrafted stuff and hard to dislike for pop lovers.


JONESIN' CROSSWORD

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “A freshness lives deep in me which no one can take from me,” wrote poet Swedish poet Gunnar Ekelöf. “Something unstilled, unstillable is within me; it wants to be voiced,” wrote philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche. In accordance with your astrological omens, I propose we make those two quotes your mottoes for the next four weeks. In my opinion, you have a mandate to tap into what’s freshest and most unstillable about you — and then cultivate it, celebrate it, and express it with the full power of your grateful, brilliant joy. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): According to the Encyclopedia of Occultism and Parapsychology, the word “obsession” used to refer to the agitated state of a person who was besieged by rowdy or unruly spirits arriving from outside the person. “Possession,” on the other hand, once meant the agitated state of a person struggling against rowdy or unruly spirits arising from within. In the Western Christian perspective, both modes have been considered primarily negative and problematic. In many other cultures, however, spirits from both the inside and outside have sometimes been regarded as relatively benevolent, and their effect quite positive. As long as you don’t buy into the Western Christian view, I suspect that the coming weeks will be a favorable time for you to consort with spirits like those. ARIES (March 21-April 19): When directors of movies say, “It’s a wrap,” they mean that the shooting of a scene has been finished. They may use the same expression when the shooting of the entire film is completed. That’s not the end of the creative process, of course. All the editing must still be done. Once that’s accomplished, the producer may declare that the final product is “in the can,” and ready to be released or broadcast. From what I can determine, Aries, you’re on the verge of being able to say, “it’s a wrap” for one of your own projects. There’ll be more work before you’re ready to assert, “it’s in the can.” TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In accordance with astrological omens, I invite you to create your own royal throne and sit on it whenever you need to think deep thoughts and formulate important decisions. Make sure your power chair is comfortable as well as beautiful and elegant. To enhance your ability to wield your waxing authority with grace and courage, I also encourage you to fashion your own crown, scepter, and ceremonial footwear. They, too, should be comfortable, beautiful, and elegant. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In 1995, astronomer Bob Williams got a strong urge to investigate a small scrap of the night sky that most

other astronomers regarded as boring. It was near the handle of the constellation known as the Big Dipper. Luckily for him, he could ignore his colleagues’ discouraging pressure. That’s because he had been authorized to use the highpowered Hubble Space Telescope for a ten-day period. To the surprise of everyone but Williams, his project soon discovered that this seemingly unremarkable part of the heavens is teeming with over 3,000 galaxies. I suspect you may have a challenge akin to Williams’, Gemini. A pet project or crazy notion of yours may not get much support, but I hope you’ll pursue it anyway. I bet your findings will be different from what anyone expects. CANCER (June 21-July 22): A study by the Humane Research Council found that more than eighty percent of those who commit to being vegetarians eventually give up and return to eating meat. A study by the National Institute of Health showed that only about 36 percent of alcoholics are able to achieve full recovery; the remainder relapse. And we all know how many people make New Year’s resolutions to exercise more often, but then stop going to the gym by February. That’s the bad news. The good news, Cancerian, is that during the coming weeks you will possess an enhanced power to stick with any commitment you know is right and good for you. Take advantage! LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Are there two places on earth more different from each other than Europe and Africa? Yet there is a place, the Strait of Gibralter, where Europe and Africa are just 8.7 miles apart. Russia and the United States are also profoundly unlike each other, but only 2.5 miles apart where the Bering Strait separates them. I foresee the a metaphorically comparable phenomenon in your life. Two situations or influences or perspectives that may seem to have little in common will turn out to be closer to each other than you imagined possible. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Virgo basketball star Latrell Sprewell played professionally for 13 years. He could have extended his career at least three more seasons, but he turned down an offer for $21 million from the Minnesota team, complaining that it wouldn’t be sufficient to feed his four children. I will ask you not to imitate his behavior, Virgo. If you’re offered a deal or opportunity that doesn’t perfectly meet all your requirements, don’t dismiss it out of hand. A bit of compromise is sensible right now. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In 1992, an Ethiopian man named Belachew Girma became an alcoholic after he saw his wife die from AIDS. And yet today he is renowned as a

Laughter Master, having dedicated himself to explore the healing powers of ebullience and amusement. He presides over a school that teaches people the fine points of laughter, and he holds the world’s record for longest continuous laughter at three hours and six minutes. I nominate him to be your role model in the next two weeks. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you will be especially primed to benefit from the healing power of laughter. You’re likely to encounter more droll and whimsical and hilarious events than usual, and your sense of humor should be especially hearty and finely-tuned. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): A study published in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science suggests that people who use curse words tend to be more candid. “Swearing is often inappropriate but it can also be evidence that someone is telling you their honest opinion,” said the lead researcher. “Just as they aren’t filtering their language to be more palatable, they’re also not filtering their views.” If that’s true, Scorpio, I’m going to encourage you to curse more than usual in the coming weeks. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, it’s crucial that you tell as much of the whole truth as is humanly possible. (P.S. Your cursing outbursts don’t necessarily have to be delivered with total abandon everywhere you go. You could accomplish a lot just by going into rooms by yourself and exuberantly allowing the expletives to roll out of your mouth.) SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In the mid-1980s, a California carrot farmer grew frustrated with the fact that grocery stories didn’t want to buy his broken and oddly shaped carrots. A lot of his crop was going to waste. Then he got the bright idea to cut and shave the imperfect carrots so as to make smooth little baby carrots. They became a big success. Can you think of a metaphorically comparable adjustment you could undertake, Sagittarius? Is it possible to transform a resource that’s partially going to waste? Might you be able to enhance your possibilities by making some simple modifications? CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Mongolia is a huge landlocked country. It borders no oceans or seas. Nevertheless, it has a navy of seven sailors. Its lone ship is a tugboat moored on Lake Khovsgol, which is three percent the size of North America’s Lake Superior. I’m offering up the Mongolian navy as an apt metaphor for you to draw inspiration from in the coming weeks. I believe it makes good astrological sense for you to launch a seemingly quixotic quest to assert your power, however modestly, in a situation that may seem out of your league.

“Double Up”—the middle two from all five. ACROSS 1 “Downton Abbey” countess 5 Pokémon protagonist 8 Fix, as the end of a pool cue 13 Strong cards 14 “SmackDown!” org. 15 High grade 17 Johnny Carson’s predecessor 19 “Sorry Not Sorry” singer Demi 20 Magic, on a scoreboard 21 Like toast without butter 22 So far 23 “Weetzie Bat” author Francesca ___ Block 24 Get a sense of importance, say 26 Children’s author Blyton 28 E-mail address part 29 Ancient Roman road 30 Indian restaurant

appetizer 33 Hospital count 36 Places with IVs 37 “The Battle With the Slum” author and social reformer 40 ___ A. Bank (menswear retailer) 43 “Don’t move!” 44 Super Bowl XLI halftime headliner 48 Actress Hathaway an’s 8” 50 1010, in binary 52 Gloom and ___ 53 Figure out group emotions, maybe 58 Replacement 59 Wrigley Field judges 60 Boy band that sang “Girl on TV” 61 She, in Brazil 62 Surgeon for whom a mouthwash is named 63 Some purchases for vape pens 65 Prefix meaning “insect” 66 Their capacity is measured in BTUs

67 Attila’s band 68 “Quiz Show” figure Charles Van ___ 69 1950s White House nickname 70 ___-bitty DOWN 1 Persuades 2 Instrument in a Legend of Zelda title 3 Win back 4 Inquire of 5 In the know 6 Began to convince 7 She/___ pronouns 8 Chief Wiggum’s kid 9 Melodramatize 10 Copenhagen’s ___ Gardens 11 How short messages may be sent 12 Bring off, slangily 16 Seeders 18 Adobe file format 22 Say out loud 25 Legislative persuader 27 Gp. that oversees the ATF 31 Airline based

in Stockholm 32 False front 34 Slight decrease 35 Knightly title 38 Hall’s partner 39 PBS’s “Science Kid” 40 Rapper in the Fyre Festival documentaries 41 With “of,” in total agreement 42 Shapes up quickly 45 Barely defeat 46 Was unable to 47 Diplomat’s building 49 Podcast staffer 51 “I couldn’t find it” 54 HBO series set in New Orleans 55 “Great blue” marsh bird 56 Good for something 57 Actress Gretchen of “Boardwalk Empire” 63 “___ Ho” (“Slumdog Millionaire” song) 64 ___ Beta Kappa

Copyright © 2019 Jonesin’ Crosswords. For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents perminute. Must be 18+ to call. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle No. 923 CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • FEBRUARY 14, 2019 • THE PULSE • 19


FILM & TELEVISION

Plastic Blocks Go Meta Lego Movie 2 tries to build on its predecessor

The Fairest Lady Of Them All A lot has been written over the years about one of the most recognizable film stars of all time, Audrey Hepburn. And deservedly so, as Hepburn was a rare combination of talent, beauty, perseverance, grace, and charity. But for many in our current generation, she is just a name from the list of “famous movie stars of the past”. Which is why we here at The Pulse implore you to not pass up the opportunity to see Hepburn at her radiant best in one of the most enduring big screen musicals of all time: My Fair Lady. Eliza Doolittle (Hepburn) finds herself at the center of a friendly wager between Professor Henry Higgins (Rex Harrison) and his companion, Colonel Pickering (Wilfred HydeWhite): can a disheveled, cockney flower girl find her voice and blossom into a proper lady presentable in high society? Sure, the dated gender roles and oft-blatant misogyny can be a bit cringe worthy to modern audiences, but oh, the songs...the score...the clothes. And rising above it all in a performance for the ages is Hepburn herself. Winner of eight Academy awards, including Best Picture, restored frame-by-frame from the original 65mm negative, and scanned utilizing state-of-the-art technology under the supervision of famed film historian Robert Harris—you owe it yourself to see this amazing piece of movie musical history. Screening this Sunday at 1 p.m. at Hamilton Place 8, and at 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. at East Ridge 18. Be there. — Michael Thomas

By John DeVore Pulse Film Editor

The film isn’t bad, per se, but there’s not a lot in it that wasn’t covered during the first film, namely meta commentary on consumerism.”

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C

ONVENTIONAL WISDOM ESPOUSED BY FILM fans is that a sequel is never as good as the original. This rule has been challenged in recent years by several films, although the nature of filmmaking has changed quite a bit from when this rule was established. For most of the history of film, sequels were always dependent on the box office performance of the original. If a movie performed well a sequel might be developed. Now, every franchise is planned in advance, sequels are all but given unless the original film underperforms in Asian markets, and most actors and directors know that barring some public relations catastrophe they’ve got a lucrative job for many years to come. Sequels still run the gamut of quality, of course. The Lord of the Rings trilogy, for example, was filmed together, with a three-year release schedule. The

movies are essentially one long film. Others, like the Transformers eternal franchise, have a variety of directors and actors and plots that are only tangentially related by giant, noisily incomprehensible robots. The key difference, then, is vision. Either a franchise has one or it doesn’t. It seems that The Lego Movie franchise falls into the latter category. The film isn’t bad, per se, but there’s not a lot in it that wasn’t covered during the first film, namely meta commentary on consumerism in the middle of a two-hour Lego commercial. The first Lego movie is hard to clas-


sify. It is exceptional in a lot of ways, from humor to animation to a surprising amount of heart. It’s also a textbook example of metamodernism. The film is absurdly nostalgic and self-referential, winking at the audience while attempting to tell an honest story about believing in yourself, trusting your imagination, and remembering the magic of childhood. It’s also about marketing a product to a captive audience and tricking them into begging their parents for more Legos, all while being inoffensively entertaining. It’s taking the behind-the-scenes work of a toymaker and unapologetically doing it out in the open with a sly smile and a belly laugh. The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part does some of these things, but it seems that this metamodern approach to filmmaking has diminishing returns. In the second film, we join our Lego heroes where they were at the end of the first movie, as the overseeing god of this world is now forced to share an impossible Lego collection with his sister. The girl is cutesy and young, and doesn’t quite understand how to play with her older and more experienced brother. Five years pass, and the boy’s modern Lego world has been re-

Just as the film comments on the changing nature of the children who play with Legos, it’s also a commentary on the changing status of its stars, specifically Chris Pratt.” duced to a post-apocalyptic wasteland, which itself is a commentary on the changes in the imagination of a child as they pass into adolescence (we know this because the film explicitly explains this to the audience, e.g. metamodernism). The film is also about two different approaches to play and how children must learn to get along as they grow into different people. But just as the film comments on the changing nature of the children who play with Legos, it’s also a commentary on the changing status of its stars, specifically Chris Pratt. Pratt, like his character Emmett, began as a loveable dimwit on Parks and Recreation and has now become a Hollywood action movie darling through his roles in Guardians of the Galaxy and the new Jurassic Park sequels. All of this is fairly obvious for any adult paying attention—screenwriters Phil Lord and Christopher Miller (who wrote and co-directed

the first film) aren’t masters of subtlety, nor are they trying to be. But this kind of commentary worked fine for the first film because there was also a mostly engaging story behind it. The adult audiences are now wise to the canny references and as a result the story becomes much blander and predictable. Young children, though, are likely to enjoy it. My son, however, who remembers seeing the first one when he was five, was far less interested in the sequel. I guess that’s the way it goes. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 2: The Secret of the Ooze didn’t hold a candle to the original film when I was his age. We all go through it to some extent. For me, the most realistic and relatable part of The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part is that the only way kids would have that many Legos is if their parents were really Will Ferrell and Maya Rudolph. Those things are expensive as hell.

✴ NEW IN THEATERS ✴

Happy Death Day 2U In a Goundhogs Day of death, Tree Gelbman discovers that dying over and over was surprisingly easier than the dangers that lie ahead. Director: Christopher Landon Stars: Jessica Rothe, Ruby Modine, Israel Broussard, Rachel Matthews

Alita: Battle Angel A deactivated female cyborg is revived, but cannot remember anything of her past life and goes on a quest to find out who she is. Director: Robert Rodriguez Stars: Rosa Salazar, Christoph Waltz, Jennifer Connelly, Mahershala Ali

CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • FEBRUARY 14, 2019 • THE PULSE • 21


COLUMN · GAME ON!

Playing A Game Of Fools How publishers are shooting themselves in the foot for your money

I Brandon Watson Pulse columnist

Many [gaming] businesses are looking for ways to compete with, if not overthrow, the champion online game of the age called Fortnight.”

When not vaporizing zombies or leading space marines as a mousepad Mattis, Brandon Watson is making gourmet pancakes and promoting local artists.

WOULDN’T SAY BLINDSIDED IS a good word for EA’s latest attempt at winning the hearts and thumbs of gamers the world over. Bewildered and silly are even better words to describe the publishing giant’s release trends over the past few years. It seems that the Battle Royale gaming craze has even streaming media monsters like Netflix and HULU starving for attention and money, so much so that many businesses are looking for ways to compete with, if not overthrow, the champion online game of the age called Fortnight. You should know by now that Fortnight is the massively multiplayer shooter/ builder game that has defined a new generation of gamers, Twitch celebrities, and legions of confused parents. Never in my wildest dreams as a gamer would I have imagined video games robbing television of viewership ratings— though with TV’s spaghetti-to-wall “hope it sticks” approach to show content it’s a wonder people haven’t gouged their eyes out completely (I know I’ve considered it). It’s strange times for both industries and even stranger times for the avid consumer of both media platforms. EA and Bethesda are hungry to pull gamers back to their titles. The results have been near catastrophic for the big B and rollercoaster for EA. With the Hail Mary pass from the end zone of Respawn’s APEX: Legends mere weeks away from Bioware’s Anthem, I’m not too sure it was good play. I imagine EA as a great world-spanning serpent that has grown so large it now must eat its own tail to make room for itself. Even though the craze of this new streamlined take on Battle Royale has swept many off their feet, it’s dubious whether APEX is the metaphorical

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tweezers that will unlatch the bloated tick that Fortnight has become. APEX: Legends is (yet again) another online hero shooter with a roster of G.I. Joe rejects aping Overwatch drivel and mind-numbingly rehashed content. You pick your hero, link up with online players, fall from the sky, traverse a map, shoot things, unlock things, and pay cash money for things, then rinse and repeat ad infinitum. APEX: Legends has a sleek, streamlined design, and it’s not a bad game if you like online shooters. But it’s neither innovative nor ambitious; it’s the same old thing powered by the greed engine. It’s free to play, though, so go ahead and check it out for yourself if you are hankering for a PUBG, Overwatch, Fortnight clone. I’m sensing it will gather a cult following among those already playing these types of games but doubt it will exceed Fortnight in longevity. It definitely hasn’t done so in creativity. The craziest thing about EA dropping this free-to-play snooze fest is that their hyped online co-op adventure shooter Destiny clone Anthem is supposed to hit the shelves on February 22nd. If gamers are already engaged with one offering that is online and full of in-game purchases, how do you expect them to even want to play the next thing that is also online and full of in-game purchases? Call me crazy, but I think EA is doubling down here because there may not be enough confidence in either game doing well, which is very sad considering

that all those prepaid gaming journalists who spammed social media about Anthem for months may look like total fools come release day. Anthem had a small demo event that didn’t go very well, either. Demos (as far as veteran gamers are concerned) should show off some of the best aspects of the product in order to encourage people to buy it. Yet somehow a demo event to show off ample bugs and glitches has become the industry standard. Then there’s the ridiculous discovery of the price of in-game purchases for cosmetic color schemes. A turd in 4K is still a turd, albeit in high definition. But why release it with problems? Is it just me or could EA be setting up their developers for failure? I was hopeful about Anthem but after the demo and insidious ninja release of APEX: Legends I’m going to save my money and let release day slip on by. EA could be cutting off its nose to spite its face just to capitalize on gaming trends (by Odin it should), but the company should at least be more creative about how to do it. At minimum, give the developers a fighting chance to make a game worth playing and don’t throw them out of the plane without a parachute—or at least give them time to pack one.


CHATTANOOGAPULSE.COM • FEBRUARY 14, 2019 • THE PULSE • 23


Profile for Brewer Media Group

The Pulse 16.07 » February 14, 2019  

Chattanooga's Weekly Alternative

The Pulse 16.07 » February 14, 2019  

Chattanooga's Weekly Alternative