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Inside Triangle: On Mission in Haiti | 40th Graduating Class | Campus Renovation Update

Triangle Brentwood Academy Magazine Summer/Fall 2012

TEACHING outside the box

ba faculty brings out the gift of learning

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Triangle Summer/Fall 2012

from the

Headmaster

Dear BA Family, When you think back to the teachers who impacted your life, what was it that made each of those men and women so significant? I imagine that a few faces leap to mind when you read that question. What was it about that teacher, or those teachers, that gave them such influence in your life? Each of us has more influence than we realize, and that’s certainly true in our families and our friendships as well as in our scholastic environment. Sometimes the basis for that influence is our position, or our expertise in a certain area, or our persuasive personality. In the long run, how a person uses his or her influence determines if they are remembered with gratitude and appreciation. Ultimately, our greatest influences have eternal impact and affect not just what we are able to do, but who we are becoming; not just what we are good at, but what we love and what we pursue. There are as many different ways of influencing as there are people, of course. Perhaps for you it was a word of encouragement, or the teacher who obviously wanted you to succeed; perhaps it was a teacher who had such passion and enthusiasm for the subject that you became inspired and wanted to learn more. Whatever the avenue of influence, the results change us. This past summer, Brentwood Academy seniors chose a theme verse for the 2012-2013 school year that speaks to the eternal value of relationships and how we influence one another. They chose Romans 12:9-10: “Love must be sincere. Hate what is evil, cling to what is good. Be devoted to one another in brotherly love. Honor one another above yourselves.” I am grateful to be a part of a community where people work hard to discover and develop their God-given talents and their understanding of the world we live in. And I am grateful for parents, faculty, and staff who recognize that God has made each person valuable in their own right. Finally, I am grateful to be a part of a school whose mission is focused on an eternal objective. The stories in this collection reflect many different ways that God is influencing our community through teachers, parents, alumni, and current students. May our efforts continue to recognize our dependence on God, and may your resulting influence continue to bring glory to Him. Sincerely,

Curt Masters Headmaster, Brentwood Academy

On the cover The members of the class of 2012 prepare for the next step in their journey as they leave the BA nest for 46 different colleges in 17 different states.


Table of

Contents 40

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Triangle Brentwood Academy Magazine SUMMER/FALL 2012

HEADMASTER Curtis G. Masters HEADMASTER EMERITUS William B. Brown, Jr.

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2012-2013 Trustee Chair J.Mac Brown ‘83 2012-2013 Alumni Council Co-Presidents Rebecca Fletcher Holmes ‘93 Kim Smith Elliott ‘95

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Teaching Outside the Box • The gift of learning

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Fortieth Graduating Class • Celebrating four decades of alumni

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Leaving the Eagles’ Nest • College counseling prepares students

26 WAR • Spiritual Emphasis Week 2012 28

BA Forward • Campus renovations are underway

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Looking Back • 1982 assembly in the theatre

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On Mission • Alumnae and students serve in Haiti

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Fine Arts • Updates from spring 2012

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Track and Cross Country • Finish well

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Athletic News • Alumni mentor student athletes

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Parents of Alumni • Upcoming events

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Alumni News • Updates, marriages and births

2012-2013 Parents Association (BAPA) President Sherri Boatright EDITORS Leah Hoskins Susan Shafer STAFF WRITERS Lulu Clark ‘76 Ellie Collins ‘07 Leah Hoskins Ryan Hubbard Peggy O’Neal Peden Rene Rochester Susan Shafer Wendy Stallings GRAPHIC DESIGN Phil Goodman PHOTOGRAPHY Phil Goodman Barry Robbins Jennifer Vickery Smith

The Triangle magazine is published twice annually under the direction of the Brentwood Academy Communications Department and is distributed without charge to family and friends of the school.

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Triangle Summer/Fall 2012

TEACHING

outside

ba faculty brings out the gift of learning

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Do you remember a Christmas when you were expecting that special gift? by Rene Rochester Ed.D., Science Department

I remember I did not sleep much the night before in anticipation of hearing my mother say, “Ok, you can open your gifts!” My eyes would quickly scan the presents at the bottom of the tree to find the right sized package that fit my hoped-for gift. I would pick it up, weigh it, shake it, and with a confident smile I would say, “I think it is”...and then tear it open. There would be much joy and lots of hugs of appreciation and thankfulness to the giver of the gift. We share a unique teaching environment at Brentwood Academy. We are encouraged to acknowledge the Giver of the gift of knowledge and understanding. God has already given permission to open the package of wisdom as we lay out our curriculum map. Then we find creative ways to craft lessons that encourage students to anticipate the opportunity to search out a matter, weigh the evidence of a text or equation, and find new ways to investigate and “unwrap a new discovery.” In my graduate studies I recall the writings of educator and author Paulo Friere. He reminded his readers that an effective teacher is a facilitator of learning, trusting what is in the student. So as educators, we have the joy and privilege of teaching outside the box by uniquely being who God made us to be and finding ways to bring out the gift of learning in each student.

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Triangle Summer/Fall 2012 The top three greatest fears in the world: #1 Snakes #2 Public Speaking #3 Death

So technically speaking, most people would rather DIE than speak in front of an audience.

incorporate speech skills into every curriculum with their students, and not just for the purpose of eliminating the fear factor. In a presentation to BA faculty at a workshop, Hubbard cited this statistic: In a Department of Education survey of 3,173 plant managers, of the 11 criteria considered important to hiring decisions, attitude and communication skills top the list.

According to Mr. Rian Hubbard, speech and forensics facultythree are working to The top change this statistic among Brentwood greatest fears in the Academy graduates. In fact, he is world: encouraging all fellow teachers to

“Since we are a college preparatory institution, and college prepares students for the working environment, then RIGHT NOW we have the opportunity to provide students with real-world

LEARNING TO SPEAK #1 Snakes #2 Public Speaking #3 Death

So technically speaking, most people would rather DIE than speak in front of an audience. According to Mr. Ryan Hubbard, speech and forensics faculty members are working to change this statistic among Brentwood Academy graduates. In fact, he encourages all fellow teachers to incorporate speech skills into every curriculum with their students, and not just for the purpose of eliminating the fear factor. In a presentation to BA faculty at a workshop, Hubbard cited this statistic: In a Department of Education survey of 3,173 plant managers, of the 11 criteria considered important to hiring decisions, attitude and communication skills top the list. “Since we are a college preparatory institution, and college prepares students for the working environment, then RIGHT NOW we have the opportunity to provide

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skills,” Hubbard explains. This is just one of the reasons BA requires all of its students to earn a half credit of speech in order to graduate. “Whether we realize it or not, the way someone speaks directly affects his or her credibility. While the substance and ideas may be brilliant, if the ideas cannot be effectively communicated, the argument if futile,” Hubbard says. A number of BA students have gained significant confidence in their abilities as speakers while participating in speech and forensics. The programs allow students the creative freedom to perform

students with real-world skills,” Hubbard explains. This is just one of the reasons BA requires all of its students to earn a half credit of speech in order to graduate. “Whether we realize it or not, the way someone speaks directly affects his or her credibility. While the substance and ideas may be brilliant, if the ideas cannot be effectively communicated, the argument is futile,” Hubbard says. A number of BA students have gained significant confidence in their abilities as speakers while participating in speech and forensics. The programs allow students the creative freedom to perform literature or to construct speeches regarding topics or issues about which they are passionate. “Our students have brilliant minds. We are teaching them how to communicate their thoughts intelligently and charismatically,” Hubbard says.

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Bottom left: Mr. Hubbard instructs Maddie Jarrard ‘16 and Michael Rankin ‘16 as they prepare for their duo speech in the summer national forensics tournament. Below: Cooper Smith ‘16 rehearses for the solo competition in which he won second place.

LEARNING TO SPEAK

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Mr. Jeff Bryant Science Department chair

EnGINEERING SOLuTIONS

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orkforce projections by the U.S. Department of Labor, for 2014, show that 15 of the 20 fastest growing occupations require significant science or mathematics training to compete successfully for a job. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, professional information technology (IT) jobs will increase 24% between 2006 and 2016. However, as jobs requiring a solid background in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) are growing, more students are choosing not to major in these areas. Many students who would consider the field of engineering either do not feel proficient in their math and science skills or they think that it is too difficult, boring, and irrelevant to their lives. The Technology Student Association’s TEAMS program, with its annual engineering competition for high school students, is successfully working to change that “boring” image. The TEAMS program competition challenges students to work collaboratively and apply their math and science

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TO REAL-LIFE PROBLEMS knowledge in practical, creative ways to solve real everyday engineering challenges. The TEAMS competition helps develop “STEM-capable” students in an engaging way by showing them how math and science, with an engineering focus, are used to make tangible differences in the world. Tackling these challenges requires critical job-readiness skills such as collaboration, analytical thinking, and multidimensional problem-solving. On March 20, Brentwood Academy students, coached by Science Department Chair Jeff Bryant, traveled to the University of Tennessee Knoxville to participate for the first time in a TEAMS competition. This year’s theme was “Engineering Healthier Lives” where students tackled problems related to healthcare and medicine. Teams were presented with these eight scenarios representing challenges facing the medical and health care industries and were asked to use their engineering skills to come up with potential solutions:


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• Improving artificial heart valves • Improving prostheses for hip replacements for full functionality • Using the principles of biomechanics to design and develop knee prostheses • Curing disease by designing and developing drugs that target disease • Developing and designing dental implants that restore the ability to chew food • Designing products for the human body that use the concepts of fluid dynamics and heat transfer • Designing data management systems for clinical trials that safeguard patients and improve data recording • Making life-saving treatments available to the public by improving clinical trials

Scenarios were presented prior to competition so team members were able to conduct research during their months of preparation. During their practice sessions, team members also met to practice problem-solving techniques and consensus activities. Mrs. Wendy Stallings, a BA physics teacher, was especially helpful in preparing students during their practice sessions, considering that she competed in the TEAMS competition when she was in high school.

3D MODELING By Mr. Steve Hollis, Computer/Science Faculty

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inema4D is a very high end computer program that BAPA provided for the Technology Department. It has been used to create such feature films as Shrek. In Computer Applications (and now Computer Applications II) we explore 3D modeling. Students have to bring a lot of knowledge from a variety of areas to the table: physics, math, critical thinking, and problem solving just to name a few. By modeling such simple, everyday objects as a fork, spoon, and mug, they are able to take abstract concepts such as symmetry and manipulate them in a 3D environment. Even if these students do not go on to a career in technology, the higher level thinking skills they develop will be an advantage for them in the job market.

At competition, teams completed two 90-minute timed challenges; one in essay format and one in multiplechoice format. Students were able to discuss questions with their team members and use their notes to provide their best responses collectively. The BA team finished in third place, impressive for a first-time appearance. “The test was very challenging; in fact, one of the engineering professors who spoke with us said he had trouble completing the test,” said competitor James Foster ’15. “Through the competition, we learned about what a career in engineering is like, practiced teamwork skills, and bonded with our classmates. I would definitely recommend this to anyone considering participating.”

3D Modeling

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scan QR code or visit media.brentwoodacademy.com

College Counselor Shelley Miller went along on the trip and took advantage of the opportunity to give students a tour of the UT College of Engineering and to hear presentations from University staff.

Mr. Steve Hollis, computer instructor

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Triangle Summer/Fall 2012

Mr. Warren Bezuidenhout 8th grade chair

4 EVERYONE WINS IN THIS GAME

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arents and teachers have historically considered the gaming-craze as an enemy in the battle for capturing students’ time and attention. Recently, however, the rules of battle may have shifted in favor of education, and our children are the winners, thanks to a small team of educators and programmers from the United States and Finland. MinecraftEdu, the result of their collaboration, is based on a traditional survival game but has been adapted for the classroom to engage and educate young minds. Mr. Warren Bezuidenhout, director of student technology and 8th grade multi-media instructor, has incorporated MinecraftEdu into

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his curriculum and has established Brentwood Academy as one of the beta sites for development of the program. “A portion of my multimedia class this year has been devoted to learning and using MinecraftEdu in creative mode to build a scale model of our school. The students measure different parts of our school and then estimate how many blocks would be necessary for recreating that part of the building in Minecraft. One Minecraft block is equivalent to about three feet, three inches,” Mr. Bezuidenhout explains. “We have focused our attention on the middle school building and football field for right now.”

MinecraftEdu is designed from the ground up to be open-ended and modifiable, allowing it to be tailored to the curriculum. While the game is being used to teach computer skills, it easily lends itself to science, technology, engineering, and math explorations. But beyond that, language teachers are strengthening communication skills, civics teachers are exploring how societies function, and history teachers are having their students recreate ancient civilizations, much like the BA model. As the 8th graders in Mr. Bezuidenhout’s class have discovered, this is a game where everyone wins.


BRIDGES LEADS THE WAY

for new upper school students

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hat happens if you are a new Brentwood Academy student entering for the first time in the upper school? Your soon-to-be fellow students have more than likely been at BA for several years in middle school and now you must integrate yourself into a brand new school with many returning students. Bridges to the rescue!

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Started in 2007 under the leadership of English teacher Mrs. Kristin Vazquez, the Bridges program offers new upper school students the opportunity to become familiar with many aspects of Brentwood Academy before classes begin in August. The inspiration for Bridges came from Mrs. Vazquez’s experience with a similar prgram in

another school. She recognized the same need existed here at BA after working with two new students who were struggling. Two sessions of Bridges are held each summer with attendance at one being mandatory for new upper school students. A parent meeting is also held on the first day of each Bridges session. The main goal of Bridges is to facilitate students’ transitions into Brentwood Academy so they are familiar with many of our traditions and expectations when they arrive for the first day of classes. Students learn about a variety of issues they will encounter as new students including open lockers, dress code, summer reading, the lunch program, registration, and all information included in the handbook. They also learn what to expect about block scheduling, standing in class when a teacher enters the room, why we have advisory groups, what spiritual life is all about, and even how to arrange their lockers. A scavenger hunt and tours of the school allow new students to know their way around the campus before being confronted with “finding their way” on the first day of classes. Students are taught annotating skills to help with their summer reading as well as taking a math placement test to assure they are placed in the correct math class.

During their time spent in Bridges, new students hear from a variety of school leaders including Headmaster Curt Masters, Upper School Director Paul Compton, Family Life Coordinator Cookie Newton, academic department chairs, Winterim Chair Bonnie Hall, Dean of Students Kent Bradford, Spiritual Life Director Rian Berger, as well as other key school leaders. Mrs. Vazquez states, “This is an incredible opportunity for our new students to experience BA in a small setting for the first time. The classroom is usually very quiet when they come in on Monday, and usually by mid-morning on Tuesday, they interact like they have known each other for much longer than just a day! Bridges is one of my favorite parts of what I do at BA because I get to share my enthusiasm about our community with our new students while also getting to listen to other faculty share their passion for what they do.” Students typically leave Bridges with great enthusiasm for the coming year and both students and parents comment on how helpful it was to attend Bridges and how well prepared they felt after the three-day workshop.

Mrs. Kristin Vazquez welcomes new students.

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Triangle Summer/Fall 2012

6 Bryce Prior ‘13 , the newly elected governor for 2013, with sponsor Mrs. Barbara Stewart

Governor Caylyn Harvey ‘12 presides over the 2012 Youth Legislature

YOuTH LEGISLATuRE A hands-on approach to learn about politics and government

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ryce Prior ’13 comes from a long line of governors, Youth Legislature Governors.

When Bryce was elected at the 2012 session of the YMCA Youth Legislature, he joined the ranks of several Brentwood Academy students who have served in that capacity. But why would Bryce and so many others spend the time and energy on participating in Youth Leg? According to faculty member Mrs. Barbara Stewart, who has sponsored the BA program since its inception in 1978, students who

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participate in Youth Leg learn how government is organized, how to draft legislation, the role of a lobbyist, and even how to argue a court case. Several students who served in the Youth Leg press corps have gone on to study journalism/ communications in college. Students learn what the important issues are for the state. When drafting legislation documents, students enhance their writing skills while also taking a good look at existing legislation, noting what is missing and what issues need to be addressed. Students learn how to defend their ideas contained

in proposed legislation through practice sessions at school as well as at the conference. Each spring, the Youth Legislature conferences hold sessions in the state capitol giving students the opportunity to sit and act where the Tennessee State Legislature operates. Youth Leg gives students the opportunity to run for various offices which involves writing campaign speeches, delivering the speech, campaigning for office, making posters and buttons, as well as some face-to-face campaigning and handshaking.


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Another plus is that BA students get to meet other like-minded students from across the state who also possess a strong interest in the functioning of the Tennessee state government. A number of these friendships continue past the Youth Leg weekend. Relationships are often established between the older and younger BA upper school students. Younger ones see older students as role models. Everyone helps everyone and, according to Mrs. Stewart, this is remarkable to observe.

Youth Leg gives students confidence and many participants go on to become student leaders in college campus government, their Greek organizations, or in social service organizations. The program has also inspired many students to go to law school. Currently alumnus Sean McQuire ’99, a Youth Leg participant, serves as a Metro Nashville Councilman.

program will see the good people who serve in government and realize that everyone can make a difference. Maybe this program will give them confidence to participate in college and beyond.” Mrs. Stewart continues to sponsor the BA Youth Leg program because of the educational, social, and service value of the program.

Mrs. Stewart sums it up by saying, “I hope the students who are in the Youth Leg

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CALL OF THE WILD Students experience the WILD outdoors together

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aculty member Mr. Jimmy Ker and Col. Kent Bradford, dean of students, share a love of the outdoors. In 2006, they started the Brentwood Academy WILDerness Club to share that passion with students.

Exploring Colorado scan QR code or visit media.brentwoodacademy.com

Will Reynolds ‘13, center, created a video diary of the WILDerness Club’s summer hiking trip. Watch it online by scanning the QR code above.

Both teachers have spent years back packing, rock climbing, kayaking, caving, and participating in just about any activity in the outdoors. Through their experiences, they say, God has taught them the value of getting away from the distractions of everyday life, and they long to share that with students on their trips. “There is a reason why Adam was created in the wilderness and why God sent many of the heroes of the Bible, including John the Baptist and Jesus himself, to the wilderness

to grow closer to Him,” says Col. Bradford. “The BA WILDerness Club seeks that same opportunity for all its members.” The WILDerness Club normally schedules about one local trip a month during the school year, a ski trip out west right before Christmas, and a longer, more adventurous trip each summer. This past summer the club members hiked up four peaks over 14,000 feet during the course of a week in the Collegiate Range, Colorado. The club is open to all students, faculty, and alumni. Follow them on their Facebook page: Brentwood Academy WILDerness Club.

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Triangle Summer/Fall 2012

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Hollywood, California

WInTERIM

Fashion Stop

Explore, Expand, Discover, Create Paris, France

Taking the classroom out of the classroom could well be part of the mission of the annual upper school Winterim program. Round that out with hands-on learning experiences in a number of settings and the mission of Winterim becomes clear. Since 1984, Brentwood Academy upper school students have taken time from the regular classroom setting to spend three to five days each winter quarter participating in Winterim. The program continues to offer on-campus, local, and travel experiences for students. Winterim seeks to enhance the school’s mission through exploration in academics, arts, outdoors, travel, athletics, service, and creative thinking.

Winterim 2012 scan QR code or visit media.brentwoodacademy.com

Each fall, students are provided a brochure of Winterim offerings along with the challenge to expand their knowledge beyond present experiences and to embrace a love of learning…to be “life long” learners. Each upper school faculty member puts together a Winterim offering, clearly stating the goals of each offering. The Winterim brochure states goals for the program as follows: • to expand the student’s worldview and knowledge Chicago, Illinois

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• •

through exposure to new ideas and/or new skills to deepen relationships among students and faculty by working in small groups with faculty to model a love of learning through faculty involvement with students to eliminate the misconception that learning only occurs in a classroom environment and, thus, developing lifelong learners to reinforce ideas or concepts taught in the classroom in a different environment.

Faculty member and Spanish teacher Mrs. Shannon Frost led a group of Spanish students to Costa Rica and made the following observations: “Taking students on educational tours of Spanish-speaking countries like Spain and Costa Rica gives them the opportunity to practice their language skills while being immersed in the music, food, customs, and traditions that are often difficult to convey inside the classroom. Learning about Flamenco is interesting, but having students experience a Flamenco show inside a gypsy cave in Granada creates a memory that will last a lifetime.”


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PHYSICS ON A BuN

Science Department Chair Jeff Bryant sums it by by saying, “Winterim has offered me a rich variety of experiences with students for more than a decade. Each year I have the flexibility to make fine adjustments to my favorite course, or to run a completely different program. I have been able to take college tours, go behind the scenes at SeaWorld, attend Space Camp, oversee student internships, lead bicycle tours, and cook organic foods. In some years, I have shared knowledge of a subject that I personally enjoy, and in other years I have learned nearly as much as the students from the experts doing the instruction. No matter which subject studied or skills learned, Winterim courses broaden a student’s understanding of his or her community or even the world, reinforce a habit of lifelong learning, and provide many opportunities for fellowship and building community within our school.” Faculty leadership has ensured the continued growth and development of Winterim. Founding sponsor Mr. Danny Allen has been followed by Mrs. Cameron Phillips, Ms. Lindsay Fowlkes ‘86, Mrs. Bonnie Baria Hall, and Mrs. Shannon Frost. A special nod of appreciation goes to Mrs. Sharon Sheriff, parent of three alumni, for her faithful service as treasurer and bookkeeper.

By Mrs. Wendy Stallings Science Faculty There’s nothing quite like pulling out the magnifying glasses and reminiscing about chasing ants when you were little... Or at least that’s what my students start talking about when we head outside with the hot dog roaster and lenses to cook up some hot dogs and s’mores every April. Each fall when I get a new batch of students, one of the questions I get over and over is, “When do we get to roast hot dogs?” The question gets repeated throughout the year as students see the hot dog roaster in the classroom.

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When we finally head outside in the early spring to test it out, they are more than ready. As we sit around, sometimes in 50-degree weather or colder, and use a parabolic mirror to slow-roast a hot dog, some of the math and science concepts come together in a new way. Parabolas, light, heat, and energy are no longer merely definitions to be remembered, but they become

concepts you can use to achieve a goal. In one class period, we can demonstrate every concept covered in three chapters of the textbook through a simple, clear, and quite tasty activity. Every year I hear a slew of, “oh, that’s why...” and it inspires me to continue pursuing classroom activities that engage students in a meaningful way. This fall, I have enjoyed introducing Applied Physics. The goal of the course is to achieve mastery of basic physics principles entirely through hands-on activities and inquiry learning. From circuits and robots to energy transfer and aeronautics, students have the chance to put the principles of physics into action. In doing so, students are able to use math, computer programming, and even art in entirely new ways.

Physics Hot Dog Roast scan QR code or visit media.brentwoodacademy.com

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Triangle Summer 2012

MATH BY REMOTE

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BA mathematics teacher Mr. Chandler Ganick ’01 was exploring teaching methods on the internet several years ago and came upon a program, Doceri, that piqued his interest. He downloaded and taught himself the program and conducted additional research. As Ganick relates, “I was tired of just standing in the front of the classroom drawing on a whiteboard and figured that if I was able to freely move around the room, then everyone would benefit.” That is exactly what Doceri allows. Doceri works as a desktop remote allowing instructors to use their computers along with iPads which allow airplay to an Apple TV that is

connected to the projects they are working on. Ganick is in the process of using other Apple products to allow students to project from their own personal iPads and iPods. “I am able to create lessons before the class starts and have them recorded and ready to use once class begins. One of the benefits is that it allows me to be able to walk around the room and see the work the students are doing while I am still writing and working on the board.” Also, the process of solving the problems is recorded and available online for students as they complete homework and prepare for tests.

Mr. Chandler Ganick ‘01 Math Department

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FuN WITH NuMBERS BA’s math competition team grew last year to include more than 35 students. Coached by BA Honorary Trustee Hampton Pitts and Math Department Chair Floyd Elliott, the team included several students who finished in the top 20 at the State Math Contest’s regional tournament,

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sponsored by Tennessee Mathematics Teachers Association. Students placed in these categories: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, Pre Calculus, and Statistics. While learning to compete, students took the time for making math fun!


co-educational • independent • college preparatory • grades 6-12

Join us for Admission Day November 10 or February 2 to register please call 615.523.0611

Campus Tours every Tuesday and Wednesday at 8:30 AM

scan or go online to

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Triangle Summer/Fall 2012

Academy Singers - “Be Wise” scan QR code or visit brentwoodacademy.com/forward

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40 Graduating Class TH

Celebrating 40 years of Brentwood Academy alumni

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rentwood Academy alumni now number 2,832 as the 113 members of the class of 2012 were awarded diplomas at the school’s 40th graduation in May. The graduation ceremonies, held at Brentwood Baptist Church, reflected the mission of the school through student music by the Academy Singers, student speakers Wrenne Bartlett and Will Fitts, who were chosen by their classmates, and the presentation of awards. As is the tradition at Brentwood Academy, each graduating senior heard Headmaster Curt Masters read several comments prior to receiving

a diploma from trustee chair Mr. Buddy Bacon ‘82. The comments, written by the faculty, noted the strengths, joys, and attributes of each person. Each new graduate was presented a Bible by Alumni Council Co-President Mrs. Kim Smith Elliott ‘95. At Baccalaureate services at Covenant Presbyterian Church on the preceding day, speakers, chosen by the class of 2012, were faculty members Mr. Jason Mathews and Mr. Brad Perry ’92. The Academy Singers performed “Be Wise,” which has become a tradition at Baccalaureate.

graduation awards

Caylyn Harvey Founders Award Female Athlete Valedictorian

Samantha Becci Jacklyn Vanderpool Salutatorian

Andy Anderson Spiritual Life Award

Radir Annoor Male Athlete

Mr. Floyd Elliott Clyde Swift Faculty Award

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Triangle Summer/Fall 2012

COLLEGE BOUND

The members of the Class of 2012 are attending 46 different colleges in 17 different states. Students in the Class of 2012 were awarded over $4.6 million dollars in academic, leadership, and athletic scholarships, not including the Tennessee HOPE Scholarship. Three students, Wesley Cates, Luke Newman and Britta Ristau, were named National Merit Commended Scholars, and Caylyn Harvey and Ziger Huffnagle were named National Merit Finalists. The following list outlines all of the schools to which each student was offered admission. The college each graduate chose to attend is listed in bold print.

William Michael Andres - Colorado State University, University of Tennessee Knoxville Radir Ameen Annoor - Tennessee Technological University, University of Kentucky, University of Tennessee Knoxville Tyler Daniel Atkins - University of Tennessee Knoxville, Pellissippi State Technical Community College Bridge Program, Middle Tennessee State University, University of Mississippi, Samford University William Dennis Baron - Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Elizabeth Wrenne Bartlett - Clemson University, University of Georgia, University of Mississippi Alyssa Lynn Bastian - Lipscomb University, Cumberland University, Samford University

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Khy Allin Baxley - University of Central Florida, Auburn University, University of Colorado Boulder, Florida Atlantic University, Florida State University Samantha Lily Becci - Georgetown University, Boston College, University of Chicago, Emory University, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of Tennessee Knoxville Alexander Bryce Bell - University of Tennessee Knoxville, East Tennessee State University, University of Tennessee Chattanooga Joseph MacMiller Brown - Mississippi State University, Appalachian State University, Auburn University, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, University of Tennessee Knoxville Mark Andrew Burgin - University of Tennessee Knoxville, Tennessee Technological University, University of Tennessee Chattanooga


brentwoodacademy.com Byron Victor Bush - University of Tennessee Knoxville, Belmont University, Samford University, University of Colorado Boulder, University of Tennessee Chattanooga

Rachel Morgan Frey - Samford University, University of Alabama, Belmont University, Palm Beach Atlantic University, University of Tampa

Mallory Michelle Campbell - Berry College, Samford University, University of Tennessee Chattanooga, Western Kentucky University

Elizabeth Hartwell Gerrald - Clemson University, University of Kentucky

Christian Wade Carpenter - University of Maryland, Western Kentucky University

Mallory Grace Glasgow - University of Tennessee Knoxville, Auburn University, Belmont University

Kaitlyn Briana Cash - University of Tennessee Chattanooga, Indiana Institute of Technology, Johnson C. Smith University

William Ross Goodman - University of Tennessee Knoxville

Wesley Steven Cates - Auburn University Lindsey Morgan Cherry - University of Tennessee Knoxville, Auburn University Sarah Edwards Clifton - Rhodes College, Centre College, Georgetown College, University of Kentucky, Samford University, College of Wooster Austin Carl Cochran -Western Kentucky University, Carson-Newman College, Hampden-Sydney College, Mississippi State University Caroline Kennedy Cookson - Belmont University, University of Oklahoma, Oxford College of Emory, Texas Christian University Elizabeth Ann Cullum - University of Tennessee Chattanooga, Furman University, Maryville College, University of North Carolina at Asheville Taylor Grant Davis - Lee University, Auburn University, Mississippi State University, University of Tennessee Knoxville Katherine Ann Denney - Belmont University, College of Charleston, Indiana University, University of South Carolina, University of Tennessee Knoxville Caroline Grace Dodd - Tennessee Technological University, Baylor University, Murray State University, Samford University, University of Tennessee Knoxville, Union University Guy Roosevelt Dotson, III - Middle Tennessee State University Madeline Kate Dozier - University of Tennessee Knoxville, University of Alabama Rebecca Lauren Eddings - University of Tennessee Knoxville, Auburn University Tyler Mills Emery - University of Tennessee Knoxville, Auburn University, University of Mississippi Caton Keeler Eskew - University of Tennessee Knoxville, Auburn University, Clemson University, University of Memphis, University of North Carolina at Wilmington Courtney Lee Fadler - University of Kentucky, University of Tampa William Lombard Fitts - University of Tennessee Knoxville, Auburn University, Georgia Institute of Technology, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

Hannah Kristine Grimson - University of Tennessee Knoxville, Auburn University Caylyn Grace Harvey - Davidson College, Duke University, Georgetown University, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Vanderbilt University, University of Virginia, Wake Forest University, Washington University in St. Louis Bryce Gregory Hatten - University of Mississippi, Alabama A&M University, Howard University, Middle Tennessee State University, Samford University, University of Tampa, University of Tennessee Knoxville Dylan Christopher Healey - University of Arizona Jaclyn Kaye Heckle - University of Tennessee Martin Frederic Siegfried Huffnagle - George Washington University, American University of Paris, Boston University, Columbia College Chicago, Flagler College, University of Miami Trent Joseph Jenkins - Western Kentucky University, East Tennessee State University Tyler Edward Jenkins - Western Kentucky University Jessica Kate Jestings - Vanderbilt University, Auburn University, University of Georgia, University of Tennessee Knoxville, Texas Christian University Justina Theresa Jones - Tennessee Wesleyan College, Centre College, University of Evansville, Spalding University, University of Tennessee Knoxville Mamie Crockett Joyce - University of Kentucky, Mississippi State University Priscilla Maurine Kaestner - Auburn University, University of Alabama, University of Tennessee Knoxville Lindsey Diane Keller - University of Tennessee Knoxville, Auburn University Nicole Marie Kocina - Belmont University, Samford University, University of Tennessee Knoxville Michael Lee Lewis - University of Alabama, University of Mississippi Conner Douglass Lunsford - Texas Christian University, University of Tennessee Knoxville, Tulane University

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Triangle Summer/Fall 2012 Kristen Ann Mackie - University of Tennessee Knoxville, University of Alabama, University of Mississippi

Victoria Blair Perdue - Auburn University, University of Alabama, University of Mississippi, University of Tennessee Knoxville

Daniel Denny Maloney - University of Alabama, University of Mississippi

Jonathan Caleb Prather - Clemson University, University of Mississippi

Thomas Towler McClellan - Auburn University, Clemson University, University of Tennessee Knoxville

John Thomas Pratt - Belmont University, Auburn University

Taylor Victoria McFarland - Xavier University of Louisiana, Florida A&M University, Florida Southern College, Hampton University, High Point University, Howard University, Spelman College Katherine Anne McGregor - University of Tennessee Knoxville, Auburn University, University of Georgia Krista Lynn Meadow - Belmont University Olivia Christine Meers - Clemson University, Auburn University, University of Colorado Boulder, Emory University, Louisiana State University, Montana State University, Oxford College of Emory University, Pennsylvania State University, University of Tennessee Knoxville, University of Vermont

Lincoln Thomas Priest - University of Tennessee Knoxville, Auburn University, University of Mississippi, Murray State University Stormy Nicole Rains - Mississippi State University, University of Alabama, Belmont University, University of Mississippi William Allan Rankin - University of Mississippi, Auburn University, Belmont University, Furman University, University of Tennessee Knoxville Coleman Brooks Reynolds - University of Alabama, University of Mississippi Britta Sharon Ristau - Vanderbilt University, University of Tennessee Knoxville

Ryan Winn Minnigan - Belmont University, Samford University

Abigail Martin Rodgers - University of Alabama, Samford University

Jackson Lee Moore - Auburn University, Samford University, University of Tennessee Knoxville

Emily Anne Samuel - Pepperdine University, University of Alabama, Furman University, Miami University, Texas Christian University

Justin Blake Moore - Auburn University, University of Tennessee Knoxville

Amy Elizabeth Schardt - University of Alabama, University of Mississippi

Ali Holder Moss - East Tennessee State University, University of Alabama, University of Mississippi, Western Kentucky University

Jay Chan Schoerke - University of Mississippi, College of Charleston, University of Louisville

Kaylor Leanna Murray - Hampton University, Norfolk State University, Tennessee State University, University of Tennessee Knoxville

Paige Jordan Shelby - Samford University, Baylor University Alexandria Neely Shelton - Mississippi State University, East Tennessee State University, Samford University

Mary Jordan Naile - University of Alabama

Samuel Geddes Shepard - Louisiana Tech University

Virginia Alexander Nash - Lipscomb University, University of Alabama, Auburn University, University of Mississippi

Hannah Grace Shudde - Lipscomb University, University of Tennessee Chattanooga, Western Kentucky University

Joseph Luke Newman - Rhodes College, Auburn University, Clemson University, University of Tennessee Knoxville

Graham Caleb Shuler - Stanford University

Elizabeth Weaver Nichols - Elon University

Samantha Leigh Siegel - University of Colorado Boulder, University of Alabama, University of Tennessee Knoxville

Corien Ju’Don Owens - Western Kentucky University, Lindsey Wilson College

Seth Patrick Sirgo - Purdue University, Indiana University, Iowa State University

Sarah Elizabeth Panner - University of Georgia, Auburn University

Brady Dillon Slinkard - Samford University, Appalachian State University, Miami University, University of Tennessee Knoxville

Kelsey Prudence Payne - Elon University, Mississippi State University Mallory Helen Payne - University of San Diego, Auburn University, Furman University, University of North Carolina at Wilmington Elizabeth Adley Pease - Mississippi State University, Samford University, University of Tennessee Chattanooga, University of Tennessee Knoxville

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Zachary Andrew Spires - University of Tennessee Knoxville, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Arizona State University, University of Pittsburgh Alexa Kristine Stallings - University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, University of Georgia, University of Kansas, Purdue University


brentwoodacademy.com Samuel James Stark - University of Kentucky, University of Arkansas, Mississippi State University, University of Tennessee Chattanooga

Scenes from

Baccalaureate

Shannon Elise Stiles - Pepperdine University, Elon University, Gordon College Connor Hamilton Stone - Tennessee Technological University Anna Kathryn Storey - Baylor University, Auburn University, Indiana University, University of Tennessee Knoxville, University of Texas at Austin Ian Dean Taylor - Western Kentucky University, University of Tennessee Chattanooga, Almose Alphonse Thompson - University of Tennessee Chattanooga Tiana Mackenzie Trotz - Belmont University, Taylor University Geoffrey Crockett Tulloch - University of Alabama, University of Mississippi, University of Tennessee Knoxville Jacklyn Ann Vanderpool - Abilene Christian University, University of Alabama, Texas A&M University Hannah Taylor Victory - Centre College, Furman University, Meredith College, Presbyterian College, University of Tennessee Knoxville Katherine Lazar Vogel - Belmont University, University of Tennessee Knoxville Graham Redick Waldrop - University of Tennessee Knoxville Joshua Lawrence Warren - Union University, Covenant College, East Tennessee State University, University of Tennessee Knoxville, Trevecca Nazarene University, Western Kentucky University India Elizabeth Way - Auburn University, University of Tennessee Knoxville John David Westmoreland - Middle Tennessee State University, University of Tennessee Knoxville Harrison Glenn White - University of Tennessee Chattanooga Charles Franklin Wochomurka, IV - University of Tennessee Chattanooga, Auburn University, Birmingham-Southern College, University of Tampa, University of Tennessee Knoxville, University of Tennessee at Martin Hunter Austin Wood - Western Kentucky University, Trevecca Nazarene University Allison Marie Yarbrough - Furman University, Belmont University, Centre College, High Point University, Rhodes College

Mr. Brad Perry ‘92 (top) and Mr. Jason Mathews (bottom) were the faculty members selected by the Class of 2012 to speak at Baccalaureate, which was held at Covenant Presbyterian Church in Nashville.

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Triangle Summer/Fall 2012

g n i v a e L the

EAGLES’ nest College counselors prepare students for success beyond BA

The eagle gently coaxed her offspring toward the edge of the nest. Her heart quivered with conflicting emotions as she felt their resistance to her persistent nudging. “Why does the thrill of soaring have to begin with the fear of falling?” she thought. The ageless question was still unanswered for her: As in the tradition of the species, the eagle’s nest was located high on the shelf of a sheer rock face. Below, there was nothing but air to support the wings of each precious child. “Is it possible that this time it will not work?” she thought. Despite her fears, the eagle knew it was time. Her parental mission was all but complete. There remained one final task—the push. The eagle drew courage from the innate wisdom that until her children discovered their wings there was no purpose for their lives. Until they learned how to soar, they would fail to understand the privilege it was to have been born an eagle. The push was the greatest gift she had to offer. It was her supreme act of love. And, so, one by one, she pushed them. . . and they flew! --Author Unknown 22


brentwoodacademy.com

Brentwood

Class of Academy

2012

By Peggy O’Neal Peden

P

arents know the mixed feelings of the empty nest, sending a new BA graduate off to college, confident that he’s equipped for a world of independence, that she’s ready for the challenges. That confidence helps to make up for the empty space. For Ms. Shelley Miller and Ms. Courtney Jones, however, the nest is never empty. Every year there is another class of Brentwood Academy students ready to explore the possibilities of college. Ms. Miller is director of college counseling and sees her role as a mentor. “At the core,” she said, “we’re working with students, helping them through the process of college admission and selection. As early as the sophomore year, but definitely by junior year, we start forming relationships. Some students need more help. Some just want a little direction.” Ms. Jones, assistant director of college counseling, agreed. “We guide them in finding schools that

might be a fit. Then we help them with the process of applying to the schools they choose.”

when many grades are already on record and there are fewer options for classes.

“We want the student to take the initiative,” Ms. Miller said, “but it is our job to make sure they’re moving forward in the process. And it definitely is a process. There are a lot of steps.”

The following year features the freshman college meeting for students and their parents as well as the PSAT test. Ms. Miller and

“There’s not a college rep who comes here that we don’t meet with. We have a chance to sit down with the door closed and say, ‘Let me tell you about a student of ours...”

AN EARLY START That process begins in 8th grade when students participate in ERB testing and the Going to Ninth Grade meeting. “In that meeting,” Ms. Miller said, “we address course selection and encourage students to start off on the right foot, understanding that the impression they make on colleges begins forming on day one freshman year.” Too many students feel they don’t need to start preparing for college application until the junior year

Ms. Jones emphasize smart choices and commitment to academic and extracurricular interests. Students and parents are encouraged to attend area college fairs, and parents are invited to the college coffees held at BA on select Wednesday mornings from 7:00-8:30. “There’s no formal program for these coffees,” Ms.

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Triangle Summer/Fall 2012 Miller said. “It’s just a time to drop in and ask questions.” The coffees give Ms. Miller and Ms. Jones an opportunity to connect, build relationships with parents, and to give them “advice on how they can best help their children.” RAMPING UP With the sophomore year come PSAT and PLAN testing as well as the sophomore college meeting. Students receive login information

Miller and Ms. Jones. Highlights of the trip include visits with BA alumni at the colleges along the way. Ms. Miller added, “There’s nothing like getting on a college campus and finding out for yourself what you really are looking for in a college environment. They are opening their eyes to diverse college options (and in some cases changing their perspective of what they thought they wanted), and having this adventure with their college counselors (there

TEAMWORK Those college representatives listen because Ms. Miller and Ms. Jones speak their language. Both have seen the college application process from the other side of the desk. The two met years ago at a college fair when they worked for colleges: Ms. Miller for Rhodes College and Ms. Jones for Mississippi State University. After Ms. Miller went to work in college counseling for The Baylor School in Chattanooga, the friendship continued as Ms. Jones recruited Baylor students for Mississippi State. Later, when there was an opening in the BA college counseling department, Ms. Miller knew whom to call. “We are so fortunate,” Ms. Jones said. “We work so well together. We’re a team.” Last year the team included Mrs. Julie Shaver who had taught with Ms. Miller at Baylor. In 2012-13, Mrs. Jaye Goodman was added to the team to assist.

for their personal Naviance accounts. Naviance is a web platform through which students can research colleges, take personality inventories, and research careers. Students are reminded throughout the sophomore year of the importance of grades and extracurricular involvement and encouraged to begin exploring college fairs. Although priority for the limited space is given to juniors, sophomores may also apply for the Winterim college tour to visit schools with Ms.

to guide them) in knowing what questions to ask and how the whole visit process works.” The process intensifies as students begin their junior year. Now students begin to meet with the college reps who visit BA. Those visits offer special opportunities for BA students. Ms. Miller explained, “There’s not a college rep who comes here that we don’t meet with. We have a chance to sit down with the door closed and say, ‘Let me tell you about a student of ours....’”

Juniors and their parents see the team concept at work. Each junior is assigned to one of the two. Ms. Miller explained, “If one of us has worked with an older sibling and already has a relationship with the family, then we work with the younger sibling, too.” They meet individually with each student in the class. They host financial aid workshops for parents and sponsor a six-week test preparation course for students, three sessions for the ACT and three for the SAT. There are resumé and essay days for juniors and Sunday afternoon application workshops for seniors, which provide students with help as well as encouragement

Above: College Counseling Director Shelley Miller (center) celebrates college acceptances with class of ’12 members Conner Lunsford, Emily Samuels, Jacklyn Vanderpool, and Paige Shelby, all wearing their college of choice t-shirts.

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brentwoodacademy.com to complete applications and essays well before the deadlines. Scholarship opportunities are listed on the BA website for easy access. Another important part of the process for Ms. Miller and Ms. Jones is writing recommendation letters for each student. PATH TO SUCCESS Almost 100% of Brentwood Academy graduates are admitted to a four-year college. The rare exception is generally when a student has a specific athletic or career goal that precludes the normal college path. Part of the BA mission is to accept students across a broad spectrum of academic abilities. Helping those students find a good fit means working with a wide range of colleges. The 113 graduates in BA’s class of 2012 plan to attend 46 different colleges and universities in 17 different states and the District of Columbia. They earned more than $4.6 million in scholarships, and the 2011 class

successful and carry on the academic and spiritual foundations they formed at BA.” Ms. Miller and Ms. Jones have extensive experience in the college application and selection process, but they agree that it is changing every year. The growing focus on social media brings its own challenges. “You don’t know how a student will represent himself or herself on Facebook, Twitter or text messages,” Ms. Miller said. “Some students think they’re making all the right connections through social media, but many students don’t realize that more personalized communication can make a bigger impact. That’s why we strongly encourage students to meet with college reps when they visit BA and then to stop by and see those same representatives when they visit their campuses. Sometimes the basics really are the key, such as a handshake or a written letter.”

Ms. Miller and Ms. Jones continue to learn as well. They participate in conferences in Nashville and beyond, building relationships with people on both sides of the desk (high school and college side), and seeing various university campuses. Conference sponsors include the Southern Association for College Admission Counseling and the National Association for College Admission Counseling. Last summer, Ms. Jones Ellie Lee ’11 current student at Georgia Tech and Ms. Miller went to earned more than $5.1 million. Ms. a Naviance conference to facilitate Miller and Ms. Jones encourage making the transition to online students to explore, but, Ms. Miller submission. They made the most of said, “it’s ultimately the student’s the trip by scheduling college tours decision. We just want them to find a before and after the conference. school where they can continue to be

“The college counselors were great at providing unique schools for me! This really opened my mind to different opportunities. In addition, their desire to get to know each student they work with is great support to have in the college selection process.”

TIME TO CELEBRATE The hardest part of the job, according to Ms. Miller, is when she and Ms. Jones, with the students they serve, are waiting to hear from the colleges where students have applied. “There’s an insecurity in not having heard, especially when others have. We’ve gone through it with them, seen them opening themselves, investing their hearts. It’s rough to watch them battle with those emotions and still offer them the encouragement they deserve.” Students are asked to bring copies of their letters from colleges, acceptance or otherwise, to the counseling office, at least partly so Ms. Miller and Ms. Jones can learn how to help future students more effectively. When the news is good, though, it’s time to celebrate. “The biggest reward in my job,” Ms. Jones said, “is when a student comes to me beaming with excitement over an acceptance letter.” There may be no empty nest, but counseling students through the college application process does have a lot in common with parenting. When it’s done well, the students are confident and prepared for the next step. They’re ready to go—to spread their wings and fly.

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Triangle Summer/Fall 2012

WAR

SPIRITUAL EMPHASIS WEEK 2012 O u r St r u g g l e Is No t Ag a i n s t Fl e s h a n d Bl o o d

S

tudents, faculty, alumni, grandparents, and parents of alumni gathered during the week of February 6 for a powerful and hopeful look into God’s Word and what it says about spiritual warfare. Speakers shared practical measures for how we can prepare for the battle and put on the “full armor” of God to protect us in the fight. A highlight of the week was the video series, featuring Dean of Students Col. Kent Bradford, who introduced the subject for each day with segments filmed on the battlefield of Franklin. (Watch the videos by scanning the QR code, right, or go to www.brentwoodacademy. com/sew). Joe Campbell Service Day kicked off the week with the BA family spreading out in the community to serve in a variety of locations. As is tradition, the 2012 Joe Campbell Service Award was also presented on the opening day of the week. This year’s recipient was Jacklyn Vanderpool ’12, daughter of Dr. David and Laurie Vanderpool, who founded Mobile Medical Disaster Relief after Hurricane Katrina. Jacklyn has served with MMDR in Ghana and Haiti, and she has been involved in several student service projects at BA, including the Nashville Rescue Mission. SEW Topics and Speakers Prepare—Spiritual Life Director Mr. Rian Berger introduced the theme and helped the audience understand the importance of being prepared for the battle. Be Wise—Mr. Jay Dobyns, a former undercover FBI agent who worked with the Hell’s Angels, shared personal experiences as an encouragement for us to make wise choices. Enlist Support—Mr. Aaron Bryant, a pastor at Brentwood Baptist Church, shared the importance of having an “accountability group” to support us in the battle. Focus—Mr. David Cain, a professional juggler, shared a strategy for keeping focus and guarding against distractions in the battle. Remember Your Mission—Mr. Rob Cross, a Civil War historian in Franklin, offered an historical glimpse into what happens when we forget our mission and turn on one another in the midst of battle.

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E PHESI A N S 6 : 1 0 -1 7

brentwoodacademy.com ( NI V )

Finally, be strong in the Lord and in his mighty power. Put on the full armor of God so that you can take your stand against the devil’s schemes. For our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the powers of this dark world and against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly realms. Therefore put on the full armor of God, so that when the day of evil comes, you may be able to stand your ground, and after you have done everything, to stand. Stand firm then, with the belt of truth buckled around your waist, with the breastplate of righteousness in place, and with your feet fitted with the readiness that comes from the gospel of peace. In addition to all this, take up the shield of faith, with which you can extinguish all the flaming arrows of the evil one. Take the helmet of salvation and the sword of the Spirit, which is the word of God.

“If we believe the Bible, there is a battle going on all around us right now. If we could look into the realm of powers and principalities there are angels and demons with swords drawn, throwing down all around us, every bit as intensely as happened here on November 30, 1864.”

-- Col. Kent Bradford, from the Franklin battlefield

SPIRITUAL EMPHASIS WEEK 2013 February 4-8

Filmed on the historical Franklin battlefield, the five-part video series created for the week and narrated by Col. Kent Bradford, dean of students, can be viewed on the BA website by scanning the QR code (left) or going to brentwoodacademy.com/sew.

you cant‘ do it HE CAN John 15:5 and Philippians 4:13

Joe Campbell Service Award Jacklyn Vanderpool ‘12 receives the Joe Campbell Service Award presented annually to a student, who like Mr. Joe Campbell, exhibits a servant’s heart. Mr. Campbell was a 12-year member of the BA faculty and a lifetime educator. He was known for visitng school family members in the hospital, for helping any student in need, for taking students on mission trips and service projects, and for always offering a word of encouragement. BA students and faculty participate twice a year in service days named in his honor.

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Triangle Summer/Fall 2012

COMMONS: Upper school students enjoy the new furniture and elevated ambience in the commons.

THEATRE: New seating with expanded lighting and sound booth offer state-of-the-art experiences for performing arts.

Campaign Video scan QR code or visit brentwoodacademy.com/forward

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brentwoodacademy.com

THE CAMPAIGN FOR BRENTWOOD ACADEMY

TRACK: A new eight-lane track will offer high performance and an opportunity to host regional meets. A new turf field will extend play-time and accessibility for multiple uses.

HALLWAYS: New lighting, carpet and trim accent the updated open lockers, keeping with the BA tradition.

CELEBRATING GOD’S PROVISION

Plans to elevate facilities to best reflect the quality of our programs are already evident as students return for the 2012-13 academic year. As we move “BA Forward,” we celebrate beautiful enhancements to the upper school facilities including five new science labs, state-of-theart theatre and gym renovations, as well as an aesthetic makeover to the upper school. God has provided graciously through generous donors. All of these renovation projects depend fully upon gifts

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Triangle Summer/Fall 2012

SCIENCE LABS: Five new labs meet the needs of teachers engaging students and expanding experiments in all genres of science: chemistry, anatomy, biology, and physics. GYM: Volleyball players, basketball players, and cheerleaders benefit from the new sprung floor. Lighting and technology enhance events held in our primary all-school gathering space.

made to the school. Due to the cycle of athletics, our next window of opportunity for the remaining renovations is next fall. Some of the spaces slated for renovation date back to the 1970s when we had little more than 100 students. While BA has been a good steward of the spaces, growth in our programs warrant needs for improved technology and design. As we reflect on our beautiful campus and the quality of programming at BA, we are grateful to those who have come before us. We stand on the

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shoulders of those who have contributed to the mission and ministry of the school by investing their time and money. Through the renovations, we hope to glorify God and honor those who have provided for us, while we look to serving future families. Led by two alumni, Mr. Buddy Bacon ’82 and Mr. Al Waldrop ’81, the campaign has a goal of approximately $12 million to address the school’s funding priorities. A portion of each gift will go toward our endowment, ensuring longevity for BA. The entire renovation package includes five new science labs, a state-of-the-art theatre and


brentwoodacademy.com

STADIUM: The stadium will feature designated community spaces, high-tech lighting, as well as upgraded restrooms and concessions areas.

“As a parent who is also an alumnus, I have a deep sense of gratitude to my parents for making the sacrifice to send me here. The mission of this school is important, so we need facilities that will provide opportunities to bring more people in to see what we have to offer.” Mr. Al Waldrop ’81

gymnasium, aesthetic upgrades to the upper school, and a completely renovated stadium, track, and field. While the projects will happen in God’s timing, we offer this opportunity to give and encourage you to prayerfully consider your part. Pledges can be fulfilled over a three-year period.

“It is exciting to see enthusiasm for BA’s mission and commitment to strengthen the delivery of our programs. We need everyone’s investment. Our ultimate goal is to provide our students and faculty a setting that inspires excellence in all areas of academics, athletics, arts, and spiritual life.” Mr. Buddy Bacon ’82

More information is available online at brentwoodacademy. com/renovation. Please use the enclosed envelope to indicate your interest in learning more.

Pledge your support online at brentwoodacademy.com/renovation

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LOOKINGBACK

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brentwoodacademy.com

1982 Remember the murals on the wall in the theatre? This photo from 1982 features Coach Jimmy Gentry addressing an assembly with the seniors down front. Also pictured are Headmaster Bill Brown, Librarian Edna West, art teacher Barbara Bullard, Coach Wendell Harris and, to the far right, Spiritual Life Director Melissa Trevathan. Those wall murals are now “history� as the theatre underwent a dramatic transformation and renovation this summer. Please visit and see how the new improvements will benefit students.

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ON MISSION Triangle Summer/Fall 2012

ALUMNAE, STUDENTS SERVE SIDE-BY-SIDE IN HAITI By Ellie Collins ‘07

S

pring Break ’12 was quickly approaching and Brentwood Academy students were talking about meeting up in Destin or what they would do on their family’s Caribbean vacation. But seven BA girls were gathering supplies and anxiously awaiting their trip to the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere—Haiti. On March 17, 2012, Tara Carney ‘02 and I arrived in Haiti with seven Brentwood Academy freshman and sophomore girls. We joined a group of eight other people through Brent Gambrell Ministries and traveled to the Bethel guesthouse in Thomassin, Haiti, where we would stay for the week. I think we had all heard before we left how international missions will “change our lives,” but none of us were prepared for the lasting impact the week would have on our hearts.

say a few words to the congregation. The girls spoke so eloquently and you could tell the Haitians were moved by their words of gratitude and praise. The rest of the day was spent organizing supplies (soap, shampoo, toothbrushes, diapers) that we had brought and would be giving away later in the week. After sorting through supplies, we went to the orphanage at the guest house. As the girls walked in, kids flooded toward them. Soon we were all

“It was a blessing to worship alongside our brothers and sisters in Haiti, even though we only understood very few words.”

Right: Ellie Collins ‘07 plays with new friends at Wings of Hope Orphange

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STARTING OUT The next day, we headed up the mountain to the village of Callebasse, where we would be building a home for Mr. and Mrs. Masalese. Attending their beautiful church service that morning, it was a blessing to worship alongside our brothers and sisters in Haiti, even though we only understood very few words. Everyone on our team had the opportunity to be introduced and to

either playing karate and basketball, taking pictures, dancing, or swinging. Everywhere I looked there were kids hanging on, falling asleep on, and doting on the BA girls. The smiles and laughter of those precious kids and those girls are forever embedded in my memory. A DAY’S WORK Every afternoon, after finishing our day’s work, we had the opportunity to go back to the Cretche to play with the kids, building relationships with them over the whole


brentwoodacademy.com

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Triangle Summer/Fall 2012 week. We had some awesome experiences outside the Bethel house, but we looked forward to coming back every day to see our new friends. Those were the kids who captured our hearts. On Monday, while a few went to build the house in Callebasse, many of us went to a beach camp to clean dorms and prepare the facilities for American and Haitian campers. It was hard work­—shoveling, scraping paint off the floor, beating mattresses—but the girls never complained once. It would have been easy to forget why they were there because we would not get to see the finished product or campers, but the girls humbled themselves and were more than willing to do all the dirty work. BEAUTY AND JOY Most of the group visited Wings of Hope, a special needs orphanage on Tuesday. I didn’t know what to expect, seeing as Haiti lacks the resources that we have in the United States, but it was one of the most, if not the most, rewarding experiences. More than anything, I was blown away by our girls. Their patience and love was on full display at this orphanage. A lot of people, including adults, would’ve shied away from working and playing with kids and adults with mental and physical disabilities.

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But the girls quickly jumped in and fed them breakfast, played musical instruments with the kids, and helped them with arts and crafts. When Gesner grabbed the hand of Shelly Arms ‘14 and pulled her around the orphanage countless times, she just smiled brightly and laughed. When Steve would get rambunctious and surprise Brooke Martin ‘14 with one of his strong hugs, she would just gracefully accept and hug him back. I already knew these girls were beautiful on the outside, but seeing the joy they brought those kids made it apparent how incredibly beautiful they were on the inside. For me, the most heartbreaking and touching moment occurred at the Wings of Hope. Upon arriving at the orphanage, I quickly made friends with a young boy, Vilner. He was non-verbal and could not walk. To get around, he would crawl with his hands as he dragged his feet behind him. But he was smart as a whip and he had a smile that would light up any room. He didn’t live at Wings of Hope, but only came there for therapy and “school” since they didn’t have anyone at his orphanage who could work with him. When it came time for him to leave, two 10-year-old boys from his orphanage arrived. One picked up Vilner, who was not a small child, and carried him

out of the orphanage. I could not take my eyes off these two little boys as they walked back to their orphanage, taking turns carrying Vilner. I was moved to tears as I watched these young children demonstrate the love of Jesus better than anyone I had probably ever seen before. These boys carried Vilner two miles up a mountain, on the dangerous, crowded streets every single day. Not only did they not utter a complaint, but they did so with undeniable joy. We came to witness and pour into the children and people of Haiti, yet here they were witnessing to us. WORK AND PLAY We rode out to Double Harvest to tour the facility and build raised garden beds for planting several vegetables on Wednesday. We took the garden beds to the extremely dry, poor village of Canez. We worked alongside the Haitians to install the planters, and most of us enjoyed playing with the children, whose eyes lit up at the sight of paper, pens, and toothbrushes we handed out to them. Things we take for granted everyday weren’t even available to them. Yet everyone was so happy as we played hand clap games and held the kids. We could not walk anywhere without kids running after us, their small hands reaching up to grab ours, and their sweet voices telling us that


brentwoodacademy.com

Jesus loves us. How quickly their love made us forget how dirty, hot, and tired we were. The entire team went back to Callebasse on Friday to put the finishing touches on the house we built for the Masalese family. We gifted Mr. Masalese with a rocking chair, and he sat as he shared why he was blessed by his new home. He said that his family had been separated after the earthquake, but now his six children could return since that they had a home. Before saying goodbye to our new friends, the team gathered around Mr. Masalese, held hands, and prayed over his house and family.

service that week. And He used Sara Nichols ‘14, Shelly Arms ‘14, Jenna Langdon ‘15, Brooke Martin ‘14, Chelsea Williams ‘15, and Katie ‘14 and Corbie ‘14 Horton to give the people what they so desperately need, a vision of hope.

of girls take what they learned in Haiti and use their gifts and hearts for loving others to serve people here at Brentwood Academy and in the surrounding community. They are intent on making a difference in Tennessee, as well as continuing to support Haiti, whether by going back for Thanksgiving, sponsoring a child, or becoming involved with families here who have adopted Haitian kids. Actually, we have been overjoyed to discover that at least seven of the kids at the Cretch who we grew close to over the span of the week are being adopted by families in the Nashville area.

“I am excited to watch this special group of girls take what they learned in Haiti and use their gifts and hearts for loving others to serve people here at Brentwood Academy and in the surrounding community.”

SAYING GOODBYE That night would bring many more tearful goodbyes, especially when the girls had to leave the Cretche and the kids who waited for them to come back there every afternoon. We had a chance to talk about that and share what was on our hearts in our final team meeting that evening. As I listened to one of our translators, Peter, speak about the impact we had made in Haiti, I couldn’t help but think of one of our themes of the week: “Little is much when God is in it.” Our girls built a few garden beds, entertained kids, and cleaned out some dormitories. In the big scheme of things and in looking at the devastation that Haiti faces on a daily basis, it may not seem like much. But the Lord was glorified through their

LIFE-CHANGE As much as we loved and helped the people of Haiti, it could never compare to the effect they have had on us. They gave us a glimpse of the beauty of a simple life and shared with us what pride for your nation really looks like. They humbly and graciously welcomed us, loved us well, and blessed us immensely. It was an honor and a privilege to serve and work alongside the Haitians for a week. They’ve shown me more about Christ’s love in a week than I could have learned in years on my own. Everyone says missions will change your life. I can’t promise you that. But now I know from experience that it will change your heart. Then you have a choice whether or not to let that change of heart change your life. I speak for the entire group when I say our hearts have been changed by Haiti and we have made a commitment to allow that change of heart to affect the rest of our lives. I am excited to watch this special group

Thank you to BA faculty member Mrs. Jenifferlee Dager for organizing the trip, to the BA faculty and students who supported it through donations and prayer, to the girls who chose to spend their vacation serving others, and to the parents who allowed them to go. The Lord was definitely glorified in Haiti through the efforts of love, and in turn, we received the blessings of love, conviction to serve, and friendship. Maybe it wasn’t the average Spring Break trip, but I wouldn’t have traded that experience for the world.

Photo at far left: (left to right) Jenna Langdon ‘15, Katie Horton ‘14, Sarah Nichols ‘14, Ellie Collins ‘07, Brooke Martin ‘14, Corbie Horton ‘14, Chelsea Williams ‘15, Shelly Arms ‘14

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Fine Arts

U P D AT E

Forensics National Competition A middle school team of eight students, coached by Mr. Ryan Hubbard, qualified to compete at the National Forensic League Tournament in Indianapolis and represent Brentwood Academy in June. After four days of competition, 11 of the events were ranked in the top 12, six of the events made it to the semi-finals, and four of the students advanced to the final round of competition. Bryce Jarvis ’17 and Cooper Smith ’16 finished first in the nation for Duo Interpretation and Cooper also finished second for Humorous Interpretation. Each was awarded a $2,000 scholarship. Michael Rankin ‘16 and Katherine Nesbitt ‘17 placed third and fourth for Storytelling. Top Photo: (back row) Christopher Clark ‘17, Kayla Williamson ‘16, Coach Ryan Hubbard, Madison Reynolds ‘16, Maddie Jarrard ‘16, (front row) Michael Rankin ‘16, Bryce Jarvis ‘17, Katherine Nesbitt ‘17, Cooper Smith ‘16, Bottom Photo: Will Boling ‘15 and Michael DiLucchio ’13 represented the upper school, and Michael placed in the top 60 in Humorous Interpretation. They are pictured with their coach, Ms. Joanna Franzke.

Governor’s School for the Arts Daniel Byers ‘13 and Evelyn Kaestner ‘13 were selected for the Tennessee Governor’s School for the Arts, a month-long summer program for rising 11th and 12th grade students in Tennessee. They were chosen for this scholarship from more than 1,300 applicants after the highly competitive process of submitting a portfolio of their best work and an in-person interview. The pre-professional summer curriculum includes individual and group instruction designed to help each student explore and develop his or her talents in music, ballet, theatre, filmmaking, and visual art. About four hours a day, six days a week are spent working in the major area of concentration.

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Legacy A two-volume CD of 40 memorable Academy Singers’ songs, this collection is a tribute to Academy Singers alumni from 1989-2011 and includes several remastered selections. Purchase Legacy in the BA Bookstore, or download an order form on our website at brentwoodacademy.com/legacy.

Poetry in Motion A record number of middle and upper school dancers performed in the spring dance show. All genres of dance were represented in the themed show which celebrated lyric and dance together.

Best of the Best Molly Peach ‘13 and Mallory Glascow ‘12, were honored at the Tennessee Art Education Association’s Best of the Best Student Art Exhibition representing the Middle Tennessee Region at Belmont University this summer. Molly won Best Photography and Mallory won Best Ceramics.

GREASE is the word!

2012 Spring Musical 39


BUMBALOUGH

Triangle Summer/Fall 2012

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Above: Andrew Bumbalough ‘05 finished fourth in the 5,000M at the 2012 Olympic Trials in what was arguably the most competitive race for an Olympic spot. Right: Chris Vaughn ‘08 center is pictured at Hayward Field at the University of Oregon with two of his BA coaches , Charlie Harper and Hunt Atkins ‘97. Chris, who was a state champion sprinter at Brentwood Academy, competed in the 400M at the Olympic Trials representing Indiana University.


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2012 TSSAA Girls’ Track State Champions Cathy Cheeseman was named Coach of the Year for 2012.

2012 TSSAA Boys’ Track State Champions Coach Brad Perry ‘92 was named Coach of the Year for 2012.

TRACK and CROSS COUNTRY

Finish Well

2012 HVAC Middle Schools Boys’ Track State Champions 2011 TSSAA Boys’ Cross Country State Champions

2011 HVAC Middle School Boys’ Cross Country State Champions 2011 TSSAA Girls’ Cross Country State Champions

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ATHLETIC Triangle Summer/Fall 2012

Mentors Meet Players

coach cody white connects alumni to students New Varsity Football Head Coach Cody White has started the home football season with a program destined to be a winner—a mentoring program designed to connect current football players with BA football alumni. Working with the alumni office, White has invited former players and longtime Brentwood Academy associates to come alongside current players to serve as mentors. Mentor breakfasts are scheduled each Thursday morning before a home game the following evening. The breakfasts feature informative speakers, good fellowship, an opportunity to share what it means to

play football at Brentwood Academy, and a forum to discuss what the future can hold for current players. White shared, “The program will only be as good as the mentors are involved with the players. Great men have been asked to serve, and I have every confidence this will be an asset both to BA football and to the school.” It is hoped that mentoring will continue after football season has passed. White is looking for more alumni to participate. Please contact him in the athletic office if you are interested (cody_white@brentwoodacademy. com).

Left: Students and alumni gather for breakfast before the first home game against Maplewood. Right: Coach Cody White and Coach Jason Mathews serve breakfast to players, coaches, and alumni.

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NEWS

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Signing Day 2012 Radir Annoor Football Woody Baron Football Taylor Davis Golf Dylan Healey Golf Jaclyn Heckle Soccer Justina Jones Track Kaylor Murray Track Graham Shuler Football Al Thompson Football

Tennessee Tech University Virginia Tech University Lee University University of Arizona University of Tennessee Martin Tennessee Wesleyan College Hampton University Stanford University University of Tennesse Chattanooga

6th Grade Boys’ Basketball State Champs The 6th grade boys’ basketball team captured the MCAC championship on Thursday, February 9 after defeating Ensworth in the final game. The team is coached by Coach Jase Tillman ‘89, Coach Jason Mathews, and Christian Carpenter, ‘12, who assisted for the past two seasons.

MS Baseball HVAC State Champs Congratulations to the middle school baseball team for winning the 2012 HVAC Baseball Championship on May 1. The Eagles defeated MBA 8-7 to capture the title. Coach Jimmy Ker coaches the middle school players.

Robert Inman Trophy Brentwood Academy’s middle school boys’ athletic program was awarded the Robert Inman Trophy by the HVAC. The trophy goes to the HVAC school each year with the most points in all sports for that year. The award was presented to Middle School Athletic Director Buddy Alexander ‘84 in May.

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Triangle Summer/Fall 2012

Thank You!

brentwood academy annual giving

supporting the mission and ministry * 780 students and 650 families served by BA * 180 new families from 60 feeder schools * 27% of student body received financial aid * $1.8M awarded in financial aid for 2012-13 academic year * 100% of 2012 graduates enrolled in four-year college or university; 46 schools in 17 states across the nation * $4.6M awarded in college scholarships for academic, athletic/talent, and leadership skills * 35 AP and advanced courses offered * All upper school English teachers trained in AP critical thinking teaching techniques * 89 full and part-time teaching faculty; 66% hold advanced degrees * 1 million hours—a rough estimate of the annual influence teachers have, pouring their hearts into the lives of BA students

generous support makes it all possible * $473,793 raised through annual giving last year * 99% of current parents supported the school through annual giving in 2011-12 * 2,000 donors include parents of alumni, alumni, grandparents, friends, and foundations

funding the ba experience

join us in giving

Brentwood Academy could not exist without the investment of time, expertise, and financial gifts, both large and small, of our entire community.

A vast majority of our faculty and board members have already pledged their annual gifts for this year. Will you join us?

Thank you for your annual giving to BA that supplements tuition to support teachers and students. Among other things, annual giving supports professional development, keeping teachers up-to-date on trends in teaching. At Brentwood Academy, teachers and coaches are investing in the lives of young people on a daily basis. When you partner with us, we sow seeds now that will impact lives for eternity. 44

Please use the enclosed envelope to indicate your pledge or return a gift for your annual giving to support BA. Make your pledge or gift online!

www.brentwoodacademy.com/give Thank you!


ParentsofAlumni

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SAVE THE DATE Friday Night Lights Reception - October 5 Enjoy dinner with other POAs and watch the game against BGA from a great vantage point, the “Top of the Rock,” the balcony of the Athletic Center building. Homecoming - October 12 Brentwood Academy will take on local rival Father Ryan. Join us during halftime as we honor and celebrate all of Brentwood Academy’s past track and cross country state championship team members. Joe Campbell Service Day - February 4 Parents of Alumni are invited to have hands-on service experience serving a local charity together. Chairs: Corine Sandifer, Jodi Sutton Spring Musical Reception - April 28 Parents of Alumni are invited for food and fellowship before the Sunday matinee performance in the newly renovated theatre. Chairs: Sharon Johnson, Alison Rogers

Relay of Truth Any Moms’ Bible Study

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rentwood Academy families are strengthened through supportive connections formed among fathers (BADads), and mothers (grade-level Mom’s Bible Studies). Thanks to the planning of volunteers Shawna Keller, Reen Vogel, and Sherrie Moore, mothers of alumni are invited to join a Bible study within the BA community. “Relay of Truth” is an eight-week devotional that challenges participants to take small, bite-size pieces of truth into our days to focus on accessible pieces

of God’s Word and His ways that we can apply to our life situations. This is an excellent resource to meet the needs of those who are new to Bible studies and those who have studied for many years. We will spend time in worship, hear testimonies, and enjoy a lesson by Shawna Keller, an experienced leader. The break-out discussion times will be organized by grade level, as well as alumnae/ mothers of alumni, so we can get to know one another and connect on a deeper level.

Above: Laurale and Allen Williams, parents and grandparents of alumni

Thank you to the Parents of Alumni volunteer leaders! POA Chairs: Ellen Adams, Denise Long, Karen Simpson Class Communicators: 2000 Lynn Creasy 2002 Bari Jacobs 2003 Kristi Warren 2004 Janet Walls 2005 Carol Bumbalough 2006 Diane Dudney 2007 Roxane McGowan 2008 Joy Brandon 2009 Valeria Ball 2010 Kim Parks 2011 Corine Sandifer 2012 Sherrie Moore

For more information and to register, go to: brentwoodacademy.com/momsbiblestudies

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Triangle - Summer/Fall 2012