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PORTFOLIO SELECT PROJECTS

BRENDA HONG HUYNH Master of Architecture Georgia Institute of Technology


INDEX

Manitoulin Island, Ontario, Canada Bunkie Cabin Madison, Wisconsin Jacobs Residence

Dawsonville Amicacola State Falls Athens The Avenue Rose & Associates Atlanta Ponce City Market A New Bridge for the Beltline Hinman Research Survey Tensile Structures

4

Georgia Miami, Florida Manatee Matters

Manatee Matters Marine Research Facility

30

Pantheon Digital Reproduction

10

Proximity Without Closure Residential Units

32

Avenue Community Center

20

Hinman Research Building Survey

38

Shinjuku Grand Hotel Hotel, Spa, Restaurant

24

Ponce City Market Parking Deck Construction Documents

46

Home, Office, Gallery Warehouse

28

Tensile Structures Courtyard Pavilion

48

Visual Essay Travel Journal


ABOUT

Rome, Italy Pantheon Visual Essay Bianchi Exhibition

Beijing, China Beijing National Stadium Tokyo, Japan Shinjuku Grand Hotel

Siem Reap, Cambodia Angkor Wat

EDUCATION

Master of Architecture Georgia Institute of Technology | Fall 2016 to Present Bachelor of Fine Arts University of Georgia | Spring 2011 to Spring 2015 Study Abroad John D. Kehoe Center | Summer 2014

EXPERIENCE

Intern Architect Kennedy Associates | June 2017 to December 2017 Interior Design Intern Atlanta Lifestyles | January 2016 to August 2016 Clerical Village Summit | August 2012 to May 2014

ACADEMIC HONORS

Cum Laude Graduate: Honors graduate from the University of Georgia Hope Scholarship: Award from Georgia’s HOPE Scholarship Program NATWA Scholarship: Award from NATWA Scholarship Program Bianchi Exhibition: Project selected as “Professor’s Choice” to represent interior design program at La Mostra in Cortona, Italy Shinjuku Grand Hotel: Project selected for exhibition in the Lamar Dodd School of Art; Best Commercial Design Concept and Best Rendering/ Computer Generated in the ASID Student Competition

INTRODUCTION

3


MANATEE MATTERS

AIA COTE Competition Studio: Equilibrium: Living and Learning at Sea Level Instructor: Michael Gamble Location: Miami, Florida Project Type: Marine Research Facility

Manatee Matters is a marine observatory and education center located in the Biscayne Bay region of Miami, Florida. The facility emphasizes 1) the protection and restoration of the native wildlife in Miami, 2) awareness of sea level rise and climate change, and 3) harnessing clean energy to minimize its impact on the atmosphere. The focus of the project is to bring awareness to the current status of manatees by providing strategies on how to recognize and protect the endangered species. According to the most recent quantitative analysis, there are an estimated 6,000 remaining in the wild. Less than one decade ago, it

was approximated that there were only 1,000 in existence. Although the manatee population has significantly improved, they are still considered a highly threatened species. The two greatest threats to their population are: loss of habitat and collision with boats and ships.

Currently, the Miami Aquarium in Virginia Key is the only designated site to visit manatees, where they are held in captivity. Encouraged by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service, Manatee Matters promotes passive observation in order to allow manatees to function in their natural habitat without disruption. By allowing people in come in direct contact with manatees, it is believed that they adapt their behavior to rely on humans rather than functioning on instinct.


ADVANCED STUDIO I GRADUATE

Miami to Elliott Key

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Figure Ground

Transportation

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Water Depth

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Solar Analysis MANATEE MATTERS

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Residential Units x 30 15,000 square feet Kitchen & Dining 3,000 square feet

Indoor Observatory & Aquarium 2,000 square feet Outdoor Viewing Platform 4,000 square feet

Maker Space 3,000 square feet Research Labs x 5 2,000 square feet

Open Classrooms x 5 2,000 square feet


ADVANCED STUDIO I GRADUATE

Cause of Manatee Death in Florida

Of the three living species of manatees, Manatee Matters will focus on the West Indian Manatee. In the United States, they are primarily concentrated in the warm coastal waters of Florida. They are a migratory animal that have been discovered to have traveled as far north as Maine and as far west as Texas. They are most abundant in Florida during winter where the water is the most warm from the months of November to April.

Watercraft Collision, 28%

Natural, 17%

Cold Stress, 13% Floodgate/ Canal Lock, 3% Other Human Related Activities, 3% Unknown, 37%

The facility is situated along the mangrove forests in the path of the manatee migration. It is an extension of Matheson Hammock Park where it can be accessible by land or sea. The site is within a sensitive sea zone in Biscayne Bay where sea life is protected by law. To help preserve the marine ecosystem, the zone regulates boat traffic and speeds to prevent any catastrophic collisions with marine life.

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MANATEE MATTERS

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The facility can easily be accessible by land or sea. The pier extends 400 feet long into the water to minimize direct contact with the natural habitat of manatees. With a number of classrooms and exhibition spaces for public access, the layout facilitates interactive learning with the researchers. The indoor and outdoor exhibition function as the primary spaces for observatory. The form of the structure reflects its context of trees. The ground level begins with the pier, with each additional space projecting clockwise outward from a core on the next floor. The disconnection of spaces serve to provide diversity in the views of the exterior. Considering the location of the facility near the mangroves, the different levels provide views of both the forest and the ocean from above and below.


ADVANCED STUDIO I GRADUATE

The residential units at Manatee Matters were the primary focus of the project. There are three ten-story towers, each with a single unit on each floor with a total of 30 units for each researcher.

Considering the extended duration of each researcher’s stay, the units were designed with a high priority in privacy and comfort. Each unit is a comfortable 500 square feet and is equipped with a great room consisting of a living space, dining area, and full kitchen. The bedroom is the most spacious room in the unit; it contains a queen sized bed as well a study area with a large built in desk.

MANATEE MATTERS

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PROXIMITY WITHOUT CLOSURE

Studio: Logics of Architectural Design Instructor: David Yocum Location: Atlanta, Georgia Project Type: Residential

Proximity Without Closure is an invented system of architectural logics formulated for the residential units at the intersection of Highland Avenue and Corley Street on Old Fourth Ward. The logic was established through a series of iterative design processes for an intervention proposal of the Jacobs Residence.

of Highland Bakery and Infinity Yoga. The program required five residential units, one indoor space, one outdoor space, and a shared outdoor public space.

Following the precedent analysis of the Jacobs Residence, the intervention of the re-purposing of the existing fence to be dismantled and reassembled was proposed to introduce an outdoor patio. In the existing east elevation upon entrance to the house, the facade is of entirely out of wood, with a fence that obscures the remaining view of the property. The intervention implements Wright’s principle of organic architecture by demonstrating transparency from Toepfer Avenue to the courtyard garden. The wood from the fence were reassembled to create an

The residential units were situated south of the property to provide the most privacy for occupants. Each unit was designed with a strong relationship to its adjacent neighbor to demonstrate the concepts of proximity without closure and inverse. From the plan, the units are seemingly interlocked with a shared courtyard space. The units are also interlocked in their forms with the first unit occupying and first and third floor while the second unit occupies the first and second floor.

occupiable space. Proximity without closure refers to the relationship of the horizontal and vertical planes of the intervention. The cube suggests a defined space but the absence of the remaining wall gave the space a sense of opening. A site and building analysis of the existing conditions on Old Fourth Ward provide a 30,000 square foot site, with a 14-foot downward slope from the main street to the residential spaces. The site is surrounded by single home residential units in close proximity to Freedom Park Trail. It is also west


CORE STUDIO II GRADUATE

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Area Map

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PROXIMITY WITHOUT CLOSURE

64’

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Site Section

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CORE STUDIO II GRADUATE

Third Floor

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First Floor

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PROXIMITY WITHOUT CLOSURE

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JACOBS RESIDENCE

Studio: Logics of Architectural Design Instructor: David Yocum Location: Madison, Wisconsin Project Type: Precedent Analysis

The canonical house analysis explores the architectural logic behind the first Usonian home by Frank Lloyd Wright: the Jacobs Residence. Wright was approached by Herbert and Katherine Jacobs for a design and construction of their home with a $5,000 budget. It was the first project which cost was the primary criteria. Wright took on the challenge and designed the 1,500 square foot house in Madison, Wisconsin. He began by developing a unit system with a two foot by four foot floor grid. In doing so, the widths of the doors and windows were set at two feet wide, allowing for the materials to be prefabricated in bulk. The heights of the walls followed the dimensions of the wood: each one

foot contained 9 inches of plywood and 3 inches of redwood slightly recessed. The house contained three distinct wall systems: the bulk of the house constructed of 2-5/8” wood, a window-wall system surrounding the central garden to symbolize a connection between the interior and exterior, and brick walls in for

fireplace, kitchen, and bathroom to maintain the mechanical systems. The ceiling heights within the home varied from 7’-3” for the private rooms, 9’-4” for the living space, and 11’-7” for the kitchen and bathroom. The fundamental themes of the house was the use of organic architecture to bring the exterior into the interior, the use of disconnected corners to elongate circulation, changes in ceiling heights to distinguish spaces, and unit system for efficiency in the design and construction process.


CORE STUDIO II GRADUATE

Multi-Height Ceiling Ceilings heights vary from 7’-3” for bedrooms and offices, 9’-4” for dining and living space, and 11’-7” for kitchen and bathrooms; the differentiation in levels distinguish public and private spaces

Glass Wall The glass wall windows function to demonstrate organic architecture by intertwining the interior and the exterior; corner windows

Wood Wall The bulk of the house was enclosed by a wood wall system; wood is a cost-efficient natural material and was also integrated into furniture pieces throughout the house from the dining table to bookcases

Masonry Wall The mechanical systems of the house are contained within the masonry walls; the walls containing the basement begin below grade and extends to the highest elevation of the building

L-Shaped Plan The plan of the house was shaped in an L-formation to wrap around the courtyard garden; the corner plan is also a significant gesture to improve circulation and exaggerate the space Unit System The established unit system simpled the design and construction process of the Usonian house; doors and windows followed the 2’ x 4’ floor system with every width at two feet for mass production

Exploded Axonometric

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JACOBS RESIDENCE

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11’-7” 9’-4” 7’-3”

Section 1

11’-7” 9’-4” 7’-3”

Section 2


CORE STUDIO II GRADUATE

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Carport Living Room Kitchen Dining Alcove Bathroom Study Master Bedroom Bedroom Garden

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TOEPFER AVENUE

Site Plan

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JACOBS RESIDENCE

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CORE STUDIO II GRADUATE

JACOBS RESIDENCE

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HINMAN RESEARCH

Studio: Visual Awareness & Architectural Thinking Through Analog Approach Instructor: Brian Bell Location: Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia Project Type: Building Survey

Hinman Research Survey is a study of the orthographic projections of a building using the principles of descriptive geometry. The study began with a field measurement and a series of sketches of the both the interior and exterior. Taking the precise dimensions, the following technical drawings were manually drafted using graphite. Hinman Research is a three-story building constructed in 1939 that was recently renovated in 2011 with thoughtful conservation of the original materials and interior and exterior features. The structure is made predominantly of concrete and steel. The research facility includes graduate level architecture

studios, computer labs, and interdisciplinary research labs. The building contains drastically different elevations on each of the four facades. It can be accessed from both the east and west entrances. On the east entrance, the floor begins on the

second level while on the west, the floor begins on the ground level. The west also contains the entrance from the basement. The building is entirely covered in brick with each row of windows spanning the entirety of the facade; the width of the windows are 6’-6” with a 1’-6” division between each. There is a mezzanine of the second floor that is stabilized by a steel staircase and a spiral staircase that is connected to the ceiling truss above.


CORE STUDIO I GRADUATE

Longitudinal Section

South Elevation

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HINMAN RESEARCH SURVEY

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CORE STUDIO I GRADUATE

Axonometric Detail HINMAN RESEARCH SURVEY

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PONCE CITY MARKET PA

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Course: Construction Technology & Design Integration II Instructor: Dennis Shelden & Howard Wertheimer Location: Atlanta, Georgia Project Type: Parking Deck

The development of conceptual documents for Ponce City Market Parking Deck focuses on its tectonics, materials, assemblies, and construction systems and logics. The documents address building codes and practice with iterative document solutions. The following drawings concentrates on the northwest corner of the building. The project boundary is framed by the intersections of: Ponce De Leon Avenue and Glen Iris Drive and Glen Iris Drive and North Avenue. There is a significant change in grade downward from east to west. and south to north. These elevation changes introduces several levels within the deck with each facade consisting of multiple entrances on different floors..

The primary structure of the deck is made of cast in place concrete slabs and columns. The entirely of the west and south facades are covered by a layered engineered fabric system that span from the third level to the eighth level. The first row of fabric is 11’-8”; second row is 9’; and third row is 22’-1”, with each column of fabric spaced 10’ apart on center. The fabric system is stablized by an

aluminum extrusion clip system and anchored to the steel channels above and below. On the third level of the west elevation, a structural steel pedestrian bridge extend from the parking deck and into Ponce City Market. The bridge is stablized by the cross framed steel members. The vehicular bridge is located one level beneath the pedestrian bridge. An expanision joint is placed both at the pedestrian bridge and vehicular bridge entrance into the parking deck.


CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY & DESIGN INTEGRATION GRADUATE

Northwest Axonometric PONCE CITY MARKET

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05 12 23 6” Tube Steel Outrigger Spaced 10’-0” Horizontally Across Facade 05 12 23 6” Tube Steel Mounted Vertically to Outriggers

LEVEL 6 59' - 11"

05 05 23 6” x 12” Steel Channel Mounted Horizontally to Vertical Tube

05 05 23 Aluminum Extrusion/ Clip System

LEVEL 5 49' - 11"

05 12 23 Structural Steel W Section

13 34 00 Outer Fabric Facade Screen Structure

05 12 23 6” Hollow Structural Section Cross Bracing

13 34 00 Inner Fabric Facade Screen Structure

LEVEL 4 39' - 11"

LEVEL 3 29' - 11"

05 12 23 6” Hollow Structural Section

05 13 52 Composite Slab at Walkway

05 52 13 Steel Hand Guard with Wire Mesh Infill

03 30 00 Vehicular Bridge - Cast in Place Concrete Beam

LEVEL 2 19' - 11"

Building Section


CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY & DESIGN INTEGRATION GRADUATE

05 12 23 Structural Steel W Section

03 30 00 Cast In Place Concrete Column

05 12 23 Hollow Structural Section Cross Bracing 07 95 63 Bridge Expansion Joint Cover 05 52 23 Pipe & Tube Metal Railings

05 12 23 Steel Tube 03 30 00 Cast In Place Concrete Beam

13 34 00 Fabricated Engineered Facade Structure

05 12 23 Steel Channel 05 05 23 Metal Fastenings 03 30 00 Cast In Place Concrete Barrier Wall

Axonometric Detail PONCE CITY MARKET

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TENSILE STRUCTURES

segments

polygon

bounding surfaces density

radius define bounding surface parameters

delaunay mesh produce triangulation

nth surfaces

unary force

kangaroo

level tension application

generate physics

(X * Y * Z)

compression line base & top surface

sphere

identify anchor points

Course: Advanced Rhinoceros Instructor: James Park Location: Architecture East at Georgia Institute of Technology Project Type: Courtyard Pavilion

The Tensile Structures is a design for a pavilion in the courtyard at Architecture East. The structure was selected from a series of iterative processes using a scripting software that generated forms based on periphery points on a surface. It provides aesthetic value to the site as well as features programmatic functions for visitors. The project was completed along with the following team members: Yue Liu, Saera Yoo, Lu Zhang. The following catalog examines tensile structures from three periphery points to six periphery points and the variations of their form. Beginning with a cube divided into 100 equal units on each of the six faces, one point of each face was selected on each face, excluding the base and top faces. The points controlled the form of the tensile structure; the tension was manipulated on a number slider from 0 to 1. The form was also controlled by the density

of the triangulation: the higher the number, the denser the structure. Using a point from the base and top faces, a rod was created to produce a single compression point on the tensile structure. The height of the point was controlled on a number slider at a minimum of 0 and maximum of 20. The structure was then implemented on to the courtyard at Architecture East, where anchor points to be secured alongside the building up to a height of 40 feet, and range of up to 150 feet. With

approaching pathways from four opposing directions, the structure exhibits many different views of the structure. The courtyard can also be seen from the breezeway and second and third floors. The organic shape of the tensile structure complements the orthogonal form of the building. A total of eight points were selected to produce the structure: two points on the north elevation, the center point of the west elevation, two points on the south elevation, and one point in the interior of the courtyard. There are two compression points that puncture the structure: one directly downward into the ground, and one upward at tallest height of the building.


MODELING & MEDIA III GRADUATE

Tension Level: 0.5 Triangulation Density: 15

Tension Level: 0.25 Triangulation Density: 15

Tension Level: 0.5 Triangulation Density: 15

Tension Level: 0.25 Triangulation Density: 15

Tension Level: 0.25 Triangulation Density: 20

Tension Level: 0.5 Triangulation Density: 20

Tension Level: 0.25 Triangulation Density: 25 2 Compression Points

Tension Level: 0.75 Triangulation Density: 20

Tension Level: 1.25 Triangulation Density: 20

Tension Level: 0.5 Triangulation Density: 25

Tension Level:1 Triangulation Density: 20

Tension Level: 1 Triangulation Density: 10

Tension Level: 1 Triangulation Density: 25

Tension Level: 1.25 Triangulation Density: 20

Tension Level: 1 Triangulation Density: 15 2 Compression Points

Tension Level: 1 Triangulation Density: 10 4 Compression Points TENSILE STRUCTURES

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MODELING & MEDIA III GRADUATE

TENSILE STRUCTURES

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PANTHEON

Course: Modeling & Media I Instructor: Sabri Gokmen Location: Rome, Italy Project Type: Digital Reproduction

The digital and physical reproduction of the Pantheon provides the foundational instruction into the theory and practice of architectural computation and geometric description. The project was completed throughout the course of a semester with team member Young Im. The structure consists of two principal parts: the porch, and the cylinder dome. A rectangular vestibule links the porch to the rotunda, which is under a coffered concrete dome. The oculus, the eye of the Pantheon, is the only source of light and provides the connection between the temple and the Gods above. The Pantheon was digitally constructed in AutoCAD. Its form was analyzed to recognize basic geometries for production; the symmetry in both the plan and elevation of the building allowed the commands to be easily replicated. The drawing was then exported to Adobe Illustrator and further manipulated and refined to distinguish dimension. Using the plan and elevation, the Pantheon was three-dimensionally modeled in Rhinoceros and rendered in V-Ray.

3D Printed Model


MODELING & MEDIA I GRADUATE

Exploded Axonometric

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PANTHEON

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AVENUE COMMUNITY CENTER

Studio: Senior Exit Studio Instructor: Tad Gloeckler Location: Athens, Georgia Project Type: Hospitality

The Avenue Community Center is a largely research based project that explores the psychology of architecture on the homeless population. Located in Athens-Clarke county, an area that is considered one of the poorest counties in the nation, the facility provides a broad spectrum of services to help combat homelessness in the community. The objective of the project is to select and re-purpose an existing building to provide a new space and function. A vacant 15,000 square foot building in Athens, Georgia, was located and chosen to be re-purposed into a homeless shelter to better the community,

The location of the facilities was strategically selected so it does not isolate or stigmatize the homeless population; instead, it connects them to transportation and other public facilities while projecting a positive image of the homeless.

Equipped with mental and physical facilities, as well as money management and job-searching services, the Avenue analyzes the root of homelessness to assists individuals transition to more stable living conditions. The building is located off Broad Street to allow easy accessibility and transportation. It is situated at the intersection of North Pope Street and West Broad Street; the public entrance is on Broad while the private entrance is located on Pope.


SENIOR EXIT STUDIO UNDERGRADUATE

Homeless Population Demographics 67.5%

of the overall homeless population are men while 32.5% are women

39.0%

report some form of mental health illness while 20-25% meet the criteria for serious health illness

64.0%

are homeless individuals while 36% are in homeless households

46.0%

report chronic health problems while 26% report acute health problems

East Elevation

South Elevation

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The materials and finishes were selected to promote a facility that is open and welcoming; cool shades of blue and green were used to create an atmosphere that is calm and tranquil. Walls are provided to openings to create transparencies between interiors and exteriors so that residents can feel like they are still part of the community.


SENIOR EXIT STUDIO UNDERGRADUATE

The architecture of a homeless shelter determines whether or not the population will want to seek assistance. The homeless population do not want to be institutionalized, confined, or in a place of judgment so it is important that they still feel connected to the community with open and welcoming spaces. While housing can solve the short term solution to homelessness, mental and physical health facilities as well as money management and job searching services are necessary to provide the long term solution to homelessness.

AVENUE COMMUNITY CENTER

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SENIOR EXIT STUDIO UNDERGRADUATE The architectural model of the Avenue was constructed at 1/8” = 1’-0” scale. Wall elevations were drafted in AutoCAD and laser cut using 1/8” thick basswood. Located at the intersection of West Broad Street and North Pope Street in Athens, the slope of the site allowed the center to provide two distinct entrances: one on West Broad Street for short term guests and one on North Pope Street for long term guests; the back entrance into the building is more private and secure, giving occupants a greater sense of security.

AVENUE COMMUNITY CENTER

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SHINJUKU GRAND HOTEL Presidential Suite 30th Floor

Premiere Suites 29th Floor

Deluxe Suites 28th Floor Studio: Large-Scale, Non-Residential Design Instructor: Saral Surakul Location: Tokyo, Japan Project Type: Hospitality

Shinjuku Grand is a luxury hotel and spa located in the chaotic city of Tokyo, Japan. The first to third floors of the 30-story hotel contains retail stores, restaurants, and conference spaces, while the fourth and fifth floors contains the Wellness Spa. The project was completed throughout the course of a semester along with team members: Avery Castellow, Paris Alizadeh, and Jinsil Lee. The design of the hotel was distributed amongst the members with a scheme to include curvatures to complement the city. Indigo and gold served as the primary color palette for the designs.

Nestled in the capital of an island nation dependent on the sea, Shinjuku Grand Hotel is inspired by aquatic elements in its design. Continuous curvilinear forms express the motions of water, representing energy, circulation, and centripetal flux. Polished reflective materials are inspired by the sea’s reflectivity and sparkle, while its transparency inspires the delicate panels that replace rigid walls. Shades of indigo paired with brass and lacquered wood form the basis of a simple palette that is calm and clean. The elegance of Shinjuku, expressed through gentle forms and continuous flow, aims to ease the roughness of a fast-paced urban culture.

Executive Rooms A & B 26th to 27th Floor

Deluxe Rooms A & B 5th to 25th Floor


STUDIO IV UNDERGRADUATE

Pool & Spa Suites 4th to 5th Floor

Massage Suites 4th Floor

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Indoor Pool

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STUDIO IV UNDERGRADUATE

The Wellness Spa is located on the 4th and 5th floor. It offers a wide range of services that can individually customized––guests can choose from relaxation at the pool, yoga, mediation, or receive treatment in the private suites. The indoor pool is the ideal escape from the city, with every wall shielded from the chaos of the city. Located on the 5th floor of Shinjuku Grand Hotel, the spa suites are the ultimate retreat for couples looking for the most extravagant spa treatment and services. The suites include massage beds for couples treatment, lounge chairs that overlook the city, a spacious shower, and a large Japanese soaking tub. The color palette of Shinjuku is replicated using lighter tones of indigo and gold to create a warm, relaxing setting.

Spa Suite

SHINJUKU GRAND HOTEL

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STUDIO IV UNDERGRADUATE Cheng Shi Yang is a traditional chinese restaurant on the top floor of the Shinjuku Grand Hotel. It is designed for a high-end dining experience, made by reservation only and accommodates up to fifty people. The selection of materials and finishes, as well as the small, intimate setting, strive to provide a luxurious and pleasurable experience. The rich, warm color palette welcome guests into a calm atmosphere as the overlook the busiest city in the world.

SHINJUKU GRAND HOTEL

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HOME, OFFICE, & GALLERY

Existing Building Studio: Single Family Residential Design Instructor: Tad Gloeckler Location: Athens, Georgia Project Type: Residential

The Home, Office, & Gallery is a combination residential and commercial project in an urban context. The public gallery is located beneath the residence, belonging to an artist and her family. Each of the drawings were manually drafted and rendered using pen and markers on vellum paper. The process also included creating one and twopoint perspectives using a grid. Given an empty 1,800 (60 by 30) square foot shell of a warehouse structure, the objective of the project was to design the layout that provides a gallery and office on the first floor and residence for a single family on the second floor. The property is located in the city, on the corner of a sidewalk with exposure on the north and east facades; the south and west facades are blocked by neighboring buildings. The entrance to the gallery was placed at the corner for easy accessibility while the entrance into the office was significantly recessed for more privacy. The gallery occupies a majority of the first floor, partially extending to the ceiling, while the residence occupies the remainder of the second floor. The spaces were organized by priority, with public spaces along the north and east walls for sunlight and ventilation and the private spaces along the south and west walls. Longitudinal Section

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STUDIO I UNDERGRADUATE

Second Floor

First Floor

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HOME, OFFICE, & GALLERY

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VISUAL ESSAY

Course: Visual Narrative Systems Instructor: Alex Murawski Location: Cortona, Italy Project Type: Digital Journal

The Visual Essay demonstrates the concepts and methods involved in creating sequential and time-based visual communication including exploration of visual narrative structures utilized in effective visual storytelling. The objective of the project was to create a composition that reflects the study abroad experience in Cortona, Italy. The composition was created through a series of digital collaging using physical content. The photography of the Italian sceneries were taken during excursions throughout the study

abroad program. The experience began in the southeastern region of Naples and ended in the floating city of Venice. The journal illustrates the diversity of the Italian culture, art, and architecture. A travel journal was selected as the foundation of the composition; it was scanned and refined using Adobe Photoshop. The textures of each pages were also taken from various books throughout Italy. Taking the silhouette of the world map, images of stamps from specify countries were placed with the frame of the continents. Other souvenirs such as postcards, drawings, and artwork were also collected and projected onto the journal.


VISUAL NARRATIVE SYSTEMS UNDERGRADUATE

VISUAL ESSAY

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2018

THANK YOU bhonghyunh@gmail.com +1 678 761 5770

Architecture and Interior Design Portfolio  

select projects from University of Georgia and Georgia Institute of Technology

Architecture and Interior Design Portfolio  

select projects from University of Georgia and Georgia Institute of Technology

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