a product message image
{' '} {' '}
Limited time offer
SAVE % on your upgrade

Page 1


JEAN SIBELIUS Complete Works

Sämtliche Werke


JEAN SIBELIUS Complete Works Published by The National Library of Finland and The Sibelius Society of Finland

Series I Orchestral Works Volume 5

Sämtliche Werke Herausgegeben von der Finnischen Nationalbibliothek und der Sibelius-Gesellschaft Finnland

Serie I Orchesterwerke Band 5


JEAN SIBELIUS

Symphony No. 4

Symphonie Nr. 4

Op. 63 edited by / herausgegeben von

Tuija Wicklund

2020


Editorial Committee

Redaktionskomitee

Esko Häkli

Chair / Vorsitz

Kalevi Aho · Gustav Djupsjöbacka · Lauri Suurpää Eero Tarasti · Erik T. Tawaststjerna Editorial Board

Editionsleitung

Timo Virtanen Editor-in-Chief / Editionsleiter

Folke Gräsbeck · Kari Kilpeläinen · Veijo Murtomäki · Risto Väisänen (†)

The edition was made possible with the financial support of the Finnish Ministry of Education and of the following foundations:

Die Ausgabe wurde durch die Unterstützung des Finnischen Unterrichtsministeriums und der folgenden Stiftungen ermöglicht:

Alfred Kordelinin yleinen edistys- ja sivistysrahasto, Föreningen Konstsamfundet r. f., Jenny ja Antti Wihurin rahasto, Niilo Helanderin säätiö, Suomen Kulttuurirahasto, Svenska kulturfonden, The Legal Successors of Jean Sibelius

Bestellnummer: SON 635 ISMN 979-0-004-80370-7 Notengraphik: ARION, Baden-Baden Textsatz: Ansgar Krause, Krefeld Druck: Beltz, Bad Langensalza © 2020 by Breitkopf & Härtel, Wiesbaden Printed in Germany


Contents / Inhalt Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . VI Vorwort . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . VII Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . VIII Einleitung . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . XIX Symphony No. 4 Op. 63 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I Tempo molto moderato, quasi adagio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . II Allegro molto vivace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . III Il tempo largo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IV Allegro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1 3 16 32 42

Appendix Reconstructions from the first version (HUL 0304) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Movement II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Movement III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Five passages from movement IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

78 79 92 102

Facsimiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

122

Critical Commentary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

134


VI VI

Preface

In the critical edition Jean Sibelius Works (JSW) all the surviving works of Jean Sibelius, including early versions and his own arrangements, are published for the first time. Some of the earlier editions have run out of print, some works – even some of the central ones – have never been published, and many of the published editions are not entirely unquestionable or reliable. Thus, the aim of the present edition is to provide an overview of Sibelius’s œuvre in its entirety, through musical texts based on a thorough study of all known sources, and prepared in accordance with modern editorial and text-critical principles. The edition serves to illuminate various aspects of the works’ sources and history, as well as Sibelius’s notational practices. It is intended for both scholarly use and performances. The Jean Sibelius Works is divided into nine series: Series I: Orchestral Works Series II: Works for Violin (Cello) and Orchestra Series III: Works for String Orchestra and Wind Orchestra Series IV: Chamber Music Series V: Works for Piano Series VI: Works for the Stage and Melodramas Series VII: Choral Works Series VIII: Works for Solo Voice Series IX: Varia Each volume includes an introduction, which sheds light on the genesis, first performances, early reception, publication process and possible revisions of each work; it also offers other information on the works in their historical context. Significant references to the compositions in the biographical sources and the literature, such as those concerning dates of composition and revisions, as well as Sibelius’s statements concerning his works and performance issues, are examined and discussed on the basis of the original sources and in their original context. In the Critical Commentary, all relevant sources are described and evaluated, and specific editorial principles and problems of the volume in relation to the source situation of each work are explained. The Critical Remarks illustrate the different readings between the sources and contain explanations of and justifications for editorial decisions and emendations. A large body of Sibelius’s autograph musical manuscripts has survived. Because of the high number of sketches and drafts for certain works, however, it would not be possible to include all the materials in the JSW volumes. Those musical manuscripts – sketches, drafts, and composition fragments, as well as passages crossed out or otherwise deleted in autograph scores – which are relevant from the point of view of the edition, illustrate central features in the compositional process or open up new perspectives on the work, are included as facsimiles or appendices. Sibelius’s published works typically were a result of a goal-oriented process, where the printed score basically was intended as Fassung letzter Hand. However, the composer sometimes made, suggested, or planned alterations to his works after publication, and occasionally minor revisions were also included in the later printings. What also makes the question about Sibelius’s “final intention” vis-à-vis the printed editions complicated is that he obviously was not always a very willing, scrupulous and systematic proofreader of his works. As a result, the first editions, even though basically prepared under his supervision, very often contain copy-

ists’ and engravers’ errors, misinterpretations, inaccuracies and misleading generalizations, as well as changes made according to the standards of the publishing houses. In comparison with the autograph sources, the first editions may also include changes which the composer made during the publication process. The contemporary editions of Sibelius’s works normally correspond to the composer’s intentions in the main features, such as pitches, rhythms, and tempo indications, but they are far less reliable in details concerning dynamics, articulation, and the like. Thus, if several sources for a work have survived, a single source alone can seldom be regarded as reliable or decisive in every respect. JSW aims to publish Sibelius’s works as thoroughly re-examined musical texts, and to decipher ambiguous, questionable and controversial readings in the primary sources. Those specifics which are regarded as copyists’ and engravers’ mistakes, as well as other unauthorized additions, omissions and changes, are amended. The musical texts are edited to conform to Sibelius’s – sometimes idiosyncratic – notation and intentions, which are best illustrated in his autographs. Although retaining the composer’s notational practice is the basic guideline in the JSW edition, some standardization of, for instance, stem directions and vertical placement of articulation marks is carried out in the JSW scores. If any standardization is judged as compromising or risking the intentions manifested in Sibelius’s autograph sources, the composer’s original notation is followed as closely as possible in the edition. In the JSW the following principles are applied: – Opus numbers and JS numbers of works without opus number, as well as work titles, basically conform to those given in Fabian Dahlström’s Jean Sibelius. Thematisch-bibliographisches Verzeichnis seiner Werke (Wiesbaden: Breitkopf & Härtel, 2003). – Instruments and vocal parts are designated by their Italian names. – Repetitions indicated with the symbol [ and passages annotated with instructions such as col Violino I are written out. – Unpitched percussion instruments are notated on a single line each. – As a rule, only the text to which Sibelius composed or arranged a vocal work is printed in the score. Modern Swedish (as well as German) orthography was established during Sibelius’s lifetime, in the early twentieth century. Therefore, the general orthography of the texts is modernized, a decision that most profoundly affects the Swedish language (resulting in spellings such as vem, säv, or havet instead of hvem, säf, hafvet), but to some degree also texts in Finnish and German. Other types of notational features and emendations are specified case by case in the Critical Commentary of each volume. Editorial additions and emendations not directly based on primary sources are shown in the scores by square brackets, broken lines (in the case of ties and slurs), and/or footnotes. Since the editorial procedures are dependent on the source situation of each work, the specific editorial principles and questions are discussed in each volume. Possible additions and corrections to the volumes will be reported on the publisher’s website. Helsinki, Spring 2008

Timo Virtanen Editorial Board


Vorwort In der textkritischen Ausgabe Jean Sibelius Werke (JSW) werden erstmals alle überlieferten Kompositionen von Jean Sibelius einschließlich der Frühfassungen und eigener Bearbeitungen veröffentlicht. Da einige ältere Ausgaben vergriffen sind, einige, darunter auch zentrale Werke, nie gedruckt wurden und viele Editionen nicht ganz unumstritten und zuverlässig sind, verfolgt die Ausgabe das Ziel, Sibelius’ Œuvre in seiner Gesamtheit vorzulegen – und dies mit einem Notentext, der auf einer sorgfältigen Auswertung aller bekannten Quellen basiert und auf der Grundlage moderner textkritischer Editionsprinzipien entstanden ist. Die Ausgabe geht dabei auf verschiedene Fragen zu Quellenlage, Werkgeschichte und zu Sibelius’ Notationspraxis ein. Sie soll gleichzeitig der Forschung wie der Musikpraxis dienen. Die Ausgabe Jean Sibelius Werke gliedert sich in neun Serien: Serie I Orchesterwerke Serie II Werke für Violine (Violoncello) und Orchester Serie III Werke für Streichorchester und Blasorchester Serie IV Kammermusik Serie V Klavierwerke Serie VI Szenische Werke und Melodramen Serie VII Chorwerke Serie VIII Werke für Singstimme Serie IX Varia Jeder Band enthält eine Einleitung, die zu jedem Werk über Entstehung, erste Aufführungen und frühe Rezeption, Veröffentlichungsgeschichte und eventuelle Überarbeitungen berichtet. Darüber hinaus stellt die Einleitung die Werke in ihren historischen Kontext. Biographisches Material und weitere Literatur, die z. B. für die Datierung der Komposition und späterer Revisionen wesentlich ist, sowie Sibelius’ eigene Aussagen zu seinen Werken und zu den jeweiligen Aufführungen werden in der Einleitung auf der Grundlage der Originalquellen und in ihrem ursprünglichen Kontext geprüft und bewertet. Der Critical Commentary beschreibt und bewertet alle wesentlichen Quellen. Er erläutert darüber hinaus besondere Editionsprinzipien und Fragestellungen des jeweiligen Bandes in Bezug auf die Quellenlage jedes Werks. Die Critical Remarks stellen die unterschiedlichen Lesarten der Quellen dar; sie enthalten Erklärungen und Begründungen der editorischen Entscheidungen und Eingriffe. Sibelius’ Notenhandschriften sind in großem Umfang erhalten. Weil die Zahl an Skizzen und Entwürfen für einige Werke hoch ist, ist die vollständige Aufnahme des gesamten Materials in die JSW-Bände nicht möglich. Soweit es aus editorischer Sicht relevant erscheint, den Kompositionsprozess erläutert oder neue Einsichten in ein Werk vermittelt, werden Skizzen, Entwürfe, Fragmente sowie im Autograph gestrichene oder anderweitig verworfene Passagen als Faksimiles oder in den Anhang aufgenommen. Sibelius’ veröffentlichte Werke waren üblicherweise das Ergebnis eines zielgerichteten Prozesses, bei dem die gedruckte Partitur grundsätzlich als Fassung letzter Hand gelten sollte. Dennoch änderte der Komponist bisweilen seine Werke nach der Drucklegung, regte Retuschen an oder plante diese, und gelegentlich wurden in späteren Auflagen auch kleinere Revisionen berücksichtigt. Die Frage, inwieweit die gedruckten Ausgaben Sibelius’ „endgültige Intention“ wiedergeben, ist nicht eindeutig zu klären, da Sibelius offensichtlich nicht immer ein bereitwilliger, gewissenhafter und systematischer Korrekturleser seiner eigenen Werke war. Infolgedessen enthalten die Erstausgaben, wenngleich sie im Wesentlichen unter seiner Aufsicht entstanden, sehr oft Fehler, Missverständnisse, Ungenauigkeiten und

VII VII

irreführende Vereinheitlichungen, die auf Kopisten und Stecher zurückgehen, sowie Abweichungen aufgrund der jeweiligen Verlagsgepflogenheiten. Im Vergleich mit den Autographen können die Erstausgaben auch Änderungen enthalten, die der Komponist erst während der Druckvorbereitungen vornahm. Die Editionen zu Sibelius’ Lebzeiten folgen in der Regel der Absicht des Komponisten, was Hauptmerkmale wie Tonhöhe, Rhythmus und Tempoangaben betrifft, bei Dynamik, Artikulation etc. sind sie jedoch in Details weitaus weniger zuverlässig. Folglich kann eine einzige Quelle selten als unter jedem Aspekt verlässlich oder ausschlaggebend gelten, wenn für ein Werk mehrere Quellen überliefert sind. Die JSW zielt darauf ab, Sibelius’ Werke in gründlich geprüften Notentexten zu veröffentlichen und vieldeutige, fragliche und widersprüchliche Lesarten der Primärquellen zu entschlüsseln. Fehler von Kopisten und Stechern sowie andere nicht autorisierte Zusätze, Auslassungen und Änderungen werden berichtigt. Die Edition der Notentexte folgt der – manchmal eigentümlichen – Notation und Intention des Komponisten, so wie sie am unmittelbarsten aus seinen Autographen hervorgehen. Wenngleich die Notationspraxis des Komponisten die grundlegende Richtschnur der JSW ist, wird diese in einigen Punkten, zum Beispiel bei der Ausrichtung der Notenhälse und der Platzierung der Artikulationszeichen, vereinheitlicht. Wenn eine solche Standardisierung jedoch Sibelius’ Absicht zu widersprechen scheint, dann hält sich die Edition so eng wie möglich an die Notation des Komponisten. Für die Jean Sibelius Werke gelten folgende Richtlinien: – Die Opuszahlen und die JS-Nummerierungen der Werke ohne Opuszahl sowie Werktitel entsprechen grundsätzlich den Angaben in Fabian Dahlströms Jean Sibelius. Thematisch-bibliographisches Verzeichnis seiner Werke (Wiesbaden: Breitkopf & Härtel, 2003). – Instrumente und Vokalstimmen sind mit italienischen Namen bezeichnet. – Abbreviaturen mit dem Zeichen [ und Stellen mit Anweisungen wie col Violino I sind ausgeschrieben. – Schlaginstrumente ohne bestimmte Tonhöhe sind auf einer Notenlinie notiert. – In der Regel ist bei Vokalwerken nur der Text wiedergegeben, den Sibelius vertont bzw. bearbeitet hat. Die neue schwedische (ebenso wie die neuere deutsche) Orthographie wurde im frühen 20. Jahrhundert, also zu Sibelius’ Lebzeiten, eingeführt. Die Orthographie der Texte ist daher modernisiert. Diese Entscheidung betrifft vor allem die schwedische Sprache (Schreibweisen wie vem, säv oder havet statt hvem, säf, hafvet), sie wirkt sich aber zuweilen auch auf finnische oder deutsche Texte aus. Andere Notationseigenheiten und Eingriffe sind von Fall zu Fall im Critical Commentary beschrieben. Editorische Ergänzungen und Korrekturen, die nicht direkt auf Primärquellen zurückgehen, werden in den Partituren durch eckige Klammern, Strichelung (im Falle von Halte- und Bindebögen) und/oder Fußnoten gekennzeichnet. Da das editorische Prozedere von der Quellensituation jedes einzelnen Werks abhängt, werden spezielle Editionsprinzipien und -fragen in jedem Band eigens erörtert. Mögliche Ergänzungen und Korrekturen der Bände werden auf der Website des Verlages aufgeführt.

Helsinki, Frühling 2008

Timo Virtanen Editionsleitung


VIII

Introduction The present volume concerns Sibelius’s Symphony No. 4 (Op. 63). The work was premiered in April 1911, after which Sibelius revised it. The revised version was published in 1912 by Breitkopf & Härtel and the JSW score is based on that. In JSW, the score is followed by reconstructions from the first version: the second and third movements in their entirety, and five passages from the fourth movement. In these, the most plenty or thorough changes accumulate. Otherwise the differences between the versions are explained in the Critical Commentary, and some cases are further illuminated with examples and facsimiles from the autograph manuscript. Genesis Sibelius spent five months abroad at the beginning of 1909, staying in London, Paris, and Berlin. He began keeping a diary during his trip and on 21 May when he was in Berlin he noted: “Must go home. Impossible to work here any longer. Change of style?!”1 He finished Ten Pieces for Piano (Op. 58) in August, and during the fall he wrote the music for the play Ödlan (Op. 8) and In memoriam (Op. 59). In September–October of 1909, Sibelius visited the renowned Koli hill in Northern Karelia, accompanied by his brother-in-law, painter Eero Järnefelt (1863–1937). It is believed that this inspired his Fourth Symphony. After returning home he noted in his diary: “At Koli! One of the greatest impressions in my life. Plans [for] ‘La Montagne’!”As he worked during the fall his spirits fluctuated: “Been in Hades. A valley like never before” and “The Himalaya once again. Everything bright and strong. Worked like a giant.”2 It seems that at least some musical thoughts did indeed originate from the Koli impressions. Namely, Sibelius’s friend and patron Axel Carpelan (1858–1919), who had visited him at the beginning of December, wrote: “Yes, I have thought much about the symphony – what you played to me from ‘The Mountain’ and ‘Wanderer’s thoughts’ were surely the most powerful I have heard from you.”3 On Twelfth Night in 1910 Sibelius noted: “A grain of something new and great!”4 This “new and great” appeared to be the Fourth Symphony (cf. endnote 43). Spring 1910 was overshadowed by serious financial worries that Sibelius had to resolve, which made it difficult for him to find time to compose. It was probably for financial reasons, therefore, that he focused on shorter and older works: he finished The Dryad (Op. 45 No. 1) in February, revised In memoriam in March and Impromptu (Op. 19) in April. Carpelan rallied round to help and arranged a fundraising event after which Sibelius was able to substantially reduce his outstanding bills of exchange.5 Work on the symphony continued: “In a deep dell again. Working with tremble on the ‘new’.” He continued working even when not at his desk: “Walked six miles while composing. That is, hammered the musical metal to obtain the silvery ring.”6 During the summer, Sibelius finished Eight Songs (Op. 61) and sent them to Breitkopf at the end of July. He spent a week alone on an island called Järvö near Kirkkonummi, on the Southern coast of Finland, from 30 July 1910, and got finally off to a good start with the symphony. “All these days on the rocky islet in a storm and in high spirits. Working on the new ‘with tremble’.”7 Sibelius’s often-quoted observation “Don’t give up the pathos in life!” dates from these feelings: as he explained to Carpelan a few days later when the first movement was taking shape: “I am working on my new symphony and every now and then I have really enjoyable moments. Sometimes something so sublime, the like of which I have never before been part in. […] Only the symphony lives within me. It is so wonderful to be able to totally devote oneself!”8 The work did indeed proceed well. According to his diary, Sibelius worked on the first movement throughout August. The development section (“genomföringen”) gave him the most trouble and he deleted it for the first time on 17 August. He advised himself in his diary: “More

beauty and real music! Not combinations and dynamic crescendi, with stereotypical figures – ‘New speed!’ ‘Now or never’!” He crossed the development section out once more on 28 August before being satisfied on the result. He considered the movement finished two days later and there are no more mentions of it in the diary.9 The first diary reference to composing the second movement is in the entry from 2 September 1910. The movement seems to have taken shape quite smoothly, according to his entry from 11 September: “II haunts my brain. Ready as a plan. [I] begin the third.”10 The second movement is not mentioned in the diary after this date. Sibelius does refer to beginning the third movement, but it did not really take shape and after five days he turned to the fourth movement (17 September). At this point, he also offered Tulen synty (Op. 32) for publication to Breitkopf. He decided to revise it, however, and he spent the end of September working on the revision of Tulen synty and the fourth movement of the Symphony alternately. In October 1910, Sibelius went on a concert tour abroad. First he conducted a concert in Christiania (now Oslo) on 8 October. According to a letter he sent in June to Iver Holter concerning the arrangements for the Oslo concert, he had hoped to present the Fourth on this tour but in the end, he had to change the program. He gives an interesting detail concerning the planned orchestration in another letter to Holter, mentioning that because the Fourth was not ready, he did not need a bass clarinet in the orchestra.11 From Oslo he traveled to Berlin, where he finished the revision of Tulen synty and met the head of Breitkopf Hermann von Hase, among other people. Sibelius reported to Carpelan: “Symphony IV matures!” and according to the diary he worked on the third movement “secretly” (“hemligt”) during his tour.12 After returning home at the beginning of November Sibelius continued to work on the third movement (4 November): “Enjoyed to the full. The silence! Time freezes! Working and forging! A wonderful feeling!” He worked on the fourth movement, too, and contemplated the essence of a symphony: “A symphony is not a ‘composition’ in a traditional sense. It is rather a confession of faith in different stages of one’s life.”13 He also forced himself to study counterpoint (6 and 7 November). On 8 November he met soprano Aino Ackté (1876–1944), which side-tracked him into making compositional plans concerning Edgar Allan Poe’s (1809–1849) poem The Raven. The Raven Ackté had already contacted Sibelius in May 1910 with a proposal to give “a major orchestral concert in Berlin (an exclusive Sibelius program)” in the coming fall with her.14 Sibelius accepted the offer and wrote to her in July: “Because all my old compositions are often performed in Germany (my symphonies several times in Berlin) both the symphony as well as naturally the composition for you, must be new.”15 The surviving correspondence does not reveal whether composing a new work for Ackté was her or Sibelius’s idea. Sibelius suggested the concert be given later, in February 1911, to give him enough time to finish the new works. Ackté contacted the Munich impresario Emil Gutmann and they started preparing a larger tournee. Plans were eventually made to give several concerts in Berlin, Vienna, Munich, and Prague including the Second Symphony (Op. 43) and Pohjola’s Daughter (Op. 49) as well as songs Höstkväll (Op. 38 No. 1), Jubal (Op. 53 No. 1), and Hertig Magnus (Op. 57 No. 6) in addition to the two new works. Apparently, more detailed plans were made when Sibelius visited Ackté on 8 November 1910. He noted in his diary: “I am curious to see what our plans will lead to. I must do a good job. Wonderful day.”16 In any case, The Raven is mentioned by name only after this meeting. Sibelius had the Swedish translation, Korpen, by Viktor Rydberg.17 It could be assumed from the diary that he began to set the poem to music after


IX the meeting, and concentrated on it for about a month, although at times he was also working on the symphony (according to the diary, at least the third movement). Sibelius was excited about Korpen: “[I] have forged ‘Korpen.’ All ideas in a fluid form. Wonderful day,” but he also had reservations: “Have my doubts concerning ‘Korpen.’ The way I work with it. On the whole.”18 He told Carpelan about Korpen: “I think it will be good,” adding “I forgot to mention that the undercurrent in everything I do is in the spirit of Symphony IV.”19 Carpelan replied: “Thus ‘Korpen!’ The devil of a poem. Just make the singing part easy enough for others as well as Aino Ackté to sing it! I certainly believe that you are going to succeed brilliantly.”20 After working for about a week Sibelius noted in his diary: “[I] find ‘Korpen’ too dark and heavy for me now.”21 His mood may have been affected because he was worried about his wife Aino’s health. Her rheumatism had deteriorated so much that she had to stay in hospital in Helsinki for several weeks. Sibelius continued to work on Korpen, however. He worked with the Swedish translation to start with, but then he bought German translations on 18 November.22 The original poem comprises 18 stanzas, but Sibelius decided to shorten it by three stanzas.23 His markings in the margins of the text reveal that he skipped the original stanzas 9, 10, and 13. He continued working on the third movement of the symphony, which, as he noted, “is taking shape and color.” On the following day he “took up ‘Korpen’ again.”24 As he admitted in his diary: “[h]overing all the time between ‘symphony’ and ‘Korpen’. – The latter must soon take shape.”25 He was not fully satisfied, however: “Doubts regarding the text. ‘Words’ are always a burden in my art.”26 It seems that he proceeded with his work on Korpen despite everything, working on stanza 9 (originally stanza 11) on 4 December according to the diary.27 A few days later things were going more smoothly: “New speed in ‘Korpen.’ Crossed out the old, as too much ‘modernly insignificant.’ My excitement concerning this piece [is] enormous. – Wonderful moods. As if time was at a standstill and the sky was mysterious with omens and moons. Castanets and triangle!”28 Sibelius still seemed confident on 9 December, and reassured Ackté – who was performing in London and making arrangements for the tour – that everything would work out.29 He was still in this good mood the following day: “Working on ‘Der Rabe’. Hoping again! Wonderful Ego.” He also planned the program for the Munich concert (17 February) but observed: “It’s a shame that Symphony IV does not have time to mature in time.”30 On the next day, however, he dropped a bombshell in a telegraphed message to Ackté: “[I] am hindered from taking part on the tour.”31 He stated in his diary entry: “[I] have burnt my boats again. [I] have broken with Gutmann advertising and Aino Ackté. But [I’ll] take the consequences! – Abandoning ‘Korpen’ for the time being. Thrown away a month! [My] heart weeps.”32 Ackté was shocked and angry when she received Sibelius’s message and replied: “I am not accustomed to being made fun of, not to mention being dismissed in a laconic telegram and it would have been more honest if you had told me right away that Sibelius concerts abroad did not appeal to you. That way you would have saved me a lot of trouble – not to mention much else – and I would not have been put into this ridiculous, less-than-flattering situation vis-à-vis Gutmann and others, my future relationship with whom you have ruined.”33 Sibelius explained himself to Carpelan: “Leaving Diva Ackté to her advertising-like fate. ‘Korpen’ must simmer on. Symphony IV bursts forth in sunshine and strength.” He added on the reverse side of the letter: “My art is totally different from ‘concert articles’ that ‘sell.’ When I give a concert no divas can be the center of attention, but instead it is my symphonic art that will triumph. That you, dear friend Axel, share my view – I know for sure.”34 He was right, as friend Axel replied: “[I] totally share your view on your art and Aino Ackté’s advertising idiocy. After having a piece of the interview in the ‘Daily News’ (‘I’ll take him – Sibelius – with me’) I now assume all further cooperation

between you two precluded.”35 Cooperation did resume later, however, and Sibelius composed Luonnotar (Op. 70) for Ackté in 1913. Sibelius’s friend and advocate in Britain, Rosa Newmarch (1857–1940) wrote to Sibelius, wondering whether it was wise to cancel the tour. She had met Ackté in London on 21 December and was sympathetic to her. She explained: “At least [you should] write to this excellent singer. She suffers because of her amour propre and you of all people should know what it means. But all the same she speaks of you and of your music most touchingly.”36 Sibelius explained his reasons to Newmarch: “I received your second friendly letter concerning Madame Ackté, whom I admire, and I must confess that there is no other way I could have acted. The affair took a direction quite unlike what had been presented to me at the outset. Above all the advertising. As the advertising described precisely and in detail what sort of a composition it is, which direction it takes etc., all without the work being finished – the whole composition work became impossible for me. Furthermore, they wanted to introduce me as a completely unknown composer – in Munich! Etc.! […] I am working on new works. […] Symphony IV will probably be ready in February.”37 Sibelius was referring to the announcements published in Vienna and in several German and other European newspapers revealing that he “has just finished a great symphonic poem for voice and orchestra, which, depicted by those who know the score, is highly peculiar in terms of orchestral technique and an exceedingly effective opus, which applies the same tangy, symbolic charm as Finnish folk poetry or the paintings by one Axel Galén [sic].”38 In 1916, Sibelius returned to the Korpen incident in an interview. Asked about his new compositions, he replied: “I cannot begin to discuss those matters, this I have strictly decided once and for all. I am once bitten, twice shy. Once some time ago I was to set to music Poe’s poem ‘The Raven’ for Aino Ackté for a concert tour. News on that was immediately telegraphed over the world. I, in turn, came to the conclusion that it [the poem] is impossible to be composed otherwise than as a melodrama. The composition did then naturally not work out and I was left in a difficult position and open to misapprehensions.”39 Whether or not Sibelius had any plans to compose Korpen as a melodrama, remains unknown. One interesting question arising from the Korpen project is whether Sibelius used the material he had sketched for Korpen to finish the symphony. Sibelius biographer Erik Tawaststjerna points out that there seemed to be some similarities between a sketch for Korpen and the musical ideas in the finale, specifically the horn theme (bb. 159– 167). In fact, the horn theme already appears in two earlier sketch pages, where ideas that ended up in the Violin Concerto (first version in 1904) and the Third Symphony (1907) appear.40 Furthermore, the booklet containing sketches for Korpen also includes some ideas that ended up in the third movement of the Fourth Symphony.41 Not much has been written on the subject, and in light of the few surviving sketches it is impossible to verify whether Sibelius originally incorporated the musical ideas into Korpen or the symphony. Finishing the Fourth After deciding to abandon Korpen, Sibelius immediately continued with his Fourth Symphony. He worked again on the third movement during the last few weeks of 1910, although the work took its time: “[I] have a feeling of the direction that the third movement of the Symphony will take. Everything though still in chaos and in need of concentration.”42 He postponed the planned concert by two weeks to 20 February 1911. On the last day of 1910, he noted in his diary: “The ‘great’ that I foresaw just a year ago is taking shape.”43 Beset with financial worries and concern about Aino’s illness, Sibelius moved to Hotel Fennia in Helsinki in January 1911, so as to have some peace and quiet.44 He still continued work on the third movement: “Remolded movement III in the symphony”, and he decided to postpone the concert again, now until the end of March.45


X Although time was running short – the concert was set for 31 March – Sibelius set off on a concert tour of Sweden and Latvia on the last day of January, during which he gave six concerts.46 As he confided in Carpelan: “I want to take this orchestra shower properly before I finish the symphony.”47 After returning home Sibelius finished two new pieces, Canzonetta and Valse romantique (Op. 62) for Arvid Järnefelt’s revised play “Kuolema” (“Death”), due to be performed in March. Only then did he return to the Fourth – to the third movement.48 The movement seems to have matured and eventually it found its final shape: two days later Sibelius moved on to the fourth movement. He focused on the second theme (“det andra temat”) for a few days, and then he worked on the end of the symphony. Even in the middle of March he noted: “Crossed out the sketch for movement IV, the disposition. But [I] believe I’m closer to the goal. A weak, utterly weak hope to get the symphony ready for the concert.”49 Sibelius was “[s]truggling with God!” and full of doubts: “Worked! Will I make it in time? And be able to realize my idea concerning the instrumentation? ‘Joyful art’! Lightness!!”50 According to the diary, the last days before the premiere were frantic: “Fighting for life with the symphony. Bear your ‘compositional cross’ with manliness!”51 The symphony was finished for the premiere, but it was a close shave. The players recalled decades later that changes were still being made the day before and that the copyist followed Sibelius home to make changes to the parts. Thus, the orchestra had the finished materials for the rehearsal on the day of the concert.52 On the day before the premiere, Sibelius wrote in his diary: “The Symphony ‘ready.’ Iacta alea est! Must! It requires a lot of manliness to look life in the face. You know.”53 First performances and reception The premiere of the Fourth Symphony took place in the Solemnity Hall of the University of Helsinki on 3 April 1911, with the Helsinki Philharmonic Society Orchestra under Sibelius’s baton. The first half of the concert comprised In memoriam (Op. 59), Canzonetta (Op. 62a), The Dryad (Op. 45 No. 1), and Night Ride and Sunrise (Op. 55), in that order. In memoriam and Dryad were heard for the first time in Finland and Canzonetta (from Kuolema) had premiered one month earlier at the theatre. The Fourth was played after the interval. The concert was played again two days later to a full house. Sibelius then decided to revise the work for publication, thus the next performances were given about a year later. Sibelius’s Fourth Symphony was the long-awaited main item in the concert, as Helsingin Sanomat declared: “The opportunity to acquaint ourselves here in Finland with the latest orchestral works of our most ingenious composer has long been anticipated with excitement. […] The main number will be the new symphony in four movements.”54 After the first performance the critiques concentrated on the first half of the concert, and with regard to the symphony they mainly reiterated what Nya Pressen put into words: “our master has entered a new developmental stage with this composition.” It was stated that one needs to hear the symphony again to be able to comprehend it. The orchestration was described as masterly and “transparently clear.”55 The Symphony was reviewed in more detail after the second concert. Most critics were united in their view that it was the most difficult work to understand in Sibelius’s oeuvre, and that it was new and bold in its contrapuntal and harmonic perspective. It seemed to represent a new style in his oeuvre, and in fact this change in style was mentioned in the advertorial written in Hufvudstadsbladet.56 Carpelan discussed the style of the symphony in his review: “Seen as a whole, the symphony is a protest against the musical style that is dominant in the symphony’s real homeland, Germany, where instrumental music is in the process of degenerating into a sound art from which life has diverged, into a kind of musically engineered art that seeks

to cover its inner emptiness by means of a tremendous mechanical apparatus. It is to be expected that a corrupted critique will ‘criticize to death’ a work like the Fourth Symphony, in which spirit and nature have merged in a wonderful way to create an entity of a kind that has never been heard before.”57 Interestingly, Sibelius also used the word protest in a letter to Newmarch: “My new symphony is a total protest against present-day compositions. Nothing – absolutely nothing of the circus [in it].”58 The critic Evert Katila shared the ideas Carpelan expressed, concluding: “But although the composer has thus thrown away all external splendor, his work is not backward looking, it is the opposite. It is the newest of new music, from a contrapuntal and harmonic perspective the boldest thus far. When one first hears it, it seems difficult to understand simply because of the richness of the dissonances and the radicality of the harmonic structure, but when one acquaints oneself with it more closely, one senses the extraordinary technique and strong logic behind it, which on first hearing seems so obscure.”59 Sibelius appreciated Katila’s view: “Katila [has] written about me and the symphony understandingly.”60 Oskar Merikanto also noted the lack of external splendor in his review, concluding thus: “So I think that in this work Sibelius, in a manner of speaking, has withdrawn into his chamber and has begun to explore himself and the mystery of life, the fundamental questions smoldering in the human heart. […] I feel that an entirely new world is opening up for Sibelius as a symphonist, one that thus far has been shown to no other, and that he alone with his surprisingly highly developed sense of tone and color is able to see and depict for others.”61 Sibelius noted in his diary: “Merikanto [has] written a wonderful article about my new music in ‘Tampereen Sanomat’.”62 The form of the symphony was also generally noticed and described as “totally free” and “appearing complex […] due to its radical structure.”63 As Otto Andersson opined, Sibelius “though, is too free in form”, but he gave him credit for being “capable of widening the form.”64 Carpelan explained the relation between form and content: “What immediately strikes and surprises the listener is the new, strange idea content and the extraordinary handling of form dependent on that. Wonderful recitative-like motives and interjectional outbursts, varying with broader melodic formations, profound counterpoint joined with a transparent, strict logic and lucidness, in addition to Spartan simplicity in means of expression – all this is what immediately enters one’s ears.”65 Regardless of the positive reviews, Sibelius nevertheless felt that his work was not appreciated. He wrote to his friend Adolf Paul (1863– 1943): “Here at home I am now out of the running. They do not understand my music. And I don’t give a damn!”66 He told his friend, Swedish composer Wilhelm Stenhammar (1871–1927), that the concerts went “with modest real understanding by the public and critics” and later also that “this symphony has been totally misunderstood here.”67 Andersson mentioned that the audience and critiques received the work “in a somewhat restrained manner” and “the audience stood dumbfounded” after the concert.68 Aino reminisced on the reception later to Erik Tawaststjerna: “Shifty looks, head shakes, embarrassed or secretly ironic smiles. Not many came to the artist’s foyer to congratulate.”69 The negative critiques of the Fourth seem to have affected Sibelius deeply. As late as in 1943 he reminisced to his son-in-law Jussi Snellman about the premiere and how the symphony was said “to be ‘tourist music,’ Hufvudstadsbladet wrote a few lines about it and only Erik [Eero Järnefelt] came to thank me. They will understand only in the future what that work contains.” In reality, Hufvudstadsbladet’s Bis penned quite lengthy articles both in advance of and after both concerts, and what he stated about ‘tourist music’ concerned the finale: “Sibelius wrote more impressive finales to his earlier symphonies. This one has – as it seems to me now – a slight tourist-like tang.”70


XI On the programmatic aspects Sibelius’s despair and an issue still puzzling scholars is the programmatic depiction attached to the symphony and its origins. After the second performance, Bis of Hufvudstadsbladet declared a program for the symphony: “The first movement, Tempo di molto moderato, depicts Koli Hill and the impression of it. In the second movement, Vivace assai, the composer is on the mountain. Beneath him he sees Lake Pielisjärvi. The sun sends its gold over the lake, its sparkling waves playfully reflecting its life-giving light. The third movement, Il tempo largo, describes the wonderful panorama in moonlight, an excellent picture with poetic undertones. The finale depicts the return. One passage in particular is worthy of comment. Where the composer wanders the sun shines, but a whirling snow storm approaches from the North-East, from the White Sea. It does not quite reach us, but the contrast between the sun shining in the foreground and the threat of a mighty snow storm behind it is effective. This is the subject matter of the symphony.”71 The origins of Bis’s depiction remains unknown. In response, Sibelius commented in his diary: “Bis’s stupidities.” The following day’s newspaper included Sibelius’s statement: “Pseudonym Bis’s presumption concerning the program of my new symphony is incorrect. I suspect it has something to do with a topographical explanation on this purpose, that I gave to a few good friends on the last first of April.” Bis’s reply followed: “Addition. A very close friend of both Sibelius and me approached me and specifically referred to the contents of the symphony as authentic […]; and it is confirmed justified in this relation by Mr. Sibelius himself, who here above admits he has given such an explanation precisely ‘on this (programmatic) purpose’.”72 It could be deduced from Carpelan’s article two weeks later that the programmatic depictions attached to the Fourth bothered Sibelius. He obviously discussed the issue with Carpelan – who was in Ainola on 7 April when Bis’s review appeared. Carpelan explained: “Because the symphony evolved during a visit to Kolivaara overlooking the huge Lake Pielisjärvi in Karelia, which is famous for its wonderful nature and wide views, one would a priori be inclined to assume it would have the characteristics of a landscape painting. This is not the case, however. Although strange nature sounds and moods emerge from the orchestra at times, the symphony rather gives the impression of something unearthly, ‘weltentrückt,’ or not human, one might be tempted to say. No human emotions or passions are expressed in this work: everything is absorbed in inner thoughts, it conveys nothing but chastity and ethereal expression.”73 But also Carpelan hinted at references to nature in his article: “The first time one hears it one might find the third movement with its ethereal moonlight mood the most impressive.”74 The third movement was furthermore connected to moonlight by Bis (see endnote 71) even twice, while later in his article he additionally mentioned how “moonlight quivers in the violins” (“månljuset dallrar i violinerna”). Perhaps this image has an element of truth, because Sibelius did not react to Carpelan’s mention of it although he reacted to many other things. After all, he had disclosed some programmatic musical ideas to Carpelan after his trip to Koli (see Genesis above). Sibelius read Carpelan’s article “with great satisfaction,” thanked him, and added: “This article is ‘continental,’ well-written, and above all brilliant from a professional perspective. One of the best that has been written on my music.”75 Revision and Publication Sibelius was eager to get the symphony published. He contacted Breitkopf on the day of the second performance (5 April 1911) asking whether he could send his new symphony to be considered for publication. Two days later he wondered in his diary: “Should I let the symphony be published in this form? Yes! – ??”76 He seems somewhat hesitant, as he may also have been before the premiere when he noted

“Symphony ‘ready’” in his diary. While Sibelius was waiting for Breitkopf ’s answer he decided to make a fair copy of the score. Breitkopf replied on 11 April that they were interested in the symphony, and Sibelius wrote in his diary that in addition to making the fair copy he also had to “give a final form” to the symphony.77 According to the diary, he seemed to find it difficult to start this work, but eventually wrote: “I am working on the quiet on some ‘places’ in symphony IV, places that need clarifying.”78 Most of the revisions concerned orchestration, dynamics, and articulation, but are in places also quite thorough. The first movement was revised most lightly, the others somewhat more, and the second and fourth movements were lengthened (see the Reconstructions). The fair-copying and revision continued in bursts and, as always, Sibelius’s moods fluctuated: “In spring, as always, ‘la tristesse.’ Work! And earnings! All as good as 0,” for example, or “Sun and poetry.”79 He explained to Carpelan: “I live partly in the present – writing up the symphony [–] partly in all ‘the new.’ In the symphony I am emphasizing certain things more than in the original form.”80 In mid-May he stated: “Fair-copied all the way to the fourth movement of the symphony. […] [I] think that this final revision gives the symphony its final shape that will last for all time. Rightly so, you wonderful Ego, rightly so!”81 Eventually, on 20 May, he noted that the symphony was ready and that he could send it to Breitkopf that evening. A few weeks later he also sent the orchestral parts, as the publisher had requested.82 The publication process was fairly fluent. Breitkopf told Sibelius in June that they aimed to have the symphony printed in early 1912, and in November 1911 they informed him that the engraving was done and Hauskorrektur was underway. Sibelius was in Paris composing and meeting friends – including Rosa Newmarch – when he received the proofs.83 He was pleased with Breitkopf ’s proofreader but above all he was overjoyed that the Fourth was to be published. He confessed to Aino: “I love this work. It is super fine.”84 He added the dedication An Eero Järnefelt to the score at the proof-reading stage. The printed score and the parts were sent to Sibelius in late February 1912, and the Fourth was performed from printed materials thereafter, for the first time in Helsinki in April. However, following the performance of the symphony in Birmingham in October 1912 (see below), Sibelius told Breitkopf he had found “some bad mistakes in the score and parts.”85 He attached a correction slip with eleven changes to the letter (see source G in the Critical Commentary). Breitkopf promised to make the corrections in the score by hand, and additionally to make a correction slip that also included the corrections for the parts, to be sent to conductors when they rented the material for performance. Sibelius apparently read the proofs at this stage because Breitkopf confirmed having received them back at the end of October.86 The score was corrected according to G. In 1930, Sibelius asked Breitkopf if a study score could be made, to which Breitkopf agreed.87 The Finnish publishers Fazers Musikhandel approached Sibelius in 1934, probably in connection with preparing the study score: they wished to inform Breitkopf of the errors in preparation for a new print.88 In a surviving letter Sibelius is asked to return a corrected sample with comments to be sent to Breitkopf. A study score was published in 1935, but it is based on the 1912 corrected score. For unknown reasons, no new changes were executed. In May 1942, Sibelius contacted Breitkopf informing them that the tempi in a radio broadcast performance of the Fourth he had heard were incorrect. Breitkopf asked for a list of metronome markings for all Sibelius’s symphonies, which Sibelius provided.89 There were still mistakes in the score, however. Sibelius gave Hellmuth von Hase, the head of Breitkopf who visited him in the summer, a score of the Fourth in which he had corrected errors (for details, see the Critical Commentary).90 According to Breitkopf ’s Aktennotiz (action memo), corrections were included in the study score in 1991 and from there


XII to the conductor’s score (Dirigierpartitur) in 1998, but the materials for hire (score and parts) were left uncorrected. Performances of the revised version Helsinki, March 1912 The revised version was performed for the first time on 29 March 1912 and from the freshly printed materials. The concert began with the Fourth Symphony, followed by Rakastava for string orchestra (Op. 14) that had been premiered two weeks earlier, the premiere of Scènes historiques II (Op. 66), and the revised version of Impromptu (Op. 19). The concert was repeated twice because – as mentioned in Helsingin Sanomat – even after the second concert a couple of hundred eager listeners had been left without a ticket.91 The concert featured the Helsinki Philharmonic Society Orchestra – or the “Domestic Orchestra” (“Kotimainen orkesteri”) as it was called – with Sibelius conducting.92 Although Sibelius noted in his diary that the concerts succeeded well, he was not happy with the orchestra’s execution: “The orchestra quite bad. Strangely enough, e.g., the clarinet in this our philharmonic orchestra is one of the worst instruments. He, in other words the clarinetist, can nothing. Is Confused! – This orchestra shower has had its distinct meaning to me again.” Although most critics spoke well of the orchestra’s performance, two of them mentioned that the violins could have played more distinctly in places.93 Otherwise the critics covered the same topics. Bis still mentioned Koli (30 March), but others did not refer to nature influences. The rich instrumentation was also frequently pointed out. Although the work had been revised, neither the revision nor its effect was touched upon. Instead, several critics reiterated what Otto Kotilainen had put into words: “[…] hearing the symphony several times clarifies the strange problematic impression it left the first time, in a concert one year ago.”94 The critiques tended to speculate on the psychological depth of the Symphony and its form. Leo Funtek provided the most thorough description in Dagens Tidning one day before the concert, in an attempt to prepare listeners for the performance: “Sibelius’s string quartet carries the title ‘Voces intimae.’ If one was to give the same title to the Fourth Symphony one would strike at the heart of the matter, define the work in its entirety, touch upon the basis from which one could attain understanding for details. There really is hardly any other work in the entire symphonic literature, which speaks from the soul with iron consistency without taking into consideration any external effects; what one could call a ‘psychological symphony’ – the composer’s own expression. The way in which Sibelius has given artistic shape to his highly personal impressions and moods is interesting. Two rocks have to be avoided […] Rigid formalism on the one hand, and – which was the greater danger given the nature of the work – individualism in tones that could very easily degenerate into anarchy. […] Thanks to his remarkable talent in terms of both form and logic, Sibelius has perfectly succeeded in this delicate task: the symphony’s poetic and psychological content has lost nothing of its freedom and immanent logic on the one hand, and the outer forms have become classically clear on the other; the highest individual freedom and strictness of form have coalesced into an organic whole; the living soul’s direct speech has infused life into the form; and again the individual has become universal through perfection of form. […] this Fourth Symphony constitutes an entirety, such that none of the movements can be contemplated alone.”95 Carpelan lavishly praised Sibelius in a letter pointing out the wholeness of the form: “What I admire most, apart from its deeply beautiful idea contents, is the absolute congruity between form and substance […] that the contents is completely and without any remainder absorbed into the form.” On the next day, Sibelius penned in his diary: “A wonderful, understanding letter about symphony IV from Axel. He gave me much with it.”96

Birmingham, October 1912 The end of 1912 and the beginning of 1913 marked a wealth of performances of the Fourth abroad, both in Europe and the US. The first two of them, in Birmingham and Copenhagen, Sibelius conducted himself. The first performance took place at the Birmingham Festival half a year after the Helsinki premiere, on 1 October 1912. This concert featured the premiere of Edward Elgar’s (1857–1934) The Music Makers, conducted by the composer, in addition to Sibelius’s Fourth. Sibelius’s diary reveals that he had some doubts about the success of his Fourth: “It really is too subtle and tragic for our miserable world.”97 Sibelius wrote to Aino after the first rehearsal: “I have just rehearsed. The orchestra is not too good because the additional players in this orchestra are new. But magnificent. Dear God when they play unisono in the III movement. […] He [Granville Bantock], in particular, compliments my symphony. He was charmed by the sound. Otherwise they are not yet ‘mature.’ Rosa [Newmarch] was enchanted, her head rocked all the time. I hope for the best anyway.”98 Sibelius wrote again just before the concert: “In half an hour I will be the conductor of that great orchestra and the work is the dear Fourth. – It is strange this world and life. Sometimes it is as if one seizes the common thread of history oneself, and that hurts.”99 Newmarch had written a lengthy “analytical note” for the program leaflet, which included 26 short music examples. It is based on writings in Swedish by Otto Andersson (see endnote 57) in addition to correspondence and conversations with Sibelius, whom she met in Paris in the fall of 1911. The note thus echoed Sibelius’s views in that she avoided straight landscape depictions and referred to “simplicity of means.” She wrote: “The Fourth Symphony […] is music of an intimate nature, and much of it was thought out and written in the isolation of hoary forests, by rushing rapids, or wind-lashed lakes. There are moments – especially in the first movement – when we feel ourselves ‘alone with nature’s breathing things.’ It has, however, no programme that could, or should, be expressed in literary terms. […] In common with most of the composers in Northern Europe he values form for its own sake. […] the structure of the Fourth Symphony, with all its telescoping of formal divisions, remains strong and clear. […] Sibelius undoubtedly retains an old-fashioned respect for the theme and regards the melodic material as the inspired word on which the whole message of the music depends.”100 The critiques covered many of the same issues as the ones published in Finland, and the audience reaction seems to have been quite similar. There were some harsh comments, such as the “impression was one of extreme vagueness and considerable lack of charm”, and “the music left no ardent desire to hear it again.”101 The puzzling nature of the work was generally attributed to the fact that it was “a series of more or less unconnected meditations” composed in a “very unfamiliar idiom,” that being Finnish.102 Most of the critiques were impartial in tone, however, such as The Times: “M. Sibelius’s symphony […] was received rather with courtesy towards a visitor than with any enthusiasm for the music itself. The hearers, indeed, could hardly be blamed if they failed to trace the logical sequence of its development, the way in which ideas dimly suggested at first blossom into greater fullness in the later movements. The music stands aloof, suggests where most composers would command, and seems to dream of half-forgotten memories and new unrealized visions of the future. Its harmony and orchestral colour are alike strange, and yet really so simple that time must make their beauty clearer. For a modern work, quite a small orchestra is used, and every instrument in the score tells. It was not perfectly played.” The critic returned to the work still a few days later and concluded: “Sibelius’s Symphony has shown us that we shall have to consider him as a far more important factor in modern music than such compositions as Finlandia and En saga gave any warrant for supposing.”103


XIII Newmarch sent some reviews to Sibelius after he returned home, including in addition to The Times Ernst Newman’s critique in the Nation: “Sibelius’s fourth symphony gave the audience the toughest nuts to crack, and left them frankly puzzled. The work confuses, at first hearing, not by reason of any elaboration of tissue, but by its drastic simplification of both idea and of expression. Sibelius has no need of the grossly swollen orchestral apparatus of the average modern composer. His scores are as simple in appearance as those of Beethoven. With his clean strength of thought he has no need to be dressing platitudes in sumptuous raiment. In his fourth symphony he has carried his normal simplicity and directness of speech to extraordinary lengths. Those who were confounded by it at the Festival may be assured that its appeal grows greatly as one knows it better. It is still the Sibelius of old – dour and tender in turns, rarely smiling, but without Tchaikovski’s tearfulness and self-pity – but the soul of the man has now obviously retired further into itself, and is brooding at a depth to which it is not easy to follow him without a guide. But even the Philistine, one imagines, must feel at once that there is a powerful brain seizing upon life in its own way.”104 Sibelius summed up his Birmingham journey in his diary: “My IV Symphony is a success under my baton. The critique more confused and bad. Although there are some good ones. […] [I] had a strong and deep impression of my symphony IV in England. Rightly so, wonderful Ego! Rightly so. [On the opposite, blank page:] Critique, the English one, roughly speaking, excellent (e.g., Ernst Newman and Times) –. The trip to England + – 0. Possibly a couple of hundred in deficit.”105 Copenhagen, December 1912 Sibelius conducted the next performance of the Fourth in Copenhagen on 3 December, this time featuring the Royal Danish Orchestra. The second half included Scènes historiques II, Night Ride and Sunrise, and five songs with the Danish soprano Borghild Langaard (1883– 1922) as soloist. Sibelius had his doubts as he was choosing the program at the beginning of November. He expressed his concern about the Fourth to his friend Georg Boldemann (1865–1946), who lived in Copenhagen and helped him with the concert arrangements: he asked, “is it too bold?”106 He wrote to Aino before the first rehearsal: “I stand alone surely, I think, with my Fourth. Though – rather that than compromises.”107 The orchestra did not satisfy him either: “I have rehearsed this bad orchestra and I have barked at them. Let’s see if the concert works out at all. But when I have the honor of conducting this Symphony IV, I am tough. […] I wonder how I’ve become a stern conductor. One with ambition.”108 The newspapers carried articles on Sibelius not only before but also after the rehearsal, at which the critic was present. The attitude was quite positive: “From the seeming chaos arose beautiful and fine tone waves, threatening, dark figures and secretive, mystical sounds. Now one recognized Sibelius again.”109 The critiques of the concert varied, as expected. Charles Kjerulf of Politiken described Sibelius’s style of conducting with “large, hovering beats with stretched arms – something about him as a bird flying – the music seems to sail along on these supporting wings.” He further pointed out that whereas the three previous symphonies had been Cyclops, the Fourth was rather “a young enchantress in a teasing mode who laughs and cries, lures and gaggles between the islands of the archipelago in Finland’s light green summer’s night.” Kjerulf also remarked: “the symphony is more like a sinfonietta, a large chambermusic work for orchestra” with a “bewitching dialogue of solo instruments.”110 Sibelius wrote in his diary: “Given the concert successfully. Kjerulf critiqued it brilliantly; his enemies infernally, as I believe.”111 Sibelius was not totally wrong. Although mentioning his “brilliant fantasy” (“glødende Fantasi”), one critic added: “it is Sibelius’s limitation that he is not entirely capable of subordinating himself to the rules of the

world of tones.”112 Another critic continued: “[…] he plunges rather into the grotesque than remaining on the spot and exploits the gold mine that he found. […] He preferably moves in the periphery where music almost ceases to be music. […] He is thin on the ground when it comes to the ability to hold the stuff together, mold, forge, and carve so that everything is clear and unwavering. It becomes almost merely fantastic drawings in a grey shade, in the mystical.” Despite the complicated nature of the music, however, it is described as indisputable: “Where he [Sibelius] scouts towards unknown paths, he always finds something that captures one’s soul to the highest degree. In the symphony there are sounds of rare beauty, moods that sound so deeply that they seem to touch even the subconscious.”113 This opinion was shared: “tone pictures […] abound with images of great singularity and also – especially in the last movements – of much beauty and poetry which nobody can deny.”114 Sibelius’s peace of mind suffered due to the critiques, as he noted in his diary: “The devils are out in the Copenhagen newspapers. [I have been] lambasted in an infernal way.”115 He wrote to Boldemann: “I would like to see the critiques of Vort Land and other bad ones. I cannot understand how one can be so stupid. For those gentlemen refined art is weak. It is as I have always said: they believe forte is power, rawness originality and so on. That is ridiculous! Otherwise I am not at all pleased with the concert in Copenhagen. It did not go well – too few rehearsals – and the musicians of the Hofkapell are completely generalized. They understand no better.”116 Other performances The plan was to play the Fourth Symphony in Vienna in December 1912, conducted by Felix Weingartner (1863–1942). The Vienna concert was advertised as taking place on 15 December, but two days beforehand the work was no longer mentioned in the program. According to Richard Specht of Der Märker, the reason given – the glockenspiel was not available – was incorrect and, in reality, the orchestra had refused to play in the rehearsal. Specht wondered who made the programming decisions, insisting that once the work had been included in the program the orchestra and Weingartner as its leader had the duty and obligation to play it instead of doing harm to a famous composer.117 The news reached and struck Sibelius in January: “Weingartner does not perform my latest symphony although it has already been rehearsed. This has cast me down. Glorious, composing Ego! My star [is] falling. That I have known for a long time.”118 The next performance was to take place in Berlin on 25 January 1913, conducted by Sibelius’s old friend Ferruccio Busoni (1866–1924). According to a diary entry from the beginning of February: “No news from Busoni’s performance of my symphony IV. Has he done it or is this still another – bagatelle.”119 When he heard what had happened in Vienna, he suspected that the same thing had occurred in Berlin. He took it badly: “This breaks my heart! But perhaps time – wonderful time – will heal this too. – I wanted to sell everything I own, but – who will buy. How should I proceed in this situation? – It is a question of not losing one’s nerve; and – above all – one’s reason. They believe – at least most orchestra musicians in the world – that I’m a dead man. Mais nous verrons! Will this be now the end of Jean Sibelius as a composer?”120 At the end of March, Busoni finally telegraphed Sibelius, but unexpectedly from Amsterdam: “Conducted today your fourth symphony with great pleasure.”121 The critic of Algemeen Handelsblad in Amsterdam had some reservations but valued the work: “That a few less important pages appear in this four-movement symphonic work is not to be denied, but the whole has an interesting texture (harmony, melody, rhythm) as well as inner life, plenty of moments of poetic atmosphere.” The critic thought that the recitatives of solo instruments and ample episodic treatment made it difficult to follow the music but continued: “How can one, however, overlook the freshness and originality of thought, and not appreciate the independence of the composer who disdains all outer effects!”122


XIV The turbulence surrounding the performances of the Fourth did not end there. There were another two performances at the beginning of 1913 in Gothenburg (17 January and 5 February), conducted by Wilhelm Stenhammar. He had written to Sibelius in December and posed some questions about the score, which Sibelius clarified (see the Critical Commentary). After the concert, Stenhammar confessed in a letter that he had made an unwise act (“oklokhet”) in performing the Fourth in a subscription concert, the audience at which lacks “earnest interest in music” (“allvarligare musikintresse”). He continued: “And so the unheard-of, and as far as I know a unique [thing] in the musical history of Gothenburg, happened: when the symphony ended the sparse, cautious applause was silenced with loud hushing. I cannot deny that, after the initial shock it was quite refreshing, and I felt really proud on your behalf […] our stupid so-called critique, which until now has worshipped you, did a sudden turnabout and scolded you in a most ridiculous, inappreciative way. The symphony had provided them a great disappointment, marked retrogression, flagging, lack of invention, formlessness.” Stenhammar revealed that he was tempted to write to the paper himself, but instead he conducted the symphony anew in a regular concert on the evening before he penned his letter. He further explained: “And [I] exceeded all expectations in abundance. My dear Wednesday public excelled themselves yesterday like seldom. So warmly, so spontaneously, not without a certain demonstrative color – I got the applause, lasting disapproval from both the subscription public and the critics’ judgement. Thus, we have an intelligent, independently feeling and judicious public here, and it is ready to welcome you warmly and with dignity. […] my respect for you as an artist is unalterable and constantly growing.”123 Sibelius heard the news and noted in his diary: “Symphony IV got the raspberry in Gothenburg.”124 Stenhammar’s “good letter” (“ett bra bref ”) arrived the next day but in the end, it did not really ease Sibelius’s feelings. He remarked in the diary: “[My] mind is sick, very sick. A bullet would be the best for me.”125 The first performance in the US took place on 2 March 1913 when Walter Damrosch (1862–1950) conducted the Symphony Society’s Orchestra in New York. According to the Sun, Damrosch addressed the audience before the performance. He said that even if no one would wish to hear the composition again, it was a conductor’s duty to let the latest composition of a renowned master be heard at least once. The critic of the New York Times further recalled that Mr. Damrosch “added that it [the symphony] was the work of a man ‘tired of the musical effects of the past, or of what have hitherto been considered such;’ also that it embodied the most extraordinary ideas of symphonic development that ever he had seen.” Although the music carried some surprises, the critics did see some merit in it. The critic of the Sun opined: “Sibelius […] has joined the futurists. He is as frankly dissonant as the worst of them. He has swallowed the whole tone scale, the disjointed sequences, the chord of the minor second, the flattened supertonic and all the Chinese horrors of the forbidden fifths. But the symphony is a noteworthy composition. It has elemental imagination, courage of utterance, fearlessness of style. It is […] a consistently planned and masterfully executed work. The themes are unusual, remote, solitary, but impressively thought; […] the symphony is clearly written and its thought nicely balanced. Its chords are exquisitely distributed, its instrumentation is marvelously pure and transparent, and above all the work has much to say.”126 Musical America introduced the Fourth: “The symphony is a work which some will enjoy greatly and others detest. But whatever one’s attitude towards it there is no denying its intense interest. It is fascinating, bewilderingly, hypnotically, singularly devoid of the elements of sensuous musical beauty, yet intensely convincing in its sheer strangeness; legitimate, potently vital, an utterance tremendously elemental. […] The symphony is somber in hue; one might almost call parts of it black. Lyrical graciousness or suavity of melodic phraseology are

practically non-existent in it. It is uncouth, rugged, disdainful alike of urbanity of style or finesse of expression. Despite the criticism, the critic wishes the symphony to be soon repeated.”127 Sibelius wrote in his diary: “Maliciousness aimed at me in Musical America. […] My 4th symphony has been performed this season in New York and it attracted much attention. Nevertheless, unfortunately [it] became totally misunderstood.”128 A few months later issue of Musical America asked whether Sibelius could be playing a practical joke and continued: “Sibelius seems to have left the ranks of his contemporaries and become a ‘futurist.’ The symphony is neither fish, flesh nor fowl – nor good red herring.”129 In the following year, when Sibelius traveled in America, he summed up the critique there in a report to Carpelan: “America’s best critics like my 4th symphony” and “The fourth symphony here in Boston is highly admired. Dr. [Karl] Muck is said to have conducted it wonderfully. Also in New York with Damrosch well.”130 *** Sibelius – reflecting the views of many critics – was right in predicting that the Fourth would be understood as the number of performances grew and the years passed. Appreciation and understanding did build up over the years, both in Finland and abroad, when also recordings started to emerge.131 In the 1930s, the Finnish writer and composer Elmer Diktonius called the Fourth a “Bark Bread Symphony” (“barkbrödssymfoni”) and stated: “[O]ur firm belief is that this bark-bread bit will be dwelled upon for several generations.” He depicted the work as “a bit of absolute music framed within Finnish nature. […] Because an incomprehensible work, an indigestible symphony could not be performed so frequently here and elsewhere if it did not meet with sympathy among its public. And it is even the case that the Fourth of the seven [symphonies] is the one one most preferably wishes to hear again.”132 As the American music critic Olin Downes, known as “Sibelius’s apostle,” wrote of the Fourth in 1936: “in these pages Sibelius emerges, lonely and incomparable, one of the deepest and most concentrated musical thinkers of our epoch. The Fourth symphony is a series of musical ideas, boiled down to their sheerest essence, and there is no factitious allure about it at all. […] it is an unprecedented alembication, and a style highly modern in texture, which strikes like the arrow to the heart of the musical idea.”133 *** My heartfelt thanks are due to my colleagues Kai Lindberg, Anna Pulkkis, Timo Virtanen, and Sakari Ylivuori. I am also grateful to Pertti Kuusi, Janne Kivistö, and Turo Rautaoja for their proofreading; Juha Karvonen for his help with the French text; Niels Bo Foltman and Peter Hauge for their help with the Danish texts; and Joan Nordlund for revising the English language. I also thank Minna Cederkvist of the Helsinki Philharmonic Orchestra Library, Sanna LinjamaMannermaa of the Sibelius Museum, Tommi Harju of the Sibelius Academy Library, the staff of the National Library of Finland – especially Inka Myyry, Antti Riikonen and Petri Tuovinen, the staff of the National Archives of Finland, the staff of the Helsinki City Archives, and the staff at the Archives of Breitkopf & Härtel. Helsinki, Fall 2019

1

Tuija Wicklund

Diary, 21 May 1909: “Måste hem. Här går det ej längre att arbeta. En stilförändring?!” Sibelius’s diary is preserved in the National Archives of Finland, Sibelius Family Archive [= NA, SFA], file boxes 37–38. It has also been published: Fabian Dahlström (ed.), Jean Sibelius Dagbok 1909– 1944 (Helsingfors: Svenska litteratursällskapet i Finland [= SLS], 2005).


XV 2

3

4 5 6

7 8

9 10 11

12 13

14 15

16 17 18 19 20 21 22

23 24

Diary, 3 October 1909: “På Koli! Ett af de största intryck i mitt lif. Planer ‘La Montagne!’” Diary, 8 November 1909: “Varit i Hades. En dal sådan som aldrig.” and 27 December 1909: “Ett Himalaya åter. Allt ljust och kraftigt. Arbetat som en jätte.” On the programmatic aspects of the Fourth, see “On the programmatic aspects” below. Carpelan to Sibelius, 27 December 1909 (the letters from Carpelan to Sibelius are preserved in NA, SFA, file box 18): “Ja, den symfonin har jag mycket tänkt på – det du spelade för mig ur ‘Bärget’ och ‘Vandrarens tankar’ var väl det väldigaste jag av dig hört.” The correspondence has been published: Fabian Dahlström (ed.), Högtärade Maestro! Högtärade Herr Baron! Korrespondensen mellan Axel Carpelan och Jean Sibelius 1900–1919 (Helsingfors: SLS, 2010). Diary, 6 January 1910: “Korn på något nytt och stort!” Sibelius’s remaining debts (ca. €88.000 at the 2017 rate) had more than halved. Diary, 21 April 1910: “Åter i en djup däld. Arbetar med bäfvan på det ‘nya.’” and 7 May 1910: “Promenerat en mil under komponerande. D. v. s. hamrade på den musikaliska metallen i och för erhållande af silfverklang.” Diary, undated, but before 8 August 1910: “Alla dessa dagar i skären i storm och hög stämning. Arbetar på det nya ‘med bäfvan’.” Diary, 12 August 1910: “Släpp ej patos i lifvet!” Sibelius to Carpelan on 16 August 1910 (the letters from Sibelius to Carpelan are preserved in NA, SFA, file box 120): “Min nya symfoni arbetar jag på och har då och då högtidsstunder. Ibland något så sublimt att jag nog ej förr varit med om dylikt. […] Endast sinfonin lefver i mig. Det är så underbart att helt få ge sig!” Diary, 17 August 1910: “Mera skönhet och verklig musik! Icke combinationer och dynamiska crescendis, med stereotypa figurer – ‘Ny fart!’ ‘Nu eller aldrig’!” Diary, 28 and 30 August 1910. Diary, 11 September 1910: “II spökar i hjärnan. I plan färdig. Börjar med III.” When he wrote the latter letter Sibelius was working on the fi rst movement. The Oslo program included Night Ride and Sunrise, Swanwhite Suite, Symphony No. 2, Valse triste, and the premieres of the Dryad and In memoriam. Sibelius to Iver Holter on 4 June and 26 August 1910 (National Library of Finland [= NL], Coll. 206.62.1). Sibelius to Carpelan dated 9 October 1910: “Sinfoni IV mognar!” Diary, 25 and 26 October 1910. Sibelius referred to confession of faith on several occasions in connection with his symphonies. See, e.g., diary entries 21 November 1914 and 24 April 1915, and Tomi Mäkelä, Jean Sibelius (Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 2011), p. 261ff. Diary, 4 November 1910: “Njutit i fulla drag. Stillheten! Tiden stannar! Arbetar och smider! En underbar stämning!” and 5 November 1910: “En sinfoni är icke en ‘composition’ i vanlig mening. Det är fastmer en trosbekännelse vid olika skeden af ens lif.” Ackté to Sibelius on 16 May 1910 (NA, SFA, file box 16): “en större orchester-konsert i Berlin (uteslutande Sibelius program).” Sibelius to Ackté on 22 July 1910 (NL, Coll. 4.13): “Då alla mina gamla compositioner ofta äro uppförda i Tyskland (mina sinfonier flere gånger i Berlin) måste såväl sinfonien, som naturligtvis compositionen för Eder, vara nya.” Diary, 8 November 1910: “Är nyfi ken i hvad våra planer resultera. Ett duktigt arbete måste jag fullgöra. Härlig dag.” Viktor Rydberg’s Swedish translation appears in his poetry collection Dikter. Första samlingen (Stockholm: Albert Bonniers Förlag, 1899). Diary, 11 November 1910: “Smidit på ‘Korpen.’ Alla idéer i flytande tillstånd. Härlig dag.” and 12 November 1910: “Har mina dubier angående ‘Korpen.’ Mitt sätt att arbeta med den. Öfverhufvudtaget.” Sibelius to Carpelan on 13 November 1910: “Jag tror den skall blifva bra.” and “Jag glömde omnämna att underströmmen i allt hvad jag gör är i Sinfoni IVs tecken.” Carpelan to Sibelius on 16 November 1910: “Således ‘Korpen!’ En tusan till dikt. Gör nu blott sångpartiet så pass lätt att även andra än Aino Ackté kan sjunga det! Att du skall lyckas glansfullt tror jag förvisso.” Diary, 17 November 1910: “Finner ‘Korpen’ för mörk och tung för mig nu.” A bookshop’s invoice dated 18 November 1910 reveals that Sibelius purchased two copies of Poe’s poems in German (NA, SFA, file box 3). The version that bears Sibelius’s markings was translated by Theodor Etzel (München & Leipzig: Georg Müller, 1909), pp. 7–15, and is currently preserved at Ainola. According to his letter to Carpelan dated 26 November 1910. Diary, 25 November 1910: “tager form och färg.”, and 26 November 1910: “‘Korpen’ åter framme.”

25 26 27 28

29 30 31 32 33

34

35

36

37

38

39

Diary, 2 December 1910: “Sväfvar alltid emellan ‘sinfoni’ och ‘Korpen.’ – Den sednare måste snart taga form.” Diary, 3 December 1910: “Dubier angående texten. Alltid äro ‘orden’ ett onus i min konst.” The surviving sketch (see HUL 0320, p. [4]) bears the marking “Vers 9”, and Sibelius also copied the text of stanza 10 (originally 12) on another page. Diary, 7 December 1910: “Ny fart i ‘Korpen.’ Strukit det gamla, som för mycket ‘modärnt intetsägande.’ Min spänning angående detta stycke enorm. – Underbara stämningar. Som stode tiden stilla och himlen vore gåtfull med järtecken och månar. Castagnetter och Triangolo!” Ackté was performing as Salome in Richard Strauss’s opera at Covent Garden, London. Sibelius to Ackté on 9 December 1910 (NL, Coll. 4.13). Diary, 10 December 1910: “Arbetar på ‘Der Rabe.’ Hoppas åter! Härliga Ego. Skada att ej Sinf. IV hinner mogna.” Sibelius to Ackté on 11 December 1910 (NL, Coll. 4.13): “Werhindrad [sic] att deltaga i Tourneen.” According to Gutmann, Sibelius also sent a similar telegram to him (NL, Coll. 4.16). Diary, 11 December 1910: “Brännt återigen mina skepp. Brutit med Gutman[n]-reklamen och Aino Ackté. Men står för konsekvenserna! – Lämnar tillsvidare ‘Korpen’. Kastat bort en månad! Hjärtat gråter.” Ackté to Sibelius on 13 December 1910 (NA, SFA, file box 16): “Jag är inte van vid att man drifver med mig, ej häller vid att bli afskedad med lakoniska telegram och det hade varit ärligare om Ni genast sagt mig att Sibelius-konserterna utomlands ej tilltalade Er. Då hade Ni besparat mig mycken möda – för att ej nämna mycket annat – och jag hade häller ej då råkat i denna löjliga, litet smickrande situation vis à vis Gutman[n] o. andra, hos hvilka Ni nu för framtiden förstört mina chancer.” Sibelius to Carpelan on 12 December 1910: “Lemnar divan Achté [sic] åt sitt reclamartade öde. ‘Korpen’ måste ligga till sig ännu. Sinfoni IV bryter fram i solljus och kraft.” and: “Min konst är alldeles af annan art än denna ‘Konsertvaror’ som ‘går.’ Då jag ger en consert bör inga divor ta hufvudintresset, utan nog är det min sinfoniska konst som skall segra. Att Du, vän Axel, är af samma åsikt – vet jag säkert.” The newspaper Nya Pressen quoted Ackté’s interview in the Daily Mail on 13 December, in which she stated: “In January, I shall sing Finnish music in Germany and Austria. The Finnish composer Sibelius has written some beautiful pieces for me, and he will follow me on the tour.” (“I januari skall jag sjunga finsk musik i Tyskland och Österrike. Den finska kompositören Sibelius har skrifvit några vackra bitar för mig, och han skall följa med mig på tournén.”). Carpelan to Sibelius on 14 December 1910: “Gillar fullkomligt din åsikt om din konst och Aino Acktés reklamidioti. Efter att ha fått del av intervjun i ‘Daily News’ (‘jag tar honom – Sib. – med mig’) anser jag allt vidare samarbete Er emellan omöjliggjort.” Newmarch to Sibelius on 22 December 1910 (NA, SFA, file box 24): “Au moins écrivez à cette excellente cantatrice. Elle souffre dans son amour propre – et vous connaissez bien vous ce que cela veut dire. Mais tout de même elle parle de vous et de votre musique d’une façon très touchante.” The correspondence has been translated into English and published in Philip Ross Bullock, The Correspondence of Jean Sibelius and Rosa Newmarch 1906–1939 (Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 2011 [= Bullock 2011]). Sibelius to Newmarch on 1 January 1911: “Ihre freundliches zweites Brief betreffend Madame Ackté, die ich bewundere, habe ich bekommen und ich muss gestehen dass ich nicht anderes handeln konnte. Die Sache nahm eine ganz andere Richtung als wie im Anfang mir vorgestellt wurden. Vor allem die Reclamen. Da die Reclame detailliert und genau beschreibt wie die Composition ist, in welcher Richtung u.s.w. sie geht, ohne das Werk fertig ist – wurde mir das ganze Componieren unmöglich. Dazu kam noch dass mann mich presentieren wollten als einen ganz unbekanten Componisten – in München! U.s.w.! […] Ich arbeite an neue Werke. […] Sinfonie IV wird wahrscheinlich in Februar fertig.” Given that the new work and tournee were advertised in newspapers around Europe (at least in Germany, Austria, and Norway) an official retraction was also published in Der Merker (Vienna) on 10 December 1910 and elsewhere (NA, SFA, file box 86 and Erik Tawaststjerna Archive, file box 43): “[…] hat soeben eine große, symphonische Dichtung für Gesang und Orchester vollendet, die von Kennern der Partitur als ein orchestertechnisch höchst seltsames, dabei außerordentlich wirkungsvolles Opus geschildert wird, das den gleichen herben, symbolisierenden Stimmungsreiz ausübt wie die finnländische Volksdichtung oder die Bilder eines Axel Galén.” Leevi Madetoja of Helsingin Sanomat on 10 August 1916: “Niistä asioista en woi ruveta keskustelemaan, sen olen kerta kaikkiaan jyrkästi päät-


XVI

40

41 42 43 44

45 46

47 48 49 50

51 52 53 54

55 56 57

58

tänyt. Olen wahingosta wiisastunut. Kerran joku aika sitten minun piti säweltää Aino Acktélle Poen runo ‘Korppi’ konserttimatkaa warten. Siitä lennätettiin heti uutinen ympäri maailmaa. Minä taas tulin siihen tulokseen, että se on mahdoton säwellettäwäksi muuten kuin melodraamana. Säwellyksestä ei siis tietysti tullut mitään ja minä jäin noloon wälikäteen ja wäärinkäsityksille alttiiksi.” Two earlier sketches are HUL 0472 (Violin Concerto) and 0253 (Third Symphony). See Timo Virtanen, “Sibelius’ Sketches for the Violin Concerto” in Jean Sibelius’s Legacy. Research on his 150th Anniversary ed. by Daniel Grimley, Tim Howell, Veijo Murtomäki, and Timo Virtanen (Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2017), pp. 363– 375. See also Erik Tawaststjerna, Sibelius 3 (Helsinki: Otava, 1989), p. 263 (with a facsimile of the sketch HUL 0320, p. [4]) and the List of Sketches at the end of this volume. See HUL 0320, pp. [7, 8] in the List of Sketches and Facsimile XII. Diary, 18 December 1910: “Anar i hvilken riktning sats III i Sinf. kommer att gå. Allt dock ännu kaos och i behof af concentration.” Diary, 31 December 1910: “Det ‘stora’ jag för jämt ett år sedan anade, tager form.” Diary, 1 January 1911. Sibelius had a throat operation in 1908, which was followed by a seven-year period of abstinence. This gave him many difficult moments, and time and again he confessed in his diary how much he craved for cigars and a drink (see the diary, e.g., on 11 and 22 January 1911). Diary, 21 January 1911: “Omgestaltat III satsen i sinfonien.” and 2 March 1911. The concerts took place in Gothenburg (6 and 8 February), Riga (13, 15, and 16 February), and Mitau ( Jelgava, 17 February). The programs included the same works as in Oslo (see endnote 11) and additionally Symphony No. 3, En saga, Pan and Echo, Pohjola’s Daughter, The Swan of Tuonela, and Lemminkäinen’s Return. Sibelius to Carpelan on 26 January 1911: “Jag vill taga denna orkester dusch ordentligt förrän jag slutför sinfonien.” Sibelius did also rehearse the Finnish National Theatre Orchestra (diary, 8 March), but he did not conduct the performances. Diary, 2 March 1911. Diary, 14 March 1911: “Strukit förslaget till sats IV, dispositionen. Men tror mig kommit närmare målet. Ett svagt, ytterst svagt, hopp om att få sinf. färdig till Koncerten.” There are no traces in the manuscript score of late changes in the instrumentation. Diary, 15 March 1911: “Kämpar med Gud!” and 17 March 1911: “Arbetat! Skall jag hinna? Samt kunna realisera min idé hvad instrumentation angår? ‘En glad konst’! Lätthet!!” Diary, 28 March 1911: “Kämpar för lifvet med sinfonien. Bär med manlighet ditt ‘kompositoriska kors!’” See Martti Pajanne, “Muusikkojen muistelmia mestarista orkesterinjohtajana” in Uusi musiikkilehti 9/1955, p. 16 and Paavo Helistö: Aerila: Kajanuksen klarinetisti (Hämeenlinna: Karisto, 2005), pp. 94–95. Diary, 2 April 1911: “Sinfonin ‘färdig.’ Jacta alea est! Måste! Det fordras mycken manlighet att se lifvet i hvitögat. Alltså.” Unidentified critic of Helsingin Sanomat, 2 April 1911: “Tätä tilaisuut ta, jolloin täällä kotimaassakin saataisiin tutustua nerokkaimman säweltäjämme uusimpiin orkesterituotteisiin, on jo kauan jännityksellä odotettu. […] Päänumerona tulee olemaan uusi 4-osainen sinfonia.” Unidentified critic of Nya Pressen, 4 April 1911: “[…] vår mästare med denna tonskapelse inträdt i ett nytt skede af utväckling” and “genomskinligt klar.” See Hufvudstadsbladet on 2 April and 4 April 1911, Uusi Suometar on 11 April, Säveletär (No. 6–7) on 15 April 1911. Carpelan names Richard Strauss and Gustav Mahler. Otto Andersson in Tidning för musik No. 12, [15 April] 1910/1911, pp. 171–173 [= Andersson 1911] and E. K. [Evert Katila] of Uusi Suometar on 11 April 1911 also refer to Strauss and Mahler. Carpelan, “Sibelius’ nya symfoni” in Göteborgs Handels- och Sjöfartstidning on 21 April 1911 [= Carpelan 1911]: “I sin helhet betraktad är symfonien en protest mot den musikaliska stilriktning, som f. n. är den dominerande, främst i symfoniens egentliga hemland, Tyskland, där instrumentalmusiken är på väg att urarta till en klangkonst, ur hvilken lifvet vikit, till en slags musikalisk ingeniörskonst, som genom en ofantlig mekanisk apparat söker täcka öfver sin inre tomhet. Det är då att förutse att en korrumperad kritik skall söka ‘kritisera ihjäl’ ett värk som denna fjärde symfoni, där ande och natur på underbart sätt sammansmultit till ett helt af förr ohörd art.” Furuhjelm also uses the word protest in Erik Furuhjelm, Jean Sibelius: hans tondiktning och drag ur hans liv (Borgå: Holger Schildts Förlag, 1916), p. 216 [= Furuhjelm 1916]: “The Fourth Symphony […] includes a silent protest against all hollow impressionism, baroque instrumentation, and

59

60 61

62 63 64 65

66

67

68 69

70

71

crass naturalism.” (“Fjärde symfonin innebär […] en stilla protest mot ihålig impressionism, barock instrumentering, krass naturalism.”) Sibelius to Newmarch on 2 May 1911 (NA, SFA, file box 121): “Meine neue Sinfonie ist eine vollständige Protest gegen d. Compositionen heutzutage. Nichts – absolut nichts vom Cirkus.” Andersson 1911 also shared these views in his article. E. K. of Uusi Suometar on 11 April 1911: “Mutta waikka säweltäjä näin on heittänyt pois kaiken ulkonaisen loisteliaisuuden, ei hänen teoksensa kuitenkaan ole taaksepäin suuntautuwa, päinwastoin. Se on uusista uusinta musiikkia, kontrapunktisesti ja soinnullisesti rohkeinta taidetta mitä on kirjoitettu. Se waikuttaa ensi kuulemilla waikeatajuiselta juuri riitasointujen rikkauden ja harmoonisen rakenteensa radikaalisuuden wuoksi, mutta lähemmin tutustuttua teokseen saa aawistuksen, mikä tawaton tekniikka ja rautainen logiikka piilee tässä teoksessa, joka aluksi tuntuu niin hämärältä.” Diary, 11 April 1911: “Katila skrifvit om mig och sinfonin förståelsefullt.” O[skar] Merikanto of Tampereen Sanomat on 20 April 1911: “Niinpä mielestäni Sibeliuskin tässä teoksessaan on ikään kuin sulkeutunut kammioonsa ja alkanut tutkia itseänsä ja elämän mysteeriota, ihmisen powessa kytewiä suuria kysymyksiä. […] Sillä minusta tuntuu, kuin aukeisi nyt Sibeliukselle sinfoniasäweltäjänä aiwan uudet maailmat, joita ei ole wielä muille näytetty ja joita yksin hän ihmeteltäwän korkealle kehittyneellä säwel- ja wäriaistillaan kykenee näkemään ja muille kuwaamaan.” Diary, 21 April 1911: “Merikanto skrifvit en härlig artikel i ‘Tampereen Sanomat’ om min nya musik.” Merikanto of Tampereen Sanomat on 20 April 1911: “aiwan wapaa muoto” and Katila of Uusi Suometar on 11 April 1911: “waikuttaa waikeatajuiselta […] rakenteensa radikaalisuuden wuoksi.” Andersson 1911: “att han dock är för fri i formen. […] att han förmår vidga formerna.” See also the discussion before endnote 73. Carpelan 1911: “Hvad som genast frapperar och förvånar åhöraren är det nya, sällsamma tankeinnehållet och den af detta betingade egendomliga form behandlingen. Underbara recitativiska motiv och interjektionala utbrott, växlande med bredare melodiska bildningar, en djupsinnig kontrapunkt, förmäld med en genomskinlig, sträng logik och öfversiktlighet, därtill en spartansk enkelhet i uttrycksmedlen – allt detta är hvad som genast faller en i öronen.” The correspondence has been published in Fabian Dahlström (ed.), Din tillgifne ovän. Korrespondensen mellan Jean Sibelius och Adolf Paul 1889– 1943 (Helsingfors: SLS, 2016). Sibelius to Paul on 23 April 1911 (Uppsala University Library, Adolf Paul archive; copies at NL, Coll. 206.62): “Här hemma är jag numera ur räkningen. De begripa ej min musik. Och jag ger dem blanka fan!” Sibelius to Stenhammar on 5 April 1911 (NA, Erik Tawaststjerna Archive [= ETA], file box 38): “med ringa egentlig förståelse från publikens och kritikens sida.” and 26 June 1911: “har denna sinfoni blifvit totalt missförstådd här hemma.” Andersson 1911: “något förbehållsamt” and “stodo åhörarena stumma av häpnad.” Many newspapers, however, reported as Nya Pressen on 4 April 1911 that “Stormy applause and bravos followed the symphony.” (“Stormande applåder och bravorop följde på symfonin.”). Quite similar to Aino’s recollection is Furuhjelm 1916, p. 215. See Tawaststjerna 1971, p. 229: “Vältteleviä katseita, päänpudistuksia, hämillisiä tai salaisesti ironisia hymyjä. Monia onnittelijoita ei taiteilijahuoneeseen tullut.” Jussi Snellman wrote according to Sibelius’s dictation, “Sibelius oikaisee ja selittää”, on 25 December 1943 (NA, SFA, fi le box 41): “[…] se on ‘turistmusik’, Hufvudst.bl. kirjoitti siitä muutamalla rivillä ja ainoastaan Erik (Eero Järnefelt) tuli kiittämään minua. Vasta tulevaisuudessa tulevat ymmärtämään, mitä se sävellys sisältää.” Bis [Karl Fredrik Wasenius] on 7 April 1911: “Imposantare finaler skref Sibelius till sina föregående sinfonier. Denna har – som det nu synes mig – en något turistartad bismak.” The tempo indications refer to the first version. Bis of Hufvudstadsbladet on 7 April 1911: “Första satsen, Tempo di molto moderato, skildrar Koli berg och intrycket af detsamma. I andra satsen, Vivace assai, befi nner sig komponisten på berget. Nedanför sig ser han Pielisjärvi. Solen sänder sitt guld öfver sjön, hvars lekande böljor ge tusende gnistrande reflexer af dess fröjd och lif skänkande ljus. Tredje satsen, Il tempo largo, ger oss en framställning af det mäktiga panoramat i månskensbelysning, en tafla med poesi, som heter duga. Finalen skildrar återfärden. Den har en passus, som förtjänar särskildt omnämnande. Där komponisten färdas lyser sol, men från nordost, från Hvita hafvet, nalkas en rykande snöstorm. Den når ej ända fram, men kontrasten mellan solljus öfver den närmaste miljön och snöstormens mäktiga hot är effektfull. Detta är stoffet för sinfonin.”


XVII 72

73

74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83

84

85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92

93

94

1 April is April Fool’s Day; Katila also pointed this out in his review on 21 April. The “very close friend” was rumored to be Eero Järnefelt. Diary, 7 April 1911: “Bis’ dumheter.” Hufvudstadsbladet on 8 April 1911: “Märket Bis’ förmodan angående ett program för min nya symfoni är icke riktig. Det anar mig att den sammanhänger med en topografisk utläggning i detta syfte, som jag för några goda vänner framställde den 1 sistlidne april.” and “Tillägg. En närastående vän till Sibelius och äfven mig har efter andra konserten adresserat sig till mig och uttryckligen delgifvit mig som autentiskt det innehåll för sinfonin […]; och bekräftas det berättigade i denna relation ju af hr Sibelius själf, då han här ofvan tillstår sig ha gjort en utläggning just ‘i detta (program-) syfte’.” Katila (Uusi Suometar on 11 April 1911) and Andersson 1911 also claimed that the program was not valid. Carpelan 1911: “Enär symfonien koncipierats under ett besök å det för sin härliga natur och vida utsikter berömda Kolivaara fjäll invid den väldiga Pielisjärvi i Karelen, vore man à priori böjd för att tro den vara af naturmålerisk art. Detta är likväl ingalunda fallet. Dyka än då och då sällsamma naturljud och stämningar upp i orkestern, bär dock symfonien snarast prägeln af något öfverjordiskt ‘weltentrückt’, man vore frestad säga icke-mänskligt. Inga mänskliga affekter och lidelser finnas i detta värk, där allt är försjunkenhet i inre skådande, idel kyskhet och förandligat uttryck.” Carpelan 1911: “Mest anslår vid ett första åhörande måhända tredje satsen med sin månskensstämning af knappt jordisk art.” Sibelius to Carpelan on 3 May 1911: “med stor förnöjelse […] Artikeln i fråga är ‘kontinental,’ välskrifven och, framför allt, ur fackmannasynpunkt brillant. Ett af det bästa som om min musik blifvit skrifvet.” Diary, 7 April 1911: “Skall jag låta trycka sinfonin i denna form? Ja! – ??” Breitkopf & Härtel [= B&H] to Sibelius on 11 April 1911 (B&H’s letters to Sibelius are preserved in NA, SFA, file box 42). Diary, 15 April 1911: “gifva slutgiltig form.” Diary, 21 April 1911: “Jag arbetar i stillhet på några ‘ställen’ i sinf. IV, hvilka ställen tarfva förtydligande.” Diary: “Om våren, som alltid, ‘la tristesse.’ Arbetet! Och förtjänsten! Allt lika med 0.” (30 April) and “Sol och poesi.” (12 May 1911). Sibelius to Carpelan on 3 May 1911: “Jag lefver dels i nuet – skrifver rent sinfonien dels i allt ‘det nya’. I sinfonien pointerar jag vissa saker mera än i den ursprungliga gestalten.” Diary, 15 May 1912: “Skrifvit rent ända till fjärde satsen i sinfonien. […] Finner det sinfonin, genom denna slutliga omredigering, erhåller en för alla tider bestående form. Rätt så, härlige Ego, rätt så!” Diary, 20 May 1911. B&H to Sibelius on 2 June 1911. B&H to Sibelius on 21 June and 11 November 1911. An interesting detail comes out in Newmarch’s letter to her sister about the reasons for her trip to Paris: “Today Breitkopf & Härtel said they wanted me to go [to Paris], so that somebody might see about his [Sibelius’s] new works getting corrected and printed.” Cited in Bullock 2011, p. 135. Sibelius to B&H on 18 November 1911 (Sibelius’s letters to B&H are preserved at B&H Archives). Sibelius to Aino on 16 November 1911 (Sibelius’s letters to Aino are preserved in NA, SFA, file box 96): “Jag älskar det verket. Det är urfint.” Sibelius to B&H on 7 October 1912: “einige schlimme Fehler in Partitur und Stimmen.” B&H to Sibelius on 11 and 26 October 1912. Sibelius to B&H on 22 December 1930; B&H to Sibelius on 30 December 1930. Fazer to Sibelius on 27 October 1934 (NL, Coll. 206.44). Sibelius to B&H on 15 May 1942. B&H to Sibelius on 3 June 1942. Von Hase to B&H on 11 August 1942 (B&H Archives). See Helsingin Sanomat on 2 April 1911. Two orchestras gave concerts in Helsinki in the spring of 1912 in what was known as the orchestra war. Conductor Robert Kajanus continued to work with his orchestra and most of his players, with fi nancial help from lotteries, the state, and a loan. Pro-Finnish audiences and newspapers supported his Domestic Orchestra, which could be one reason why the papers advertised noticeably the concerts that featured Sibelius’s Fourth and also praised the orchestra’s performances. See Nils-Eric Ringbom, Helsingin orkesteri 1882–1932 (Helsinki: Frenckellin kirjapaino, 1932), p. 33ff. See Nya Pressen on 30 March and Hufvudstadsbladet on 4 April 1912. Diary, 1 April 1912; 4 April: “Orkestern tämligen dålig. Egendomligt nog är t.ex. Clarinetten i denna vår fi lharmoniska orkester ett af de sämsta instrumenten. Han, d. v. s. clarinettisten, kan ingenting. Är Confus! – Detta orkester-bad har haft sin stora betydelse för mig åter.” O. K. [Otto Kotilainen] of Helsingin Sanomat on 30 March 1912: “[…] sinfonian useampi kuuleminen selwittää sen kumman ongelmaisuuden, minkä siitä ensi kerralla, konsertissa wuosi sitten, sai.”

95

96

97 98

99

100

101 102 103 104

105

106 107 108

109

110

Leo Funtek of Dagens Tidning on 29 March 1912: “Sibelius’ stråkkvartett bär titeln ‘Voces intimae.’ Ger man IV symfonin samma öfverskrift så har man träffat kärnan, definierat verket i sin helhet, antydt utgångspunkten, från hvilken man kan ernå förståelse för enskildheterna. Det finnes verkligen i hela den symfoniska litteraturen knappast ett annat verk, hvilket skulle så utan hänsyn till yttre effekter med så järnhård konsekvens tala själens språk; ‘psychologisk symfoni’ – komponistens eget uttryck – skulle man kunna kalla den. Intressant är det sätt på hvilket Sibelius har gifvit konstnärlig gestalt åt sina högst personliga intryck och stämningar. Tvenne klippor måste undvikas […] Å ena sidan gällde det att undgå den stela formalismen å andra sidan – och detta var, motsvarande verkets karaktär, den största faran – kan individualismen i tonspråket mycket lätt urarta till anarki. […] Sibelius har, tack vare en utpräglad formell och logisk begåfning fullkomligt lyckats i den delikata uppgiften: å ena sidan har symfonins poetiska och psykologiska innehåll icke förlorat någonting af sin frihet och immanenta logik, å andra sidan ha de yttre formerna blifvit klassiskt klara; den högsta individuella friheten och formens stränghet ha sammansmultit till ett organiskt helt; den lefvande själens omedelbara språk har ingjutit lif i formen; och återigen har genom formens fulländning det individuella blifvit allmängällande. […] denna IV symfoni bildar ett helt, så att ingen af satserna kan betraktas för sig allena.” Carpelan to Sibelius on 11 March 1912: “Vad jag mest beundrar är, oavsett dess djupsinnigt sköna tankehalt, den absoluta kongruensen mellan form och materia […] att formen innehållet fullständigt och utan rest uppsugits i innehållet formen.” Diary, 12 March 1912: “Af Axel ett härligt, förståelsefullt bref om sinf. IV. Han gaf mig mycket därmed.” Diary, 8 September 1912; 14 September 1912: “Den är nog för subtil och tragisk för vår snöda verld.” Composer Granville Bantock (1868–1946) was the organizer of the Festival and Sibelius stayed with him. Sibelius to Aino on 26 September 1912: “Olen juuri repeteerannut. Orkesteri ei ole erittäin hyvä siitä syystä että lisävoimat ovat uusia tässä orkesterissa. Mutta mahtava. Herra Jumala kun III satsissa pelaavat unisono. […] Hän komplementeeraa minun sinf. johdosta erittäin. Klangista hän oli hurmaantunut. Muuten ne eivät vielä ole ‘mogna.’ Rosa oli ihastunut, pää keikkuu koko ajan. Toivon kuitenkin parasta.” Sibelius to Aino (s.a. [1912]): “1/2 tunnin perästä olen tuon suuren orkesterin johtajana ja kappale on tuo rakas neljäs. – Se on kummallista tämä mailma ja elämä. Välistä on kun tarttuisi itse historian punaiseen lankaan ja se koskee.” Newmarch’s analytical notes appeared in the concert program on 1 October 1912. A copy of the revised version, published by B&H in 1913, is preserved in Sibelius’s Library in Ainola. See also Bullock 2011, p. 249ff. Unidentified critics of The Observer and Referee on 6 October 1912. Unidentified critic of the Sunday Times on 6 October 1912 and North Mail on 7 October 1912. Unidentified critic of The Times on 2 October and 5 October 1912. Some of the critiques are cited in Bullock 2011, pp. 157–158. Ernst Newman in Nation on 12 October 1912. Newman’s critique of 2 October in Birmingham Daily Post was also cited (translated) in Hufvudstadsbladet on 9 October. Newman was the most celebrated British music critic in the first half of the 20th century. Diary, 1–6 October 1912: “Min IV Sinf. under min direktion gör succes. Kritiken mera konfus och dålig. Dock några goda. […] Hade ett stort och djupt intryck af min sinf. IV i England. Rätt så härlige Ego! Rätt så.” and “Kritiken, den engelska, i stort sedt, utomordentlig (Ernst Newman och Times t.ex.) –. Engelska resan + - 0. Möjligen ett par hundra deficit.” Sibelius to Boldemann on 9 November 1912 (Sibelius Museum, Turku): “ist es zu gewagt?” Sibelius to Aino (Copenhagen, s.a. [1912]): “Jag står nog ensam tror jag med min IVde. Fast – hel[l]re det än kompromisser.” Sibelius to Aino on 2 December 1912: “Olen harjoittanut tätä huonoa orkesteria ja haukkunut niitä pataluhaksi. Saa nähdä tuleeko koko konsertista mitään. Mutta minulla kun on kunnia johtaa tätä Sinf IVtta niin olen kova. […] Ihmettelen kuinka minusta on tullut kova dirigentti. En med pretentioner.” The article appeared translated in Hufvudstadsbladet on 3 December 1912. Pseudonym Ces of Politiken on 2 December 1912: “Ud af det tilsyneladende Kaos steg skønne og fine Tonebølger, truende, mørke Gestalter og hemmelighedsfulde, mystiske Klange. Nu kendte man Sibelius igen.” The critique was cited in part in Hufvudstadsbladet on 6 December 1912. Charles Kjerulf of Politiken, 4 December 1912: “[…] store, svævende Takt-


XVIII

111 112 113

114 115 116

117 118 119 120

121

slag med udstrakte Arme – der er noget af en Fugl i Flugt over ham – Musiken synes at sejle af Sted paa disse bærende Vinger. […] en drilsk, ung Troldkvinde, der ler og græder, lokker og gækker mellem Skærgaardens Holme i Finlands lysegrønne Sommernat.” and “Symfonien er næsten mere en Sinfonietta, et stort Stykke Kammermusik for Orkester.” “Enkelt-Instrumenternes koglende Samtalen.” Diary, before 7 December 1912: “Konserterade med framgång. Kjerulf kritiserat glänsande; hans fiender infernaliskt som jag tror.” Emilius Bangert in Hovedstaden on 4 December 1912: “Det er Sibelius’s Begrænsning, at han ikke formaar helt at underordne sig Toneverdenens Love.” A. T. [Alfred Tofft] of Berlingske Tidende on 4 December 1912: “[…] han styrter sig hellere ud i det groteske, end at blive paa Stedet og udnytte den Guldgrube, han fandt. […] Han bevæger sig helst ude i Periferien, der, hvor Musik næsten ophører at være Musik. […] Evnen til at holde fast paa Stoffet, udarbejde, hamre og tømre, saa alt staar klart og urokkeligt, den skorter det ham paa. Det bliver nærmest kun fantastiske Tegninger ud i det graa, ud i det mystiske.” “Hvor han spejder sig frem paa ukendte Stier, finder han altid noget, som i højeste Grad fanger Sindet. Der er i Symfonien Klange af sjælden Skønhed, Stemninger, som lodder saa dybt, at de synes at røre ved selve Underbevidstheden.” R–r. H. [Roger Henrichsen] of Riget on 4 December 1912: “Tonemaleri […] vrimler med Billeder af stor Ejendommelighed og tillige – navnlig i de sidste Satser – af megen Skønhed og Poesi vil ingen kunne nægte.” Diary, 8 December 1912: “Djäflarna framme i Köpenhamns tidningar. Nedskäld på ett infernaliskt sätt.” Sibelius to Boldemann on 9 December 1912 (SibMus): “Die Kritiken vom Vort Land und andere schlechte möchte ich sehn. Ich kann nicht verstehen wie man dermassen dumm sein kann. Den Herren ist eine verfeinerte Kunst schwach. Es ist wie ich immer gesagt habe: die glauben forte ist Kraft, Roheit Originalität u.s.w. Es ist zum lachen! Sonst bin ich gar nicht zufrieden mit dem Conzert in Kopenhagen. Es ging nicht gut – zu wenig Repetitionen – und die Musikern des Hofkapellets sind vollständig verallgemeinerte. Die verstehen nicht besseres.” Sibelius had been offered a professorship at the University of Music and Performing Arts Vienna in January 1912. Richard Specht, “Anklagen”, in: Der Märker, January 1913, p. 4. Diary, 19 January 1913: “Weingartner uppför ej min sednaste sinfoni, ehuru redan inöfvad. Detta har nedslagit mig. Härlige, komponerande Ego! Min stjärna i nedåtgående. Det har jag länge sedan vetat.” Diary, 2 February 1913: “Intet höres om Busonis uppförande af min sinfonie IV. Har han gjordt det, eller är nu detta åter en – bagatell.” Diary, 20 February 1913: “Det svider nu detta! Men kanske tiden – den underbara tiden – råder bot äfven på detta. – Jag ville sälja allt det jag äger, men – hvem köper. Huru nu i detta fall begå? – Det gäller nu att ej förlora modet; samt – framförallt – ej hufvudet. De anse – åtminstone verldens flesta orkestermusiker – att jag är en död man. Mais nous verrons! Skall nu detta vara slutet på Jean Sibelius som tonsättare?” Sibelius mentions the telegram in his diary on 1 April. According to Allgemeine Musik-Zeitung 1913 (40), Busoni cancelled his concerts with the Blüthner-Orchester in Berlin for personal reasons (See also Dahlström 2005, p. 409). Busoni’s telegram seems to be dated 17 [it should be 30] March 1913 (NA, SFA, file box 17): “Heute deine vierte Sinfonie mit grosser Freude dirigiert.”

122 Unidentified critic of Algemeen Handelsblad on 31 March 1913: “Dat enkele minder belangrijke bladzijen in dit vier-deelig symphonisch werk voorkomen, is niet te ontkennen, maar het geheel heeft interessante factuur (harmonie, melodie, rhythme) evenzeer als innerlijk leven, poëtische stemmingsmomenten te over. […] Hoe kan men echter de frischheid en originaliteit der gedachten voorbij zien, en de zelfstandigheid van den toondichter die alle uiterlijk effect versmaadt niet waardeeren!” 123 Stenhammar to Sibelius on 6 February 1913 (NA, SFA, file box 30): “Och så inträffade det oerhörda och så vidt jag vet i Göteborgs musikhistorias annaler enastående att efter symfoniens slut de fåtaliga försiktiga handklappningarna nedtystades af ljudliga hyschningar. Jag kan inte neka till, att det efter den första öfverraskningen kändes rätt uppfriskande, och att jag kände mig rätt stolt å dina vägnar. […] vår dumma s.k. kritik, som hittills burit dig på sina händer, gjorde plötslig[t] kovändning och skällde ut dig på det löjligaste, mest oförstående sätt. Symfonien hade beredt dem en stor besvikelse, betecknade tillbakagång, afmattning, brist på uppfinning, formlöshet […]. Och lyckades långt öfver förväntan. Min kära onsdagspublik hedrade sig i går så som sällan. Så varmt, så spontant, icke utan en bestämdt demonstrativ färg – mig kom bifallet, bestående underkännande både abonnemangspublikens och, recensenternas dom. Vi ha alltså en intelligent, själfständigt kännande och bedömande publik här, och den står redo att ta emot dig varmt och värdigt. […] min vördnad för dig såsom konstnär är oföränderlig och ständigt växande.” 124 Diary, 8 February 1913: “Sinf. IV uthvisslad [underlined in red] i Göteborg.” 125 Diary, 11 February 1913: “Sinnet sjukt, mycket sjukt. Ett skott vore nog det bästa för mig.” 126 Unidentified critics of the New York Times and of the Sun on 3 March 1913. 127 Herbert F. Peyser, “A New and Strange Sibelius Symphony” in Musical America on 8 March 1913, p. 26. 128 Diary, 19 June 1913: “Gemenheter i Musical America angående mig. […] Min 4de sinf. blifvit uppförd under denna säsong i New York och väckt mycken uppmärksamhet. Dock tyvärr blifvit alldeles missförstått.” 129 William Henry Humiston, “New Sibelius Symphony a Puzzle” in Musical America on 9 August 1913, p. 17. 130 Sibelius to Carpelan on 31 May 1914 from Norfolk: “Amerikas bästa kritiker håller styft på min 4de sinfoni.” and on 10 June from Boston: “4de sinfonin här i Boston starkt beundrad. Dr. Muck lär ha spelat den härligt. Äfven i New York under Damrosch bra.” 131 The first recording was made by the Philadelphia Orchestra conducted by Leopold Stokowski (Victor 7686, 1932). 132 Elmer Diktonius, Opus 12. Musik. (Helsingfors: Holger Schildts Förlag, 1933), pp. 44–45: “vår fasta tro är att denna barkbrödsbit kommer att omtuggas av flere mänskosläkten.” and “en bit absolut musik omramad av finsk natur. […] Ty ett obegripligt verk, en svårsmält symfoni kunde ej uppföras så titt och tätt hos oss och annorstädes, om den ej funne genklang hos sin publik. Och faktiskt har det ju gått så långt att den fjärde är den av de sju vilken man helst återhör.” 133 Olin Downes, Symphonic Masterpieces (New York: Stratford Press, 1936), p. 272.


XIX

Einleitung Der vorliegende Band widmet sich der 4. Symphonie op. 63 von Jean Sibelius. Das Werk wurde im April 1911 uraufgeführt, danach überarbeitete Sibelius es. Breitkopf & Härtel veröffentlichte 1912 die revidierte Fassung; auf dieser basiert die vorliegende Partitur der Jean Sibelius Werke ( JSW). Anschließend werden Rekonstruktionen der ersten Fassung präsentiert: die Sätze II und III in vollständiger Form sowie fünf Passagen aus Satz IV. Darin konzentrieren sich die umfassendsten und tiefgreifendsten Änderungen. Ansonsten werden die Unterschiede der Fassungen im Critical Commentary erläutert; einige Stellen werden zudem durch Beispiele und Faksimiles aus dem Manuskriptautograph beleuchtet. Entstehung Anfang 1909 verbrachte Sibelius fünf Monate in London, Paris und Berlin. Während dieser Reise begann er mit einem Tagebuch – und als er am 21. Mai in Berlin war, notierte er: „Muss heim. Unmöglich, hier weiterzuarbeiten. Stilwechsel?!“1 Im August vollendete er die Zehn Klavierstücke op. 58, und im Herbst schrieb er sowohl die Schauspielmusik zu Ödlan op. 8 als auch In memoriam op. 59. Im September/Oktober 1909 besuchte Sibelius, begleitet von seinem Schwager, dem Maler Eero Järnefelt (1863–1937), Koli, den bekannten Berg in Nordkarelien. Man geht davon aus, dass dieser Ausflug die 4. Symphonie inspirierte. Nach seiner Rückkehr schrieb Sibelius ins Tagebuch: „Auf dem Koli! Einer der stärksten Eindrücke meines Lebens. Pläne [für] ,La Montagne‘!“Bei der Arbeit daran im Herbst schwankten seine Stimmungen: „War im Hades. Ein Tal wie nie zuvor“ und „Erneut der Himalaya. Alles schön und stark. Arbeitete wie ein Riese.“2 Offenbar lassen sich zumindest einige musikalische Gedanken tatsächlich auf die in Koli empfangenen Eindrücke zurückführen. So schrieb Sibelius’ Freund und Förderer Axel Carpelan (1858–1919), der ihn Anfang Dezember besucht hatte: „Ja, ich habe viel über die Symphonie nachgedacht – was Du mir aus ,Das Gebirge‘ und ,Wanderers Gedanken‘ vorgespielt haben, war mit Sicherheit das Gewaltigste, was ich je von Dir gehört habe.“3 Am Dreikönigsabend 1910 notierte Sibelius: „Ein Keim von etwas Neuem und Großem!“4 Dieses „Neue und Große“ war wohl die 4. Symphonie (vgl. Anmerkung 43). Das Frühjahr 1910 wurde überschattet von ernsthaften finanziellen Problemen, die Sibelius zu lösen hatte; daher fiel es ihm schwer, Zeit zum Komponieren zu finden. Vermutlich konzentrierte er sich daher aus finanziellen Gründen auf kürzere und ältere Werke: im Februar vollendete er Die Dryade op. 45 Nr. 1, danach überarbeitete er im März In memoriam und im April Impromptu op. 19. Carpelan war helfend unterwegs und organisierte ein Unterstützertreffen, nach dem Sibelius in der Lage war, seine ausstehenden Schuldscheine merklich zu verringern.5 Die Arbeit an der Symphonie ging weiter: „Wieder in einer tiefen Grube. Bebend an der ,Neuen‘ gearbeitet.“ Er setzte die Arbeit auch fort, als er nicht am Schreibtisch saß: „Beim Komponieren sechs Meilen gewandert. Das heißt, [ich habe] das musikalische Metall geschmiedet, um den silbernen Ring zu bekommen.“6 Im Sommer beendete Sibelius die Acht Lieder op. 61 und schickte sie Ende Juli an Breitkopf. Vom 30. Juli 1910 an verbrachte er eine Woche allein auf der Insel Järvo (bei Kirkkonummi) an der finnischen Südküste, um sich für einen guten Anfang mit der Symphonie zurückzuziehen. „All diese Tage auf der Felseninsel in Sturm und in heiterer Stimmung. Arbeite ,bebend‘ an der Neuen.“7 Die von Sibelius häufig zitierte Beobachtung „Gib das Pathos im Leben nicht auf!“ geht auf diese Empfindungen zurück. So erläuterte er ein paar Tage später Carpelan, als der erste Satz Gestalt annahm: „Ich arbeite an meiner neuen Symphonie und ich habe hier und da wirklich erfreuliche Augenblicke. Manchmal etwas so Sublimes, woran ich nie zuvor Anteil hatte. […] Nur die Symphonie lebt in mir. Es ist so wundervoll, mich ihr so vollkommen zuwenden zu können!“8

Das Werk machte in der Tat gute Fortschritte. Dem Tagebuch zufolge arbeitete Sibelius den ganzen August am ersten Satz. Der Durchführungsabschnitt („genomföringen“) bereitete ihm die größte Mühe, und er strich ihn am 17. August zum ersten Mal durch. Im Tagebuch gab er sich den Rat: „Mehr Schönheit und wirkliche Musik! Keine Kombinationen und dynamischen Crescendi mit stereotypen Figuren – ,Neue Geschwindigkeit!‘ ,Jetzt oder nie‘!“ Am 28. August strich er den Durchführungsabschnitt erneut durch, bevor er mit dem Ergebnis zufrieden war. Zwei Tage später hielt er den Satz für abgeschlossen; danach wird er im Tagebuch auch nicht mehr erwähnt.9 Der erste Tagebucheintrag, der sich auf die Komposition des zweiten Satzes bezieht, erfolgte am 2. September 1910. Dem Eintrag vom 11. September zufolge scheint der Satz ganz glatt Gestalt angenommen zu haben: „II spukt in meinem Hirn. Als Plan fertig. [Ich] beginne den dritten.“10 Danach wird Satz II im Tagebuch nicht mehr erwähnt. Sibelius erwähnte, den dritten Satz zu beginnen, dieser nahm jedoch nicht wirklich Gestalt an, und fünf Tage später (am 17. September) wandte er sich Satz IV zu. Zu diesem Zeitpunkt bot er Breitkopf auch Tulen synty op. 32 zur Veröffentlichung an. Er entschloss sich jedoch dazu, das Werk zu überarbeiten, und er verbrachte Ende September sowohl mit der Arbeit an der Revision von Tulen synty als auch am vierten Satz der Symphonie. Im Oktober 1910 begab sich Sibelius auf eine Konzertreise ins Ausland. Zunächst dirigierte er am 8. Oktober ein Konzert in Christiania (heute Oslo). In einem Brief, den er im Juni wegen der Vereinbarungen für das Konzert in Oslo an Iver Holter geschickt hatte, hatte Sibelius die Hoffnung, die Vierte auf dieser Reise zu präsentieren, musste dann aber letztlich das Programm ändern. In einem anderen Brief an Holter findet sich ein interessantes Detail zur geplanten Instrumentierung, indem Sibelius erwähnte, dass er keine Bassklarinette brauche, weil die Vierte noch nicht fertig sei.11 Von Oslo reiste er weiter nach Berlin, wo er die Revision von Tulen synty abschloss und unter anderem Hermann von Hase, den Direktor von Breitkopf, traf. Sibelius berichtete Carpelan: „Die Symphonie IV reift!“, und er arbeitete laut Tagebuch während der Konzertreise „heimlich“ („hemligt“) an ihrem dritten Satz.12 Nach der Rückkehr Anfang November setzte Sibelius die Arbeit an Satz III fort (am 4. November): „Erfreute mich an der Fülle. Die Stille! Die Zeit gefriert! Arbeitend und schmiedend! Ein wunderbares Gefühl!“ Er arbeitete auch am vierten Satz und stellte Betrachtungen zur Essenz einer Symphonie an: „Eine Symphonie ist keine ,Komposition‘ im traditionellen Sinn. Es ist vielmehr ein Glaubensbekenntnis in verschiedenen Stadien eines Lebens.“13 Zudem verordnete er sich Kontrapunktstudien (am 6. und 7. November). Am 8. November traf er die Sopranistin Aino Ackté (1876–1944), was ihn veranlasste, Kompositionspläne zu dem Gedicht The Raven (Der Rabe) von Edgar Allan Poe (1809–1849) zu machen. The Raven Ackté hatte Sibelius schon im Mai 1910 kontaktiert und ihm vorgeschlagen, im kommenden Herbst mit ihr „ein großes Orchesterkonzert in Berlin (ausschließlich mit einem Sibelius-Programm)“ zu geben.14 Sibelius nahm das Angebot an und schrieb ihr im Juli: „Da alle meine alten Kompositionen oft in Deutschland aufgeführt wurden (meine Symphonien mehrfach in Berlin), müssen sowohl die Symphonie als auch natürlich die Komposition für Sie neu sein.“15 Der überlieferten Korrespondenz lässt sich nicht entnehmen, ob die Idee eines neuen Werks für Ackté auf die Sängerin oder auf Sibelius zurückging. Sibelius regte an, das Konzert später, im Februar 1911, durchzuführen, um mehr Zeit zu bekommen, die neuen Werke abzuschließen. Ackté kontaktierte den Münchner Konzertagenten Emil Gutmann, und sie begannen mit der Vorbereitung einer größeren Tournee. Letztendlich entstanden dabei Pläne für Konzerte in Berlin, Wien, München und


XX Prag, die zusätzlich zu den beiden neuen Werken die 2. Symphonie op. 43, Pohjolas Tochter op. 49 sowie die Lieder Höstkväll op. 38 Nr. 1, Jubal op. 53 Nr. 1 und Hertig Magnus op. 57 Nr. 6 umfassten. Als Sibelius Ackté am 8. November 1910 besuchte, entstanden offenbar detailliertere Pläne. Er notierte in sein Tagebuch: „Ich bin neugierig zu sehen, wohin sich unsere Pläne entwickeln. Ich muss gute Arbeit machen. Wundervoller Tag.“16 Auf jeden Fall wird The Raven namentlich erst nach diesem Treffen erwähnt. Sibelius besaß Korpen, die schwedische Übersetzung von Viktor Rydberg.17 Aus dem Tagebuch könnte man vermuten, Sibelius habe nach dem Treffen mit der Vertonung des Gedichts begonnen und sich etwa einen Monat lang auf diese Arbeit konzentriert, obwohl er auch hin und wieder an der Symphonie arbeitete (laut Tagebuch zumindest am dritten Satz). Sibelius war von Korpen begeistert: „[Ich] habe ,Korpen‘ geschmiedet. Alle Ideen in flüssiger Form. Wundervoller Tag.“ Aber er hatte auch Bedenken: „Habe meine Zweifel, was ,Korpen‘ angeht. Die Art, wie ich damit arbeite. Insgesamt.“18 Er berichtete Carpelan über Korpen: „Ich denke, dass es gut wird.“ Und er fügte hinzu: „Ich vergaß zu erwähnen, dass der Unterton bei allem, was ich tue, im Geist der IV. Symphonie liegt.“19 Carpelan erwiderte: „Daher ,Korpen‘! Ein teuflisches Gedicht. Mache den Gesangspart aber leicht genug, damit andere es ebenso wie Aino Ackté singen können! Ich glaube fest, dass Du großartig vorankommen wirst.“20 Nachdem er ungefähr eine Woche gearbeitet hatte, notierte Sibelius in seinem Tagebuch: „[Ich] empfinde im Moment ,Korpen‘ als zu dunkel und schwer für mich.“21 Seine Stimmung könnte durch seine Sorge um die Gesundheit seiner Frau Aino getrübt gewesen sein. Ihr Rheuma hatte sich derart verschlechtert, dass sie für mehrere Wochen in Helsinki ins Krankenhaus musste. Sibelius arbeitete indes an Korpen weiter. Er begann die Arbeit mit der schwedischen Übersetzung, kaufte sich dann aber am 18. November deutsche Übertragungen.22 Das Gedicht umfasst im Original 18 Strophen, Sibelius entschied sich jedoch, es um drei Strophen zu kürzen.23 Seine Anmerkungen am Textrand lassen erkennen, dass er die ursprünglichen Strophen 9, 10 und 13 übersprang. Er setzte die Arbeit am dritten Satz der Symphonie fort, der, wie er anmerkte, „Gestalt und Farbe bekommt“. Am darauffolgenden Tag „nahm [er] ,Korpen‘ wieder auf.“24 Er bekannte im Tagebuch: „[s]chwebe die ganze Zeit zwischen ,Sinfonie‘ und ,Korpen‘. – Letzterer muss bald Gestalt annehmen.“25 Dennoch war er nicht ganz zufrieden: „Zweifel, den Text betreffend. ,Worte‘ sind in meiner Kunst immer eine Belastung.“26 Es hat den Anschein, als sei er trotz allem mit der Arbeit an Korpen vorangekommen, da er laut Tagebuch am 4. Dezember an Strophe 9 (ursprünglich Strophe 11) arbeitete.27 Wenige Tage später gingen die Dinge eher reibungslos voran: „Neues Tempo bei ,Korpen‘. Habe das alte ausgestrichen, weil es zu sehr ,auf moderne Art unbedeutend‘ war. Meine Begeisterung gegenüber diesem Stück [ist] enorm. – Wundervolle Stimmungen. Als würde die Zeit stillstehen und der Himmel mit Vorzeichen und Monden geheimnisvoll sein. Kastagnetten und Triangel!“28 Noch am 9. Dezember schien Sibelius zuversichtlich zu sein, und er versicherte Ackté, die in London auftrat und die Tournee vorbereitete, dass alles gelingen werde.29 Am folgenden Tag war er immer noch in dieser Hochstimmung: „Habe an ,Der Rabe‘ gearbeitet. Wieder Hoffnung! Wundervolles Ego.“ Er plante auch das Programm für das Konzert in München (17. Februar), merkte aber an: „Es ist ein Jammer, dass die 4. Sinfonie keine Zeit hat, um in Ruhe zu reifen.“30 Am nächsten Tag jedoch ließ er in einem Telegramm an Ackté eine Bombe platzen: „[Ich] bin verhindert, an der Tournee teilzunehmen.“31 Im Tagebucheintrag hielt er fest: „[Ich] habe wieder meine Schiffe verbrannt. [Ich] habe mit Gutmanns Reklame und mit Aino Ackté gebrochen. Aber [ich werde] die Konsequenzen tragen! – Habe ,Korpen‘ gegenwärtig verlassen. Einen Monat weggeworfen! [Mein] Herz weint.“32 Ackté war geschockt und wütend, als sie Sibelius’ Nachricht erhielt, und sie erwiderte: „Ich bin es nicht gewohnt, dass man sich über mich

lustig macht, ganz zu schweigen davon, in einem lakonischen Telegramm entlassen zu werden. Es wäre ehrlicher gewesen, wenn Sie mir gleich gesagt hätten, dass Ihnen Sibelius-Konzerte im Ausland nicht zusagen. Dadurch hätten Sie mir eine Menge Ärger erspart – um nicht noch mehr zu sagen –, und ich hätte mich Gutmann und anderen gegenüber nicht in diese lächerliche, alles andere als schmeichelhafte Lage gebracht, womit Sie meine künftige Verbindung mit diesen Personen ruiniert haben.“33 Sibelius erklärte sich gegenüber Carpelan: „Habe Diva Ackté ihrem Reklame-Schicksal überlassen. ,Korpen‘ muss köcheln. Die IV. Symphonie strahlt mächtig in Sonnenschein und Kraft.“ Auf der Rückseite des Briefes fügte er hinzu: „Meine Kunst unterscheidet sich grundlegend von den ,Konzertwaren‘, die sich ,verkaufen‘. Wenn ich ein Konzert gebe, dann können Divas nicht das Hauptinteresse auf sich ziehen, vielmehr muss meine symphonische Kunst triumphieren. Ich weiß gewiss, dass Du, lieber Freund Axel, meine Ansicht teilst.“34 Er lag richtig, denn der Freund Axel antwortete: „[Ich] teile völlig Deine Sicht auf Deine Kunst und Aino Acktés Reklame-Idiotie. Nachdem ich einen Beleg des Interviews aus den ,Daily News‘ in Händen gehalten hatte (,Ich werde ihn – Sibelius – mitnehmen‘), nehme ich an, dass jede weitere Kooperation zwischen Euch beiden ausgeschlossen ist.“35 Die Zusammenarbeit wurde indes später wieder aufgenommen, als Sibelius 1913 Luonnotar op. 70 für Ackté komponierte. Rosa Newmarch (1857–1940), eine Freundin und Fürsprecherin von Sibelius in England, schrieb Sibelius, weil sie zweifelte, ob es klug war, die Tournee abzusagen. Sie hatte Ackté am 21. Dezember in London getroffen und hatte Verständnis für sie. Sie erläuterte: „Schreiben Sie zumindest dieser großartigen Sängerin. Ihr Selbstwertgefühl leidet sehr – und Sie sollten zuallererst wissen, was dies bedeutet. Aber abgesehen davon spricht sie ergreifend über Sie und über Ihre Musik.“36 Sibelius erläuterte Newmarch seine Beweggründe: „Ihre freundliches zweites Brief betreffend Madame Ackté, die ich bewundere, habe ich bekommen und ich muss gestehen dass ich nicht anderes handeln konnte. Die Sache nahm eine ganz andere Richtung als wie im Anfang mir vorgestellt wurden. Vor allem die Reclamen. Da die Reclame detailliert und genau beschreibt wie die Composition ist, in welcher Richtung u.s.w. sie geht, ohne das Werk fertig ist – wurde mir das ganze Componieren unmöglich. Dazu kam noch dass mann mich presentieren wollten als einen ganz unbekan[n]ten Componisten – in München! U.s.w.! […] Ich arbeite an neue Werke. […] Sinfonie IV wird wahrscheinlich in Februar fertig.“37 Sibelius spielte dabei auf die Ankündigungen an, die in Wien sowie in einigen deutschen und anderen europäischen Zeitungen erschienen waren. Ihnen war zu entnehmen, er habe „soeben eine große, symphonische Dichtung für Gesang und Orchester vollendet, die von Kennern der Partitur als ein orchestertechnisch höchst seltsames, dabei außerordentlich wirkungsvolles Opus geschildert wird, das den gleichen herben, symbolisierenden Stimmungsreiz ausübt wie die finnländische Volksdichtung oder die Bilder eines Axel Galén [sic].“38 1916 kam Sibelius in einem Interview auf den Korpen-Vorfall zurück. Nach seinen neuen Kompositionen befragt, antwortete er: „Ich kann nicht über solche Angelegenheiten diskutieren, das habe ich ein für alle Mal klar beschlossen. Gebrannte Kinder scheuen das Feuer. Vor einiger Zeit war ich dabei, Poes Gedicht ,The Raven‘ für eine Konzerttournee mit Aino Ackté zu vertonen. Neuigkeiten dazu wurden sofort in die ganze Welt telegrafiert. Ich hingegen kam zu der Überzeugung, dass es [das Gedicht] unmöglich zu vertonen ist – es sei denn als Melodram. Die Komposition funktionierte dann natürlich nicht, und ich befand mich in einer schwierigen Lage, die zu Missverständnissen führte.“39 Unbekannt ist, ob Sibelius Pläne hatte, Korpen als Melodram zu vertonen oder nicht. Aus dem Korpen-Projekt geht die interessante Frage hervor, ob Sibelius das für Korpen skizzierte Material benutzte, um die Symphonie zu vollenden. Sein Biograph Erik Tawaststjerna hebt hervor, dass es zwi-


XXI schen einer Skizze zu Korpen und musikalischen Ideen im Finale, vor allem beim Hornthema (T. 159–167), Ähnlichkeiten zu geben scheint. Tatsächlich erscheint das Hornthema schon auf zwei früheren Skizzenseiten, deren Ideen dann im Violinkonzert (Erstfassung 1904) und in der 3. Symphonie (1907) auftauchen.40 Darüber hinaus enthält das Heft mit den Skizzen zu Korpen auch einige Gedanken, die in den dritten Satz der 4. Symphonie münden.41 Darüber ist bislang wenig geschrieben worden, und mit Blick auf die wenigen erhaltenen Skizzen ist es unmöglich festzustellen, ob Sibelius die musikalischen Gedanken für Korpen oder für die Symphonie verwendet hat. Abschluss der Vierten Direkt nachdem Sibelius beschlossen hatte, Korpen aufzugeben, setzte er die Arbeit an der 4. Symphonie fort. In den letzten Wochen des Jahres 1910 arbeitete er wieder am dritten Satz, obwohl ihn die Arbeit Zeit kostete: „[Ich] spüre die Richtung, die Satz III der Symphonie nehmen wird. Alles ist noch im Chaos und bedarf der Konzentration.“42 Er verschob das geplante Konzert um zwei Wochen auf den 20. Februar 2011. Am letzten Tag des Jahres 1910 schrieb er in sein Tagebuch: „Das ,Große‘, das ich vor gerade einem Jahr vorausgesehen habe, nimmt Gestalt an.“43 Bedrängt von finanziellen Sorgen und betroffen von Ainos Krankheit, bezog Sibelius im Januar 1911 Quartier im Hotel Fennia in Helsinki, um etwas Ruhe und Frieden zu finden.44 Immer noch arbeitete er am dritten Satz: „Satz III der Symphonie umgestaltet“, und er beschloss, das Konzert erneut zu verschieben, und zwar nun auf Ende März.45 Obwohl die Zeit knapp war – das Konzert war auf den 31. März festgelegt –, begab sich Sibelius am letzten Tag im Januar auf eine Konzerttournee durch Schweden und Lettland, bei der er sechs Konzerte gab.46 Carpelan vertraute er an: „Ich will diese Konzertdusche richtig genießen, bevor ich die Symphonie abschließe.“47 Nach seiner Rückkehr beendete Sibelius zwei neue Stücke, Canzonetta und Valse romantique op. 62, für Arvid Järnefelts Neufassung des Theaterstücks Kuolema („Tod“), das im März aufgeführt werden sollte. Erst danach kehrte er zur Vierten zurück – und zwar zum dritten Satz.48 Dieser war offenbar gereift und hatte letztlich seine definitive Gestalt gefunden; zwei Tage später begab sich Sibelius an den vierten Satz. Er konzentrierte sich für ein paar Tage auf das zweite Thema („det andra temat“), danach arbeitete er am Schluss der Symphonie. Noch Mitte März notierte er: „Habe die Skizze zu Satz IV gestrichen – die Anlage. Aber [ich] glaube, dass ich dem Ziel näher bin. Eine schwache, ganz schwache Hoffnung, dass ich die Symphonie für das Konzert fertigstellen kann.“49 Sibelius „[k]ämpfte mit Gott!“ und war voller Zweifel: „Gearbeitet! Schaffe ich es rechtzeitig? Und bin ich in der Lage, meine Idee zur Instrumentation zu verwirklichen? ,Glückliche Kunst!‘ Helligkeit!!“50 Laut Tagebuch waren die letzten Tage vor der Uraufführung hektisch: „Mit der Symphonie ums Überleben gekämpft. Trage männlich dieses ,Kompositionskreuz‘!“51 Die Symphonie wurde für die Uraufführung fertig, aber es war sehr knapp. Die Musiker erinnerten sich noch Jahrzehnte später daran, dass es am Vortag noch Änderungen gab und dass der Kopist Sibelius nach Hause begleitete, um die Stimmen zu korrigieren. Folglich erhielt das Orchester das fertige Aufführungsmaterial für die Probe am Tag des Konzerts.52 Am Tag vor der Uraufführung schrieb Sibelius in sein Tagebuch: „Die Symphonie ,fertig‘. Iacta alea est! Muss! Es fordert eine Menge Männlichkeit, um dem Leben ins Gesicht zu schauen. Du weißt es.“53 Erste Aufführungen und Rezeption Die Uraufführung der 4. Symphonie fand am 3. April 1911 im Festsaal der Universität Helsinki statt; Sibelius leitete das Orchester der Philharmonischen Gesellschaft Helsinki. Die erste Hälfte des Konzerts umfasste – in dieser Reihenfolge – In memoriam op. 59, Canzonetta op. 62a, Die Dryade op. 45 Nr. 1 und Nächtlicher Ritt und Sonnenaufgang

op. 55. Für In memoriam und für Die Dryade waren es finnische Erstaufführungen, Canzonetta (aus Kuolema) war einen Monat zuvor im Theater uraufgeführt worden. Nach der Pause wurde die Vierte gespielt. Das Konzert wurde zwei Tage später vor ausverkauftem Haus wiederholt. Sibelius entschied sich dann, das Werk für die Veröffentlichung zu überarbeiten, und so fanden die nächsten Aufführungen etwa ein Jahr später statt. Wie Helsingin Sanomat erklärte, war Sibelius’ 4. Symphonie der lang erwartete Hauptprogrammpunkt in dem Konzert: „Die Gelegenheit, hier in Finnland die letzten Orchesterwerke unseres genialsten Komponisten kennenzulernen, war schon lange mit Spannung erwartet worden. […] Die Hauptnummer wird die neue Symphonie in vier Sätzen sein.“54 Nach der Uraufführung konzentrierten sich die Kritiken auf die erste Hälfte des Konzerts, und hinsichtlich der Symphonie wiederholten sie zumeist das, was Nya Pressen in Worte fasste: „[...] unser Meister hat mit dieser Komposition eine neue Entwicklungsstufe erreicht.“ Es wurde angemerkt, dass man die Symphonie noch einmal hören müsse, um in der Lage sein, sie zu verstehen. Die Instrumentierung wurde als meisterhaft und „durchsichtig klar“ beschrieben.55 Nach dem zweiten Konzert wurde die Symphonie eingehender besprochen. Die meisten Kritiker waren sich einig in ihrer Sichtweise, dass dies das Werk sei, das in Sibelius’ Oeuvre am schwierigsten zu verstehen sei, und dass es unter kontrapunktischer und harmonischer Perspektive neu und kühn sei. Es schien einen neuen Stil in seinem Schaffen darzustellen, und in der Tat wurde dieser Stilwechsel in der redaktionellen Anzeige in Hufvudstadsbladet erwähnt.56 Carpelan erörterte in seinem Bericht den Stil der Symphonie: „Insgesamt gesehen ist die Symphonie ein Protest gegen den musikalischen Stil, der im eigentlichen Heimatland der Symphonie, in Deutschland, vorherrscht, wo die Instrumentalmusik zu einer Klangkunst degeneriert, von der sich das Leben verabschiedet hat, zu einer Art musikalischer Ingenieurskunst, die ihre innere Leere durch einen aufwändigen mechanischen Apparat zu verdecken versucht. Es ist zu erwarten, dass eine korrumpierte Kritik ein Werk wie die 4. Symphonie ,zu Tode kritisiert‘ – ein Werk, in dem Geist und Natur in einer wunderbaren Art zusammengekommen sind, um eine Einheit zu schaffen, wie sie nie zuvor gehört worden ist.“57 Interessanterweise verwendete auch Sibelius in einem Brief an Newmarch das Wort Protest: „Meine neue Sinfonie ist eine vollständige Protest gegen d. Compositionen heutzutage. Nichts – absolut nichts vom Cirkus [in ihr].“58 Der Kritiker Evert Katila teilte die von Carpelan geäußerten Gedanken und sagte abschließend: „Aber obwohl der Komponist allen äußerlichen Glanz abgeworfen hat, ist sein Werk nicht rückwärtsgewandt, im Gegenteil. Es ist das Neueste der neuen Musik, bislang das kühnste in kontrapunktischer und harmonischer Hinsicht. Wenn man es zum ersten Mal hört, scheint es schwer verständlich zu sein – einfach wegen des Reichtums der Dissonanzen und der Radikalität der harmonischen Struktur, aber wenn man es besser kennenlernt, spürt man die außergewöhnliche Technik und strenge Logik dahinter, die beim ersten Hören noch dunkel schien.“59 Sibelius schätzte Katilas Ansicht: „Katila [hat] verständnisvoll über mich und die Symphonie geschrieben.“60 Oskar Merikanto bemerkte in seinem Bericht auch das Fehlen äußeren Glanzes und schloss mit den Worten: „So denke ich, dass Sibelius sich in diesem Werk sozusagen in seine Kammer zurückgezogen und begonnen hat, sich selbst und die Geheimnisse des Lebens zu erforschen, die grundlegenden Fragen, die im menschlichen Herzen schwelen. […] Ich fühle, dass sich Sibelius als Symphoniker eine völlig neue Welt eröffnet hat, die sich bislang noch keinem gezeigt hat und die er allein mit seinem erstaunlich hoch entwickelten Sinn für Ton und Farbe zu sehen und für andere darzustellen in der Lage ist.“61 Sibelius notierte in sein Tagebuch: „Merikanto schrieb über meine neue Musik einen wunderbaren Artikel in ,Tampereen Sanomat‘.“62 Auch die Form der Symphonie wurde allgemein als „völlig frei“ und als „komplex erscheinend […] aufgrund ihrer radikalen Struktur“ wahr-


XXII genommen und beschrieben.63 Otto Andersson meinte, Sibelius „ist allerdings zu frei in der Form“, zollte ihm aber dafür Anerkennung, dass er „in der Lage sei, die Form zu weiten“.64 Carpelan erläuterte die Beziehung zwischen Form und Inhalt: „Was den Hörer sofort frappiert und überrascht, ist der neue, merkwürdige Ideengehalt und die davon abhängige außerordentliche Behandlung der Form. Wunderbare rezitativ-ähnliche Motive und dazwischengeworfene Ausbrüche, die sich mit breiteren melodischen Gebilden abwechseln, tiefsinniger Kontrapunkt in Verbindung mit einer durchsichtigen, strengen Logik und Übersichtlichkeit, zusätzlich spartanische Einfachheit hinsichtlich des Ausdrucks – dies alles ist unmittelbar zu hören.“65 Ungeachtet der günstigen Beurteilungen empfand Sibelius, dass sein Werk nicht geschätzt wurde. Er schrieb seinem Freund Adolf Paul (1863–1943): „Hier zuhause bin ich jetzt aus dem Rennen. Sie verstehen meine Musik nicht. Und ich kann das nicht verdammen!“66 Er erzählte dem befreundeten schwedischen Komponisten Wilhelm Stenhammar (1871–1927), die Konzerte hätten „mit bescheidenem wirklichem Verständnis durch das Publikum und die Kritiker“ stattgefunden, und er fuhr fort, dass „diese Symphonie hier völlig missverstanden wurde“.67 Andersson erwähnte, dass das Auditorium und die Kritiken das Werk „auf eine irgendwie zurückhaltende Art“ aufgenommen hätten und das Publikum nach dem Konzert „sprachlos herumgestanden“ habe.68 Aino erinnerte sich später gegenüber Erik Tawaststjerna an die Rezeption: „Hinterhältige Blicke, Kopfschütteln, verlegen oder versteckt ironisches Lächeln. Zur Gratulation kamen nicht viele ins Künstlerfoyer.“69 Die negativen Kritiken an der Vierten scheinen Sibelius tief getroffen zu haben. Noch 1943 erinnerte er sich gegenüber seinem Schwiegersohn Jussi Snellman an die Uraufführung und daran, dass die Symphonie „,Touristenmusik‘ genannt worden war. Hufvudstadsbladet schrieb ein paar Zeilen darüber und nur Erik [Eero Järnefelt] kam, um mir zu danken. Sie werden erst in der Zukunft verstehen, was in diesem Werk steckt.“ Tatsächlich verfasste Bis für Hufvudstadsbladet ziemlich lange Artikel sowohl vor als auch nach beiden Konzerten, und was er als „Touristenmusik“ bezeichnete, betraf das Finale: „Sibelius schrieb in seinen früheren Symphonien eindrucksvollere Schlusssätze. Dieser hat – so scheint es mir im Moment – einen leichten touristenähnlichen Beigeschmack.“70 Über programmatische Aspekte Die programmatischen Schilderungen, die man der Symphonie und ihrer Herkunft anhaftete, waren für Sibelius’ Verzweiflung und die heute noch irritierten Exegeten verantwortlich. Nach der zweiten Aufführung verkündete Bis in Hufvudstadsbladet ein Programm für die Symphonie: „Der erste Satz, Tempo di molto moderato, beschreibt den Berg Koli und Eindrücke von ihm. Im zweiten Satz, Vivace assai, befindet sich der Komponist auf dem Berg. Er blickt auf den See Pielisjärvi ihm zu Füßen. Die Sonne liegt golden über dem See, dessen glitzernde Wellen spielerisch ihr lebensspendendes Licht reflektieren. Der dritte Satz, Il tempo largo, beschreibt das wundervolle Panorama bei Mondlicht, ein ausgezeichnetes Bild mit poetischen Farbtönen. Das Finale schildert die Rückkehr. Eine Passage ist besonders bemerkenswert. Wo der Komponist wandert, scheint die Sonne, aber ein Schneesturm nähert sich wirbelnd von Nordosten, vom Weißen Meer. Er erreicht uns nicht ganz, aber der Kontrast zwischen dem Sonnenschein im Vordergrund und der Bedrohung durch einen gewaltigen Schneesturm dahinter ist wirkungsvoll. Das ist der Hauptstoff der Symphonie.“71 Die Ursprünge von Bis’ Beschreibung sind nicht bekannt. Als Reaktion kommentierte Sibelius im Tagebuch: „Bis’ Dummheiten.“ Die Zeitung des folgenden Tages druckte Sibelius’ Bemerkung ab: „Die Vermutung des Pseudonyms Bis über das Programm meiner neuen Symphonie trifft nicht zu. Ich vermute, dass es mit einer topografischen Erläuterung zu diesem Thema zu tun hat, die ich einigen guten

Freunden kürzlich am 1. April gab.“ Bis’ Replik folgte: „Zusatz. Ein sehr enger Freund von Sibelius und mir kam auf mich zu und bewertete genau die Inhalte der Symphonie als authentisch […]; und es ist in dieser Hinsicht von Herrn Sibelius selbst bekräftigt, er habe hier eingestanden, eine solche Erklärung exakt ,zu diesem (programmatischen) Sachverhalt‘ gegeben zu haben.“72 Aus Carpelans zwei Wochen später veröffentlichtem Aufsatz könnte abgeleitet werden, dass die der Vierten zugeschriebenen programmatischen Beschreibungen Sibelius unangenehm waren. Offenbar diskutierte er den Sachverhalt mit Carpelan, der sich am 7. April, als Bis’ Rezension erschien, in Ainola aufhielt. Carpelan erläuterte: „Wegen der Konzeption der Symphonie während eines Besuchs in Kolivaara, von dem aus man den großen See Pielisjärvi in Karelien überblickt, das für seine großartige Natur und seine weite Aussicht bekannt ist, würde man a priori geneigt sein anzunehmen, dass sie Züge eines Landschaftsgemäldes aufweist. Dies ist jedoch nicht der Fall. Obwohl hin und wieder fremde Naturklänge und -stimmungen aus dem Orchester hervortreten, wirkt die Symphonie eher erdfern, ,weltentrückt‘, man ist versucht zu sagen, nicht belebt. In diesem Werk werden keine menschlichen Regungen oder Leidenschaften ausgedrückt: alles ist in die Innenwelt absorbiert, es vermittelt nichts als Keuschheit und ätherischen Ausdruck.“73 Und doch klingen auch in Carpelans Artikel Bezüge auf Natur an: „Beim ersten Hören könnte man den dritten Satz mit seiner ätherischen Mondscheinstimmung am eindrucksvollsten finden.“74 Darüber hinaus wurde der dritte Satz auch bei Bis (vgl. Anmerkung 71) mit Mondschein in Verbindung gebracht, und dies sogar zweimal, denn in seinem Artikel beschrieb er später, wie „Mondlicht in den Violinen flirrt“ („månljuset dallrar i violinerna“). In diesem Bild ist vielleicht ein wahrer Kern, denn Sibelius reagierte auf diese Erwähnung Carpelans im Gegensatz zu vielen anderen Punkten nicht. Immerhin hatte er nach seiner Reise nach Koli (vgl. oben „Entstehung“) Carpelan einige programmmusikalische Ideen aufgedeckt. Sibelius las Carpelans Artikel „mit großer Genugtuung“, dankte ihm und fügte hinzu: „Dieser Artikel ist ,kontinental‘, gut geschrieben und aus fachmännischer Perspektive vor allem brillant. Einer der besten, die über meine Musik geschrieben worden sind.“75 Revision und Veröffentlichung Sibelius war begierig, die Symphonie herauszubringen. Am Tag der zweiten Aufführung (5. April 1911) kontaktierte er Breitkopf und fragte, ob er seine neue Symphonie senden könne, damit sie veröffentlicht werde. Zwei Tage später fragte er sich in seinem Tagebuch: „Soll ich die Symphonie in dieser Form veröffentlichen lassen? Ja! – ??“76 Er schien etwas zögerlich zu sein, wie er es auch vor der Uraufführung gewesen sein dürfte, als er „Symphonie ,fertig‘“ ins Tagebuch schrieb. Während Sibelius auf Breitkopfs Antwort wartete, entschloss er sich, eine Abschrift der Partitur anzufertigen. Breitkopf antwortete am 11. April, man sei an der Symphonie interessiert, und Sibelius schrieb in sein Tagebuch, er habe über das Abschreiben hinaus der Symphonie „ihre endgültige Form zu geben“.77 Dem Tagebuch zufolge fand er nur schwer einen Anfang für diese Arbeit, schrieb aber letztlich: „Ich arbeite in Stille an manchen ,Stellen‘ in der 4. Sinfonie, die es zu klären gilt.“78 Die meisten Änderungen betrafen Orchestrierung, Dynamik und Artikulation, was aber an manchen Stellen recht einschneidend war. Der erste Satz wurde nur leicht revidiert, die anderen Sätze etwas mehr, die Sätze II und IV wurden erweitert (vgl. die „Reconstructions“). Das Abschreiben und Überarbeiten setzte sich in Ausbrüchen fort, und Sibelius’ Stimmung schwankte wie immer: „Im Frühling, wie immer, ,la tristesse‘. Arbeit! Und der Ertrag! Alles so gut wie 0“ – aber es gab auch „Sonne und Poesie“.79 Er erläuterte Carpelan: „Ich lebe zum Teil in der Gegenwart – beim Abschreiben der Symphonie – teils in all ,dem Neuen‘. In der Symphonie betone ich bestimmte Dinge


XXIII stärker als in der ursprünglichen Form.“80 Mitte Mai stellte er fest: „Alles bis zum vierten Satz der Symphonie reingeschrieben. […] [Ich] denke, dass diese Abschlussrevision der Symphonie ihre definitive Kontur gibt, die für allezeit gültig ist. Recht so, Du wundervolles Ego, recht so!“81 Am 20. Mai notierte er schließlich, dass die Symphonie fertig sei und er sie am Abend an Breitkopf schicken könne. Einige Wochen später folgten auch die Orchesterstimmen, die der Verlag angefordert hatte.82 Der Veröffentlichungsprozess war ziemlich zügig. Im Juni teilte Breitkopf Sibelius mit, man habe sich zum Ziel gesetzt, die Symphonie Anfang 1912 zu drucken, und im November 1911 informierte der Verlag ihn, dass der Notenstich erledigt und die Hauskorrektur unterwegs sei. Sibelius war in Paris, komponierte, traf Freunde – unter ihnen Rosa Newmarch –, als er die Korrekturabzüge erhielt.83 Er war von Breitkopfs Korrektor angetan, vor allem aber war er überglücklich, dass die Vierte nun herauskommen sollte. Er gestand Aino: „Ich liebe dieses Werk. Es ist superfein.“84 In der Phase des Korrekturlesens fügte er in der Partitur die Widmung An Eero Järnefelt hinzu. Ende Februar 1912 schickte man Sibelius die gedruckte Partitur und die Stimmen, worauf die Vierte seither von gedrucktem Material aufgeführt wurde – erstmals im April desselben Jahres in Helsinki. Nach der Aufführung der Symphonie im Oktober 1912 in Birmingham (siehe unten) teilte Sibelius Breitkopf jedoch mit, er habe „einige schlimme Fehler in Partitur und Stimmen“ gefunden.85 Er fügte dem Brief ein kleines Korrekturblatt mit elf Änderungen hinzu (vgl. Quelle G im Critical Commentary). Breitkopf versprach, die Änderungen in der Partitur per Hand auszuführen und zusätzlich ein kleines Korrekturblatt anzufertigen, das auch die Korrekturen für die Stimmen beinhalten sollte, um es Dirigenten zuzusenden, die das Material zur Aufführung gemietet hatten. Offenbar las Sibelius in diesem Stadium die Korrekturabzüge, denn Breitkopf bestätigte Ende Oktober ihre Rücksendung.86 Die Partitur wurde nach den Angaben in G korrigiert. 1930 fragte Sibelius Breitkopf, ob eine Studienpartitur produziert werden könne, worauf der Verlag zustimmte.87 Der finnische Verlag Fazers Musikhandel kam 1934 auf Sibelius zu, wahrscheinlich in Verbindung mit den Vorbereitungen zur Studienpartitur, weil man Breitkopf bei der Druckvorstufe über Fehler informieren wollte.88 In einem überlieferten Brief wurde Sibelius gebeten, Breitkopf ein korrigiertes Exemplar mit Kommentaren zurückzusenden. Die Studienpartitur wurde 1935 veröffentlicht; sie geht jedoch auf die 1912 korrigierte Partitur zurück. Aus nicht bekannten Gründen wurden dabei keine weiteren Änderungen vorgenommen. Im Mai 1942 kontaktierte Sibelius Breitkopf und informierte den Verlag darüber, dass er in einer Radioübertragung der Vierten falsche Tempi gehört habe. Breitkopf bat daher um eine Liste mit Metronomangaben für alle Sibelius-Symphonien, die Sibelius auch lieferte.89 Es gab jedoch noch immer Fehler in der Partitur. Sibelius übergab dem Verlagsleiter von Breitkopf, Hellmuth von Hase, der ihn im Sommer besuchte, eine Partitur der Vierten, in der er Fehler korrigiert hatte (zu Details siehe den Critical Commentary).90 Breitkopfs Aktennotiz zufolge wurden die Korrekturen 1991 in der Studienpartitur eingetragen und 1998 in die Dirigierpartitur übernommen; die mietweise lieferbaren Aufführungsmateriale (Partitur und Stimmen) blieben jedoch unkorrigiert. Aufführungen der revidierten Fassung Helsinki, März 1912 Die erste Aufführung der revidierten Fassung fand am 29. März 1912 mit frisch gedrucktem Material statt. Das Konzert begann mit der 4. Symphonie, es folgten Rakastava für Streichorchester op. 14, das zwei Wochen zuvor uraufgeführt worden war, die Uraufführung der Scènes historiques II op. 66 und der Neufassung von Impromptu op. 19. Das Konzert wurde zweimal wiederholt, weil – so Helsingin Sanomat – selbst nach dem zweiten Konzert einige hundert neugierige Hörer

keine Eintrittskarte bekommen hatten.91 Unter Sibelius’ Leitung spielte das Orchester der Philharmonischen Gesellschaft Helsinki – oder das „Nationalorchester“ („Kotimainen orkesteri“), wie es genannt wurde.92 Obwohl Sibelius in seinem Tagebuch notierte, dass die Konzerte erfolgreich verlaufen waren, war er mit der Ausführung durch das Orchester nicht glücklich. „Das Orchester ganz schlecht. Seltsam genug, dass z. B. die Klarinette in diesem unserem philharmonischen Orchester eines der schlechtesten Instrumente ist. Er, also in anderen Worten: der Klarinettist, kann nichts. Ist verwirrt! – Diese Orchesterdusche hat für mich wieder eine spezielle Bedeutung gehabt.“ Obwohl die meisten Kritiker die Darbietung durch das Orchester gut beurteilten, wurde von zweien erwähnt, dass die Violinen an manchen Stellen deutlicher hätten spielen können.93 Ansonsten behandelten die Kritiker dieselben Themen. Bis erwähnte immer noch den Koli (am 30. März), aber die anderen erwähnten keine Natureinflüsse. Häufig wurde auch die reiche Instrumentierung hervorgehoben. Obwohl das Werk überarbeitet worden war, wurde weder die Revision noch ihre Auswirkung erwähnt. Vielmehr wiederholten einige Kritiker, was Otto Kotilainen in Worte gefasst hatte: „[...] die Symphonie mehrere Male zu hören, klärt den befremdlich problematischen Eindruck, den sie im Konzert vor einem Jahr beim ersten Mal hinterlassen hat.“94 Die Kritiken neigten dazu, Mutmaßungen über die psychologische Tiefe der Symphonie und ihre Form anzustellen. Leo Funtek gab einen Tag vor dem Konzert in Dagens Tidning die eingehendste Beschreibung, als er versuchte, die Hörer auf die Aufführung vorzubereiten: „Sibelius’ Streichquartett trägt den Titel ,Voces intimae‘. Würde man der 4. Symphonie denselben Titel geben, gelänge man ins Zentrum des Themas, definierte das Werk in seiner Gesamtheit und berührte die Grundlage, von der aus das Verständnis für Details erlangt werden könnte. Es gibt wohl kaum ein anderes Werk in der gesamten symphonischen Literatur, das so mit eiserner Konstanz von der Seele spricht, ohne äußerliche Effekte in Betracht zu ziehen; was man eine ,psychologische Symphonie‘ nennen könnte – so die Bezeichnung des Komponisten selbst. Es ist interessant, wie Sibelius seinen zutiefst persönlichen Eindrücken und Stimmungen künstlerische Gestalt gegeben hat. Zwei Klippen müssen umschifft werden. […] Einerseits rigider Formalismus und – die größere Gefahr entsprechend dem Charakter des Werks – Individualismus in der Tonsprache, der sehr leicht in Anarchie ausarten kann. […] Dank seiner bemerkenswerten Begabung, was sowohl Form als auch Logik betrifft, hat Sibelius diese delikate Aufgabe ganz und gar erfolgreich gelöst: der poetische und psychologische Gehalt der Symphonie hat einerseits nichts von seiner Freiheit und ihr innewohnenden Logik verloren, andererseits sind die äußeren Formen klassisch klar geworden; die höchste individuelle Freiheit und die Formstrenge haben zu einem organischen Ganzen gefunden; die unmittelbare Sprache der lebendigen Seele haben der Form Leben eingehaucht; und wieder ist das Individuelle durch die Vollendung der Form allgemeingültig geworden. […] diese 4. Symphonie bildet eine Ganzheit, so dass kein Satz allein betrachtet werden kann.“95 In einem Brief, der die Ganzheit der Form betonte, lobte Carpelan Sibelius überschwänglich: „Was ich am meisten bewundere, abgesehen vom tiefsinnig-schönen Ideengehalt, ist die absolute Übereinstimmung zwischen Form und Materie […], dass der Inhalt vollständig und ohne irgendeinen Rest in der Form aufgeht.“ Am nächsten Tag notierte Sibelius in seinem Tagebuch: „Von Axel ein herrlicher, verständnisvoller Brief zur 4. Sinfonie. Er gab mir viel damit.“96 Birmingham, Oktober 1912 Ende 1912 und Anfang 1913 sind durch eine Fülle an Aufführungen der Vierten im Ausland gekennzeichnet, sowohl in Europa als auch in den USA. Die ersten beiden Aufführungen, in Birmingham und in Kopenhagen, dirigierte Sibelius selbst.


XXIV Die erste Aufführung fand am 1. Oktober 1912 ein halbes Jahr nach der Erstaufführung in Helsinki beim Birmingham-Festival statt. Dieses Konzert brachte außer Sibelius’ 4. Symphonie die Uraufführung von Edward Elgars (1857–1934) The Music Makers, die der Komponist selbst leitete. Aus Sibelius’ Tagebuch geht hervor, dass er einige Zweifel am Erfolg der Vierten hegte: „Sie ist zu subtil und tragisch für unsere schnöde Welt.“97 Nach der ersten Probe berichtete Sibelius Aino: „Ich habe gerade geprobt. Das Orchester ist nicht allzu gut, weil die zusätzlichen Spieler in diesem Orchester neu sind. Aber prächtig. Gott im Himmel, wenn sie im dritten Satz unisono spielen. […] Er [Granville Bantock] lobt meine Symphonie besonders. Er war vom Klang entzückt. Andererseits sind sie noch nicht ,reif ‘. Rosa [Newmarch] war verzaubert, ihr Kopf wackelte die ganze Zeit. Ich hoffe trotzdem das Beste.“98 Kurz vor dem Konzert schrieb Sibelius erneut: „In einer halben Stunde werde ich der Dirigent jenes großen Orchesters sein, und das Werk ist die geliebte Vierte. – Diese Welt und dieses Leben sind eigenartig. Manchmal ist es, als ob man selbst den allgemeinen Strang der Geschichte ergreift, und das schmerzt.“99 Für den Programmzettel hatte Newmarch eine längere „Analytische Notiz“ geschrieben, die 26 kurze Musikbeispiele enthielt. Diese Notiz geht auf schwedische Texte von Otto Andersson zurück (siehe Anmerkung 57) und darüber hinaus auf Korrespondenz und Gespräche mit Sibelius, den sie im Herbst 1911 in Paris getroffen hatte. In der Notiz findet sich Sibelius’ Sichtweise wieder, da Newmarch direkte Landschaftsbeschreibungen vermeidet und sich auf die „Einfachheit der Mittel“ bezieht. Sie schrieb: „Die 4. Symphonie […] ist Musik von intimer Natur, und viel von ihr wurde in der Isolation verwitterter Wälder, rasender Stromschnellen und vom Wind gepeitschter Seen erdacht und geschrieben. Es gibt – insbesondere im ersten Satz – Momente, in denen wir uns ,allein mit den atmenden Dingen der Natur‘ fühlen. Sie hat jedoch kein Programm, das in Worten ausgedrückt werden könnte oder sollte. […] Wie die meisten Komponisten Nordeuropas schätzt er die Form um ihrer selbst willen. […] die Struktur der 4. Symphonie bleibt mit all ihren ineinandergeschobenen formalen Abschnitten stark und klar. […] Sibelius bewahrt sich zweifelsohne eine alteingesessene Hochachtung vor dem Thema und betrachtet das melodische Material als genialen Text, von dem die ganze Botschaft der Musik abhängt.100 Die Kritiken behandelten viele der gleichen Themen wie die in Finnland publizierten Berichte, und die Reaktion des Publikums scheint ganz ähnlich gewesen zu sein. Es gab einige herbe Kommentare, wie „der Eindruck war der einer extremen Unklarheit und eines beträchtlichen Mangels an Charme“ und „die Musik hinterließ nicht das brennende Verlangen, sie noch einmal zu hören“.101 Die rätselhafte Anlage des Werks wurde generell dem Umstand zugeschrieben, dass es „eine Folge von mehr oder weniger zusammenhanglosen Mediationen“ in einer „sehr fremdartigen Mundart“, dem Finnischen, komponiert sei.102 Die meisten Kritiken waren jedoch unvoreingenommen im Ton, so The Times: „Die Symphonie von Herrn Sibelius […] wurde eher mit Höflichkeit gegenüber einem Besucher aufgenommen denn mit Begeisterung für Musik selbst. Die Zuhörer könnten in der Tat nicht getadelt werden, wenn es ihnen nicht gelang, auf der Spur der logischen Folge ihrer Entwicklung zu bleiben, bei der Ideen beim ersten Aufblühen schemenhaft angezeigt und in den späteren Sätzen zu größerer Fülle gebracht werden. Die Musik bleibt unnahbar, deutet an, wo die meisten Komponisten befehlen würden, und sie scheint von halb vergessenen Erinnerungen und neuen, nicht realisierten Zukunftsvisionen zu träumen. Ihre Harmonie und Orchesterfarbe sind ebenso seltsam und dennoch wirklich so einfach, dass die Zeit ihre Schönheit klarer machen muss. Für ein modernes Werk wird ein ziemlich kleines Orchester verwendet, und jedes Instrument in der Partitur kommt zu Wort. Es wurde nicht perfekt gespielt.“ Der Kritiker kam wenige Tage

später auf das Werk zurück und schloss: „Sibelius’ Symphonie hat uns gezeigt, dass wir ihn als wesentlich wichtigeren Faktor in moderner Musik betrachten müssen, als uns dies Kompositionen wie Finlandia und En saga nahegelegt hatten.“103 Newmarch schickte Sibelius einige Berichte, nachdem er nach Hause zurückgekehrt war, und fügte der Times Ernst Newmans Kritik aus der Nation hinzu: „Sibelius’ 4. Symphonie gab den Hörern die härtesten Nüsse zu knacken und ließ sie, offen gesagt, verwirrt zurück. Das Werk irritiert beim ersten Hören, nicht, weil die Materie so elaboriert ausgearbeitet ist, sondern durch seine drastische Vereinfachung des Gedankens und des Ausdrucks. Sibelius braucht nicht den dick geschwollenen Orchesterapparat des modernen Durchschnittskomponisten. Seine Partituren erscheinen so einfach wie die von Beethoven. Mit seiner sauberen Gedankenstärke muss er keine Plattitüden in opulente Gewänder kleiden. In seiner 4. Symphonie hat er seine normale Einfachheit und die Direktheit seiner Sprache in außergewöhnliche Längen getrieben. Diejenigen, die beim Festival dadurch verwirrt waren, mögen versichert sein, dass der Appell des Werks stark zunimmt, wenn man es besser weiß. Es ist noch der alte Sibelius – mal mürrisch und mal zärtlich, selten lächelnd, aber ohne Tschaikowskys Tränenreichtum und Selbstmitleid –, aber die Seele dieses Mannes hat sich offenkundig stärker in sich selbst zurückgezogen und grübelt in einer Tiefe, in die man ihm ohne Führer nicht leicht folgen kann. Aber selbst die Philister – so stellt man es sich vor – müssen sofort spüren, dass hier ein kraftvoller Verstand das Leben auf seine Art ergreift.“104 In seinem Tagebuch fasste Sibelius die Birmingham-Reise zusammen: „Meine 4. Sinfonie ist unter meinem Stab ein Erfolg. Die Kritik eher verwirrt und schlecht. Obwohl es einige gute gibt. […] [Ich] hatte einen starken und tiefen Eindruck meiner 4. Sinfonie in England. Recht so, wundervolles Ego! Recht so. [Auf der gegenüberliegenden, leeren Seite:] Kritik, die englische, überschlägig gesagt, ausgezeichnet (z. B. Ernst Newman und Times) –. Die Reise nach England + – 0. Vielleicht einige Hundert Defizit.“105 Kopenhagen, Dezember 1912 Sibelius dirigierte die nächste Aufführung der Vierten am 3. Dezember in Kopenhagen, diesmal mit der Königlichen Kapelle Kopenhagen. Die zweite Hälfte des Konzerts bestand aus Scènes historiques II, Nächtlicher Ritt und Sonnenaufgang sowie fünf Liedern mit der dänischen Sopranistin Borghild Langaard (1883–1922) als Solistin. Sibelius hatte seine Zweifel, als er Anfang November das Programm zusammenstellte. Gegenüber seinem Freund Georg Boldemann (1865–1946), der in Kopenhagen lebte und ihm bei den Konzertvorbereitungen half, äußerte er seine Sorgen über die Vierte und fragte „ist es zu gewagt?“.106 Vor der ersten Probe schrieb er Aino: „Mit meiner Vierten, denke ich, stehe ich bestimmt allein. Dennoch – lieber das als Kompromisse.“107 Auch das Orchester stellte ihn nicht zufrieden: „Ich habe mit diesem schlechten Orchester geprobt und sie angebellt. Schauen wir, ob das Konzert überhaupt gut läuft. Aber wenn ich die Ehre habe, diese 4. Sinf. zu dirigieren, bin ich hartnäckig. […] Ich frage mich, wie ich ein strenger Dirigent werde. Einer mit Ehrgeiz.“108 Die Zeitschriften brachten nicht nur vor, sondern auch nach der Probe, bei der die Kritik anwesend war, Artikel über Sibelius. Die Haltung war recht positiv: „Aus dem scheinbaren Chaos erwuchsen schöne und feine Tonwellen, drohende, dunkle Figuren und geheimnisvolle, mystische Klänge. Nun erkannte man Sibelius wieder.“109 Die Konzertkritiken waren wie erwartet vielfältig. Charles Kjerulf beschrieb in Politiken Sibelius’ Dirigierstil: „weite, schwebende Schläge mit gestreckten Armen – es sieht bei ihm etwa so aus wie ein Vogel, der fliegt –, und die Musik scheint auf diesen stützenden Flügeln zu segeln.“ Er betonte ferner, dass, während die drei vorangegangenen Symphonien Zyklopen gewesen seien, sei die Vierte eher „eine junge Zauberin mit neckischer Art, die zwischen den Schäreninseln in Finnlands hellgrüner Sommernacht lacht und weint, lockt und gackert.“


XXV Kjerulf merkte auch an: „Die Symphonie ist eher eine Sinfonietta, ein großes Kammermusikwerk für Orchester“ mit einem „bezaubernden Dialog der Soloinstrumente“.110 Sibelius schrieb in sein Tagebuch: „Gab das Konzert erfolgreich. Kjerulf berichtete glänzend; seine Feinde abgefeimt, wie ich glaube.“111 Sibelius lag nicht ganz falsch. Obwohl seine „glühende Fantasie“ („glødende Fantasi“) von einem Kritiker erwähnt wurde, fügte dieser hinzu: „Es ist Sibelius’ Beschränkung, dass er nicht vollständig in der Lage ist, sich den Regeln der Tonwelt unterzuordnen.“112 Ein anderer Kritiker führte aus: „[...] er taucht eher in das Groteske ab als auf dem Punkt zu bleiben und die Goldmine auszubeuten, die er gefunden hat. […] Er bewegt sich bevorzugt in der Peripherie, wo die Musik fast aufhört, Musik zu sein. […] Er ist im Kern dünn, wenn es um die Fähigkeit geht, den Stoff zusammenzuhalten, ums Ausarbeiten, Hämmern und Meißeln, so dass alles klar und stabil ist. Es wird fast nur noch zu fantastischen Zeichnungen in grauen Schatten, im Mystischen.“ Trotz der komplexen Natur der Musik wird sie jedoch als unstrittig beschrieben: „Wo er [Sibelius] unbekannte Pfade auskundschaftet, findet er immer etwas, das die Seele im höchsten Maß ergreift. In der Symphonie gibt es Klänge von seltener Schönheit, Stimmungen, die so tiefempfunden klingen, dass sie sogar das Unterbewusste zu berühren scheinen.“113 Diese Meinung wurde geteilt: „Tonbilder […] strotzen vor Bildern von großer Einzigartigkeit und auch – vor allem in den letzten Sätzen – vor Schönheit und Poesie, was niemand bestreiten kann.“114 Sibelius’ Seelenfrieden litt durch die Kritiken, wie er im Tagebuch notierte: „In den Kopenhagener Zeitungen ist der Teufel los. [Ich bin] infernalisch verdroschen worden.“115 Er schrieb Boldemann: „Die Kritiken vom Vort Land und andere schlechte möchte ich sehn. Ich kann nicht verstehen wie man dermassen dumm sein kann. Den Herren ist eine verfeinerte Kunst schwach. Es ist wie ich immer gesagt habe: die glauben forte ist Kraft, Roheit Originalität u.s.w. Es ist zum lachen! Sonst bin ich gar nicht zufrieden mit dem Conzert in Kopenhagen. Es ging nicht gut – zu wenig Repetitionen – und die Musikern der Hofkapellets sind vollständig verallgemeinerte. Die verstehen nicht besseres.“116 Weitere Aufführungen Es gab die Absicht, die 4. Symphonie im Dezember 1912 in Wien unter Leitung von Felix Weingartner (1863–1942) aufzuführen. Das Wiener Konzert wurde für den 15. Dezember angekündigt, aber zwei Tage zuvor im Programm nicht mehr erwähnt. Nach Richard Specht von Der Märker war der genannte Grund – das Glockenspiel sei nicht verfügbar – vorgeschoben; tatsächlich hätte sich das Orchester in der Probe geweigert, das Stück zu spielen. Specht fragte sich, wer für die Programmentscheidungen verantwortlich sei, und betonte, dass das Werk einmal ins Programm aufgenommen worden war und Weingartner als Leiter die Pflicht und Schuldigkeit habe, es aufzuführen, anstatt einem berühmten Komponisten zu schaden.117 Die Nachricht erreichte und traf Sibelius im Januar: „Weingartner führt meine neueste Symphonie nicht auf, obwohl sie schon geprobt worden ist. Das hat mich niedergeschlagen. Herrliches, komponierendes Ego! Mein Stern im Niedergang. Das habe ich schon lange Zeit gewusst.“118 Die nächste Aufführung sollte am 25. Januar 1913 in Berlin stattfinden – unter der Leitung von Sibelius’ altem Freund Ferruccio Busoni (1866–1924). Ein Tagebucheintrag von Anfang Februar besagt: „Keine Nachricht von Busonis Aufführung meiner 4. Sinfonie. Hat er es getan oder ist das noch eine andere – Bagatelle.“119 Als Sibelius erfuhr, was sich in Wien ereignet hatte, befürchtete er, dass in Berlin dasselbe passiert sei. Er nahm das schlecht auf: „Das bricht mein Herz! Aber vielleicht wird die Zeit – die wunderbare Zeit – dies auch heilen. – Ich wollte alles verkaufen, was ich besitze, aber – wer will es kaufen. Wie soll ich in dieser Lage vorgehen? – Es geht um die Frage, nicht die Nerven zu verlieren; und – vor allem – nicht die Vernunft. Sie glauben – zumindest die meisten Orchestermusiker auf der Welt –, dass ich ein

toter Mann bin. Aber wir werden schon sehen! Ist das nun das Ende von Jean Sibelius als Komponist?“120 Schließlich aber telegraphierte Busoni Ende März an Sibelius unerwartet aus Amsterdam: „Heute deine vierte Sinfonie mit grosser Freude dirigiert.“121 Die Kritik von Het Algemeen Handelsblad in Amsterdam enthielt einige Vorbehalte, schätzte aber das Werk: „Dass in diesem viersätzigen symphonischen Werk einige weniger wichtige Seiten vorkommen, lässt sich nicht leugnen, aber das Ganze hat sowohl eine interessante Faktur (Harmonie, Melodie, Rhythmus) als auch ein Innenleben voller Momente von poetischer Atmosphäre.“ Der Kritiker befand, dass die Rezitative der Soloinstrumente und die ausgedehnte episodische Behandlung es erschwerten, der Musik zu folgen, setzte aber fort: „Wie kann man aber die Frische und Originalität der Gedanken übersehen und nicht die Selbständigkeit des Komponisten schätzen, der jeden äußerlichen Effekt verschmäht.“122 Die Turbulenzen, die die Aufführungen der Vierten umgaben, waren damit noch nicht zu Ende. Anfang 1913 gab es zwei weitere Aufführungen, am 17. Januar und am 5. Februar in Göteborg unter Leitung von Wilhelm Stenhammar. Er hatte Sibelius im Dezember geschrieben und ihm einige Fragen zur Partitur gestellt, die Sibelius klärte (vgl. den Critical Commentary). Nach dem Konzert gestand Stenhammer in einem Brief, er habe sich unklug („oklokhet“) verhalten, weil er die Vierte in einem Subkriptionskonzert aufführte, wo dem Auditorium das „aufrichtige Interesse an der Musik“ („allvarligare musikintresse“) fehle. Er fuhr fort: „Und so geschah das Unerhörte und, soweit ich weiß, Einmalige in der Musikgeschichte Göteborgs: als die Symphonie zu Ende war, wurde der vorsichtige Applaus durch vernehmbares Zischen gestoppt. Ich kann nicht leugnen, dass dies nach dem anfänglichen Schock recht erfrischend war, und ich empfand für Sie einen gewissen Stolz […] unsere dumme, sogenannte Kritik, die Sie bis jetzt verehrt hat, vollzog eine plötzliche Kehrtwendung und beschimpfte Sie auf höchst lächerliche, verständnislose Art. Die Symphonie hat ihnen große Enttäuschung bereitet, bedeutete ihnen Rückschritt, Ermattung, Mangel an Einfällen, Formlosigkeit.“ Stenhammar ließ durchblicken, dass er versucht war, selbst der Zeitung zu schreiben – er dirigierte aber stattdessen die Symphonie erneut, diesmal in einem regulären Konzert am Abend, bevor er den Brief schrieb. Er erläuterte weiter: „Und [ich] übertraf alle Erwartungen im Überfluss. Mein liebes Mittwochspublikum übertraf sich gestern selbst wie selten. So warm, so spontan, nicht ohne eine gewisse demonstrative Färbung – bekam ich den Beifall, anhaltende Missbilligung der Abonnenten und des Urteils der Kritiker. Wir haben hier so ein intelligentes, selbständig empfindendes und vernünftiges Publikum, und es ist bereit, Ihnen ein warmherziges und würdiges Willkommen entgegenzubringen. […] mein Respekt für Sie als Künstler ist unumstößlich und wächst ständig.“123 Sibelius hörte die Neuigkeiten und notierte in seinem Tagebuch: „Sinfonie 4 wurde ausgebuht in Göteborg.“124 Stenhammars „guter Brief “ („ett bra bref “) kam am nächsten Tag an, beruhigte aber letztlich Sibelius’ Gefühle nicht wirklich. „[Mein] Geist ist krank, sehr krank. Eine Kugel wäre für mich das Beste.“125 Die Erstaufführung in den USA fand am 2. März 1913 statt, als Walter Damrosch (1862–1950) in New York das Orchester der Symphonischen Gesellschaft dirigierte. Folgt man der Sun, wandte sich Damrosch vor der Aufführung an das Publikum. Er sagte, auch wenn niemand die Komposition noch einmal hören wolle, so sei es doch die Pflicht des Dirigenten, das neueste Werk eines berühmten Meisters zumindest einmal zu Gehör zu bringen. Der Kritiker der New York Times erinnerte dabei daran, dass Damrosch „hinzufügte, sie [die Symphonie] sei das Werk eines Mannes, der ,der musikalischen Effekte der Vergangenheit oder dessen, was man bislang als solche betrachtet hatte, überdrüssig sei‘; und auch, dass sie die außergewöhnlichsten Ideen symphonischer Entwicklung beinhalte, die jemals da gewesen sind.“ Obwohl einige Überraschungen in der Musik steckten, entdeckten die Kritiker in ihr auch etliche Verdienste. Der Kritiker der Sun meinte:


XXVI „Sibelius […] hat sich den Futuristen angeschlossen. Er ist so freizügig dissonant wie die schlimmsten unter ihnen. Er hat sich die ganze Tonleiter einverleibt, die unzusammenhängenden Sequenzen, den kleinen Sekundakkord, die erniedrigte Super-Tonika und all die chinesischen Ängste vor verbotenen Quintparallelen. Aber die Symphonie ist eine bemerkenswerte Komposition. Sie besitzt einen elementaren Einfallsreichtum, Mut zur Äußerung, furchtlosen Stil. Es ist […] ein stimmig geplantes und meisterhaft ausgeführtes Werk. Die Themen sind ungewöhnlich, entlegen, eigenbrötlerisch, aber eindrucksvoll erdacht; […] die Symphonie ist klar geschrieben, und ihre Gedanken sind fein ausgewogen. Ihre Akkorde sind vorzüglich verteilt, ihre Instrumentation ist von großartiger Reinheit und Transparenz, und vor allem hat dieses Werk viel zu sagen.“126 Musical America gab eine Einführung in die Vierte: „Diese Symphonie ist ein Werk, das manche höchst erfreuen wird und das andere ablehnen werden. Aber bei welcher Haltung ihr gegenüber auch immer – unbestritten ist das intensive Interesse an ihr. Sie ist faszinierend, verblüffend, hypnotisierend, einmalig frei von Elementen sinnlicher musikalischer Schönheit, aber intensiv überzeugend durch ihre pure Fremdheit; seriös, von starker Vitalität, eine gewaltige elementare Äußerung. […] Die Symphonie hat eine düstere Farbe; man könnte Teile von ihr fast schwarz nennen. Lyrische Verbindlichkeit oder die Gewandtheit der melodischen Ausdrucksweise gibt es in ihr praktisch nicht. Sie ist grob, rau, und sie verachtet sowohl die Stilverbindlichkeit als auch die Raffinesse des Ausdrucks. Trotz der Verurteilung wünscht der Kritiker der Symphonie, dass sie bald wiederholt wird.“127 Sibelius schrieb in sein Tagebuch: „In Musical America zielte Gemeinheit auf mich. […] Meine 4. Sinfonie ist in dieser Saison in New York aufgeführt worden, und sie zog viel Aufmerksamkeit auf sich. Dennoch wurde [sie] unglücklicherweise völlig missverstanden.“128 Die wenige Monate später erschienene Ausgabe von Musical America fragte, ob sich Sibelius damit einen praktischen Scherz erlaubt habe, und fuhr fort: „Sibelius scheint die Reihen seiner Zeitgenossen verlassen zu haben und ein ,Futurist‘ geworden zu sein. Die Symphonie ist weder Fisch noch Fleisch noch Geflügel – noch guter Räucherhering.“129 Als Sibelius ein Jahr später durch Amerika reiste, fasste er die Kritik in einem Bericht an Carpelan zusammen: „Amerikas beste Kritiker mögen meine 4. Sinfonie“ und „Die 4. Sinfonie wird hier in Boston sehr bewundert. Dr. [Karl] Muck soll sie herrlich dirigiert haben. Auch in New York unter Damrosch gut.“130 *** Sibelius, der über die Standpunkte vieler Kritiker nachdachte, lag mit seiner Voraussage richtig, dass man die Vierte mit der zunehmenden Zahl an Aufführungen und im Laufe der Jahre verstehen werde. Wertschätzung und Verständnis bauten sich sowohl Finnland als auch im Ausland mit der Zeit auf, als zunehmend auch Aufnahmen herauskamen.131 In den 1930er-Jahren nannte der finnische Schriftsteller und Komponist Elmer Diktonius die Vierte eine „Borkenbrot-Symphonie“ („barkbrödssymfoni“) und bemerkte: „[U]nser fester Glaube ist, dass auf diesem Borkenbrothappen noch einige Generationen lang herumgekaut wird.“ Er beschrieb das Werk als „ein bisschen absolute Musik umrahmt von finnischer Natur. […] Denn ein unverständliches Werk, eine unverdauliche Symphonie könnte nicht hier und andernorts so oft aufgeführt werden, wenn es beim Publikum nicht auf Sympathie träfe. Und es ist sogar so, dass die Vierte von den sieben [Symphonien] diejenige ist, die man am ehesten wiederhören möchte.“132 Der amerikanische Musikkritiker Olin Downes, der als „Sibelius-Apostel“ bekannt war, schrieb 1936 über die Vierte: „aus diesen Seiten geht Sibelius einsam und unvergleichbar hervor, einer der tiefsten und konzentriertesten musikalischen Denker unserer Epoche. Die 4. Symphonie ist eine Abfolge musikalischer Ideen, auf die reinste Essenz verdichtet, und dabei gibt es absolut keine weiteren künstlichen Reize. […] sie ist eine beispiellose künstlerische Verschraubung und ein in

hohem Maße moderner Stil in ihrer Struktur, der wie ein Pfeil ins Herz der musikalischen Vorstellung trifft.“133 *** Mein herzlicher Dank gilt meinen Kollegen Kai Lindberg, Anna Pulkkis, Timo Virtanen und Sakari Ylivuori. Des Weiteren bin ich zu Dank verpflichtet: Pertti Kuusi, Janne Kivistö und Turo Rautaoja für ihr Korrekturlesen, Juha Karvonen für seine Hilfe bei dem französischen Text, Niels Bo Foltman und Peter Hauge für ihre Hilfe bei den dänischen Texten, Joan Nordlund für die Durchsicht der englischen Texte. Ich danke ferner Minna Cederkvist von der Bibliothek des Philharmonischen Orchesters Helsinki, Sanna Linjama-Mannermaa vom Sibelius-Museum, Tommi Harju von der Bibliothek der Sibelius-Academie, dem Team der Nationalbibliothek Finnland – vor allem Inka Myyry, Antti Riikonen und Petri Tuovinen –, dem Team des Nationalarchivs Finnland, dem Team des Stadtarchivs Helsinki sowie dem Team des Archivs von Breitkopf & Härtel. Helsinki, Herbst 2019

1

2

3

4 5 6

7 8

9 10 11

12 13

Tuija Wicklund (Übersetzung: Frank Reinisch)

Tagebuch, 21. Mai 1909: „Måste hem. Här går det ej längre att arbeta. En stilförändring?!“ Sibelius’ Tagebuch wird auf bewahrt im Nationalarchiv Finnland, Sibelius-Familien-Archiv [= NA, SFA], Kästen 37 und 38. Es ist veröffentlicht in: Jean Sibelius Dagbok 1909–1944, hrsg. von Fabian Dahlström, Helsingfors: Svenska litteratursällskapet i Finland [= SLS], 2005. Tagebuch, 3. Oktober 1909: „På Koli! Ett af de största intryck i mitt lif. Planer ,La Montagne!‘“ Tagebuch, 8. November 1909: „Varit i Hades. En dal sådan som aldrig.“; 27. Dezember 1909: „Ett Himalaya åter. Allt ljust och kraftigt. Arbetat som en jätte.“ Zu den programmatischen Aspekten der Vierten siehe unten den Absatz „Über programmatische Aspekte“. Carpelan an Sibelius, 27. Dezember 1909 (die Briefe von Carpelan an Sibelius sind auf bewahrt in NA, SFA, Kasten 18): „Ja, den symfonin har jag mycket tänkt på – det du spelade för mig ur ,Bärget‘ och ,Vandrarens tankar‘ var väl det väldigaste jag av dig hört.“ Der Briefwechsel ist veröffentlicht in: Högtärade Maestro! Högtärade Herr Baron! Korrespondensen mellan Axel Carpelan och Jean Sibelius 1900–1919, hrsg. von Fabian Dahlström, Helsingfors: SLS, 2010. Tagebuch, 6. Januar 1910: „Korn på något nytt och stort!“ Sibelius’ übrige Schulden (ca. 88.000 € zum Kurs von 2017) hatten sich mehr als halbiert. Tagebuch, 21. April 1910: „Åter i en djup däld. Arbetar med bäfvan på det ,nya.‘“; 7. Mai 1910: „Promenerat en mil under komponerande. D. v. s. hamrade på den musikaliska metallen i och för erhållande af silfverklang.“ Tagebuch, undatiert, aber vor dem 8. August 1910: „Alla dessa dagar i skären i storm och hög stämning. Arbetar på det nya ‚med bäfvan‘.“ Tagebuch, 12. August 1910: „Släpp ej patos i lifvet!“ Sibelius an Carpelan am 16. August 1910 (die Briefe von Sibelius an Carpelan sind verwahrt in NA, SFA, Kasten 120): „Min nya symfoni arbetar jag på och har då och då högtidsstunder. Ibland något så sublimt att jag nog ej förr varit med om dylikt. […] Endast sinfonin lefver i mig. Det är så underbart att helt få ge sig!“ Tagebuch, 17. August 1910: „Mera skönhet och verklig musik! Icke combinationer och dynamiska crescendis, med stereotypa figurer – ,Ny fart!‘ ,Nu eller aldrig‘!“ Tagebuch, 28. und 30. August 1910. Tagebuch, 11. September 1910: „II spökar i hjärnan. I plan färdig. Börjar med III.“ Als Sibelius den zweiten Brief schrieb, arbeitete er am ersten Satz. In Oslo enthielt das Programm Nächtlicher Ritt und Sonnenaufgang, die Schwanenweiß-Suite, die 2. Symphonie, Valse triste sowie die Uraufführungen von Die Dryade und In memoriam. Sibelius an Iver Holter am 4. Juni und 26. August 1910 (Finnische Nationalbibliothek [= NL], Coll. 206.62.1). Sibelius an Carpelan, datiert 9. Oktober 1910: „Sinfoni IV mognar!“ Tagebuch, 25. und 26. Oktober 1910. Auf das Glaubenskenntnis bezieht sich Sibelius in Verbindung mit seinen Sinfonien bei mehreren Gelegenheiten. Siehe z. B. Tagebucheinträge


XXVII

14 15

16 17 18 19 20

21 22

23 24 25 26 27 28

29 30 31 32 33

34

35

vom 21. November 1914 und 24. April 1915, sowie Tomi Mäkelä, Jean Sibelius, Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 2011, S. 261ff. Tagebuch, 4. November 1910: „Njutit i fulla drag. Stillheten! Tiden stannar! Arbetar och smider! En underbar stämning!“; 5. November 1910: „En sinfoni är icke en ,composition‘ i vanlig mening. Det är fastmer en trosbekännelse vid olika skeden af ens lif.” Ackté an Sibelius am 16. Mai 1910 (NA, SFA, Kasten 16): „en större orchester-konsert i Berlin (uteslutande Sibelius program).“ Sibelius an Ackté am 22. Juli 1910 (NL, Coll. 4.13): „Då alla mina gamla compositioner ofta äro uppförda i Tyskland (mina sinfonier flere gånger i Berlin) måste såväl sinfonien, som naturligtvis compositionen för Eder, vara nya.“ Tagebuch, 8. November 1910: „Är nyfiken i hvad våra planer resultera. Ett duktigt arbete måste jag fullgöra. Härlig dag.“ Viktor Rydbergs schwedische Übersetzung ist in seiner Gedichtsammlung Dikter. Första samlingen (Stockholm: Albert Bonniers Förlag 1899) enthalten. Tagebuch, 11. November 1910: „Smidit på ,Korpen‘. Alla idéer i flytande tillstånd. Härlig dag.“; 12. November 1910: „Har mina dubier angående ,Korpen‘. Mitt sätt att arbeta med den. Öfverhufvudtaget.“ Sibelius an Carpelan am 13. November 1910: „Jag tror den skall blifva bra.“; „Jag glömde omnämna att underströmmen i allt hvad jag gör är i Sinfoni IVs tecken.“ Carpelan an Sibelius am 16. November 1910: „Således ,Korpen‘! En tusan till dikt. Gör nu blott sångpartiet så pass lätt att även andra än Aino Ackté kan sjunga det! Att du skall lyckas glansfullt tror jag förvisso.“ Tagebuch, 17. November 1910: „Finner ,Korpen‘ för mörk och tung för mig nu.“ Die Rechnung einer Buchhandlung vom 18. November 1910 zeigt, dass Sibelius zwei Exemplare der Poe-Gedichte in deutscher Fassung gekauft hat (NA, SFA, Kasten 3). Die Fassung, welche Sibelius’ Einzeichnungen enthält (München & Leipzig: Georg Müller 1909, S. 7–15), wurde von Theodor Etzel übersetzt und ist derzeit in Ainola verwahrt. Gemäß dem Brief an Carpelan, datiert 26. November 1910. Tagebuch, 25. November 1910: „tager form och färg.“; 26. November 1910: „,Korpen‘ åter framme.“ Tagebuch, 2. Dezember 1910: „Sväfvar alltid emellan ,sinfoni‘ och ,Korpen‘. – Den sednare måste snart taga form.“ Tagebuch, 3. Dezember 1910: „Dubier angående texten. Alltid äro ,orden‘ ett onus i min konst.“ Der erhaltene Entwurf (siehe HUL 0320, S. [4]) enthält den Hinweis „Vers 9“, und Sibelius hat den Text von Strophe 10 (original 12) auf eine andere Seite geschrieben. Tagebuch, 7. Dezember 1910: „Ny fart i ,Korpen‘. Strukit det gamla, som för mycket ,modärnt intetsägande‘. Min spänning angående detta stycke enorm. – Underbara stämningar. Som stode tiden stilla och himlen vore gåtfull med järtecken och månar. Castagnetter och Triangolo!“ Ackté sang die Salome in Richard Strauss’ Oper in Covent Garden, London. Sibelius an Ackté am 9. Dezember 1910 (NL, Coll. 4.13). Tagebuch, 10. Dezember 1910: „Arbetar på ,Der Rabe‘. Hoppas åter! Härliga Ego. Skada att ej Sinf. IV hinner mogna.“ Sibelius an Ackté am 11. Dezember 1910 (NL, Coll. 4.13): „Werhindrad [sic] att deltaga i Tourneen.“ Laut Gutmann schickte Sibelius ihm ein ähnliches Telegramm (NL, Coll. 4.16). Tagebuch, 11. Dezember 1910: „Brännt återigen mina skepp. Brutit med Gutman[n]-reklamen och Aino Ackté. Men står för konsekvenserna! – Lämnar tillsvidare ,Korpen‘. Kastat bort en månad! Hjärtat gråter.“ Ackté an Sibelius am 13. Dezember 1910 (NA, SFA, Kasten 16): „Jag är inte van vid att man drifver med mig, ej häller vid att bli afskedad med lakoniska telegram och det hade varit ärligare om Ni genast sagt mig att Sibelius-konserterna utomlands ej tilltalade Er. Då hade Ni besparat mig mycken möda – för att ej nämna mycket annat – och jag hade häller ej då råkat i denna löjliga, litet smickrande situation vis à vis Gutman[n] o. andra, hos hvilka Ni nu för framtiden förstört mina chancer.“ Sibelius an Carpelan am 12. Dezember 1910: „Lemnar divan Achté [sic] åt sitt reclamartade öde. ,Korpen‘ måste ligga till sig ännu. Sinfoni IV bryter fram i solljus och kraft.“; „Min konst är alldeles af annan art än denna ,Konsertvaror‘ som ,går‘. Då jag ger en consert bör inga divor ta hufvudintresset, utan nog är det min sinfoniska konst som skall segra. Att Du, vän Axel, är af samma åsikt – vet jag säkert.“ Die Zeitung Nya Pressen zitierte Ackté’s Interview aus der Daily Mail am 13. Dezember, in dem sie verlautbarte: „Im Januar werde ich in Deutschland und in Österreich finnische Musik singen. Der finnische Komponist Sibelius hat für mich einige schöne Stücke geschrieben, und er wird

36

37 38

39

40

41 42 43 44

45 46

47 48 49 50

51 52 53 54

mich auf der Tournee begleiten.“ („I januari skall jag sjunga fi nsk musik i Tyskland och Österrike. Den finska kompositören Sibelius har skrifvit några vackra bitar för mig, och han skall följa med mig på tournén.“). Carpelan an Sibelius am 14. Dezember 1910: „Gillar fullkomligt din åsikt om din konst och Aino Acktés reklamidioti. Efter att ha fått del av intervjun i ,Daily News‘ („jag tar honom – Sib. – med mig“) anser jag allt vidare samarbete Er emellan omöjliggjort.“ Newmarch an Sibelius am 22. Dezember 1910 (NA, SFA, Kasten 24): „Au moins écrivez à cette excellente cantatrice. Elle souffre dans son amour propre – et vous connaissez bien vous ce que cela veut dire. Mais tout de même elle parle de vous et de votre musique d’une façon très touchante.“ Der Briefwechsel wurde ins Englische übersetzt und veröffentlicht in: The Correspondence of Jean Sibelius and Rosa Newmarch 1906–1939, hrsg. von Philip Ross Bullock, Woodbridge: Boydell Press 2011 [= Bullock 2011]. Sibelius an Newmarch am 1. Januar 1911. Da das neue Werk und die Tournee überall in den europäischen Zeitungen angekündigt worden waren (zumindest in Deutschland, Österreich und Norwegen), wurde ebenso ein öffentlicher Widerruf in Der Merker (Wien) am 10. Dezember 1910 und andernorts publiziert (NA, SFA, Kasten 86, und Erik-Tawaststjerna-Archiv, Kasten 43). Leevi Madetoja in Helsingin Sanomat vom 10. August 1916: „Niistä asioista en woi ruveta keskustelemaan, sen olen kerta kaikkiaan jyrkästi päättänyt. Olen wahingosta wiisastunut. Kerran joku aika sitten minun piti säweltää Aino Acktélle Poen runo ,Korppi‘ konserttimatkaa warten. Siitä lennätettiin heti uutinen ympäri maailmaa. Minä taas tulin siihen tulokseen, että se on mahdoton säwellettäwäksi muuten kuin melodraamana. Säwellyksestä ei siis tietysti tullut mitään ja minä jäin noloon wälikäteen ja wäärinkäsityksille alttiiksi.“ Zwei frühere Skizzen sind HUL 0472 (Violinkonzert) und 0253 (Dritte Symphonie). Siehe Timo Virtanen, Sibelius’s Sketches for the Violin Concerto, in: Jean Sibelius’s Legacy. Research on his 150th Anniversary, hrsg. von Daniel Grimley, Tim Howell, Veijo Murtomäki und Timo Virtanen, Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing 2017, S. 363–375. Siehe auch Erik Tawaststjerna, Sibelius 3, Helsinki: Otava 1989, S. 263 (mit einem Faksimile des Entwurfs HUL 0320, S. [4]) und der Liste der Skizzen am Ende dieses Bandes. Siehe HUL 0320, S. [7, 8] in der Liste der Skizzen und Faksimile XII. Tagebuch, 18. Dezember 1910: „Anar i hvilken riktning sats III i Sinf. kommer att gå. Allt dock ännu kaos och i behof af concentration.“ Tagebuch, 31. Dezember 1910: „Det ,stora‘ jag för jämt ett år sedan anade, tager form.“ Tagebuch, 1. Januar 1911. Sibelius hatte 1908 eine Kehlkopfoperation, woraufhin er sieben Jahre abstinent blieb. Dies war für ihn immer wieder schwer auszuhalten, und er gesteht in seinem Tagebuch immer wieder, wie er sich nach Zigarren und alkoholischen Getränken sehnte (siehe das Tagebuch z. B. am 11. und am 22. Januar 1911). Tagebuch, 21. Januar 1911: „Omgestaltat III satsen i sinfonien.“; 2. März 1911. Die Konzerte fanden in Göteborg (6. und 8. Februar), Riga (13., 15. und 16. Februar) und Mitau ( Jelgava, 17. Februar) statt. Die Programme enthielten dieselben Werke wie in Oslo (siehe Anmerkung 11) sowie zusätzlich Symphonie Nr. 3, En saga, Pan und Echo, Pohjolas Tochter, Der Schwan von Tuonela und Lemminkäinen zieht heimwärts. Sibelius an Carpelan am 26. Januar 1911: „Jag vill taga denna orkester dusch ordentligt förrän jag slutför sinfonien.“ Sibelius probte auch mit dem Orchester des finnischen Nationaltheaters (Tagebuch, 8. März), aber er dirigierte nicht die Vorstellungen. Tagebuch, 2. März 1911. Tagebuch, 14. März 1911: „Strukit förslaget till sats IV, dispositionen. Men tror mig kommit närmare målet. Ett svagt, ytterst svagt, hopp om att få sinf. färdig till Koncerten.“ Es gibt im Manuskript keine Hinweise auf späte Änderungen der Instrumentation. Tagebuch, 15. März 1911: „Kämpar med Gud!“; 17. März 1911: „Arbetat! Skall jag hinna? Samt kunna realisera min idé hvad instrumentation angår? ,En glad konst‘! Lätthet!!“ Tagebuch, 28. März 1911: „Kämpar för lifvet med sinfonien. Bär med manlighet ditt ,kompositoriska kors‘!“ Siehe Martti Pajanne, Muusikkojen muistelmia mestarista orkesterinjohtajana, in: Uusi musiikkilehti 9 (1955), S. 16, und Paavo Helistö: Aerila: Kajanuksen klarinetisti, Hämeenlinna: Karisto 2005, S. 94f. Tagebuch, 2. April 1911: „Sinfonin ,färdig‘. Jacta alea est! Måste! Det fordras mycken manlighet att se lifvet i hvitögat. Alltså.“ Anonymer Kritiker in Helsingin Sanomat vom 2. April 1911: „Tätä tilaisuutta, jolloin täällä kotimaassakin saataisiin tutustua nerokkaimman


XXVIII

55 56 57

58

59

60 61

62 63 64 65

66

67

68

säweltäjämme uusimpiin orkesterituotteisiin, on jo kauan jännityksellä odotettu. […] Päänumerona tulee olemaan uusi 4-osainen sinfonia.“ Anonymer Kritiker in Nya Pressen vom 4. April 1911: „[…] vår mästare med denna tonskapelse inträdt i ett nytt skede af utväckling“ und „genomskinligt klar“. Siehe Hufvudstadsbladet vom 2. April und vom 4. April 1911, Uusi Suometar vom 11. April sowie Säveletär (Nr. 6–7) vom 15. April 1911. Carpelan nennt Richard Strauss und Gustav Mahler. Otto Andersson in Tidning för musik (1910/11), Nr. 12 [15. April], S. 171–173 [= Andersson 1911], und E. K. [Evert Katila] in Uusi Suometar vom 11. April 1911 beziehen sich ebenso auf Strauss und Mahler. Carpelan, Sibelius’ nya symfoni, in: Göteborgs Handels- och Sjöfartstidning vom 21. April 1911 [= Carpelan 1911]: „I sin helhet betraktad är symfonien en protest mot den musikaliska stilriktning, som f. n. är den dominerande, främst i symfoniens egentliga hemland, Tyskland, där instrumentalmusiken är på väg att urarta till en klangkonst, ur hvilken lifvet vikit, till en slags musikalisk ingeniörskonst, som genom en ofantlig mekanisk apparat söker täcka öfver sin inre tomhet. Det är då att förutse att en korrumperad kritik skall söka ,kritisera ihjäl‘ ett värk som denna fjärde symfoni, där ande och natur på underbart sätt sammansmultit till ett helt af förr ohörd art.“ Furuhjelm benutzt ebenso das Wort „Protest“; Erik Furuhjelm, Jean Sibelius: hans tondiktning och drag ur hans liv, Borgå: Holger Schildts Förlag 1916, S. 216 [= Furuhjelm 1916]: „Die 4. Symphonie […] beinhaltet einen stillen Protest gegen allen hohlen Impressionismus, barocke Instrumentierung und krassen Naturalismus.“ („Fjärde symfonin innebär […] en stilla protest mot ihålig impressionism, barock instrumentering, krass naturalism.“) Sibelius an Newmarch am 2. Mai 1911 (NA, SFA, Kasten 121). Andersson teilte 1911 in seinem Artikel diese Ansichten auch. E. K. in Uusi Suometar vom 11. April 1911: „Mutta waikka säweltäjä näin on heittänyt pois kaiken ulkonaisen loisteliaisuuden, ei hänen teoksensa kuitenkaan ole taaksepäin suuntautuwa, päinwastoin. Se on uusista uusinta musiikkia, kontrapunktisesti ja soinnullisesti rohkeinta taidetta mitä on kirjoitettu. Se waikuttaa ensi kuulemilla waikeatajuiselta juuri riitasointujen rikkauden ja harmoonisen rakenteensa radikaalisuuden wuoksi, mutta lähemmin tutustuttua teokseen saa aawistuksen, mikä tawaton tekniikka ja rautainen logiikka piilee tässä teoksessa, joka aluksi tuntuu niin hämärältä.“ Tagebuch, 11. April 1911: „Katila skrifvit om mig och sinfonin förståelsefullt.“ O[skar] Merikanto in Tampereen Sanomat vom 20. April 1911: „Niinpä mielestäni Sibeliuskin tässä teoksessaan on ikään kuin sulkeutunut kammioonsa ja alkanut tutkia itseänsä ja elämän mysteeriota, ihmisen powessa kytewiä suuria kysymyksiä. […] Sillä minusta tuntuu, kuin aukeisi nyt Sibeliukselle sinfoniasäweltäjänä aiwan uudet maailmat, joita ei ole wielä muille näytetty ja joita yksin hän ihmeteltäwän korkealle kehittyneellä säwel- ja wäriaistillaan kykenee näkemään ja muille kuwaamaan.“ Tagebuch, 21. April 1911: „Merikanto skrifvit en härlig artikel i ,Tampereen Sanomat‘ om min nya musik.“ Merikanto in Tampereen Sanomat vom 20. April 1911: „aiwan wapaa muoto“; Katila in Uusi Suometar vom 11. April 1911: „waikuttaa waikeatajuiselta […] rakenteensa radikaalisuuden wuoksi.“ Andersson 1911: „att han dock är för fri i formen. […] att han förmår vidga formerna.“ Siehe auch die Diskussion vor Anmerkung 73. Carpelan 1911: „Hvad som genast frapperar och förvånar åhöraren är det nya, sällsamma tankeinnehållet och den af detta betingade egendomliga form behandlingen. Underbara recitativiska motiv och interjektionala utbrott, växlande med bredare melodiska bildningar, en djupsinnig kontrapunkt, förmäld med en genomskinlig, sträng logik och öfversiktlighet, därtill en spartansk enkelhet i uttrycksmedlen – allt detta är hvad som genast faller en i öronen.“ Der Briefwechsel ist veröffentlicht in: Din tillgifne ovän. Korrespondensen mellan Jean Sibelius och Adolf Paul 1889–1943, hrsg. von Fabian Dahlström, Helsingfors: SLS 2016. Sibelius an Paul am 23. April 1911 (Uppsala Universitätsbibliothek, Adolf-Paul-Archiv; Kopien in NL, Coll. 206.62): „Här hemma är jag numera ur räkningen. De begripa ej min musik. Och jag ger dem blanka fan!“ Sibelius an Stenhammar am 5. April 1911 (NA, Erik-TawaststjernaArchiv [= ETA], Kasten 38): „med ringa egentlig förståelse från publikens och kritikens sida“; 26. Juni 1911: „har denna sinfoni blifvit totalt missförstådd här hemma“. Andersson 1911: „något förbehållsamt“ und „stodo åhörarena stumma av häpnad“.

69

70

71

72

73

74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83

Dennoch berichteten einige Zeitungen wie Nya Pressen vom 4. April 1911, es seien „nach der Symphonie ein stürmischer Beifall und Bravos gefolgt“ („Stormande applåder och bravorop följde på symfonin.“). Ainos Erinnerung entspricht auch Furuhjelm 1916, S. 215. Siehe Tawaststjerna 1971, S. 229: „Vältteleviä katseita, päänpudistuksia, hämillisiä tai salaisesti ironisia hymyjä. Monia onnittelijoita ei taiteilijahuoneeseen tullut.“ Jussi Snellman schrieb nach Sibelius’ Diktat „Sibelius oikaisee ja selittää“, und am 25. Dezember 1943 (NA, SFA, Kasten 41): „[…] se on ,turistmusik‘, Hufvudst.bl. kirjoitti siitä muutamalla rivillä ja ainoastaan Erik (Eero Järnefelt) tuli kiittämään minua. Vasta tulevaisuudessa tulevat ymmärtämään, mitä se sävellys sisältää.“ Bis [Karl Fredrik Wasenius] am 7. April 1911: „Imposantare finaler skref Sibelius till sina föregående sinfonier. Denna har – som det nu synes mig – en något turistartad bismak.“ Die Tempoangaben beziehen sich auf die erste Version. Bis in Hufvudstadsbladet vom 7. April 1911: „Första satsen, Tempo di molto moderato, skildrar Koli berg och intrycket af detsamma. I andra satsen, Vivace assai, befinner sig komponisten på berget. Nedanför sig ser han Pielisjärvi. Solen sänder sitt guld öfver sjön, hvars lekande böljor ge tusende gnistrande reflexer af dess fröjd och lif skänkande ljus. Tredje satsen, Il tempo largo, ger oss en framställning af det mäktiga panoramat i månskensbelysning, en tafla med poesi, som heter duga. Finalen skildrar återfärden. Den har en passus, som förtjänar särskildt omnämnande. Där komponisten färdas lyser sol, men från nordost, från Hvita hafvet, nalkas en rykande snöstorm. Den når ej ända fram, men kontrasten mellan solljus öfver den närmaste miljön och snöstormens mäktiga hot är effektfull. Detta är stoffet för sinfonin.“ Der 1. April ist der „Narrentag“; Katila betonte dies auch am 21. April in seinem Bericht. Hinter dem „sehr engen Freund“ wurde Eero Järnefelt vermutet. Tagebuch, 7. April 1911: „Bis’ dumheter.“ Hufvudstadsbladet vom 8. April 1911: „Märket Bis’ förmodan angående ett program för min nya symfoni är icke riktig. Det anar mig att den sammanhänger med en topografisk utläggning i detta syfte, som jag för några goda vänner framställde den 1 sistlidne april.“; „Tillägg. En närastående vän till Sibelius och äfven mig har efter andra konserten adresserat sig till mig och uttryckligen delgifvit mig som autentiskt det innehåll för sinfonin […]; och bekräftas det berättigade i denna relation ju af hr Sibelius själf, då han här ofvan tillstår sig ha gjort en utläggning just ,i detta (program-) syfte‘.“ Katila (Uusi Suometar vom 11. April 1911) und Andersson 1911 behaupteten auch, dass das Programm nicht genehmigt war. Carpelan 1911: „Enär symfonien koncipierats under ett besök å det för sin härliga natur och vida utsikter berömda Kolivaara fjäll invid den väldiga Pielisjärvi i Karelen, vore man à priori böjd för att tro den vara af naturmålerisk art. Detta är likväl ingalunda fallet. Dyka än då och då sällsamma naturljud och stämningar upp i orkestern, bär dock symfonien snarast prägeln af något öfverjordiskt ,weltentrückt‘, man vore frestad säga icke-mänskligt. Inga mänskliga affekter och lidelser finnas i detta värk, där allt är försjunkenhet i inre skådande, idel kyskhet och förandligat uttryck.“ Carpelan 1911: „Mest anslår vid ett första åhörande måhända tredje satsen med sin månskensstämning af knappt jordisk art.“ Sibelius an Carpelan am 3. Mai 1911: „med stor förnöjelse […] Artikeln i fråga är ,kontinental‘, välskrifven och, framför allt, ur fackmannasynpunkt brillant. Ett af det bästa som om min musik blifvit skrifvet.“ Tagebuch, 7. April 1911: „Skall jag låta trycka sinfonin i denna form? Ja! – ??“ Breitkopf & Härtel [= B&H] an Sibelius am 11. April 1911 (B&Hs Briefe an Sibelius sind verwahrt in NA, SFA, Kasten 42). Tagebuch, 15. April 1911: „gifva slutgiltig form“. Tagebuch, 21. April 1911: „Jag arbetar i stillhet på några ,ställen‘ i sinf. IV, hvilka ställen tarfva förtydligande.“ Tagebuch: „Om våren, som alltid, ,la tristesse‘. Arbetet! Och förtjänsten! Allt lika med 0.“ (30. April); „Sol och poesi.“ (12. Mai 1911). Sibelius an Carpelan am 3. Mai 1911: „Jag lefver dels i nuet – skrifver rent sinfonien dels i allt ,det nya‘. I sinfonien pointerar jag vissa saker mera än i den ursprungliga gestalten.“ Tagebuch, 15. Mai 1912: „Skrifvit rent ända till fjärde satsen i sinfonien. […] Finner det sinfonin, genom denna slutliga omredigering, erhåller en för alla tider bestående form. Rätt så, härlige Ego, rätt så!“ Tagebuch, 20. Mai 1911. B&H an Sibelius am 2. Juni 1911. B&H an Sibelius am 21. Juni und am 11. November 1911. Ein interessantes Detail geht aus Newmarchs Brief an ihre Schwester hervor, in dem sie über die Gründe für ihre Reise nach Paris berichtet: „Heute teilte mir Breitkopf & Härtel mit sie wünschten, dass ich [nach Paris] fahre, damit sich jemand darum kümmert, dass seine [Sibelius’] neuen Werke korri-


XXIX giert und gedruckt werden.“ („Today Breitkopf & Härtel said they wanted me to go [to Paris], so that somebody might see about his new works getting corrected and printed.“) Zitiert bei Bullock 2011, S. 135. 84 Sibelius an B&H am 18. November 1911 (Sibelius’ Briefe an B&H befi nden sich im B&H-Archiv). Sibelius an Aino am 16. November 1911 (Sibelius’ Briefe an Aino sind verwahrt in NA, SFA, Kasten 96): „Jag älskar det verket. Det är urfint.“ 85 Sibelius an B&H am 7. Oktober 1912. 86 B&H an Sibelius am 11. und am 26. Oktober 1912. 87 Sibelius an B&H am 22. Dezember 1930; B&H an Sibelius am 30. Dezember 1930. 88 Fazer an Sibelius am 27. Oktober 1934 (NL, Coll. 206.44). 89 Sibelius an B&H am 15. Mai 1942. B&H an Sibelius am 3. Juni 1942. 90 Von Hase an B&H am 11. August 1942 (B&H-Archiv). 91 Siehe Helsingin Sanomat vom 2. April 1911. 92 Im Frühjahr 1912 gaben zwei Orchester Konzerte in Helsinki, was als Orchesterkrieg bekannt wurde. Der Dirigent Robert Kajanus führte die Arbeit mit seinem Orchester und den meisten seiner Musiker fort, finanziell unterstützt durch Lotterien, den Staat und einen Kredit. Pro-Finnische Auditorien und Zeitungen unterstützten sein „Nationalorchester“, was ein Grund dafür sein könnte, warum die Zeitungen auffallend die Konzerte bewarben, welche Sibelius’ Vierte aufwiesen, und auch die Leistung des Orchesters lobten. Siehe Nils-Eric Ringbom, Helsingin orkesteri 1882–1932, Helsinki: Frenckellin kirjapaino 1932, S. 33ff. 93 Siehe Nya Pressen vom 30. März und Hufvudstadsbladet vom 4. April 1912. Tagebuch, 1. April 1912; 4. April: „Orkestern tämligen dålig. Egendomligt nog är t.ex. Clarinetten i denna vår filharmoniska orkester ett af de sämsta instrumenten. Han, d. v. s. clarinettisten, kan ingenting. Är Confus! – Detta orkester-bad har haft sin stora betydelse för mig åter.“ 94 O. K. [Otto Kotilainen] in Helsingin Sanomat vom 30. März 1912: „[…] sinfonian useampi kuuleminen selwittää sen kumman ongelmaisuuden, minkä siitä ensi kerralla, konsertissa wuosi sitten, sai.“ 95 Leo Funtek in Dagens Tidning vom 29. März 1912: „Sibelius’ stråk kvartett bär titeln ,Voces intimae‘. Ger man IV symfonin samma öfverskrift så har man träffat kärnan, definierat verket i sin helhet, antydt utgångspunkten, från hvilken man kan ernå förståelse för enskildheterna. Det finnes verkligen i hela den symfoniska litteraturen knappast ett annat verk, hvilket skulle så utan hänsyn till yttre effekter med så järnhård konsekvens tala själens språk; ,psychologisk symfoni‘ – komponistens eget uttryck – skulle man kunna kalla den. Intressant är det sätt på hvilket Sibelius har gifvit konstnärlig gestalt åt sina högst personliga intryck och stämningar. Tvenne klippor måste undvikas […] Å ena sidan gällde det att undgå den stela formalismen å andra sidan – och detta var, motsvarande verkets karaktär, den största faran – kan individualismen i tonspråket mycket lätt urarta till anarki. […] Sibelius har, tack vare en utpräglad formell och logisk begåfning fullkomligt lyckats i den delikata uppgiften: å ena sidan har symfonins poetiska och psykologiska innehåll icke förlorat någonting af sin frihet och immanenta logik, å andra sidan ha de yttre formerna blifvit klassiskt klara; den högsta individuella friheten och formens stränghet ha sammansmultit till ett organiskt helt; den lefvande själens omedelbara språk har ingjutit lif i formen; och återigen har genom formens fulländning det individuella blifvit allmängällande. […] denna IV symfoni bildar ett helt, så att ingen af satserna kan betraktas för sig allena.“ 96 Carpelan an Sibelius am 11. März 1912: „Vad jag mest beundrar är, oavsett dess djupsinnigt sköna tankehalt, den absoluta kongruensen mellan form och materia […] att formen innehållet fullständigt och utan rest uppsugits i innehållet formen.“ Tagebuch, 12. März 1912: „Af Axel ett härligt, förståelsefullt bref om sinf. IV. Han gaf mig mycket därmed.“ 97 Tagebuch, 8. September 1912; 14. September 1912: „Den är nog för subtil och tragisk för vår snöda verld.“ 98 Der Komponist Granville Bantock (1868–1946) war der Organisator des Festivals, und Sibelius wohnte bei ihm. Sibelius an Aino am 26. September 1912: „Olen juuri repeteerannut. Orkesteri ei ole erittäin hyvä siitä syystä että lisävoimat ovat uusia tässä orkesterissa. Mutta mahtava. Herra Jumala kun III satsissa pelaavat unisono. […] Hän komplementeeraa minun sinf. johdosta erittäin. Klangista hän oli hurmaantunut. Muuten ne eivät vielä ole ,mogna‘. Rosa oli ihastunut, pää keikkuu koko ajan. Toivon kuitenkin parasta.“ 99 Sibelius an Aino (undatiert [1912]): „1/2 tunnin perästä olen tuon suuren orkesterin johtajana ja kappale on tuo rakas neljäs. – Se on kummallista tämä mailma ja elämä. Välistä on kun tarttuisi itse historian punaiseen lankaan ja se koskee.“ 100 „The Fourth Symphony […] is music of an intimate nature, and much of it was thought out and written in the isolation of hoary forests, by

101 102 103 104

105

106 107 108

109

110

111 112 113

114 115 116 117

rushing rapids, or wind-lashed lakes. There are moments – especially in the first movement – when we feel ourselves ‚alone with nature’s breathing things.’ It has, however, no programme that could, or should, be expressed in literary terms. […] In common with most of the composers in Northern Europe he values form for its own sake. […] the structure of the Fourth Symphony, with all its telescoping of formal divisions, remains strong and clear. […] Sibelius undoubtedly retains an oldfashioned respect for the theme and regards the melodic material as the inspired word on which the whole message of the music depends.” Die analytischen Notizen von Newmarch erschienen im Konzertprogramm vom 1. Oktober 1912. Ein Exemplar der überarbeiteten Fassung, veröffentlicht 1913 bei B&H, ist in Sibelius’ Bibliothek in Ainola verwahrt. Siehe auch Bullock 2011, S. 249ff. Anonyme Kritiker in The Observer und in Referee, jeweils vom 6. Oktober 1912. „[...] impression was one of extreme vagueness and considerable lack of charm [...]“; „[...] the music left no ardent desire to hear it again.“ Anonyme Kritiker in Sunday Times vom 6. Oktober 1912 und in North Mail vom 7. Oktober 1912. Anonymer Kritiker in The Times vom 2. Oktober und vom 5. Oktober 1912. Einige der Kritiken werden zitiert bei Bullock 2011, S. 157f. Ernst Newman in Nation vom 12. Oktober 1912. Newmans Kritik vom 2. Oktober in Birmingham Daily Post wurde in Hufvudstadsbladet am 9. Oktober (übersetzt) zitiert. Newman war der berühmteste englische Musikkritiker in der ersten Hälfte des 20. Jahrhunderts. Tagebuch, 1.–6. Oktober 1912: „Min IV Sinf. under min direktion gör succes. Kritiken mera konfus och dålig. Dock några goda. […] Hade ett stort och djupt intryck af min sinf. IV i England. Rätt så härlige Ego! Rätt så.“ und „Kritiken, den engelska, i stort sedt, utomordentlig (Ernst Newman och Times t.ex.) –. Engelska resan + - 0. Möjligen ett par hundra deficit.“ Sibelius an Boldemann am 9. November 1912 (Sibelius-Museum, Turku). Sibelius an Aino (Kopenhagen, undatiert [1912]): „Jag står nog ensam tror jag med min IVde. Fast – hel[l]re det än kompromisser.“ Sibelius an Aino am 2. Dezember 1912: „Olen harjoittanut tätä huonoa orkesteria ja haukkunut niitä pataluhaksi. Saa nähdä tuleeko koko konsertista mitään. Mutta minulla kun on kunnia johtaa tätä Sinf IVtta niin olen kova. […] Ihmettelen kuinka minusta on tullut kova dirigentti. En med pretentioner.” Der Artikel erschien übersetzt in Hufvudstadsbladet vom 3. Dezember 1912. Kritiker mit dem Kürzel Ces in Politiken vom 2. Dezember 1912: „Ud af det tilsyneladende Kaos steg skønne og fi ne Tonebølger, truende, mørke Gestalter og hemmelighedsfulde, mystiske Klange. Nu kendte man Sibelius igen.“ Die Kritik wurde teilweise in Hufvudstadsbladet vom 6. Dezember 1912 zitiert. Charles Kjerulf in Politiken vom 4. Dezember 1912: „[…] store, svævende Taktslag med udstrakte Arme – der er noget af en Fugl i Flugt over ham – Musiken synes at sejle af Sted paa disse bærende Vinger. […] en drilsk, ung Troldkvinde, der ler og græder, lokker og gækker mellem Skærgaardens Holme i Finlands lysegrønne Sommernat.“ und „Symfonien er næsten mere en Sinfonietta, et stort Stykke Kammermusik for Orkester.“; „Enkelt-Instrumenternes koglende Samtalen.“ Tagebuch, vor dem 7. Dezember 1912: „Konserterade med framgång. Kjerulf kritiserat glänsande; hans fiender infernaliskt som jag tror.“ Emilius Bangert in Hovedstaden vom 4. Dezember 1912: „Det er Sibelius’s Begrænsning, at han ikke formaar helt at underordne sig Toneverdenens Love.“ A. T. [Alfred Tofft] in Berlingske Tidende vom 4. Dezember 1912: „[…] han styrter sig hellere ud i det groteske, end at blive paa Stedet og udnytte den Guldgrube, han fandt. […] Han bevæger sig helst ude i Periferien, der, hvor Musik næsten ophører at være Musik. […] Evnen til at holde fast paa Stoffet, udarbejde, hamre og tømre, saa alt staar klart og urokkeligt, den skorter det ham paa. Det bliver nærmest kun fantastiske Tegninger ud i det graa, ud i det mystiske.“; „Hvor han spejder sig frem paa ukendte Stier, finder han altid noget, som i højeste Grad fanger Sindet. Der er i Symfonien Klange af sjælden Skønhed, Stemninger, som lodder saa dybt, at de synes at røre ved selve Underbevidstheden.“ R–r. H. [Roger Henrichsen] in Riget vom 4. Dezember 1912: „Tonemaleri […] vrimler med Billeder af stor Ejendommelighed og tillige – navnlig i de sidste Satser – af megen Skønhed og Poesi vil ingen kunne nægte.“ Tagebuch, 8. Dezember 1912: „Djäflarna framme i Köpenhamns tidningar. Nedskäld på ett infernaliskt sätt.“ Sibelius an Boldemann am 9. Dezember 1912 (SibMus). Sibelius wurde im Januar 1912 in Wien eine Professur an der Universität für Musik und darstellende Kunst angeboten. Richard Specht, Anklagen, in: Der Märker, Januar 1913, S. 4.


XXX 118 Tagebuch, 19. Januar 1913: „Weingartner uppför ej min sednaste sinfoni, ehuru redan inöfvad. Detta har nedslagit mig. Härlige, komponerande Ego! Min stjärna i nedåtgående. Det har jag länge sedan vetat.“ 119 Tagebuch, 2. Februar 1913: „Intet höres om Busonis uppförande af min sinfonie IV. Har han gjordt det, eller är nu detta åter en – bagatell.“ 120 Tagebuch, 20. Februar 1913: „Det svider nu detta! Men kanske tiden – den underbara tiden – råder bot äfven på detta. – Jag ville sälja allt det jag äger, men – hvem köper. Huru nu i detta fall begå? – Det gäller nu att ej förlora modet; samt – framförallt – ej hufvudet. De anse – åtminstone verldens flesta orkestermusiker – att jag är en död man. Mais nous verrons! Skall nu detta vara slutet på Jean Sibelius som tonsättare?“ 121 Sibelius erwähnt das Telegramm am 1. April in seinem Tagebuch. Laut der Allgemeinen Musik-Zeitung 40 (1913) sagte Busoni seine Konzerte mit dem Blüthner-Orchester in Berlin aus persönlichen Gründen ab (siehe auch Dahlström 2005, S. 409). Busonis Telegramm war wohl auf den 17. [recte: 30.] März 1913 datiert worden (NA, SFA, Kasten 17). 122 Anonymer Kritiker in Algemeen Handelsblad vom 31. März 1913: „Dat enkele minder belangrijke bladzijen in dit vier-deelig symphonisch werk voorkomen, is niet te ontkennen, maar het geheel heeft interessante factuur (harmonie, melodie, rhythme) evenzeer als innerlijk leven, poëtische stemmingsmomenten te over. […] Hoe kan men echter de frischheid en originaliteit der gedachten voorbij zien, en de zelfstandigheid van den toondichter die alle uiterlijk effect versmaadt niet waardeeren!“ 123 Stenhammar an Sibelius am 6. Februar 1913 (NA, SFA, Kasten 30): „Och så inträffade det oerhörda och så vidt jag vet i Göteborgs musik historias annaler enastående att efter symfoniens slut de fåtaliga försiktiga handklappningarna nedtystades af ljudliga hyschningar. Jag kan inte neka till, att det efter den första öfverraskningen kändes rätt uppfriskande, och att jag kände mig rätt stolt å dina vägnar. […] vår dumma s.k. kritik, som hittills burit dig på sina händer, gjorde plötslig[t] kovändning och skällde ut dig på det löjligaste, mest oförstående sätt. Symfonien hade beredt dem en stor besvikelse, betecknade tillbakagång, afmattning, brist på uppfinning, formlöshet […]. Och lyckades långt öfver förväntan. Min kära onsdagspublik hedrade sig i går så som sällan. Så varmt, så spontant, icke utan en bestämdt demonstrativ färg – mig kom bifallet, bestående underkännande både abonnemangspublikens och, recensenternas dom. Vi ha alltså en intelligent, själfständigt kännande och bedömande publik här, och den står redo att ta emot dig varmt och värdigt. […] min vördnad för dig såsom konstnär är oföränderlig och ständigt växande.“ 124 Tagebuch, 8. Februar 1913: „Sinf. IV uthvisslad [rot unterstrichen] i Göteborg.“ 125 Tagebuch, 11. Februar 1913: „Sinnet sjukt, mycket sjukt. Ett skott vore nog det bästa för mig.“ 126 Anonyme Kritiker in New York Times und in Sun, jeweils vom 3. März 1913. „[Damrosch] added that it [the symphony] was the work of a man ‚tired of the musical effects of the past, or of what have hitherto been considered such;’ also that it embodied the most extraordinary ideas of symphonic development that ever he had seen.“ und „Sibelius […] has joined the futurists. He is as frankly dissonant as the worst of them. He

127

128 129

130

131 132

133

has swallowed the whole tone scale, the disjointed sequences, the chord of the minor second, the flattened supertonic and all the Chinese horrors of the forbidden fifths. But the symphony is a noteworthy composition. It has elemental imagination, courage of utterance, fearlessness of style. It is […] a consistently planned and masterfully executed work. The themes are unusual, remote, solitary, but impressively thought; […] the symphony is clearly written and its thought nicely balanced. Its chords are exquisitely distributed, its instrumentation is marvelously pure and transparent, and above all the work has much to say.“ Herbert F. Peyser, A New and Strange Sibelius Symphony, in: Musical America vom 8. März 1913, S. 26. „The symphony is a work which some will enjoy greatly and others detest. But whatever one’s attitude towards it there is no denying its intense interest. It is fascinating, bewilderingly, hypnotically, singularly devoid of the elements of sensuous musical beauty, yet intensely convincing in its sheer strangeness; legitimate, potently vital, an utterance tremendously elemental. […] The symphony is somber in hue; one might almost call parts of it black. Lyrical graciousness or suavity of melodic phraseology are practically non-existent in it. It is uncouth, rugged, disdainful alike of urbanity of style or finesse of expression. Despite the criticism, the critic wishes the symphony to be soon repeated.“ Tagebuch, 19. Juni 1913: „Gemenheter i Musical America angående mig. […] Min 4de sinf. blifvit uppförd under denna säsong i New York och väckt mycken uppmärksamhet. Dock tyvärr blifvit alldeles missförstått.“ William Henry Humiston, New Sibelius Symphony a Puzzle, in: Musical America vom 9. August 1913, S. 17. „Sibelius seems to have left the ranks of his contemporaries and become a ‚futurist.’ The symphony is neither fish, flesh nor fowl – nor good red herring.“ Sibelius an Carpelan am 31. Mai 1914 aus Norfolk: „Amerikas bästa kritiker håller styft på min 4de sinfoni.“ und am 10. Juni aus Boston: „4de sinfonin här i Boston starkt beundrad. Dr. Muck lär ha spelat den härligt. Äfven i New York under Damrosch bra.“ Die erste Aufnahme wurde vom Philadelphia Orchestra unter Leitung von Leopold Stokowski gemacht (Victor 7686, 1932). Elmer Diktonius, Opus 12. Musik., Helsingfors: Holger Schildts Förlag 1933, S. 44f.: „vår fasta tro är att denna barkbrödsbit kommer att omtuggas av flere mänskosläkten.“ und „en bit absolut musik omramad av finsk natur. […] Ty ett obegripligt verk, en svårsmält symfoni kunde ej uppföras så titt och tätt hos oss och annorstädes, om den ej funne genklang hos sin publik. Och faktiskt har det ju gått så långt att den fjärde är den av de sju vilken man helst återhör.“ Olin Downes, Symphonic Masterpieces, New York: Stratford Press 1936, S. 272. „[...] in these pages Sibelius emerges, lonely and incomparable, one of the deepest and most concentrated musical thinkers of our epoch. The Fourth symphony is a series of musical ideas, boiled down to their sheerest essence, and there is no factitious allure about it at all. […] it is an unprecedented alembication, and a style highly modern in texture, which strikes like the arrow to the heart of the musical idea.“


Symphony No. 4 Op. 63


Instrumentation Flauto I, II Oboe I, II Clarinetto (A, Bj) I, II Fagotto I, II Corno (E, F) I, II, III, IV Tromba (E, F) I, II Trombone I, II, III Timpani Campanelli Violino I, II Viola Violoncello Contrabbasso


An Eero Järnefelt

Symphony No. 4 I

Op. 63

Tempo molto moderato, quasi adagio * Flauto

I II

Oboe

I II

Clarinetto I in A II

I Fagotto

dim.

II

Corno in F

I II III IV

Tromba I in F II I II Trombone III

Timpani

Tempo molto moderato, quasi adagio * I Violino II

Viola 1 Vc. Solo [dolce]

con sord.

Violoncello

dim.

div.

**

con sord.

dim.

dim. con sord.

Contrabbasso

div.

dim.

div.

div.

con sord. dim.

dim.

dim.

* For metronome markings, see the Critical Commentary. ** See the Critical Remarks.

© 1912 by Breitkopf & Härtel, Leipzig Revised edition © 2020 by Breitkopf & Härtel, Wiesbaden


4 7

(Solo)

12

(Solo)

3

Vc.

Cb.

A

Vc.

3

Cb.

17

Fg.

I II

Timp. con sord.

I Vl.

con sord. div.

II con sord.

div.

Va. (Solo)

Vc.

Cb.

div.

[ ][ ]


22

a2

Cl. (A) I II

Fg.

5

poco larg.

cresc.

I II

cresc. nat.

gest.

I II Cor. (F) III IV

cresc.

gest.

nat.

cresc.

I cresc. [unis.]

Vl. II

cresc.

Va. (Solo)

cresc.

Leseprobe

cresc.

Vc.

div.

poco larg. poco

dim.

poco

dim.

[unis.]

senza sord.

senza sord.

cresc.

senza sord.

Cb. cresc.

29

Fg.

I II

B Adagio

( = )

a2

I II Cor. (F) III IV

a2

Tr. (F) I II

Tbn.

Sample page

I II III

Timp. ( = )

Adagio

senza sord.

I Vl.

senza sord.

II senza sord.

Va. Tutti

Vc. Cb.

cresc.

cresc.


6 35

Fl.

I II

Ob.

I II

C

( = )

Cl. (A) I II a2

I II

Fg.

tranquillo

I II

dim.

Cor. (F) III IV

Leseprobe 3

mutano in E

(a 2)

poco

mutano in E

(a 2) dim.

poco

mutano in E

Tr. (F) I II

tranquillo 3 gest.

nat.

a2 ten.

mutano in F 3

ten.

I II

3

Tbn.

ten.

III

( )

Timp. ( = )

I Vl. II

Sample page div.

Va.

div.

div.

Vc.

div.

unis.

Cb.

3


41

Fl.

I II

Fg.

I II

7

D

Tempo I

dolce

I II Cor. (E) III IV

nat. (

)

Timp.

Tempo I I Vl.

Leseprobe dolce

II

dolce

Va.

pizz.

dolce

Vc.

pizz.

dolce

div.

pizz.

Cb.

47

Fl.

I II

Ob.

I II

Cl. (A) I II

I Solo dolce I Solo

dolce

Fg.

I II

I II Cor. (E) III IV Timp. I

Sample page

Vl. II Va. Spitze

div. a 3

arco

Spitze arco

3 3

Spitze arco

3

3 3

Vc.

div.

Cb.

arco

3

mutano in F

mutano in F


8 54

Fl.

I II

E

a2

Cl. (A) I II I Vl. II arco

Va.

Leseprobe 1 Vc. Solo

Vc.

Cb.

61

Fl.

I II

poco dim.

(a 2)

Cl. (A) I II con sord.

I Vl.

con sord.

II dim.

Va. (Solo)

Vc. Cb.

66

dim.

Sample page F

I cresc.

Vl.

cresc.

II cresc.

Va. [Tutti]

con sord.

Vc. 3

Cb.

3

3


9 71

Fl.

a2

I II

poco cresc.

Cl. (A) I II sulla tastiera 3

poco cresc. 3

I Vl.

sulla tastiera 3

3

II con sord. 3

Va.

sulla tastiera 3

Leseprobe subito

Vc. [

]

Cb.

73

Fl.

I II

(a 2)

Cl. (A) I II

I Vl.

poco a

poco

meno

piano

poco a

poco

meno

piano

II

Va. poco a poco meno

piano

Vc. Cb.

75

Fg.

I II

Sample page G

a2

I Vl. II

Va. senza sord.

Vc.

Cb.


10 77

Fl.

I II

Cl. (A) I II

Fg.

(a 2)

I II

3

Timp.

Leseprobe

I Vl. II

Va.

senza sord.

con sord.

Vc.

3

div.

Cb.

I Solo

79

6

Cl. (A) I II (

Sample page

)

Timp.

dim.

I Vl.

senza sord.

II

senza sord.

Va.

Vc.

dim.

con sord.

3

3

dim. quasi niente

Cb. 3

3

3

3


11 81

Fl.

H

I Solo

I II

6

6

(I Solo)

Cl. (A) I II

6

[

Fg.

] a2

I II

Timp.

I Vl. II div.

Va.

Leseprobe senza sord.

Vc.

Cb.

83

Fl.

(I Solo)

I II

6

6

(I Solo)

Cl. (A) I II

6

(a 2)

Fg.

I II [

Timp.

I Vl. II

Va.

Vc.

Cb.

[

]

Sample page ]

[]


12

(I Solo) a2

85

Fl.

I II

6 6

a2

Ob.

I II

[

6

Cl. (A) I II a2

Fg.

I II

] a2

[ ] 6

a4

Cor. I−IV (F) (

)

Timp. I Vl.

marc. 3

Leseprobe cresc.

II

cresc.

[unis.]

Va.

cresc.

Vc. subito

Cb. subito

87

Fl.

I II

Ob.

I II

Cl. (A) I II

allarg. (a 2)

(a 2)

(a 2)

Fg.

I II

Cor. I−IV (F)

(a 4)

Sample page allarg.

I Vl. [ ]

II div.

Va.

Vc. [

Cb.

]


89

I Adagio (

13 = )

I II

Fl.

dim. possibile

I II

Ob.

Cl. (A) I II dim. possibile a2

I II

Fg.

dim. al piano tranquillo 3 marc.

I II Cor. (F)

Leseprobe cresc. molto

III IV

dim. sempre

gest.

3

cresc. molto

Tr. (F) I II

a2

cresc. molto

I II cresc. molto

Tbn. III

cresc. molto

Timp. cresc. molto al

dim. molto al piano

dim. sempre

Adagio ( = ) I Vl. II

Sample page div.

Va.

div.

div.

Vc.

div.

Cb. dim. al piano


14 Fg.

K

Tempo I

96

I II

I II Cor. (F) III IV

[ ]

[nat.]

a 2 ten.

Tr. (F) I II

3

ten.

[ ] ten.

ten.

ten.

a 2 ten.

I II

3

Tbn.

ten.

III

Leseprobe ten.

ten.

3

( )

Timp.

Tempo I

I Vl.

dolce

II dolce

Va. dolce

Vc. dolce

Cb.

100

Fl.

I II

Ob.

I II

Fg.

I II

I II Cor. (F) III IV

I Solo espress.

Sample page

I Vl.

dolce

II pizz.

Va. pizz.

Vc. div. pizz.

Cb.

dolce


15 104

Fl.

I II

Ob.

I II

(I Solo)

I Solo

Cl. (A) I II

Fg.

più

espress.

I II

I II Cor. (F) III IV

Leseprobe

Timp.

morendo

Spitze

arco

div. a 3

Spitze arco

3

3

Spitze arco

3 3

3

Vc. 3

arco

Cb.

108

Ob.

I II

Cl. (A) I II

Fg.

(I Solo)

I II

I II Cor. (F) III IV

Timp.

(I Solo)

più

Sample page morendo

I Vl. II arco

Va.

Vc.

Cb.


16

II Allegro molto vivace I II

Flauto

I Solo

I II

Oboe

Clarinetto I II in B

I II

Fagotto

Leseprobe

I II Corno in F III IV

Tromba I in F II

I II Trombone III

Timpani

Sample page

Allegro molto vivace I Violino II

Viola

Violoncello

Contrabbasso

div.


12

Ob.

I II

17

A

(I Solo) 3

espress.

I Vl. II

Va.

Leseprobe

Vc. Cb.

I Solo

25

Ob.

poco rit.

a tempo

poco rit.

a tempo

I II

I Vl. II

Va. marc.

Vc.

Cb.

39

Ob.

I II

I Vl. II

Va.

Vc.

Cb.

(I Solo)

pizz.

Sample page

piĂš


18 50

B(

= )

segue

I poco

Vl.

a

poco

meno

piano segue

II poco

a

poco

Va.

Vc.

Leseprobe

Cb.

63

I Vl. II segue

Va. [ poco

a

poco

meno

piano]

Vc.

Cb.

75

Fg.

a2

I II

Sample page

Timp.

I Vl. II

Va.

Vc. arco

Cb.

meno

piano


19

C

88

Tr. (F) I II

cresc.

Tbn.

I II cresc.

( )

Timp.

I Vl.

Leseprobe

II

Va.

Vc.

Cb.

101

Fl.

I II

Ob.

I II

Cl. (B ) I II Fg.

a2

I II

al

Tbn.

I II al

Timp.

I Vl. II

Va. Vc.

Cb.

Sample page cresc. molto

Tr. (F) I II

cresc.

cresc.


20

D

116

Fl.

I II

Ob.

I II

Cl. (B ) I II I II Cor. (F)

sempre

III IV

Leseprobe sempre

( )

Timp. morendo

I Vl. II

Va.

Vc. Cb. assai

134

I Solo

I II

Ob.

I II Cor. (F) III IV

Timp.

poco rit.

sempre

Sample page

dim.

sempre

sempre

I Vl. II

Va.

Vc.

Cb. dim.

morendo

dim.

poco rit.


21 150

I II

Ob.

a tempo

E

(I Solo)

I II Cor. (F) III IV

a tempo [

]

I Vl.

Leseprobe

II

Va.

Vc.

pizz.

Cb.

Tranquillo

a tempo

161

Fl.

I II

Ob.

I II

Fg.

I II I II

Cor. (F) III IV

3

Sample page Tranquillo

I Vl.

a tempo

II

Va.

pizz.

Vc.

Cb.

pizz.

arco

pizz.

arco


22

F

172

Fl.

I II

Tranquillo

3

I Solo

Ob.

I II

Fg.

I II

I II Cor. (F) III IV

Tranquillo

Leseprobe

I Vl. II

pizz.

Va.

pizz.

pizz.

Vc. (pizz.)

Cb.

Fl.

G

a tempo

183

I II I Solo

Cl. (B ) I II Fg.

I II

I II Cor. (F)

Sample page

III IV Timp.

a tempo I

......

Vl. II

...... arco

[ ] Va.

...... arco

[ ]

...... arco

Vc. arco

Cb.


194

Ob.

23

I Solo 3

I II

[ ] [

]

I Vl.

arco

pizz.

II pi첫

[

Va.

pizz.

Vc. pizz.

Cb.

Leseprobe pi첫

pi첫

206

Ob.

I II

(I Solo)

espress.

I Vl. II

Va.

arco

espress.

Vc. [

(pizz.)

]

Cb.

218

Ob.

I II

I Vl. II

Va.

Vc.

Cb.

Sample page H

poco rit.

a tempo

poco rit.

a tempo

(I Solo)

pi첫

]


24 229

Ob.

(I Solo)

I II

I Vl. II

Va.

Leseprobe

Vc.

(pizz.)

Cb.

240

I

I dolce

Vl. II

div.

Va.

Vc.

Sample page

Cb.

248

I Vl. II

div.

cresc.

Va. cresc. div.

Vc.

Cb.


260

K

Doppio piĂš lento ( = )

25

I Solo

I II

Ob.

Cl. (B ) I II

Timp.

Doppio piĂš lento ( = ) I Vl. II

Leseprobe sempre

Va.

3

div.

Vc.

3

sempre 3 div. arco

Cb.

div. 3

unis.

3

sempre

270

a2

I II

Ob.

Cl. (B ) I II

I II

Fg.

poco cresc.

gest.

I II Cor. (F)

Sample page gest.

III IV

( )

Timp.

dim. assai

div.

I Vl. II 3

Va. unis.

Vc.

Cb.

[ ]

poco cresc.

poco cresc.


26 280

*

I II

Fg.

ma

poco cresc.

I II Cor. (F)

poco cresc.

III IV poco cresc.

( )

Timp. marc.

I

Leseprobe

Vl.

cresc.

II

marc.

Va.

[ ]

marc.

Vc.

cresc.

Cb.

L

289

I II

Fg.

a2

dim.

I II cresc.

Cor. (F) III IV

cresc.

Tr. (F) I II

Tbn.

I II III

Timp.

a2

Sample page

I Vl. II Va.

Vc. div.

3

3

Cb. dim.

* See the Critical Remarks.

poco

a


27 298

Fl.

I II

Cl. (B ) I II

Fg.

(a 2)

I II

Timp. poco

dim.

I

a

poco

Leseprobe poco

Vl. II

Va.

poco div. 3

Vc.

3

poco

dim.

a

poco

Cb. poco

307

Fl.

I II [

Ob.

]

I II poco

Cl. (B ) I II poco

Fg.

I II

Sample page [

( )

Timp.

div.

I Vl.

poco

II

div. 3

3

Va. dim.

Vc.

Cb.

poco

a

poco

]

unis.


28

M

316

I II

Fl.

poco a2

I II

Ob.

poco a2

Cl. (B ) I II

poco a2

I II

Fg.

I II

Leseprobe poco

gest.

Cor. (F)

poco a poco cresc.

III IV

]

[

gest.

poco a poco cresc.

cresc.

cresc.

Tr. (F) I II I II Tbn. III

( )

Timp.

I Vl. II

Sample page

Va.

cresc.

cresc.

Vc.

Cb. poco a poco cresc.

cresc.


29 325

Fl.

I II

Ob.

I II

(a 2)

[

]

Cl. (B ) I II (a 2)

I II

Fg.

Leseprobe cresc.

I II

cresc. poco a cresc. poco a

Cor. (F)

poco poco

III IV

Tr. (F) I II

I II Tbn. III

Timp.

Sample page poco

I Vl. II

Va. cresc.

Vc.

Cb. cresc.

a

poco

cresc.

al


30 333

I II

Fl.

dim. a2

I II

Ob.

a2

Cl. (B ) I II

Leseprobe

I II

Fg.

[

I II Cor. (F)

dim.

molto

dim.

molto

dim.

]

III IV

Tr. (F) I II poco cresc. al

dim.

molto

poco cresc. al

dim.

molto

poco cresc. al

dim.

molto

I II Tbn. III

( )

Timp.

Sample page dim.

I Vl. II

Va.

Vc.

Cb.

molto


31 341

dim.

I II

Fl.

(a 2)

I II

Ob.

(a 2)

Cl. (B ) I II

a2

Leseprobe

I II

Fg.

I II Cor. (F) III IV

Tr. (F) I II

I II Tbn. III

( )

Timp.

I Vl.

Sample page

II dim.

Va.

sul G

Vc.

Cb.

marcato


32

III

Il tempo largo

I Solo

I II

Flauto

3

I II

Oboe

I Solo

Clarinetto I II in A I II

Fagotto

Corno in E

I II

Leseprobe

III IV

Tromba I in E II

Trombone

3

I II III

Timpani

Il tempo largo I Violino II

Viola div. con sord.

Violoncello

Contrabbasso

Sample page

(I Solo)

5

Fl.

I II

Cl. (A) I II

3

3

I Vl.

con sord.

II con sord.

Va.

Vc. 3

Cb. 3

dim.

I Solo


9

I II

33

A

Cor. (E) [

dolce

poco cresc.

]

III IV dolce

poco cresc.

3

I Vl. senza sord.

3

II senza sord.

Leseprobe

Va.

senza sord.

Vc. Cb.

15

Fl.

3

div.

a2

I II

Cl. (A) I II Fg.

I Solo

I II

I II Cor. (E) III IV Tr. (E) I II

Tbn.

I II III

Timp.

a2

Sample page 3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

I Vl. II

Va.

Vc. Cb. 3

3


34 20

I Solo

Cl. (A) I II

B

I Fg. II

con sord.

I Vl.

Leseprobe

II

con sord.

Va.

con sord.

Vc.

Cb.

28

Fl.

I II

I Solo

3

Ob.

I II

Cl. (A) I II

I Solo

I Solo

Fg.

I II

Timp.

I Vl. II

Va.

Vc.

Cb.

3

Sample page

con sord.


35

dolce

32

Fl.

Ob.

C

(I Solo)

I II

3

3

I II dolce I Solo

Cl. (A) I II

II 3

(I Solo)

Fg.

I II

poco cresc. ( )

Timp.

I Vl. II

dolce dim.

3

3

Leseprobe

Va. Vc. Cb.

36

Ob.

I II II

Cl. (A) I II

Sample page

(I Solo)

Fg.

I II

II

tremolo

I Vl.

tremolo

II

tremolo

div.

Va.

senza sord. cantabile

Vc. poco

Cb.

tremolo


36

D

41

Ob.

I II

Cl. (A) I II Fg.

I II

Cor. (E) I II senza sord.

I

Leseprobe

Vl. II

senza sord.

senza sord.

poco

Va.

senza sord. poco

espress.

Vc. dim.

Cb.

I Solo

47

Ob.

I II

espress.

Cl. (A) I II

I Vl. II unis.

Sample page

espress.

div.

Va.

1 Vc. Solo dolce

Vc. [altri]

div.

Cb.

[unis.]


37 54

I Solo

Cl. (A) I II

espress.

I poco

Vl. II

unis.

Va. poco Tutti

Vc.

Leseprobe

poco

pizz.

Cb.

58

Ob.

I Solo

I II

3

(I Solo)

Cl. (A) I II 3

Fg.

I Solo

I II

3

I Vl. II

Va. Vc.

61

Ob.

I II

Cl. (A) I II Fg.

I II

Sample page

(I Solo)

3

ten.

(I Solo)

3

3

(I Solo)

3

3

[

]

I Vl. II un poco cresc.

Va.

Vc.

3


38

E

64

Ob.

I II

Timp. I Vl. II

Va.

Leseprobe

Vc.

arco

Cb.

67

Ob.

I II [

]

Cl. (A) I II

Fg.

cresc.

I II

I II Cor. (E) III IV Tr. (E) I II

Tbn.

I II III

a2

Sample page

( )

Timp.

I cresc.

Vl. II

cresc.

Va. [

]

cresc.

[

]

cresc.

Vc. div.

Cb.

pizz.

arco


39 73

Fl.

F

I

I II

Cl. (A) I II

Fg.

I II

Cor. (E) I II Timp.

Leseprobe con sord.

I

3

Vl.

dim.

3

con sord.

II

3

con sord.

Va.

dim.

3

3

3

dim. espress.

Vc. Cb.

77

Fl.

I II

I Solo 3

I Solo

Cl. (A) I II

Fg.

I II

3

Sample page dim.

I II Cor. (E) III IV

dim.

dim.

3

I Vl. 3

II 3

Va. espress.

Vc.

Cb.


40 81

Fl.

I II

Ob.

I II

G

poco

dim.

I Cl. (A) II

I II

Fg.

Leseprobe a2

sempre

I II

sempre

Cor. (E) III IV

sempre a2

Tr. (E) I II

poco

I poco [ ]

Tbn.

II [ ]

III [

]

poco

Timp.

Sample page senza sord.

I Vl.

senza sord.

II

senza sord.

Va. sempre

Vc. div.

Cb.

marc.

[unis.]


41 I Solo

88

Fl.

3

3

I II

[

] 3

3

I Cl. (A) II

I Fg.

Leseprobe

II

gest. a 2

I II Cor. (E)

dim.

a2

nat.

III IV

dim. gest. 3

3

I Vl. II

Va.

Vc. Cb.

95

I II Cor. (E) III IV

Sample page

(a 2)

(a 2)

I Vl.

dim. 3

3

II dim.

Va. [dim.] 3

3

Vc. pizz. 3

Cb.

3

arco


42 Allegro Flauto

I II

Oboe

I II

IV

Clarinetto I in A II I II

Fagotto

Corno in E

I II

Leseprobe

III IV

Tromba I in E II

Trombone

I II III

Timpani Campanelli

Allegro I Violino II

Viola

Violoncello

Contrabbasso

9

I

Sample page A

Vl. div.

II

Va.

Vc.

Cb.


Fl.

I II marc.

Cl. (A) I II Fg.

43

marc.

19

I II

Cor. (E) I II marc. 3

marc. 3

Timp. C-lli

Leseprobe

dolce

div.

I Vl.

unis. 3

7

II

pizz.

Va.

arco

3

3

pizz. div.

div. arco

Vc. pizz.

Cb.

26

Fl.

dim.

I II

Cl. (A) I II Fg.

I II

I II Cor. (E) III IV

Sample page

( )

Timp.

I Vl.

3

II

Va. Vc. Cb.

mutano in F

gest.

mutano in F

gest.


44 32

Cl. (A) I II I II Cor. (F) III IV ( )

Timp. 1 Vl. Solo

I Vl. II Va. 1 Vc. Solo

Vc.

Leseprobe

affettuoso

ten.

ten.

(pizz.)

Cb.

40

Cl. (A) I II poco cresc.

Fg.

I II

poco cresc.

I II Cor. (F) III IV ( )

Timp.

I

poco cresc.

III

poco cresc.

Sample page poco a poco cresc.

(Solo) ten.

I Vl.

ten.

Tutti

cresc.

II cresc.

Va. cresc.

Vc.

Tutti div.

poco a poco cresc.

poco a poco cresc.

Cb.


a2

I II

Fl.

6

a2

I II

Ob.

45

B

46

6

a2

Cl. (A) I II

6

I II

Fg.

I II

Cor. (F) III IV

(I)

mutano in E

nat.

3

(III)

mutano in E

nat.

3

(

Leseprobe

)

Timp.

3

C-lli I Vl. II

Va. div.

pizz.

Vc. 3

(pizz.)

arco

Cb.

52

I II

Fl.

3

6

Cl. (A) I II dim. molto

I II

Fg.

Sample page 6

mutano in F

6

I II Cor. (E)

dim.

6

III IV

mutano in F

Timp. poco

I

3

7

3

3

3

3

Vl. II 7

div. pizz.

Va.

arco

7

arco

Vc. pizz.

Cb.

arco sempre


46 59

Cl. (A) I II poco marc.

I Vl. II

Va. poco marc.

Vc.

Cb.

69

Leseprobe

I sempre

Vl. II

sempre

Va. sempre

Vc. sempre

Cb. sempre

77

Fl.

I II

Sample page C

I Solo

Ob.

I II

I Vl. II

Va.

Vc.

Cb.


47 84

Fl.

I II

Ob.

I II

I Solo

gest.

I II Cor. (F)

gest.

III IV

poco cresc.

poco cresc.

Timp.

Leseprobe

C-lli I Vl. II Va. Vc.

div.

Cb.

91

Fl.

I II

Ob.

I II

(I Solo)

I Solo

Cl. (A) I II

I II Cor. (F) III IV

3

Sample page mutano in E

mutano in E

( )

Timp. C-lli

poco marc.

I Vl.

poco marc.

II poco marc.

Va. Vc. Cb.


48 97

Fl.

a2

I II

poco cresc.

Cl. (A) I II Fg.

a2

I II

gest. a 4

Cor. I−IV (E)

poco cresc.

poco cresc.

( )

marc.

Timp. C-lli

Leseprobe

I Vl. II

Va.

3

3

Vc. Cb.

103

Fl.

I II

Ob.

I II

D(a 2) 3 poco

I Solo dim. assai

3

Cl. (A) I II Fg.

I II

Cor. I−IV (E)

(a 2)

(a 4)

3

Sample page poco

marc.

dim.

marc.

Timp. C-lli

marc.

I

3

3

7

Vl. marc.

II

Va.

3

marc. 3

7

7

Vc. [ ]

Cb.


49 110

Ob.

(I Solo)

I II

I II Cor. (E)

(a 2)

nat.

mutano in F

(a 2)

nat.

mutano in F

III IV

I Vl. II 1 Va. Sola

Leseprobe 3

Va.

div.

poco cresc.

Vc. sempre

[ ]

Cb.

E

116

Ob.

I II

I II Cor. (F) III IV

Sample page

Spitze

I

poco cresc.

Vl.

Spitze

II

poco cresc. (Sola)

Va.

Altre

unis.

Vc. sempre

Cb. sempre

I Solo

marc.


50

a2

122

Fl.

I II

Ob.

I II

Fg.

I II

(I Solo)

I Solo

I II Cor. (F) III IV

3

marc.

Timp. 3

I Vl. II Tutte

Va.

III

Leseprobe marc. 3

marc.

marc. 3

marc. 3

3

Vc. Cb.

a2

(a 2)

127

Fl.

I II 18

Cl. (A) I II Fg.

I II

I II Cor. (F) III IV Timp.

I Solo

Sample page marc. 3

marc.

marc. 3

marc. 3

I Vl.

3

II

Va. Vc.

Cb.


Dies ist eine Leseprobe. Nicht alle Seiten werden angezeigt. Haben wir Ihr Interesse geweckt? Bestellungen nehmen wir gern Ăźber den Musikalienund Buchhandel oder unseren Webshop entgegen.

This is an excerpt. Not all pages are displayed. Have we sparked your interest? We gladly accept orders via music and book stores or through our webshop.


Profile for Breitkopf & Härtel

SON 635 – Sibelius, Sämtliche Werke, Serie I, Bd. 5  

SON 635 – Sibelius, Sämtliche Werke, Serie I, Bd. 5  

Profile for breitkopf