Page 1


JEAN SIBELIUS Complete Works Published by The National Library of Finland and The Sibelius Society of Finland

Series VII Works for Choir Volume 3

Sämtliche Werke Herausgegeben von der Finnischen Nationalbibliothek und der Sibelius-Gesellschaft Finnland

Serie VII Chorwerke Band 3


JEAN SIBELIUS

Works for Choir and Orchestra

Werke fĂźr Chor und Orchester

Opp. 19, 28, 29, 30 edited by / herausgegeben von

Sakari Ylivuori

2019


Contents / Inhalt Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . VI Vorwort . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . VII Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . VIII Einleitung . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . XVI Opus 19 Impromptu [1902] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Impromptu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1 41

Opus 28 Sandels [1898] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sandels. Improvisation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

93 161

Opus 29 Snöfrid. Improvisation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

231

Opus 30 Islossningen i Uleå älv. Improvisation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

301

Appendix Impromptu [Op. 19/1902]: Reconstruction of bb. 102–120 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

337

Facsimiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 340 Critical Commentary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 348


VI

Preface Preface

In the critical edition Jean Sibelius Works (JSW) all the surviving works of Jean Sibelius, including early versions and his own arrangements, are published for the first time. Some of the earlier editions have run out of print, some works – even some of the central ones – have never been published, and many of the published editions are not entirely unquestionable or reliable. Thus, the aim of the present edition is to provide an overview of Sibelius’s œuvre in its entirety, through musical texts based on a thorough study of all known sources, and prepared in accordance with modern editorial and text-critical principles. The edition serves to illuminate various aspects of the works’ sources and history, as well as Sibelius’s notational practices. It is intended for both scholarly use and performances. The Jean Sibelius Works is divided into nine series: Series I: Orchestral Works Series II: Works for Violin (Cello) and Orchestra Series III: Works for String Orchestra and Wind Orchestra Series IV: Chamber Music Series V: Works for Piano Series VI: Works for the Stage and Melodramas Series VII: Choral Works Series VIII: Works for Solo Voice Series IX: Varia Each volume includes an introduction, which sheds light on the genesis, first performances, early reception, publication process and possible revisions of each work; it also offers other information on the works in their historical context. Significant references to the compositions in the biographical sources and the literature, such as those concerning dates of composition and revisions, as well as Sibelius’s statements concerning his works and performance issues, are examined and discussed on the basis of the original sources and in their original context. In the Critical Commentary, all relevant sources are described and evaluated, and specific editorial principles and problems of the volume in relation to the source situation of each work are explained. The Critical Remarks illustrate the different readings between the sources and contain explanations of and justifications for editorial decisions and emendations. A large body of Sibelius’s autograph musical manuscripts has survived. Because of the high number of sketches and drafts for certain works, however, it would not be possible to include all the materials in the JSW volumes. Those musical manuscripts – sketches, drafts, and composition fragments, as well as passages crossed out or otherwise deleted in autograph scores – which are relevant from the point of view of the edition, illustrate central features in the compositional process or open up new perspectives on the work, are included as facsimiles or appendices. Sibelius’s published works typically were a result of a goal-oriented process, where the printed score basically was intended as Fassung letzter Hand. However, the composer sometimes made, suggested, or planned alterations to his works after publication, and occasionally minor revisions were also included in the later printings. What also makes the question about Sibelius’s “final intention” vis-à-vis the printed editions complicated is that he obviously was not always a very willing, scrupulous and systematic proofreader of his works. As a result, the first editions, even though basically prepared under his supervision, very often contain copy-

ists’ and engravers’ errors, misinterpretations, inaccuracies and misleading generalizations, as well as changes made according to the standards of the publishing houses. In comparison with the autograph sources, the first editions may also include changes which the composer made during the publication process. The contemporary editions of Sibelius’s works normally correspond to the composer’s intentions in the main features, such as pitches, rhythms, and tempo indications, but they are far less reliable in details concerning dynamics, articulation, and the like. Thus, if several sources for a work have survived, a single source alone can seldom be regarded as reliable or decisive in every respect. JSW aims to publish Sibelius’s works as thoroughly re-examined musical texts, and to decipher ambiguous, questionable and controversial readings in the primary sources. Those specifics which are regarded as copyists’ and engravers’ mistakes, as well as other unauthorized additions, omissions and changes, are amended. The musical texts are edited to conform to Sibelius’s – sometimes idiosyncratic – notation and intentions, which are best illustrated in his autographs. Although retaining the composer’s notational practice is the basic guideline in the JSW edition, some standardization of, for instance, stem directions and vertical placement of articulation marks is carried out in the JSW scores. If any standardization is judged as compromising or risking the intentions manifested in Sibelius’s autograph sources, the composer’s original notation is followed as closely as possible in the edition. In the JSW the following principles are applied: – Opus numbers and JS numbers of works without opus number, as well as work titles, basically conform to those given in Fabian Dahlström’s Jean Sibelius. Thematisch-bibliographisches Verzeichnis seiner Werke (Wiesbaden: Breitkopf & Härtel, 2003). – Instruments and vocal parts are designated by their Italian names. – Repetitions indicated with the symbol [ and passages annotated with instructions such as col Violino I are written out. – Unpitched percussion instruments are notated on a single line each. – As a rule, only the text to which Sibelius composed or arranged a vocal work is printed in the score. Modern Swedish (as well as German) orthography was established during Sibelius’s lifetime, in the early twentieth century. Therefore, the general orthography of the texts is modernized, a decision that most profoundly affects the Swedish language (resulting in spellings such as vem, säv, or havet instead of hvem, säf, hafvet), but to some degree also texts in Finnish and German. Other types of notational features and emendations are specified case by case in the Critical Commentary of each volume. Editorial additions and emendations not directly based on primary sources are shown in the scores by square brackets, broken lines (in the case of ties and slurs), and/or footnotes. Since the editorial procedures are dependent on the source situation of each work, the specific editorial principles and questions are discussed in each volume. Possible additions and corrections to the volumes will be reported on the publisher’s website. Helsinki, Spring 2008

Timo Virtanen Editorial Board


Vorwort Vorwort In der textkritischen Ausgabe Jean Sibelius Werke (JSW) werden erstmals alle überlieferten Kompositionen von Jean Sibelius einschließlich der Frühfassungen und eigener Bearbeitungen veröffentlicht. Da einige ältere Ausgaben vergriffen sind, einige, darunter auch zentrale Werke, nie gedruckt wurden und viele Editionen nicht ganz unumstritten und zuverlässig sind, verfolgt die Ausgabe das Ziel, Sibelius’ Œuvre in seiner Gesamtheit vorzulegen – und dies mit einem Notentext, der auf einer sorgfältigen Auswertung aller bekannten Quellen basiert und auf der Grundlage moderner textkritischer Editionsprinzipien entstanden ist. Die Ausgabe geht dabei auf verschiedene Fragen zu Quellenlage, Werkgeschichte und zu Sibelius’ Notationspraxis ein. Sie soll gleichzeitig der Forschung wie der Musikpraxis dienen. Die Ausgabe Jean Sibelius Werke gliedert sich in neun Serien: Serie I Orchesterwerke Serie II Werke für Violine (Violoncello) und Orchester Serie III Werke für Streichorchester und Blasorchester Serie IV Kammermusik Serie V Klavierwerke Serie VI Szenische Werke und Melodramen Serie VII Chorwerke Serie VIII Werke für Singstimme Serie IX Varia Jeder Band enthält eine Einleitung, die zu jedem Werk über Entstehung, erste Aufführungen und frühe Rezeption, Veröffentlichungsgeschichte und eventuelle Überarbeitungen berichtet. Darüber hinaus stellt die Einleitung die Werke in ihren historischen Kontext. Biographisches Material und weitere Literatur, die z. B. für die Datierung der Komposition und späterer Revisionen wesentlich ist, sowie Sibelius’ eigene Aussagen zu seinen Werken und zu den jeweiligen Aufführungen werden in der Einleitung auf der Grundlage der Originalquellen und in ihrem ursprünglichen Kontext geprüft und bewertet. Der Critical Commentary beschreibt und bewertet alle wesentlichen Quellen. Er erläutert darüber hinaus besondere Editionsprinzipien und Fragestellungen des jeweiligen Bandes in Bezug auf die Quellenlage jedes Werks. Die Critical Remarks stellen die unterschiedlichen Lesarten der Quellen dar; sie enthalten Erklärungen und Begründungen der editorischen Entscheidungen und Eingriffe. Sibelius’ Notenhandschriften sind in großem Umfang erhalten. Weil die Zahl an Skizzen und Entwürfen für einige Werke hoch ist, ist die vollständige Aufnahme des gesamten Materials in die JSW-Bände nicht möglich. Soweit es aus editorischer Sicht relevant erscheint, den Kompositionsprozess erläutert oder neue Einsichten in ein Werk vermittelt, werden Skizzen, Entwürfe, Fragmente sowie im Autograph gestrichene oder anderweitig verworfene Passagen als Faksimiles oder in den Anhang aufgenommen. Sibelius’ veröffentlichte Werke waren üblicherweise das Ergebnis eines zielgerichteten Prozesses, bei dem die gedruckte Partitur grundsätzlich als Fassung letzter Hand gelten sollte. Dennoch änderte der Komponist bisweilen seine Werke nach der Drucklegung, regte Retuschen an oder plante diese, und gelegentlich wurden in späteren Auflagen auch kleinere Revisionen berücksichtigt. Die Frage, inwieweit die gedruckten Ausgaben Sibelius’ „endgültige Intention“ wiedergeben, ist nicht eindeutig zu klären, da Sibelius offensichtlich nicht immer ein bereitwilliger, gewissenhafter und systematischer Korrekturleser seiner eigenen Werke war. Infolgedessen enthalten die Erstausgaben, wenngleich sie im Wesentlichen unter seiner Aufsicht entstanden, sehr oft Fehler, Missverständnisse, Ungenauigkeiten und

VII

irreführende Vereinheitlichungen, die auf Kopisten und Stecher zurückgehen, sowie Abweichungen aufgrund der jeweiligen Verlagsgepflogenheiten. Im Vergleich mit den Autographen können die Erstausgaben auch Änderungen enthalten, die der Komponist erst während der Druckvorbereitungen vornahm. Die Editionen zu Sibelius’ Lebzeiten folgen in der Regel der Absicht des Komponisten, was Hauptmerkmale wie Tonhöhe, Rhythmus und Tempoangaben betrifft, bei Dynamik, Artikulation etc. sind sie jedoch in Details weitaus weniger zuverlässig. Folglich kann eine einzige Quelle selten als unter jedem Aspekt verlässlich oder ausschlaggebend gelten, wenn für ein Werk mehrere Quellen überliefert sind. Die JSW zielt darauf ab, Sibelius’ Werke in gründlich geprüften Notentexten zu veröffentlichen und vieldeutige, fragliche und widersprüchliche Lesarten der Primärquellen zu entschlüsseln. Fehler von Kopisten und Stechern sowie andere nicht autorisierte Zusätze, Auslassungen und Änderungen werden berichtigt. Die Edition der Notentexte folgt der – manchmal eigentümlichen – Notation und Intention des Komponisten, so wie sie am unmittelbarsten aus seinen Autographen hervorgehen. Wenngleich die Notationspraxis des Komponisten die grundlegende Richtschnur der JSW ist, wird diese in einigen Punkten, zum Beispiel bei der Ausrichtung der Notenhälse und der Platzierung der Artikulationszeichen, vereinheitlicht. Wenn eine solche Standardisierung jedoch Sibelius’ Absicht zu widersprechen scheint, dann hält sich die Edition so eng wie möglich an die Notation des Komponisten. Für die Jean Sibelius Werke gelten folgende Richtlinien: – Die Opuszahlen und die JS-Nummerierungen der Werke ohne Opuszahl sowie Werktitel entsprechen grundsätzlich den Angaben in Fabian Dahlströms Jean Sibelius. Thematisch-bibliographisches Verzeichnis seiner Werke (Wiesbaden: Breitkopf & Härtel, 2003). – Instrumente und Vokalstimmen sind mit italienischen Namen bezeichnet. – Abbreviaturen mit dem Zeichen [ und Stellen mit Anweisungen wie col Violino I sind ausgeschrieben. – Schlaginstrumente ohne bestimmte Tonhöhe sind auf einer Notenlinie notiert. – In der Regel ist bei Vokalwerken nur der Text wiedergegeben, den Sibelius vertont bzw. bearbeitet hat. Die neue schwedische (ebenso wie die neuere deutsche) Orthographie wurde im frühen 20. Jahrhundert, also zu Sibelius’ Lebzeiten, eingeführt. Die Orthographie der Texte ist daher modernisiert. Diese Entscheidung betrifft vor allem die schwedische Sprache (Schreibweisen wie vem, säv oder havet statt hvem, säf, hafvet), sie wirkt sich aber zuweilen auch auf finnische oder deutsche Texte aus. Andere Notationseigenheiten und Eingriffe sind von Fall zu Fall im Critical Commentary beschrieben. Editorische Ergänzungen und Korrekturen, die nicht direkt auf Primärquellen zurückgehen, werden in den Partituren durch eckige Klammern, Strichelung (im Falle von Halte- und Bindebögen) und/oder Fußnoten gekennzeichnet. Da das editorische Prozedere von der Quellensituation jedes einzelnen Werks abhängt, werden spezielle Editionsprinzipien und -fragen in jedem Band eigens erörtert. Mögliche Ergänzungen und Korrekturen der Bände werden auf der Website des Verlages aufgeführt.

Helsinki, Frühling 2008

Timo Virtanen Editionsleitung


VIII

Introduction The seventh series of Jean Sibelius Works ( JSW) consists of more than 100 choral works, including both a cappella and accompanied works for mixed choir, male choir, and female choir, as well as for different formations of children’s choir. The present volume ( JSW VII/3) contains four works for choir and orchestra that were composed and premiered at the turn of the 20th century. The works in the volume are arranged according to their opus numbers, though this does not fully reflect their chronology: Impromptu (Op. 19) for female choir and orchestra, composed and premiered in 1902; Sandels (Op. 28) for male choir and orchestra, composed in 1898 and premiered in 1900; Snöfrid (Op. 29) for reciter, mixed choir, and orchestra, composed and premiered in 1900; and Islossningen i Uleå älv (Op. 30) for reciter, male choir, and orchestra, composed and premiered in 1899. Sibelius planned to revise all of these four works, but he only revised Impromptu in 1910 and Sandels in 1915. Both versions of these two works appear in the present volume. On the background of the poems The four works in the present volume are settings of poems by three different authors who wrote in Swedish. Viktor Rydberg (1828–1895) was a Swedish writer whose collected works, Skrifter af Viktor Rydberg, appeared in 14 volumes soon after his death. The first volume of his collected works, Dikter (Poems), was published in 1899.1 Sibelius’s own copy of the 1899 edition (currently in Sibelius’s home, Ainola) has many markings in Sibelius’s hand. For instance, the excerpt of Rydberg’s extensive poem Lifslust och lifsleda (Zest and Weariness of Life), which Sibelius set to music in 1902 and named Impromptu (Op. 19), appears highlighted in pencil. Sibelius also planned to set another passage of Lifslust och lifsleda to music in 1915, but these plans were never realized (for details, see “The revised version” of Sandels, below). Dikter also contains the poem Snöfrid, which Sibelius set to music, albeit in a somewhat shortened form, in autumn 1900.2 Johan Ludvig Runeberg (1804–1877) achieved the status of Finland’s national poet during his lifetime. Sibelius set many of Runeberg’s poems to music throughout his career. Sandels was part of his epic poem Fänrik Ståls sägner (Tales of Ensign Stål) published in 1848.3 The poem, which Sibelius set to music in 1898, describes the battle of Koljonvirta fought on 27 October 1808 as a part of the Russo-Swedish War, also known as the Finnish War (1808–1809). Although the poem depicts a real battle and its main character has a real-life model in Johan August Sandels (1764–1831), the storyline is mainly fictional.4 Zacharias Topelius (1818–1898) was a Finnish author and historian who worked as a journalist for Helsing fors Tidningar in 1840–1860.5 Topelius first published many of his poems, including Islossningen i Uleå elf (The Breaking of the Ice on the Oulu River), in the newspaper, and included them in his poem collections later. He wrote and published Islossningen i Uleå elf in the context of the end of the Crimean War in 1856. The peace treaty was celebrated in Finland on 29 April, which was also Emperor Alexander II’s birthday. Helsing fors Tidningar described the celebrations the following day. The paper also published Topelius’s Islossningen i Uleå elf, adding the subtitle Naturtafl a (Nature painting), for example, to avoid censorship of this patriotic allegory of a river proclaiming its desire to create its own future and break free of the ice.6 Topelius made revisions to the poem later. Sibelius’s setting is based on the version published in 1888 as part of the poetry collection Sånger I, Ljungblommor. Impromptu (Op. 19) The first version On 8 March 1902, Sibelius conducted a profile concert in Helsinki with a program consisting solely of premieres. The concert began

with Overture in A minor ( JS 144), which was followed by Impromptu (Op. 19). The concluding main work was the Second Symphony (Op. 43), which naturally attracted the most attention both in the advance advertising as well as in the newspaper reviews in the days that followed. It has been assumed that Sibelius composed both Overture and Impromptu specifically for this concert, possibly during the short amount of time between the completion of the Symphony in January and the profile concert at the beginning of March.7 Although very little documentation of the compositional process has survived, the appearance of Impromptu’s two main thematic elements in his earlier sketches upholds the possibility that Sibelius created the work rather quickly, as it was based on his earlier ideas.8 Impromptu’s first theme (Vl. I and Vc. from b. 5 on) appears in a sketch that Sibelius dated Berlin, 22 January 1901. In addition to the date, he penciled the words “memento mori” beside the melodic sketch. It is unlikely that the melody was intended for Impromptu at the time, although the perishable nature of life does constitute its subject matter. In all likelihood, he wrote the sketch as a melodic idea for later use.9 Sibelius composed the recurrent dance-like melody appearing in the wind instruments (for the first time from rehearsal letter E on) almost ten years before Impromptu. It appears in the second movement of an incomplete G-minor String Trio ( JS 210), which probably dates from the mid-1890s.10 Unlike in Impromptu, it only appears in minor mode in the trio. Additionally, the melody appearing in Impromptu in bb. 185–188 (and bb. 189–192) somewhat resembles the first melody of the third movement in the String Trio. Despite the circumstantial evidence suggesting that Impromptu was composed just before the premiere concert that took place on 8 March 1902, the dating remains uncertain. The concert premiering Impromptu was highly successful. Because of the great demand for tickets the program was performed three times altogether, twice in the Solemnity Hall of Helsinki University (10 and 14 March) and once in Palokunnantalo (the Festival Hall of the Volunteer Fire Brigade, 16 March).11 The audience demanded Impromptu to be repeated in each concert, and most of the newspaper reviews mentioned the work favorably. The composer and critic Oskar Merikanto (1868–1924) wrote in Päivälehti after the first concert: “The choral part was very beautiful and the soft accompaniment by the orchestra and harp, as well as the occasional plucking of the castanets, gave the work some southern charm.” Merikanto concluded his review with a prediction: “Without a doubt this work will become a very popular number with a piano accompaniment.”12 The only exception among the otherwise positive reviews was that of Evert Katila (1872–1945) in Uusi Suometar: he considered both Overture and Impromptu “merely a sideshow in the concert.” He wrote: “Impromptu for female choir and orchestra is quite entertaining, although it does not show any particular immersion in the spirit of Rydberg’s poem. The orchestral accompaniment is based on rather characteristic motives and is colored in a way that caresses the ear, but the declamatory handling of the choral part does not correspond to the dithyrambic nature of the text.”13 Following the premiere concerts in Helsinki, Impromptu was performed five times in different cities in Finland: Vaasa (April 1902), Turku (December 1902), Tampere (April 1903), and Viipuri (April 1904 and 1905).14 Despite the favorable reviews after each performance, the work then disappeared from the repertoire and remained unpublished during Sibelius’s lifetime – only the choral score was printed as a facsimile edition.15 The orchestral score in the present volume is the first edition of the first version of Impromptu.


IX The revised version In February 1910, Sibelius compiled in his diary a list of his earlier works that should be revised. The very first item on the list was Impromptu.16 He did not revise all the works on the list, but he immediately began working on Impromptu: he mentioned in a diary entry from 16 February having already begun the revision. He also mentioned his plans for Impromptu to the publisher Breitkopf & Härtel in a letter dated 15 February. The publisher replied that they were excited to hear about such plans.17 The revising of Impromptu was interrupted by another project, however, as Sibelius decided to revise In memoriam (Op. 59) as well, although he had not included it in the above-mentioned list. Having completed his revision of In memoriam he returned to Impromptu, which he finished in mid-April.18 Sibelius’s revision of Impromptu was thorough. He reduced the instrumentation by omitting the trumpets and most of the percussion – including the castanets specifically mentioned in the reviews of the first version. He also composed completely new music for the work: he took another excerpt that appeared later in Rydberg’s Lifslust och lifsleda and set it as an introduction (bb. 1–18). Sibelius also completely re-wrote the ending. Even in the passages in which he retained the original choral parts of the first version, he reworked the accompanying orchestral textures. Sibelius sent the fair copy of the revised Impromptu to Breitkopf & Härtel on 19 April. The shipment included both the orchestral score and the piano score. The piano score was not intended solely for rehearsal purposes, as Sibelius wrote in the cover letter: “The piano score is arranged in such a manner that it can be used in performances if orchestra is unavailable.”19 Sibelius had high hopes that the publication of Impromptu would provide him with much-needed income. About a week previously, at the beginning of April, he had – with the help of his friend and benefactor Axel Carpelan (1858–1919) – managed to renew his bill of exchange, but his need for money was still acute.20 The reply from Breitkopf & Härtel turned out to be disappointing. The offer was prefaced with a lengthy introduction, thus the publisher seems to have anticipated Sibelius’s unhappiness with it: “Regarding the past works we have had the pleasure of receiving from you, we have agreed to the fee you suggested without question. Today we ask you to abandon your stipulated sum, for a specific reason. Namely, a work for female choir with orchestra has no chance of being performed in Germany or in other countries. The few female choirs we have here are not able to pay for an orchestra for their performances and they limit themselves to works with piano accompaniment. In any case, the demand in this orchestration [i.e., female choir with orchestral accompaniment] is very low, although many fine, lovely works have been created in this genre.”21 After these opening words, Breitkopf & Härtel made an offer of 1,000 Rmk including both the orchestral and the piano score (1,000 copies each), instead of the 2,500 Rmk Sibelius requested.22 Sibelius reacted thus in his diary: “Today from B&H a very knocked-down offer. [I] must therefore ‘take stock’ again.”23 In spite of his disappointment, Sibelius eventually decided to accept the offer. Nine days later he wrote in his diary: “As I received only 1,000 Rmk from B&H, must I revert to ‘bread and butter’ once again. Songs?!” The publishing contract for Impromptu including both the piano and orchestral score was signed on 24 May 1910. 24 Preparations for the publication of the piano score began shortly thereafter. The production was delayed, however, as the German translation (by Julius Boruttau) of Rydberg’s poem took longer than expected. The proofs were sent to Sibelius on 17 October and the piano score was published in November 1910. In addition to the original Swedish poem and the above-mentioned German translation, the piano score also contains a text underlay in English by Rosa Newmarch.25 The first performance of the revised version of Impromptu was delayed for another one and a half years. It was eventually premiered on 29

March 1912 under the title Lifslust/Elämänhalu (Zest of Life), with Impromptu as the secondary title. Because no orchestral score had been published, Sibelius asked Breitkopf & Härtel to return his autograph score for the concert. The publisher complied with the request and sent the score as well as the hand-written orchestral parts. 26 The concert program included the Fourth Symphony (Op. 63) as the opening number, followed by Rakastava for string orchestra (Op. 14) and Scènes historiques II (Op. 66). The premiere of the revised Impromptu was the closing number. Sibelius conducted the concert himself. An anonymous critic reviewed it in Dagens Tidning the following day: “The performance of the symphony suffered somewhat from nervousness; by contrast, the orchestra distinguished itself – and its wind players in particular – in both suites [Op. 14 and Op. 66]; one was charmed by the excellent voices of the participating women in the choir composition. The composer himself as the conductor put his heart and soul into the execution of his works.”27 Impromptu was only briefly described in the reviews, the main focus being on the Fourth Symphony. The critics generally complimented Impromptu, but complained about the lack of rhythmical precision on the part of the choir. The audience’s response was nevertheless enthusiastic, and the composer was hailed by the celebrating crowd outside the concert hall. The program was repeated twice (on 30 March and 3 April 1912).28 The traces concerning the whereabouts of the autograph orchestral score disappear after the premiere: it seems that Sibelius never returned it to the publisher.29 Despite the publishing contract, Breitkopf & Härtel did not produce an engraved orchestral score. Until the present volume, which contains the first engraved orchestral score for Impromptu, the orchestral score in its entirety existed only in two contemporary manuscripts that were in foreign hands.30 Sibelius did not originally assign Impromptu the opus number 19: it appears in a catalogue from 1905 as Op. 34. The final opus number was assigned during the revision process in 1910, and Op. 19 appears in print for the first time in the piano score from that year.31 Sandels (Op. 28) The first version To celebrate the upcoming 20th anniversary of its first public performance, the Helsinki-based male choir Muntra Musikanter (Merry Musicians, MM) organized a composition competition during the spring of 1898. The competition was advertised in several newspapers around Finland in mid-January. Entries were to be submitted by 20 April at the latest, and the results would be announced on the anniversary day, 11 May 1898. The competition was open to new compositions for male choir either a cappella or with piano or orchestral accompaniment. It was specifically emphasized in the announcements that the submitted works should not touch on the ongoing Finnish-Swedish language dispute in Finland in any way.32 Sibelius travelled to Berlin with his wife Aino in February 1898. While he was there he set to music Johan Ludvig Runeberg’s Sandels and entered it in the MM competition using the pseudonym Homo. The exact dates when Sibelius completed and submitted Sandels remain unknown. He had sent the orchestral score to Finland before the deadline (20 April), which can be deduced from the correspondence between him and Aino. Jean stayed in Berlin until the end of May, whereas Aino returned to Finland at the beginning of April. In a letter dated 13 April, Jean asked Aino to make one change to the orchestral score of Sandels, which unequivocally indicates that the score was in Finland at that time. Sibelius sent another letter to Aino on 22 April, apologizing for asking her to make the change, because he wanted to make yet another one in the same passage of music. However, Aino replied in a letter dated on the same date (22 April) that she had, in fact, succeeded in making the change he had requested in his earlier letter.33 Sibelius, who was still in Berlin, was eager to hear about the results. He asked Aino to inform him by telegram as soon as they came in. He also wondered how much prize money he would get: “I wonder if


X Sandels will yield me anything. It should [give] something at least.”34 For unknown reasons, the results were not published on the anniversary date as planned, but came out more than two weeks later on 27 May 1898. One possible reason for the delay was that altogether 24 works under 17 pseudonyms had been submitted to the competition. According to Mikko Slöör, the jury had particularly complimented Sibelius’s beautiful orchestration, but some members of the jury had their doubts as to whether the choir’s role in Sandels was too small for it to be understood as choral music.35 However, Sandels won the first prize and Sibelius was awarded 700 Fmk.36 Sandels was premiered (by MM, Orchestra of the Philharmonic Society of Helsinki, cond. Gösta Sohlström) two years later in the Solemnity Hall of Helsinki University on 16 March 1900. The program consisting of both a cappella and accompanied works was repeated on 18 March in the festival hall of the Volunteer Fire Brigade (Palokunnantalo). Sibelius reported to Aino, who was staying in Lohja at the time and did not attend the concert, that the first performance was a success and he was called onto the stage after it.37 Surprisingly, the main focus in the reviews was not on Sibelius’s novel work but rather on the poor quality of the choir. The critics were merciless: “In brief: an unexpected fiasco” wrote Aftonposten. Other critics were not so brief, but dedicated several paragraphs of their reviews to running the choir down: “Yes, it is dead and dissolved, the MM choir!” concluded the critic in Nya Pressen, and Uusi Suometar agreed: “Sic transit gloria mundi!”38 Most critics described Sibelius’s composition using terms taken from the visual arts. For example, as the critic in Nya Pressen wrote: “‘Sandels’ is a tone painting, which without any hesitation we place at the forefront among all the compositions that Mr. Sibelius has created within the same genre. […] Without lapsing into painting details that would dissect the work into pieces, he has understood his subject epically, and yet in a dramatically vivid and lyrically effective way.”39 The same choir and orchestra performed Sandels in Seurahuone (Society House) two weeks later, on 31 March 1900, at a soirée organized to cover the cost of the orchestra’s planned trip to the World Exhibition in Paris in the summer of 1900.40 According to the critics, the quality of the performance was no better than at the premiere. An anonymous critic in Hufvudstadsbladet further complained on 1 April that the work would require three times as many singers as it had now, because it was impossible to hear anything from the undersized choir. Additionally, the audience did not have Runeberg’s text to hand, which – according to the critic – meant that it was practically impossible to follow the story in the performance.41 The audience was more favorable, however, and gave a huge round of applause. Sandels’s final chorus (from the rehearsal letter R) was performed as an encore. MM and Sibelius did not sign a publishing conctract for Sandels during the time of the competition or in the context of the premiere, and it eventually remained unpublished; only the choral part appeared in print. Sandels was performed in its first version during Sibelius’s lifetime only once (in 1908).42 The present volume is the first edition of the orchestral score. The revised version The plans to revise Sandels appear in Sibelius’s diary and correspondence from 1913 and 1914. Sibelius explained that the revision was needed because Sandels in its first version was “not plastic enough.”43 The revision plans materialized only when Muntra Musikanter was organizing a concert for Sibelius’s 50th birthday in December 1915, with an all-Sibelius program including Sandels. Sibelius and MM worked closely together in 1914–1915, as MM commissioned five works from Sibelius during those years: four a cappella works (currently known as Op. 84 Nos. 1–4) and one work for male choir and orchestra. Sibelius did not deliver the last-mentioned commission, but its history is intertwined with the revision of Sandels.

The new work for male choir and orchestra was commissioned in February 1915.44 Very little is known about it, although the working title Unge hellener, as it was referred to both in the correspondence regarding the commission and in Sibelius’s diary, suggests that Sibelius was planning to set to music an excerpt of Rydberg’s Lifslust och lifsleda, which also included the excerpt he set as Impromptu (Op. 19). Sibelius intensively sketched out the work in April and May, expressing frustration about the slow progress in several diary entries.45 He probably decided to change the text to be set on 21 May.46 The last diary entry that mentions working with the MM commission is from 21 June. MM contacted Sibelius on 19 July, expressing concern about whether the choir would own the copyright to Sandels, especially if Sibelius were to revise the work. The fact that no factual publishing contract was made in 1898 further complicated the copyright issue from MM’s point of view. The matter was resolved on 23 July: the choir used the sum of 1,200 Fmk, which was originally reserved for the commission of Unge hellener, to buy the publication rights for the revised version of Sandels, and the commission for the new work was dissolved.47 A confusing detail in the work’s revision history is Sibelius’s diary entry on the very day the publishing contract for Sandels was signed: “[I d]ecided not to revise Sandels. It shall become a document humain from 1898. More correctly [18]97.”48 This was, however, only a temporary moment of hesitation, as he completed the revision within a week. MM gave the Sibelius concert on 14 December 1915 according to the original plans, although Olof Wallin (1884–1920), the original planner and the one who organized the commissions, had resigned from his post as MM’s artistic director. The first section of the anniversary concert consisted of Sibelius’s a cappella works conducted by the new artistic director Ragnar Hollmerus (1886–1954). The second section was performed in cooperation with the City Orchestra conducted by Georg Schnéevoigt (1872–1947). It included Vårsång (Op. 16), the revised Sandels and, finally, Athenarnes sång (Op. 31 No. 3).49 MM invited all its former members as well as another male choir, Akademiska Sångföreningen, to participate in the two accompanied numbers (Sandels and Athenarnes sång).50 Despite the enlarged choir, the Hufvudstadsbladet critic would have preferred to see even more singers on stage: “Had the choir been even greater in number, the ending would have been more impressive.”51 Referring to Sandels, the critics yet again emphasized its descriptive qualities: “‘Sandels’, Sibelius’s unrivaled tone depiction of Runeberg’s familiar poem, absolutely enthused the audience. The setting animates Sandels’s feasting, his adjutant’s passionate state of mind, and the turmoil of the war at the Partala bridge in a masterly way. How carelessly hilarious is the orchestra’s jovial depiction of the historical breakfast of the ‘general’ and the ‘minister’. […] In its genre, it is, without a doubt, the best Sibelius has produced.”52 According to the competition rules in 1898, it was forbidden for the submissions to make any reference to the ongoing language dispute. Now, some 15 years later, it was quite different. For example, the critic of the Swedish-language newspaper Hufvudstadsbladet highlighted the Swedish qualities in Sibelius’s work: “Sibelius has brought out Sandels’s fine, true-Swedish, sparklingly spirited character, [and] with a little Epicurean-flavored pungent intelligence and heroism, the compelling and sunny, charming Swedishness, in the best sense of the term. His depiction of Sandels in the village of Partala is excellent. The scene is painted in vivid colors.”53 Despite the publishing contract between Sibelius and MM, neither the score nor the parts were ever engraved or printed, but the work was performed from hand-written orchestral materials in MM’s possession. MM published a typeset edition of the choral score (i.e., only the choral parts with no piano reduction). The Sandels orchestral score is published for the first time in the present volume.


XI Snöfrid (Op. 29) The Orchestra of the Philharmonic Society of Helsinki went on a European Tour during the summer of 1900, during which it also performed at the World Exhibition in Paris. The tour was partly funded from debt, therefore the Philharmonic Society organized a lottery soirée on 20 October 1900 to cover some of the expenses. Sibelius described the situation to his friend Adolf Paul in a letter dated 14 September 1900: “Here we have to collect some 80,000 [Fmk] to cover [the expenses of] our trip. As you can imagine, I do not get away with a little composing work. This is the mess I’m in now.”54 The “little composing work” was Snöfrid. Not much information about the compositional process has survived. Much later, in 1943, Sibelius told his son-in-law Jussi Jalas: “I composed Snöfrid more or less in one sitting, after coming home from a three-day binge.”55 Sibelius did not set the entirety of Rydberg’s poem to music. From the first section he took only the dialogue between the two characters, Gunnar and Snöfrid; the second section appears in its entirety as the final chorus (from b. 285 on). Thus, Sibelius’s setting does not give the audience any initial verbal context: for instance, the poetic milieu of the stormy night is depicted only through music. The characters’ relationship is not explained in the excerpts appearing in Sibelius’s setting, either. However, the program handed to the members of the audience in many performances at the beginning of the 20th century included the whole of Rydberg’s poem and not just the passages Sibelius set to music.56 Snöfrid was used as the main attraction in the soirée’s advance advertisement: “We neither can nor will list everything that will be presented in the program in advance, but we are allowed to reveal that Sibelius, for this occasion only, has composed grandiose music to set off Viktor Rydberg’s beautiful poem ‘Snöfrid.’ This number alone is enough to raise our interest. We have become accustomed to being captivated and charmed by every new composition of Sibelius as he develops his creative genius to achieve ever-higher levels of perfection.”57 The advertisement was effective: Seurahuone (Society House) was full of people and all 12,000 lottery tickets were sold. The soirée began with a shortened version of Orfeo ed Euridice by Christoph Willibald Gluck, which was followed by scenes (tableaux vivants) arranged by several Finnish artists. The last two numbers in the program were Franz Liszt’s Hungarian Fantasy (the solo piano part played by Karl Ekman [1869–1947]) and Sibelius’s Snöfrid. The main musical numbers played at the soirée, Orfeo and Snöfrid, were performed in a concert nine days later on 29 October. The reviews of both the soirée and the concert performance praised the music in Snöfrid. The contributions of the choir (rehearsed by Thérèse Hahl [1842–1911]) and the reciter Katri Rautio (1864–1952) were also highly praised. On Snöfrid, Evert Katila wrote in Uusi Suometar: “The wildly stormy atmosphere at the beginning, the melodrama with a peculiar brass accompaniment, and the heavenly bright and warm-spirited ending, in which the string orchestra sings the splendidly broad [and] enormously deep song in unison, were united into a peacefully harmonious whole with elevating features.”58 The anonymous critic of Päivälehti also expressed a wish: “Hopefully this melodrama will not suffer a similar fate as so many other works by Sibelius, which are not heard after the premiere. Many such occasional compositions by the same master are such pearls and treasures of our music literature that they should not disappear in a whirl in one festive night. As for this latest product from Sibelius, it shows advancement in all aspects: its warm-heartedness, the atmosphere in its entirety, the descriptive qualities and the use of the choir.”59 The critic’s wish was fulfilled. Snöfrid was performed again in Helsinki only a month later on 15 November 1900, and thereafter remained in the concert programs in several Finnish cities. During the following years, for example, it was performed in Turku in December 1902, in Tampere in March 1903, in Pori and Oulu in December 1904, in

Viipuri in April 1905, in Vaasa in January and December 1906, and in Oulu in December 1906.60 Despite the several successful performances and the preliminary interest shown by the publisher Karl Wasenius in Helsinki, however, the orchestral score and parts of Snöfrid remained unpublished for a long time – only the choral score appeared in print as a lithograph in 1904.61 Sibelius sold the publication rights to the Helsinki publishers A. E. Lindgren in 1915 for the sum of 1,000 Fmk. The contract eventually came to nothing and the rights were returned to Sibelius in October 1917.62 Sibelius sold the work again one year later, this time to the publishers R. E. Westerlund in Helsinki. The contract signed on 7 May 1918 included the score as well as a piano arrangement (1,500 Fmk in total).63 Its publication was delayed, however. Four years later, Westerlund informed Sibelius that the edition was finally due to be printed during the fall of 1922. The publisher had commissioned translations in German and Finnish to accompany the original Swedish text, and a piano arrangement (possibly by Karl Ekman) was ready for Sibelius’s inspection.64 For unknown reasons, Westerlund did not publish Snöfrid in any form at that time, but sold its foreign rights to Edition Wilhelm Hansen in 1927. Wilhelm Hansen started work on it without delay, and in September 1927 Sibelius was reading the first proofs. How many sets of proofs he read is not known, but Wilhelm Hansen was still asking Sibelius to return the proof score in April 1929, so that they could start engraving the orchestral parts based on it.65 Sibelius also read proofs for Karl Ekman’s piano arrangement, which was published in April 1929.66 The first edition of the orchestral score and parts (including the choral parts) was published in December 1929 – almost 30 years after the premiere.67 The orchestral score only contained the original Swedish text underlay, but Finnish and German translations were included in the vocal parts as well as in the piano score, which had appeared half a year previously. Westerlund, who had retained the Finnish rights for Snöfrid, printed the choral score in two versions in 1930: one with the Finnish and one with the Swedish text underlay.68 In 1943, Wilhelm Hansen made a new imprint of the orchestral score without notifying Sibelius. After receiving the newly printed score, Sibelius sent the publisher a letter commenting on the several misprints in it.69 The publisher replied that, “in the present circumstances” (i.e., during war time), it was not possible for them to send any proofs, but they had not wanted to wait with the printing. During this exchange of letters, Wilhelm Hansen also asked Sibelius if he had an English translation of Snöfrid, as they planned to produce an orchestral score with Finnish, German, and English translations after the war.70 The final section (from b. 285 on) was performed on its own at the inauguration of the National Theatre in Helsinki in April 1902. A new text was commissioned from the author Volter Kilpi (1874–1939) for the occasion. Kilpi’s text was not a translation of Rydberg’s original text, but a completely new version entitled Taiteelle (To Art). Some newspapers erroneously reported that Sibelius had set Kilpi’s text to music for the occasion. Consequently, it was later thought, also erroneously, that Sibelius’s composition called Taiteelle was lost, until Fabian Dahlström clarified the misunderstanding in 1985.71 Islossningen i Uleå älv (Op. 30) Sibelius set Zacharias Topelius’s poem Islossningen i Uleå elf (The Breaking of the Ice on the Oulu River) to music for a festive soirée held on 21 October 1899. The soirée was organized by Savo-Karjalainen Osakunta (the union for students from the Savonian-Karelian region studying at Helsinki University) to raise money for the public-enlightenment work they were doing in their home region.72 Very little is known about Sibelius’s compositional process: for example, only one


XII short sketch containing material for Islossningen i Uleå älv has been identified.73 Jalmari Finne, who was one of the soirée’s organizers, recalled later that Islossningen i Uleå älv was completed just before the soirée, which meant that the musicians received their parts in the nick of time, and the reciter Axel Ahlberg could not familiarize himself with the music.74 One day before the premiere, Karl Flodin published a lengthy introductory article on the work, in which he described its form and content. According to Flodin, “[w]ith ‘Islossningen i Uleå älv’, Mr. Sibelius has created magnificent, illusorily beautiful music to one of Topelius’s most magnificent lyrical nature paintings.” Flodin considered the Adagio passage especially remarkable: “This passage makes a touching effect and builds a culmination to the entire musical composition. An ordinary composer would without doubt have depicted the river’s proud victory with joyous chords played fortissimo, but Sibelius is able to evoke the highest climax in the depiction in a much more effective way by maintaining an enchantingly mild and peaceful pianissimo lighting, which as unexpectedly as peculiarly breaks against the fermenting wild nature painting that preceded it.” 75 The soirée took place in Seurahuone (Society House) in Helsinki. The musical program included two works by Sibelius: in addition to the premiere of Islossningen i Uleå älv, he also conducted Athenarnes sång, which had premiered six months earlier.76 The soirée was successful, although a malfunction in the electric lights forced the organizers to change the order of the program at the last minute. Islossningen i Uleå älv was received by an enthusiastic audience, who called the composer back on stage several times.77 Islossningen i Uleå älv was performed in Vaasa less than a month after its premiere. This performance was part of the Press Celebration Days, a three-day event (on 3–5 November) organized in several Finnish cities to raise money for the Press Pension Fund.78 Islossningen i Uleå älv was the main attraction of the concert in Vaasa City Hall on 5 November. The original orchestration was changed to customize the work for the smaller ensemble in Vaasa. The changes appear in Sibelius’s autograph orchestral score, but not in Sibelius’s hand: they were probably made by Ferdinand Neisser, who conducted the performance.79 Islossningen i Uleå älv was enthusiastically received here, too, and the work was played da capo immediately. It was performed again in Vaasa only a month later, when it was included in the program of the orchestra’s so-called popular concert on 2 December 1899. Following its success in Vaasa, it was included in a program in Turku a few months later,80 but then it disappeared from the concert repertoire. Sibelius had plans to revise Islossningen i Uleå älv around 1910, and wrote “should be revised” (bör omarbetas) on the title page. It remained unrevised and unpublished, however.81 The present volume is the first publication of the work’s orchestral score. Interpretations of the subtitle Improvisation Sandels, Snöfrid, and Islossningen i Uleå älv appear with the opus numbers 28–30 in Sibelius’s work catalogues from the first decade of the 20th century. He added the subtitle Improvisation to each one in a catalogue dating from 1914. During the following year, he collected these three Improvisations under a single opus number 28, which was thus entitled Tre improvisationer för kör och orkester (Three improvisations for choir and orchestra). This altered opus numbering never appeared in any published catalogue or score as Sibelius, after all, reverted to his original plan of giving each work a separate opus number. Nevertheless, he retained the subtitle Improvisation in each opus.82 Many Sibelius biographers have pondered on the possible meaning of the subtitle Improvisation. Erik Furuhjelm, in the very first Sibelius biography (1916), interpreted it as deriving from the text/music-relationship, in which the music – according to Furuhjelm – was subordinate to the content of the programmatic text it depicted. He wrote:

“Islossningen i Uleå älv does not strive to be viewed as a musical entity. Namely, the composer has given a very prominent role to the literal component – i.e., the melodrama – in this work. Its significance lies in the emblematical nature painting, which is colored by strong pathos and climaxes in the impressive orchestral roar in major mode.” On Snöfrid, he wrote: “That which was allegorical in Rydberg’s poem becomes more tangible in Sibelius’s composition,” whereas of Sandels he wrote that it is “a realistic depiction [of the poem] that gets straight down to business.”83 Cecil Gray followed the idea that the text/music-relationship was at the heart of what the term Improvisation signified in his Sibelius biography (1931). He described the three works thus: “They are, in fact, intensifications of poetry rather than works of inherent musical significance. The words are of greater moment than the music, consequently contrapuntal devices which tend to impede their natural flow and movement are wholly avoided, and the choral writing is frequently in unisons and octaves, with the orchestra providing a tonal background or accompaniment of no great independent interest. They should prove highly effective in performance, none the less.”84 Erik Tawaststjerna gives a different interpretation of the meaning of the subtitle in his influential Sibelius biography, suggesting that the three Improvisations are of lesser artistic value because they were originally composed as occasional music. In his view, “[t]he subtitle was probably intended to show that the composer was aware of this.”85 Tawaststjerna also emphasized patriotism in his reading of Improvisations. In addition to the Runeberg and Topelius settings, he also saw Snöfrid primarily as a patriotic statement: “Once again, Sibelius had set a poem in order to encourage his fellow countrymen to fight for freedom.” Tawaststjerna extended his patriotic reading to Impromptu: “With his choice of text, Sibelius perhaps wanted to stress that Finns as well as Hellenes could gather in a Pan-Athenian feast at the threat of devastation.”86 Although occasional music is often placed outside any composer’s core repertoire, Jalmari Finne (Finnish author and theatre director who collaborated with Sibelius on several occasions) pointed out that occasional music such as the three Improvisations played an important role in building recognition among audiences: “[F]or a talented [composer], these occasions gave an opportunity to make one’s mark quickly, because grandiose events in those times gathered together all the most notable members of cultural life.”87 I am grateful to all those whose help contributed to the present volume but especially to my colleagues Kari Kilpeläinen, Kai Lindberg, Anna Pulkkis, Tuija Wicklund, and Timo Virtanen, as well as Joan Nordlund, Tove Djupsjöbacka, Pertti Kuusi, Turo Rautaoja, and Joanna Rinne. I would also like to thank the staffs of the National Library of Finland (Tarja Lehtinen, Petri Tuovinen, Inka Myyry) and the Sibelius Museum (Sanna Linjama-Mannermaa). Helsinki, Spring 2018

Sakari Ylivuori

11 Rydberg’s poems had previously been published in two separate collections. Although the 1899 edition is officially labeled the third edition, it is the first one to include all of his poems in one volume. The 1899 edition also contains a commentary by the publisher Karl Warburg at the end of the volume. The numbering in the collected works is not chronological, thus Dikter is not the earliest publication of the collected works, although numbered as 1. 12 Dikter also contains several other poems set to music by Sibelius during the first two decades of the 20th century. 13 Runeberg published an extended version in 1860, but Sandels was included in the first version. 14 For Johan August Sandels, see Veli-Matti Syrjö, Sandels, Johan August (Kansallisbiografia-verkkojulkaisu, Studia Biographica 4), Helsinki: Suomalaisen Kirjallisuuden Seura, 1997 [= Syrjö 1997]. For the background


XIII

5 6 7

8 9

10

11 12

13

14

15

16

17

of the poem, see Yrjö Hirn, Runeberg-gestalten, Helsingfors: Schildts, 1942 [= Hirn 1942]. For the role of Fänrik Ståls sägner in creating the Finnish national identity, see Johan Wrede, Jag såg ett folk… Runeberg, Fänrik Stål och nationen, Helsingfors: Söderström&Co., 1988, pp. 9–14 (especially on Sandels, see pp. 107–117). Topelius also had an academic career, being a history professor at the Imperial Alexander University in Finland (currently Helsinki University) in 1854–1878, and rector in 1875–1878. For further information, see, e.g., Carola Herberts [ed.], Zacharias Topelius Skrifter I, Helsingfors: Svenska litteratursällskapet i Finland, 2010, pp. XXXI–XXXV. See, e.g., Harold E. Johnson, Jean Sibelius, New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1959 pp. 102–103, and Erik Tawaststjerna, Jean Sibelius 2, Helsinki: Otava, 1967 [= Tawaststjerna 1967], p. 211. (In Swedish: Jean Sibelius. Åren 1893– 1904, Helsingfors: Söderström&Co., 1993, p. 163.) Fabian Dahlström gives the dating “Frühjahr 1902”; see Fabian Dahlström, Jean Sibelius. Thematisch-bibliographisches Verzeichnis seiner Werke, Wiesbaden: Breitkopf & Härtel, 2003 [= SibWV]), p. 78. For details, see Critical Commentary, List of Sketches. Sibelius also wrote the words “memento mori” in an undated sketch HUL 1593, probably dating from 1903–1906 according to Kari Kilpeläinen, The Jean Sibelius Musical Manuscripts at Helsinki University Library, Wiesbaden: Breitkopf & Härtel, 1991, p. 405. The connection between Impromptu and the String Trio was pointed out earlier by Erik Furuhjelm, Jean Sibelius: hans tondiktning och drag ur hans liv, Helsingfors: Holger Schildts Förlag, 1916 [= Furuhjelm 1916], p. 34. The Trio possibly dates from around 1894, despite Sibelius’s later indication that it originated in 1885 – see Kari Kilpeläinen, Tutkielmia Jean Sibeliuksen käsikirjoituksista (Studia musica universitatis helsingiensis III), Helsinki: Helsingin yliopiston musiikkitieteen laitos 1992, pp. 130–131. The Trio, on the other hand, is based on material originally found in sketches from 1888–1889 (see, e.g., Andrew Barnett, Sibelius, Cambridge: Yale University Press, 2007, p. 148 [= Barnett 2007]). The choir was rehearsed by Thérèse Hahl, but it is not named in any source. Similarly positive reviews were published in Hufvudstadsbladet on 9 March and Suomen Kansa on 11 March 1902, for example. Päivälehti, 9 March 1902, O.[skar Merikanto]: “Köörin tehtävä oli erittäin kaunis ja orkesterin ynnä harpun pehmeä säestys, kuin myöskin kastanjettien näppäilyt silloin tällöin, antoivat teokselle ikäänkuin etelämaalaisen viehkeyden. […] Kieltämättä on tästä teoksesta pianon säestyksellä tuleva hyvin suosittu numero.” Uusi Suometar, 11 March 1902, E.[vert] K.[atila]: “[…] waan täytenumeroiksi tässä konsertissa […]. Impromptu naisköörille ja orkesterille on kyllä warsin huwittawa waikka se ei todista erityisempää sywentymistä Rydbergin runon henkeen. Orkesterisäestys perustuu sangen karakteristisille aiheille ja on korwia hiwelewällä herkullisuudella wäritetty, mutta köörin deklamatoorinen käsittely ei oikein wastaa sanojen dityrambista luonnetta.” The instrumentation was slightly altered to suit the smaller ensemble in Vaasa (1902). The alterations appear sketched in the autograph score, but not in Sibelius’s hand. The orchestration was probably altered by Ferdinand Neisser, who conducted the orchestra in Vaasa. For details on the Vaasa score, see the Critical Commentary. Some correspondence between Sibelius and Neisser has survived (the National Archive, the Sibelius Family archive [= NA, SFA], file box 24), but it does not concern the work in question. The first version of Impromptu was performed in Pori in 1913. For this performance, Ewald Niegisch adapted the work to suit the Pori ensemble. He informed Sibelius about his re-orchestration, but Sibelius probably never saw the score. Niegisch was aware of the existence of the revised version dating from 1910, when making his arrangement of the fi rst version (Niegisch’s letter to Sibelius dated 22 September 1913 in NA, SFA, file box 24; Niegisch’s score is in the YLE archives [YLE = the Finnish Broadcasting Company], see the Critical Commentary). Sibelius did not date the list. On these pages he wrote his diary entries on the recto of each page, and the list appears on the verso, at the same level as the diary markings from 5 to 18 February on the corresponding recto. Possibly for this reason, the list is dated 5 February in the published diary (Fabian Dahlström [ed.], Jean Sibelius. Dagbok 1909–1944, Helsingfors: Svenska Litteratursällskapet i Finland, 2005, p. 40). The original diary is in NA, SFA, file boxes 37–38. Sibelius to Breitkopf & Härtel [= B&H], letter dated 15 February 1910 (the B&H archives, Wiesbaden). B&H to Sibelius, letter dated 19 February 1910 (NA, SFA, file box 42).

18 In memoriam was revised between 18 February and 25 March. Impromptu was completed between 16 and 19 April, Sibelius mentioning in his diary entry of 16 April that he had begun to write the fair copy, which he sent to the publisher on 19 April. 19 Sibelius to B&H, letter dated 19 April 1910 (the B&H archives, Wiesbaden): “D. Klavierauszug ist so eingerichtet dass man d. benutzen kann bei Aufführungen wo Orchester fehlt.” 20 For the renewal of the bill of exchange, see the diary entries on 3 and 8 April. For monetary problems and Impromptu, see, for example, the diary entries for 16 April and 2 May. See also Sibelius’s letter to Axel Carpelan dated 11 May 1910 (in NA, SFA, file box 120). The correspondence between Sibelius and Carpelan is published in Fabian Dahlström [ed.], Högtärade Maestro! Högtärade Herr Baron! Korrespondensen mellan Axel Carpelan och Jean Sibelius 1900–1919, Helsingfors: Svenska Litteratursällskapet i Finland, 2010. 21 B&H to Sibelius, letter dated 13 May 1910 (in NA, SFA, file box 42): “Wir haben Ihnen bei den letzten Werken, die wir das Vergnügen hatten von Ihnen zu erhalten, ohne weiteres die Honorare angenommen, die Sie vorschlugen. Wenn wir Sie aber heute bitten von der von Ihnen geforderten Summe abzugehen, so hat dies seine besonderen Gründe. Ein Werk für Damenchor mit Orchester hat nämlich in Deutschland und auch in anderen Ländern so gut wie gar keine Aussicht aufgeführt zu werden. Die wenigen Damenchöre, die wir besitzen, sind nicht in der Lage ein Orchester für Ihre Aufführungen zu bezahlen und beschränken sich ausschliesslich auf Werke mit Klavierbegleitung. Aber auch der Absatz in dieser Besetzung ist äusserst gering, obwohl gerade in diesem Genre manch feines liebenswürdiges Werk geschaffen worden ist.” 22 Sibelius requested 2,000 Rmk for the orchestral score and 500 for the piano score (Sibelius to B&H, letter dated 19 April 1910, in the B&H archives, Wiesbaden). 23 Diary, 16 May 1910: “I dag af B. et H. mycket nedprutade förslag. Måste följaktligen börja ‘refva’ åter.” 24 In a letter dated 20 May 1910 (in NA, SFA, file box 42), B&H promises to start the production of the piano score and the choral parts during the coming autumn. Diary, 25 May 1910: “Då jag erhöll endast 1000 Rmk af B. et H. måste ‘brödarbetet’ åter fram. Sånger?!” 25 Both Boruttau and Newmarch wrote their translations as the text underlay in Sibelius’s autograph piano score. The cover letter for the proofs (from B&H to Sibelius) dated 17 October 1910 is preserved (in NA, SFA, file box 42). For the dating of the first editions, see also SibWV, p. 79, and Sibelius’s letter to Carpelan dated 13 November 1910 (in NA, SFA, file box 120). The English translation was omitted in the first edition of the choral parts (published in 1912). Further, one of the surviving manuscripts for the orchestral score also contains a singing Finnish translation by an unknown translator (see the Critical Remarks). 26 B&H to Sibelius, letter dated 10 February 1912. The original letter is missing, but a copy survives in the B&H archives, Wiesbaden. The whereabouts of the parts used in the first performance remain unknown. 27 Dagens Tidning, 30 March 1912, anon.: “Utförandet af symfonin led något af nervositet; däremot hedrade sig orkestern – och särskildt dess blåsare – i de båda suiterna; i körkompositionen tjusades man af de medverkande damernas utmärkta röster. Kompositören själf inlade som dirigent hela sin personlighet i utförandet af sina verk.” 28 Nya Pressen, 1 April 1912 (pseudonym A. S.) mentioned that the choir sang with more precision in the second concert, when it was placed in front of the orchestra. For the reviews of the fi rst concert, see, e.g., Dagens Tidning, Hufvudstadsbladet, and Nya Pressen on 30 March 1912. Bis [Karl Wasenius] wrote a description of the work in Hufvudstadsbladet on 8 December 1910 in the context of the publication of the piano score. 29 According to SibWV, p. 79, the autograph fair copy of the orchestral score is in the B&H archives, Wiesbaden. However, no such autograph exists in the B&H archives. 30 For the surviving scores, see the Critical Commentary. Kalle Katrama produced a handwritten copy in 1981 based on the two early copies, which has since been in use as hired material. It should be noted that Niegisch’s re-orchestrated score (in the YLE archives) is based on the first version despite its dating after Sibelius’s revision (see the above section discussing later performances of the fi rst version). 31 Sibelius referred to Impromptu as Op. 19 for the first time in his diary on 19 April 1910. The opus number 19 also appears in the list of works to be revised from February 1910, but the actual number is a later addition. The opus number 19 was also used in the correspondence between Sibelius and B&H (see the publishing process, above). For the list of catalogues of Sibelius’s works, see SibWV, pp. 693–696. The catalogue showing Impromptu as Op. 34 is referred to in SibWV as Sib 1905–09.


XIV 32 For a brief introduction to bilingualism in Finland, see, e.g., Glenda Dawn Goss, A Composer’s Life and the Awakening of Finland, Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2009, e.g., pp. 33–41. The announcements about the competition were published in several newspapers – in both Swedish and Finnish and also outside Helsinki – after 15 January 1898 (e.g., in Hufvudstadsbladet, Åbo Underrättelser, Päivälehti, Wasa Tidning Aamulehti, and Uusi Aura). 33 The first change Sibelius asked for on 13 April is not visible in the score because he made the new revision by pasting a correction slip over the choral staves. However, the requested change survives in the correspondence. It is not known when he added the slip in the orchestral score, but it must have been before the first performance (in 1900), because no change appears in the piano score produced for rehearsal purposes, and Sibelius directly wrote the revised reading. For the musical details, see the Critical Remarks for b. 9 and bb. 3–11. Jean’s letters to Aino (1893–1904) are in NA, SFA, file box 95, and Aino’s letters to Jean in file box 27. The correspondence from that time is published in SuviSirkku Talas (ed.), Tulen synty. Aino ja Jean Sibeliuksen kirjeenvaihtoa 1892–1904, Helsinki: Suomalaisen Kirjallisuuden Seura, 2003. 34 Jean to Aino, letter dated 27 April 1898 (in NA, SFA, fi le box 95): “Tuleekohan Sandelssista mitään. Pitäisi ainakin jotain.” 35 No actual report has survived, but Mikko Slöör (a member of the choir) told Sibelius about the rumors that were circulating about the jury’s discussions in a letter dated 16 May 1898 (in the National Library [= NL], Coll.206.36). 36 The second prize was not awarded. Suomen synty (The Birth of Finland) for male choir and orchestra by Armas Järnefelt was awarded third prize (300 Fmk) and Barcarole for male choir a cappella by Ernst Fabritius the fourth prize (200 Fmk). Additionally, Karl Flodin (Häämme, Our Wedding) and Selim Palmgren (Drömmen, The Dream) each received a special prize (200 Fmk). The results were announced in several newspapers. See, e.g., Nya Pressen 27 May 1898. 37 Jean to Aino, postcard dated 17 March 1900. A letter from the same day also mentions Sandels’s success (both in NA, SFA, file box 95). 38 Päivälehti on 17 March also panned the performance. Aftonposten, 16 March 1900, the pseudonym V.: “Kort sagdt: ett oväntadt fiasko.” Nya Pressen, 17 March 1900, the pseudonym K.[arl Flodin]: “Ja, den är död och upplöst, kören MM.!”, Uusi Suometar, 17 March 1900, E.[vert] K.[atila]. 39 The word tone painting (tonmålning) was also used in Aftonposten on 17 March. According to Päivälehti, Sandels was “a very descriptive painting” (hyvin kuvaava maalaus). Hufvudstadsbladet on 1 April used the adjective “målande” (meaning “descriptive”, but derived from “måla” = to paint). On 17 March, Hufvudstadsbladet wrote: “The composer has captivated the different events in the patriotic poem in musical images […]” (Den fosterländska diktens olika situationer har kompositören fångat i musikaliska bilder […]). Nya Pressen, 17 March 1900, the pseudonym K.[arl Flodin]: “‘Sandels’ är en tonmålning, som vi utan betänkande ställa främst bland alla de kompositioner inom samma genre, som hr Sibelius skapat. […] Utan att förfalla i ett detaljmåleri, som skulle söndra stycket i stycken, har han fattat sitt ämne episkt, och dock dramatiskt lefvande och lyriskt värkningsfullt.” 40 For the trip the Orchestra of the Philharmonic Society of Helsinki made in 1900, see Snöfrid, below. 41 E.[vert] K.[atila] of Uusi Suometar complained on 17 March, i.e., after the premiere, that the choir was too small. 42 The typeset choral part was printed in 1899. The performance of 1908 took place in the commemoration of the Finnish War (1808–1809). 43 The revision plans are mentioned in the diary entries from 18 March 1913 and 23 June 1914, and in a letter to Carpelan dated 27 July 1914 (NA, SFA, file box 120): “den är ej plastisk nog.” 44 For the correspondence regarding the commission, see NL, Coll.206.40, Coll.206.47 and NA, SFA, file box 23. The commissions were mediated by Olof Wallin (MM’s artistic director) and Verner Hougberg (MM’s secretary). For further details, see also JSW VII/2, Introduction (Op. 84). 45 Sibelius also referred to the work as Op. 79. A total of 13 entries in the diary mention the sketching of the work in question in April–May 1915. 46 Lifslust och lifsleda comprises lines recited by different people or groups of people, including Young Hellenes (Unga hellener). On 21 May 1915, Sibelius wrote he had “decided on Backoståget [the Bacchus priests’ procession] Op. 79” (Beslutit mig för Backoståget Op. 79). Backospräster (Bacchus priests) is one group in Rydberg’s poem. Sibelius, however, had set the Bacchus priests’ lines earlier as the introduction in the revised version of Impromptu (Op. 19) in 1910. Thus, it is not completely clear to which text Sibelius was referring.

47 Hougberg to Sibelius, letter dated 26 July 1915 (NA, SFA, fi le box 23). The same file box also contains the publishing contract. The contract does not name the sum paid to the composer, but it was mentioned in the letter. 48 Why Sibelius refers to the year 1897 is not known; no document indicates that he composed Sandels before the spring of 1898. Diary, 23 July 1915: “Beslutit att ej omarbeta Sandels. Den må bli ett document humain af 1898. Rättare 97.” 49 The details of the anniversary concert were decided in the meeting of the choir on 10 September 1915, and the plans were published in several newspapers (see, e.g., Dagens Press, 11 September, Uusi Suometar, 12 September, and Keski-Savo, 16 September 1915). 50 The request for former members to join in the performance was also published in several newspapers outside the Helsinki region (see, e.g., Dagens Press, 11 September, Uusi Suometar, 12 September, and Keski-Savo, 16 September 1915). In Athenarnes sång, the enlarged choir was joined by a boys’ choir consisting of pupils from four schools. The number of singers on stage was ca. 350 (Hufvudstadsbladet, 15 December 1915). 51 Hufvudstadsbladet, 15 December 1915, Bis [Karl Wasenius]: “Hade kören varit än manstarkare, skulle slutet ha imponerat än mer.” 52 The breakfast scene is not a description of a historical event, although the real Sandels did have a reputation as a bon-vivant. For details, see, e.g., Syrjö 1997 and Hirn 1942. Uusi Suometar, 15 December 1915, the pseudonym H.: “‘Sandels’, tuo Sibeliuksen verraton sävelkuvaus Runebergin tuttuun runoon suorastaan haltioitti kulijakunnan [sic]. Sävellys elävöittää mestarillisella tavalla Sandelsin herkuttelemisen, hänen ajutanttinsa [sic] kiihkeän mielentilan ja sodan melskeet Partala-sillalla. Miten huolettoman hauska onkaan orkesterin veikeä kuvailu ‘kenraalin’ ja ‘pastorin’ historiallisista aamiaisista! […] Alallaan se on eittämättömästi Sibeliuksen paras tuote.” 53 Hufvudstadsbladet, 15 December 1915, Bis [Karl Wasenius]: “Det fina, äkta svenska, det blixtrande spirituella draget, den med sin af en liten epikureisk krydda pikantgjorda, intelligens och heroism hos Sandels, detta fängslande och soliga, denna vinnande svenskhet i ordets bästa bemärkelse har Sibelius fått fram. Hans skildring af Sandels i Pardala by är utmärkt. Taflan är målad i lifliga färger.” 54 Sibelius to Paul, letter dated 14 September 1900 (in Uppsala University Library, AP3 131, 132, 133): “Wi måste samla åt oss här att betäcka vår resa etwa 80.000. Du kan tänka Dig att jag ej slipper härifrån med litet komponistskap. I denna smet måste jag nu vara.” The correspondence is published in Fabian Dahlström [ed.], Din tillgifvne ovän. Korrespondensen mellan Jean Sibelius och Adolf Paul 1889–1943, Helsingfors: Svenska Litteratursällskapet i Finland 2016. 55 Jalas’s note, dated 31 December 1943, NA, SFA, file box 1: “Sävelsin Snöfridin suunnilleen yhdeltä istumalta tultuani kotiin kolmen päivän viftiltä.” (translation of the citation from Barnett 2009, p. 140). 56 The surviving program of the concert on 29 October 1900 does not contain the text, but it is possible that it was handed out as a separate leaflet. The program of the concert on 14 December 1902 (conducted by Sibelius) is the earliest surviving one with the text. Both programs are in the Sibelius Museum, Turku. 57 Hufvudstadsbladet, 14 October 1900, anon.: “Vi hvarken kunna eller vilja i förväg yppa alt hvad programmet kommer att bjuda på, men så mycket äro vi berättigade att skvallra om, att Sibelius enkom för detta tillfälle komponerat en storslagen musik till Viktor Rydbergs vackra dikt ‘Snöfrid’. Ensamt denna nummer på programmet är egnad att väcka vårt intresse. Vi ha blifvit vana att för hvarje ny komposition af Sibelius intagas och hänföras af hans skapande snilles utveckling mot en alt större fulländning.” An advertisement with similar content was published in Uusi Suometar on 16 October 1900, for example. 58 Uusi Suometar, 30 October 1900, E.[vert] K.[atila]: “Teoksen alkuosan winha myrskyinen tunnelma, omituisen torwisäestyksen seuraama melodrama ja taiwaallisen kirkas ja lämminhenkinen loppu, jossa jouhiorkesteri laulaa werrattoman leweää sywätunteisen waltawaa unisoono-lauluaan, tulivat rauhallisen ehjäksi kokonaisuudeksi, joka oli mieltäylentäwää laatua.” 59 Päivälehti, 21 October 1900, anon.: “Toivottavasti ei tämän melodraaman käy samoin kuin niin useiden Sibeliuksen sävellysten, että niitä sen koommin ei saa kuulla. Monet tällaiset tilapäiset sävellykset samalta mestarilta ovat sellaisia helmiä ja musiikkikirjallisuutemme aarteita, että niiden ei pitäisi yhden juhla illan humuun kadota. Mitä tähän Sibeliuksen uusimpaan tuotteeseen tulee, on se kouraantuntuvasti edistystä joka puolelta, sekä sydämmellisyyden ja tunnelman ehjyyden että kuvaamataiteen ja köörin käyttämisen puolesta.” 60 There are two short articles in which choristers reminisce about the early performances and rehearsals with Sibelius: Hanna Stenius in Tidning


XV

61

62

63

64

65 66 67 68

69

70

71

72 73 74

för musik Vol. 16 (1915), pp. 211–212, and Maria Beaurain, Eräs Sibeliusmuisto, in Aulos, säveltaiteellis-kirjallinen julkaisu (1925), p. 12. The lithograph does not show the publisher (see the Critical Commentary). Wasenius to Sibelius, letter dated 2 November 1900, in NA, SFA, file box 47. Carpelan also encouraged Sibelius to find a publisher for Snöfrid (letter dated 17 April 1902, in NA, SFA, fi le box 120). There is no documentation indicating why Lindgren did not proceed with the production. It may have been because of the war, as Lindgren normally had the engraving work done in Germany. The contract between Sibelius and Lindgren has not survived, but it is mentioned in an undated diary entry (from December 1915) and in the entry from 4 October 1917. Robert Kajanus conducted Snöfrid in 1915, and requested materials from Sibelius (Kajanus to Sibelius, postcard dated 2 July 1915, NA, SFA, file box 21), which may have motivated Sibelius to get it published. For Sibelius’s markings on Kajanus’s concert, see the diary entry from 1 November 1915. Thérèse Hahl, who had rehearsed the choir for the premiere, encouraged Sibelius to write an arrangement for piano or for piano and harmonium as early as in 1901 (letter dated 8 January 1901 in NL, Coll.206.14). Sibelius’s copy of the publication contract with R. E. Westerlund has not survived, but its details survive in the accounting records (including the sums and the dating) in NA, SFA, fi le box 47. The German translation was commissioned from “Mrs. Bourain” and the Finnish from Jussi Snellman. Whether Snellman fulfilled the commission in 1922 is unknown (cf. Footnote 68). The piano arrangement is not specified in the letter, but it was probably the same as that published by Wilhelm Hansen later (see below). Westerlund to Sibelius, letter dated 13 May 1922 in NA, SFA, fi le box 47. Wilhelm Hansen to Sibelius, letters dated 20 September 1927 and 18 April 1929, in NA, SFA, file box 45. All extant proofs are in NL under signum HUL 1821 (a–d are choral parts, e is the piano arrangement). For the specific dates of the publication, see also SibWV, pp. 132–133. The Finnish translation published in 1929 and 1930 was done by Lauri Pohjanpää, not Jussi Snellman, from whom Westerlund had commissioned a translation in 1922. The autograph fair copy (from 1900) contains a Finnish singing translation by Severi Nyman. Conductor Simon Parmet told Sibelius after a performance of Snöfrid in Stockholm in 1936 that “the orchestral retouches in ‘Snöfrid’ were excellent […]. If Hansen has not yet had time to print the score (the parts are already printed) it would be good if these small changes could be inserted.” It remains unknown to what “the retouches” and “small changes” refer, and whether the mentioned changes were made by Sibelius or Parmet. Parmet had met with Sibelius in January or February 1936 to discuss many of the details in Sibelius’s compositions, but Snöfrid is not mentioned in the correspondence that followed their meeting. Parmet to Sibelius, letter dated 7 April 1936, NL Coll.206.28: “Orkesterretuscherna i ‘Snöfrid’ voro utmärkta […]. Om Hansen ännu ej hunnit trycka partituret (stämmorna äro redan tryckta) vore det bra, om dessa små ändringar kunde införas.” Letters from Wilhelm Hansen to Sibelius dated 16 June 1943, 29 July 1943, 3 August 1943, and 26 April 1946 in NA, SFA, fi le box 47. The lastmentioned letter also included an English singing translation by D. Miller Craig to be approved by the composer. Wilhelm Hansen to Sibelius, letter dated 29 July 1943: “under de nuvaerende Forhold.” Erroneous information appears in Uusi Aura from 12 April 1902, for example. In addition, all the reports fail to mention that the music of Taiteelle was part of Snöfrid. Kilpi’s text appears in the Critical Commentary. Dahlström identified a copy of the choral part used in the 1902 performance in the Sibelius Museum (in Turku), which clarified the confusion. For details, see Fabian Dahlström: “Onko Sibeliuksen kuoroteos ‘Taiteelle’ olemassa?” in Pieni musiikkilehti 1985, No. 3 (p. 16). Jalmari Finne added to the confusion by erroneously stating that Sibelius originally wrote Snöfrid for orchestra and reciter, and that he added the choral part later. Jalmari Finne, Muistelmia Sibeliuksen töistä, in Aulos. Säveltaiteelliskirjallinen julkaisu (1925) [= Finne 1925], p. 20. The archives of Savo-Karjalainen Osakunta are in NL. The documents regarding the planning of the event under signa S:Hc1 and S:Ca 14. The beginning of the Adagio passage (the melody beginning with “Nejden andas” in b. 187) appears in HUL 1490, p. 23. Sibelius did not write any text underlay in the sketch, but the word Nejden appears on the page. Finne 1925, p. 20. The work was mentioned in newspapers (e.g., in Uusi Suometar) on 6 October 1899, but that does not necessarily mean that it was complete.

75 Sibelius arranged the passage for children’s choir a cappella in 1913; see Nejden andas in JSW VII/1. Shorter descriptions were published in several other newspapers (e.g., Uusi Suometar and Hufvudstadsbladet on 19 October 1899). Aftonposten, 20 October 1899, K.[arl] Flodin: “Med ‘Islossningen i Uleå älf ’ har hr Sibelius skapat en ståtlig, illusoriskt vacker musik till en af Topelius ståtligaste lyriska naturmålningar.” “Denna episod är af en gripande effekt och bildar kulmen i hela den musikaliska kompositionen. En vanlig tonsättare skulle utan tvifvel med glada fortissimoackorder illustrerat älfvens stolta segersång, men Sibelius förmår på ett mycket värkningsfullare sätt framkalla den högsta stegringen i skildringen genom att hålla denna i en tjusande mild och lugn pianissimodager, hvilken lika oväntadt som sällsamt bryter af mot alt det föregående, jäsande vilda naturmåleriet.” 76 Athenarnes sång was performed as a tableau vivant arranged by artists Eero Järnefelt, Jalmari Finne, and Yrjö Blomstedt. Other musical works in the program were Dramatic Overture by Ernst Mielck, Suite for Orchestra by Armas Järnefelt, Finnish Rhapsody by Robert Kajanus, and four patriotic male choir works a cappella. The orchestral works were conducted by Kajanus, the a cappella choral works by Heikki Klemetti. An art exhibition and a lottery were also included in the soirée. 77 For the event, see Nya pressen on 22 and Aftonposten on 23 October 1899. 78 The Press Celebration Days were also a reaction to censorship, and a more general protest against the February Manifesto given by the Governor General Nikolay Bobrikov, reducing Finland’s autonomy. Sibelius composed “Press Celebrations Music” ( JS 137) for the main event in Helsinki. Tawaststjerna 1967, p. 157 called Islossningen i Uleå älv a preliminary exercise for Finlandia. This interpretation is echoed in Barnett 2007, p. 128. 79 For details, see the Critical Remarks. 80 The work was performed three times in Turku in January 1900: on the 12th conducted by Sibelius, on the 14th conducted by Eliel Kylén (who had also rehearsed the choir), and on the 17th conducted by José Eibenschütz (the conductor of the Orchestra of the Philharmonic Society of Turku). 81 Diary 5 February 1910 (see also Impromptu, revised version, above). 82 The catalogue from 1914 is referred to in SibWV, p. 694, as Sib 1914. The changed opus numbering appears in two catalogues: in an autograph catalogue Sibelius began in 1912 and kept until 1931 (referred to in SibWV, p. 694, as Sib 1912–31), and in a catalogue from 1915 in the hand of Sibelius’s daughter, Katarina (referred to in SibWV, p. 694, as Sib 1915b). The catalogue Sib 1912–31 shows Improvisations as Op. 28 Nos. 1, 2, and 3, whereas the catalogue Sib 1915b shows them as Op. 28 a, b, and c. In the latter, Snöfrid is erroneously dated 1896 and Islossningen i Uleå älv 1897. 83 Furuhjelm 1916, p. 181: “Islossningen i Uleå älv har inga pretentioner på att bli betraktad som en musikalisk helhet. Det litterära elementet – d.v.s. melodramen – har nämligen komponisten i detta alster berett en mycket framskjuten plats. Verkets betydande värde ligger i den sinnebildliga naturmålningen, som får sin färg av ett starkt patos och som kulminerar i ett imponerande durpräglat orkesterbrus.” p. 182: “Det Rydbergs dikt äger av allegori får mera påtaglighet i Sibelius komposition.” p. 180: “[…] en mycket på sak gående, realistisk skildring.” 84 Gray 1931, p. 91. 85 Tawaststjerna 1967, p. 131: “Aliotsikon tarkoituksena lienee osoittaa, että säveltäjä on ollut tästä tietoinen.” Tawaststjerna’s dismissive attitude towards Improvisations is present throughout. He describes Sandels thus (p. 131): “[…] the composition is quite uninteresting […] the straightforward rhythms and melodic formation evoke Sibelius’s youthful works” (sävellys on jokseenkin epäkiintoisa […] mutkaton rytmiikka ja melodianmuodostus tuo mieleen Sibeliuksen nuoruuden työt) and Snöfrid (p. 189): “The orchestral storm and the first lines by the choir are a noble and simultaneously poetic initial rise. But the level does not remain as high when it comes to the programmatic sections” (Orkesterimyrsky ja kuoron ensi repliikit ovat uljas ja samalla runollinen alkunousu. Mutta taso ei pysy yhtä korkeana, kun tullaan ohjelmallisempiin jaksoihin). As mentioned above, Tawaststjerna (p. 157) saw Islossningen i Uleå älv as a preliminary exercise for Finlandia. 86 Tawaststjerna 1967, p. 189: “Jälleen Sibelius oli sävelittänyt runon kannustaakseen maanmiehiään kamppailuun apauden puolesta.” And p. 248: “Tekstinsä valinnalla Sibelius kenties halusi tähdentää, että suomalaiset yhtähyvin kuin helleenit saattoivat kokoontua panateenalaiseen juhlaan tuhon uhatessa.” 87 Finne 1925, p. 20: “lahjakkaalle sellainen antoi tilaisuuden tulla nopeasti tunnetuksi, sillä suuret juhlat kokosivat aikoinaan kaikki henkisen elämän huomattavimmat jäsenet yhteen.”


XVI

Einleitung Die Serie VII der Jean Sibelius Works ( JSW) umfasst mehr als 100 Chorwerke, dabei sowohl a-cappella-Werke als auch Werke mit Begleitung für gemischten Chor, für Männerchor, für Frauenchor sowie für verschiedene Kinderchor-Besetzungen. Der vorliegende Band ( JSW VII/3) enthält vier Werke für Chor und Orchester, die an der Wende vom 19. zum 20. Jahrhundert komponiert und uraufgeführt wurden. Die Werke sind im Band in der Reihenfolge der Opuszahlen angeordnet, was der Chronologie nicht so recht entspricht: das Impromptu op. 19 für Frauenchor und Orchester wurde 1902 komponiert und uraufgeführt, Sandels op. 28 für Männerchor und Orchester 1898 komponiert und 1900 uraufgeführt, Snöfrid op. 29 für Erzähler, gemischten Chor und Orchester 1900 komponiert und uraufgeführt, und Islossningen i Uleå älv op. 30 für Erzähler, Männerchor und Orchester 1899 komponiert und uraufgeführt. Sibelius beabsichtigte, alle vier Werke zu überarbeiten, unternahm dies aber nur bei dem Impromptu (1910) und bei Sandels (1915). Beide Fassungen dieser Werke sind in den vorliegenden Band aufgenommen worden. Zum Hintergrund der Gedichte Bei den vier vorliegenden Werken handelt es sich um Vertonungen von Gedichten dreier schwedischsprachiger Autoren. Viktor Rydberg (1828–1895) war ein schwedischer Schriftsteller, dessen gesammelte Werke, Skrifter af Viktor Rydberg, kurz nach dessen Tod in 14 Bänden herauskamen. Der erste Band dieser Ausgabe, Dikter (Gedichte), wurde 1899 veröffentlicht.1 Sibelius’ Handexemplar der Ausgabe von 1899 (heute in Sibelius’ Wohnhaus Ainola) weist viele handschriftliche Anmerkungen des Komponisten auf. So ist zum Beispiel der Auszug aus Rydbergs umfangreichem Gedicht Lifslust och lifsleda (Lebenslust und Lebensleid), das Sibelius 1902 unter dem Titel Impromptu op. 19 vertonte, durch Bleistiftunterstreichungen hervorgehoben. 1915 plante Sibelius auch die Vertonung einer anderen Passage aus Lifslust och lifsleda – diese Pläne wurden aber nie realisiert (zu Einzelheiten siehe unten, Sandels, „Die revidierte Fassung“). Dikter enthält auch das Gedicht Snöfrid, das Sibelius, wiewohl in leicht gekürzter Form, im Herbst 1900 vertonte. 2 Johan Ludvig Runeberg (1804–1877) erwarb sich zu Lebzeiten den Rang eines finnischen Nationaldichters. Sibelius vertonte während seiner Schaffenszeit viele Gedichte Runebergs. Sandels war ein Teil des 1848 veröffentlichten epischen Gedichts Fänrik Ståls sägner (Fähnrich Ståls Erzählungen).3 Das 1898 von Sibelius vertonte Gedicht beschreibt die Schlacht von Koljonvirta, die am 27. Oktober 1808 als Teil des Russisch-schwedischen Krieges (1808–1809) ausgetragen wurde. Obwohl das Gedicht den wirklichen Kampf schildert und der Protagonist in Johan August Sandels (1764–1831) ein lebendes Vorbild hat, ist die Handlung überwiegend erfunden.4 Zacharias Topelius (1818–1898) war ein finnischer Autor und Historiker, der als Journalist von 1840 bis 1860 für die Helsing fors Tidningar arbeitete.5 Topelius publizierte viele seiner Gedichte, darunter Islossningen i Uleå elf (Eisgang auf dem Uleå-Fluss), zunächst in der Zeitung und nahm sie später in seine Gedichtsammlungen auf. Er schrieb und veröffentlichte Islossningen i Uleå elf 1856 in Zusammenhang mit dem Ende des Krim-Krieges. Der Friedensvertrag wurde am 29. April in Finnland gefeiert – dieser Tag war auch der Geburtstag von Zar Alexander II. In Helsing fors Tidningar wurden die Feierlichkeiten am Tag darauf beschrieben. Das Blatt veröffentlichte dabei auch Topelius’ Islossningen i Uleå elf und fügte den Untertitel Naturtafl a (Naturgemälde) hinzu – wohl, um Zensurmaßnahmen für diese patriotische Allegorie eines Flusses zu vermeiden, der seinen Wunsch verkündet, seine Zukunft selbst zu gestalten und sich vom Eis zu befreien.6 Später überarbeitete Topelius sein Gedicht. Sibelius’ Vertonung geht auf

die Fassung zurück, die 1888 als Teil der Gedichtsammlung Sånger I, Ljungblommor erschien. Impromptu Op. 19 Die erste Fassung Am 8. März 1902 dirigierte Sibelius in Helsinki ein Portraitkonzert mit einem Programm, das nur aus Uraufführungen bestand. Es begann mit der Ouvertüre a-moll JS 144, gefolgt von dem Impromptu op. 19. Das abschließende Hauptwerk war die 2. Symphonie op. 43, die natürlich die meiste Aufmerksamkeit auf sich zog – sowohl in den Ankündigungen als auch in den Zeitungsberichten der darauffolgenden Tage. Bislang wurde angenommen, dass Sibelius sowohl die Ouvertüre als auch das Impromptu gezielt für dieses Konzert komponiert hatte, möglicherweise während der kurzen Zeitspanne zwischen der Fertigstellung der Symphonie im Januar und dem Portraitkonzert.7 Obwohl sehr wenige Dokumente über den Kompositionsprozess überliefert sind, hält das Auftreten von zwei thematischen Bestandteilen im Impromptu, die aus früheren Skizzen stammen, die Möglichkeit aufrecht, dass Sibelius das Werk ziemlich schnell schuf, da es auf bereits vorhandene Ideen zurückgeht.8 Das erste Thema im Impromptu (Vl. I und Vc., ab Takt 5) taucht in einer Skizze auf, die Sibelius selbst in Berlin auf den 22. Januar 1901 datiert hat. Ergänzend zum Datum schrieb er in Bleistift die Worte „memento mori“ neben die melodische Skizze. Es ist unwahrscheinlich, dass die Melodie damals für das Impromptu beabsichtigt war, obwohl die Vergänglichkeit des Lebens dem thematischen Sachverhalt des Werks entspricht. Allem Anschein nach schrieb er den melodischen Gedanken nieder, um ihn später zu verwenden.9 Die in den Bläsern erstmals ab Buchstabe E auftauchende und dann immer wiederkehrende tänzerische Melodie komponierte Sibelius beinahe zehn Jahre vor dem Impromptu. Sie erscheint in Satz II des unvollendeten g-moll-Streichtrios JS 210, das wahrscheinlich auf Mitte der 1890er Jahre zurückgeht.10 Anders als im Impromptu tritt die Melodie im Trio nur in Moll auf. Darüber hinaus weist die Melodie, die im Impromptu in Takt 185–188 (und 189–192) erscheint, gewisse Ähnlichkeiten mit dem ersten Thema von Satz III des Streichtrios auf. Obwohl die Umstände dafür sprechen, dass das Impromptu kurz vor dem Uraufführungskonzert am 8. März 1902 komponiert wurde, bleibt die Datierung ungewiss. Das Konzert, bei dem das Impromptu zum ersten Mal erklang, war überaus erfolgreich. Wegen der großen Nachfrage nach Eintrittskarten wurde das gesamte Programm noch dreimal aufgeführt, zweimal im Festsaal der Universität Helsinki (10. und 14. März), einmal in Palokunnantalo, dem Festsaal der Freiwilligen Feuerwehr (16. März).11 Das Publikum verlangte in jedem Konzert die Wiederholung des Impromptu, und die meisten Zeitungen gaben ein vorteilhaftes Urteil über das Werk ab. Der Komponist und Kritiker Oskar Merikanto (1868–1924) schrieb nach dem ersten Konzert in Päivälehti: „Der Chorsatz war sehr schön, und die sanfte Begleitung von Orchester und Harfe sowie auch das gelegentliche Klicken der Kastagnetten verliehen dem Werk etwas südlichen Charme.“ Merikanto beschloss seinen Bericht mit einer Prophezeiung: „Zweifellos wird dieses Werk mit Klavierbegleitung ein sehr beliebtes Stück werden.“12 Eine Ausnahme unter den ansonsten positiven Stimmen bildete Evert Katila (1872–1945) in Uusi Suometar; er bewertete sowohl die Ouvertüre als auch das Impromptu als „bloße Randerscheinung in dem Konzert“. Er schrieb: „Impromptu für Frauenchor und Orchester ist ganz unterhaltsam, obwohl es überhaupt kein besonderes Eintauchen in den Geist von Rydbergs Gedicht zeigt. Die Orchesterbegleitung geht auf charakteristische Motive zurück, und sie ist so gefärbt, dass


XVII sie dem Ohr schmeichelt, aber die deklamatorische Behandlung der Chorpartie entspricht nicht der dithyrambischen Anlage des Textes.“13 Nach den ersten Konzerten in Helsinki wurde das Impromptu insgesamt fünfmal in verschiedenen finnischen Städten aufgeführt: in Vaasa (April 1902), in Turku (Dezember 1902), in Tampere (April 1903) und in Viipuri (April 1904 und 1905).14 Trotz der günstigen Kritiken nach jeder Aufführung verschwand das Werk danach aus dem Repertoire und blieb zu Sibelius’ Lebzeiten unveröffentlicht – nur die Chorpartitur wurde in einer Faksimileausgabe gedruckt.15 Die Orchesterpartitur im vorliegenden Band stellt die Erstausgabe der ersten Fassung des Impromptu dar. Die revidierte Fassung Im Februar 1910 stellte Sibelius in seinem Tagebuch eine Liste älterer Werke zusammen, die er revidieren wollte. Der erste Eintrag auf der Liste war das Impromptu.16 Er überarbeitete nicht alle Werke dieser Liste, begann aber unverzüglich mit der Arbeit am Impromptu; in einem Tagebucheintrag vom 16. Februar erwähnte er, er habe schon mit der Revision begonnen. Ebenso benannte er im Brief vom 15. Februar an den Verlag Breitkopf & Härtel seine Pläne für das Impromptu. Der Verlag antwortete, er sei erfreut, von solchen Plänen zu hören.17 Die Revision des Impromptu wurde jedoch durch ein anderes Projekt unterbrochen, denn Sibelius entschied sich, auch In memoriam Op. 59 zu überarbeiten, obwohl er dieses Werk nicht in die oben erwähnte Liste aufgenommen hatte. Nach Abschluss der Revision von In memoriam kam er auf das Impromptu zurück, das er Mitte April abschloss.18 Sibelius’ Revision des Impromptu fiel grundlegend aus. Er reduzierte die Instrumentierung, indem er die Trompeten und einen Großteil des Schlagwerks strich – einschließlich der Kastagnetten, die in den Berichten über die Erstfassung ausdrücklich erwähnt worden waren. Andererseits komponierte er auch vollständig neue Passagen für das Werk: Er verwendete einen anderen Textausschnitt, der in Rydbergs Lifslust och lifsleda an späterer Stelle erscheint, und vertonte ihn als Einleitung (Takt 1–18). Sibelius schrieb auch den Schluss vollständig neu. Sogar in den Passagen, in denen er den ursprünglichen Chorpart beibehielt, überarbeitete er den begleitenden Orchestersatz. Am 19. April schickte Sibelius die Reinschrift des revidierten Impromptu an Breitkopf & Härtel. Die Sendung umfasste sowohl die Orchesterpartitur als auch den Klavierauszug. Letzterer war nicht nur zu Probezwecken gedacht, wie Sibelius im Begleitbrief schrieb: „D. Klavierauszug ist so eingerichtet dass man d. benutzen kann bei Aufführungen wo Orchester fehlt.“19 Sibelius hegte große Hoffnungen, dass ihm die Veröffentlichung des Impromptu das dringend benötigte Einkommen liefern würde. Etwa eine Woche zuvor, Anfang April, hatte er – mit der Hilfe seines Freundes und Gönners Axel Carpelan (1858–1919) – erreicht, seine Wechsel zu verlängern, aber seine Geldnot war weiterhin akut. 20 Die Antwort von Breitkopf & Härtel fiel enttäuschend aus. Dem Angebot ging eine längere Einleitung voraus, in der der Verlag Sibelius’ Unzufriedenheit vorwegzunehmen scheint: „Wir haben Ihnen bei den letzten Werken, die wir das Vergnügen hatten von Ihnen zu erhalten, ohne weiteres die Honorare angenommen, die Sie vorschlugen. Wenn wir Sie aber heute bitten von der von Ihnen geforderten Summe abzugehen, so hat dies seine besonderen Gründe. Ein Werk für Damenchor mit Orchester hat nämlich in Deutschland und auch in anderen Ländern so gut wie gar keine Aussicht aufgeführt zu werden. Die wenigen Damenchöre, die wir besitzen, sind nicht in der Lage ein Orchester für Ihre Aufführungen zu bezahlen und beschränken sich ausschliesslich auf Werke mit Klavierbegleitung. Aber auch der Absatz in dieser Besetzung ist äusserst gering, obwohl gerade in diesem Genre [d. h. Frauenchor mit Orchesterbegleitung] manch feines liebenswürdiges Werk geschaffen worden ist.“21 Nach dieser Eröffnung bot Breitkopf & Härtel anstelle der von Sibelius geforderten 2.500 Rmk für die Orchesterpartitur und den Kla-

vierauszug zusammen 1.000 Rmk bei einer Auflage von jeweils 1.000 Exemplaren an. 22 In seinem Tagebuch reagierte Sibelius darauf wie folgt: „Heute kam von B&H ein sehr niederschmetterndes Angebot. Muss wieder Bilanz ziehen.“23 Schließlich entschloss sich Sibelius, das Angebot trotz seiner Enttäuschung anzunehmen. Neun Tage später schrieb er in sein Tagebuch: „Da ich nur 1.000 Rmk von B&H erhielt, muss ich wieder einmal auf ,Brotarbeiten‘ zurückfallen. Lieder?!“ Der Verlagsvertrag zu Klavierauszug und Orchesterpartitur des Impromptu wurde am 24. Mai 1910 unterschrieben.24 Die Vorbereitungen zur Veröffentlichung des Klavierauszugs begannen kurz darauf. Die Produktion verzögerte sich jedoch, da die deutsche Übersetzung von Rydbergs Gedicht (durch Julius Boruttau) länger dauerte als erwartet. Die Korrekturfahnen wurden am 17. Oktober an Sibelius geschickt, und der Klavierauszug erschien im November 1910. Zusätzlich zum originalen schwedischen Text und zu der erwähnten deutschen Übersetzung enthält der Klavierauszug auch eine Textunterlegung in englischer Sprache von Rosa Newmarch.25 Bis zur ersten Aufführung der revidierten Fassung des Impromptu dauerte es noch einmal eineinhalb Jahre. Schließlich fand die Erstaufführung am 29. März 1912 statt – unter dem Titel Lifslust/Elämänhalu (Lebenslust) und mit Impromptu als Untertitel. Da die Orchesterpartitur nicht veröffentlicht war, bat Sibelius Breitkopf & Härtel, für das Konzert die autographe Partitur zurückzusenden. Der Verlag kam dieser Bitte nach und schickte sowohl die Partitur als auch handschriftliche Orchesterstimmen. 26 Das Konzertprogramm bestand aus der 4. Symphonie op. 63 als Eröffnungsstück, gefolgt von Rakastava für Streichorchester op. 14 und Scènes historiques II op. 66. Die Erstaufführung des überarbeiteten Impromptu stand am Schluss. Sibelius dirigierte das Konzert selbst. In Dagens Tidning berichtete ein anonymer Kritiker am Tag darauf: „Die Aufführung der Symphonie litt irgendwie unter Nervosität, das Orchester profilierte sich hingegen in beiden Suiten [op. 14 und op. 66], insbesondere die Bläser; verzaubert war man von den hervorragenden Stimmen der an der Chorkomposition beteiligten Frauen. Der Komponist war selbst der Dirigent und führte seine Werke mit Herzblut auf.“27 Das Impromptu wurde in den Berichten nur kurz beschrieben, das Hauptinteresse galt der 4. Symphonie. Die Kritiken lobten das Impromptu allgemein, beklagten aber den Mangel an rhythmischer Präzision in der Chorpartie. Die Reaktion des Publikums war nichtsdestotrotz enthusiastisch, und der Komponist wurde vor dem Konzertsaal von der Menge gefeiert und bejubelt. Das Programm wurde zweimal wiederholt (am 30. März und am 3. April 1912). 28 Die Spuren über den Aufenthaltsort der autographen Orchesterpartitur verlieren sich nach der Erstaufführung; anscheinend hat Sibelius sie dem Verlag nicht mehr zurückgeschickt.29 Entgegen dem Verlagsvertrag ließ Breitkopf & Härtel keine Orchesterpartitur stechen. Bis zum Erscheinen des vorliegenden Bandes, der die erste gestochene Orchesterpartitur des Impromptu enthält, existierte die vollständige Partitur nur in zwei zeitgenössischen Manuskripten, die sich in fremder Hand befinden.30 Die Opuszahl 19 erhielt das Impromptu ursprünglich nicht von Sibelius: es erscheint 1905 in einem seiner Werkverzeichnisse als Opus 34. Die endgültige Opuszahl wurde 1910 während der Überarbeitung vergeben. Gedruckt erschien das Werk als „op. 19“ erstmals im Klavierauszug aus demselben Jahr.31 Sandels op. 28 Die erste Fassung Um den herannahenden 20. Jahrestag seines ersten öffentlichen Auftritts zu feiern, organisierte der in Helsinki ansässige Männerchor Muntra Musikanter (Lustige Musikanten [= MM]) im Frühjahr 1898 einen Kompositionswettbewerb, der Mitte Januar in ganz Finnland in einigen Zeitungen angezeigt wurde. Einsendungen sollten spätestens


XVIII bis zum 20. April erfolgen, und das Ergebnis sollte am Jahrestag selbst, am 11. Mai 1898, bekanntgegeben werden. Der Wettbewerb war offen für neue Kompositionen für Männerchor – entweder a cappella oder mit Klavier oder mit Orchesterbegleitung. Ausdrücklich betont wurde in den Anzeigen, dass die einzureichenden Werke in keiner Weise die damals akute finnisch-schwedische Sprachdebatte aufgreifen sollten.32 Im Februar 1898 reiste Sibelius mit seiner Frau Aino nach Berlin. Während seines Aufenthalts vertonte er Johan Ludvig Runebergs Sandels und reichte sein Werk bei dem MM-Wettbewerb ein, wobei er das Pseudonym Homo verwendete. Die genauen Daten, wann Sibelius das Werk abschloss und wann er es einsandte, sind unbekannt. Dass er die Orchesterpartitur vor dem Einsendeschluss (20. April) nach Finnland schickte, kann aus der Korrespondenz zwischen ihm und Aino abgeleitet werden. Jean blieb bis Ende Mai in Berlin, wohingegen Aino Anfang April nach Finnland zurückgekehrt war. In einem Brief vom 13. April bat Jean Aino, eine Änderung in der Orchesterpartitur vorzunehmen – dies weist unmissverständlich darauf hin, dass die Partitur zu diesem Zeitpunkt in Finnland war. Am 22. April schickte Sibelius einen weiteren Brief an Aino und entschuldigte sich für seine damalige Bitte um eine Änderung, weil er jetzt in derselben Passage noch eine weitere Änderung machen wolle. Aino hingegen erwiderte in ihrem Brief vom selben Tag (22. April), sie habe die Änderung, um die er sie in seinem früheren Brief gebeten hatte, erfolgreich ausgeführt.33 Sibelius, der sich noch in Berlin aufhielt, war darauf erpicht, etwas über das Ergebnis zu erfahren. Er bat Aino, ihm direkt nach der Bekanntgabe ein Telegramm zu schicken. Er machte sich auch über das Preisgeld Gedanken: „Ich frage mich, ob mir Sandels etwas einbringt. Sollte zumindest etwas [geben].“34 Aus unbekannten Gründen wurde das Ergebnis nicht, wie geplant, am Jahrestag veröffentlicht, sondern mehr als zwei Wochen später am 27. Mai 1898. Ein möglicher Grund für die Verzögerung lag darin, dass insgesamt 24 Werke unter 17 Pseudonymen für den Wettbewerb eingereicht worden waren. Laut Mikko Slöör hatte die Jury Sibelius’ schöne Orchestrierung besonders gelobt, einige Jurymitglieder hätten aber Bedenken gehegt, ob der Choranteil in Sandels nicht so klein sei, dass dieses Werk nicht mehr als Chormusik gelten könne.35 Nichtsdestotrotz gewann Sandels den ersten Preis und Sibelius erhielt 700 Fmk.36 Die Uraufführung von Sandels – durch Muntra Musikanter und das Orchester der Philharmonischen Gesellschaft Helsinki unter der Leitung von Gösta Sohlström – fand zwei Jahre später, am 16. März 1900, im Festsaal der Universität Helsinki statt. Das Programm bestand sowohl aus a-cappella-Werken als auch aus Werken mit Orchesterbegleitung; es wurde am 18. März im Festsaal der Freiwilligen Feuerwehr (Palokunnantalo) wiederholt. Sibelius berichtete Aino, die sich zu dieser Zeit in Lohja aufhielt und dem Konzert nicht beiwohnen konnte, dass die Uraufführung ein Erfolg gewesen und er danach auf die Bühne gerufen worden sei.37 Überraschenderweise richtete sich das Hauptaugenmerk in den Berichten nicht auf das neue Sibelius-Werk, sondern auf die schwache Qualität des Chores. Die Kritiken waren gnadenlos: „Kurz gesagt: ein unerwartetes Fiasko“, schrieb Aftonposten. Andere waren nicht so knapp und verwendeten vielmehr einige Abschnitte darauf, den Chor niederzumachen. „Ja, er ist tot und in Auflösung begriffen, der MM-Chor!“ schloss der Bericht in Nya Pressen, und Uusi Suometar ergänzte: „Sic transit gloria mundi!“38 Um Sibelius’ Komposition zu beschreiben, gebrauchten die meisten Berichte Begriffe aus der Bildenden Kunst. So schrieb zum Beispiel der Kritiker in Nya Pressen: „,Sandels‘ ist ein Tongemälde, das wir ohne Zögern an der Spitze von allen Kompositionen ansiedeln, die Herr Sibelius in derselben Gattung geschaffen hat. […] Ohne in Detailmalerei zu verfallen, was das Werk in Einzelteile zerlegen würde, hat er sein Thema episch verstanden – und dies dennoch in dramatisch lebendiger und lyrisch wirkungsvoller Art.“39 Zwei Wochen später, am 31. März 1900, wurde Sandels im Seurahuone (Gesellschaftshaus) von denselben Interpreten aufgeführt – bei einer

Soiree, die veranstaltet worden war, um die Kosten der für Sommer 1900 geplanten Reise zur Weltausstellung nach Paris abzudecken.40 Den Berichten zufolge war die Qualität der Aufführung nicht besser als bei der Uraufführung. Ein anonymer Kritiker beklagte am 1. April in Hufvudstadsbladet des Weiteren, dass das Werk dreimal mehr Sänger benötige als aktuell vorhanden seien, weil es unmöglich sei, etwas von dem unterbesetzten Chor zu hören. Darüber hinaus lag dem Publikum Runebergs Text nicht vor, worauf – so der Kritiker – es praktisch nicht möglich sei, während der Aufführung der Handlung zu folgen.41 Das Publikum war jedoch gnädiger und spendete eine ganze Menge Applaus, so dass der Schlusschor (ab dem Probebuchstaben R) aus Sandels als Zugabe aufgeführt wurde. MM und Sibelius schlossen weder während des Wettbewerbs noch im Umfeld der Uraufführung einen Verlagsvertrag über Sandels ab, so dass das Stück letztlich unveröffentlicht blieb; nur die Chorpartie erschien im Druck. Zu Lebzeiten des Komponisten wurde die Erstfassung von Sandels nur einmal (1908) aufgeführt.42 Im vorliegenden Band liegt die Erstausgabe der Orchesterpartitur vor. Die revidierte Fassung Die Absicht, Sandels zu überarbeiten, taucht 1913 und 1914 in Sibelius’ Tagebuch und in seiner Korrespondenz auf. Sibelius erläuterte die Notwendigkeit der Revision mit dem Argument, dass Sandels in der Erstfassung „nicht plastisch genug“ sei.43 Die Revisionspläne verdichteten sich erst, als Muntra Musikanter ein Konzert zu Sibelius’ 50. Geburtstag im Dezember 1915 organisierte – mit einem Programm, das ausschließlich aus Sibelius-Werken bestand und Sandels mit einschloss. Sibelius und MM arbeiteten 1914/15 eng zusammen, als der Chor in diesen Jahren bei Sibelius fünf Kompositionen in Auftrag gab: vier a-cappella-Werke, die heute als op. 84 Nr. 1–4 bekannt sind, und ein Werk für Männerchor und Orchester. Diesen letztgenannten Auftrag erfüllte Sibelius nicht, aber die Entstehung ist mit der Revision von Sandels verflochten. Der Auftrag über das neue Werk für Männerchor und Orchester wurde im Februar 1915 erteilt.44 Es ist wenig darüber bekannt, wobei der Arbeitstitel Unge hellener, unter dem das Werk sowohl in der Korrespondenz über diesen Auftrag als auch in Sibelius’ Tagebuch geführt wird, nahelegt, dass der Komponist einen Ausschnitt aus Rydbergs Lifslust och lifsleda vertonen wollte, der auch den im Impromptu op. 19 verwendeten Ausschnitt beinhaltet. Im April und Mai skizzierte Sibelius das Werk eingehend und äußerte sich in mehreren Tagebucheinträgen frustriert über den langsamen Fortgang.45 Vermutlich beschloss er am 21. Mai, die Textvorlage auszutauschen.46 Der letzte Tagebucheintrag, in der der MM-Auftrag auftaucht, stammt vom 21. Juni. Am 19. Juli ging MM mit der Anfrage auf Sibelius zu, ob der Chor das Copyright für Sandels besitzen würde – insbesondere, wenn Sibelius das Werk überarbeiten würde. Die Tatsache, dass 1898 faktisch kein Verlagsvertrag abgeschlossen worden war, verkomplizierte die Copyright-Frage aus der Sicht des Chores. Am 23. Juli wurde die Sache geklärt: Der Chor verwendete den Betrag von 1.200 Fmk, der ursprünglich für den Auftrag zu Unge hellener zurückgelegt worden war, um die Verlagsrechte an der überarbeiteten Fassung von Sandels zu erwerben, und der Vertrag über das neue Werk wurde aufgelöst.47 Ein verwirrendes Detail zur Geschichte der überarbeiteten Fassung liefert Sibelius’ Tagebucheintrag von eben jenem Tag, an dem der Verlagsvertrag über Sandels unterzeichnet wurde: „[Ich] beschloss, Sandels nicht zu überarbeiten. Es soll als ein ,document humain‘ aus dem Jahr 1898 gelten. Oder korrekter: aus [18]97.“48 Dies war jedoch nur ein vorübergehendes Zögern, da Sibelius die Revision innerhalb einer Woche abschloss. Wie ursprünglich beabsichtigt, veranstaltete MM das Sibelius-Konzert am 14. Dezember 1915, obwohl Olof Wallin (1884–1920), der die Planung entworfen und die Aufträge organisiert hatte, von seinem Amt


XIX als künstlerischer Leiter des Chores zurückgetreten war. Der erste Abschnitt des Geburtstagskonzerts bestand aus a-cappella-Werken von Sibelius, die von dem neuen künstlerischen Leiter, Ragnar Hollmerus (1886–1954), dirigiert wurden. In Zusammenarbeit mit dem Stadtorchester unter der Leitung von Georg Schnéevoigt (1872–1947) wurde der zweite Abschnitt durchgeführt. Er umfasste Vårsång op. 16, Sandels in der revidierten Fassung und zum Abschluss Athenarnes sång op. 31 Nr. 3.49 MM hatte sowohl alle früheren Mitglieder als auch einen anderen Männerchor, Akademiska Sångföreningen, zur Teilnahme an den beiden begleiteten Stücken (Sandels und Athenarnes sång) eingeladen.50 Trotz des erweiterten Chores hätte der Kritiker von Hufvudstadsbladet gern mehr Sänger auf der Bühne gesehen: „Wäre der Chor größer gewesen, wäre das Ende eindrucksvoller ausgefallen.“51 Was Sandels betrifft, so betonten die Kritiker erneut dessen beschreibende Qualitäten: „Sandels, Sibelius’ einzigartiges Tongemälde über das bekannte Gedicht Runebergs, begeisterte das Auditorium voll und ganz. Der Schauplatz führt Sandels’ Schwelgerei, den heißblütigen Gemütszustand seines Adjutanten und das Kriegsgetümmel an der Partala-Brücke auf meisterhafte Art vor Augen. Es ist eine locker dahingeworfene Komik, mit der das Orchester das historische Frühstück des ,Generals‘ und des ,Ministers‘ gemütlich schildert. […] In dieser Gattung ist es zweifelsohne das Beste, was Sibelius hervorgebracht hat.“52 Den Wettbewerbsbedingungen von 1898 zufolge war es den Einsendungen untersagt gewesen, sich auf die damals akute Sprachdebatte zu beziehen. Etwa fünfzehn Jahre später sah dies ganz anders aus. Der Kritiker der schwedischsprachigen Zeitung Hufvudstadsbladet hob beispielsweise die schwedischen Qualitäten in Sibelius’ Werk hervor: „Sibelius hat Sandels’ vornehmen, wahrhaft schwedischen, glänzend schneidigen Charakter, seine mit ein wenig epikuräischer Pikanterie versehene beißende Intelligenz und Heldenhaftigkeit, sein unwiderstehliches und sonnig bezauberndes Schwedentum im besten Sinn des Begriffs hervorgebracht. Seine Beschreibung von Sandels in dem Dorf Partala ist hervorragend. Die Szene ist in lebhaften Farben gemalt.“53 Trotz des Verlagsvertrags zwischen Sibelius und MM wurden weder die Partitur noch die Stimmen jemals gestochen oder gedruckt; das Werk wurde aber aus handgeschriebenem Orchestermaterial, das sich im Besitz des Chores befand, aufgeführt. MM veröffentlichte eine gesetzte Ausgabe der Chorpartitur (d. h. nur die Chorstimmen ohne Klavierauszug). Die Orchesterpartitur von Sandels wird im vorliegenden Band erstmals veröffentlicht. Snöfrid op. 29 Im Sommer des Jahres 1900 begab sich das Orchester der Philharmonischen Gesellschaft von Helsinki auf eine Europatournee, die auch Konzerte bei der Weltausstellung in Paris umfasste. Für die Finanzierung der Tournee hatte das Orchester einen Kredit aufgenommen, und es veranstaltete daher am 20. Oktober eine Lotteriesoiree, um zumindest einen Teil der Ausgaben zu decken. In einem Brief beschrieb Sibelius seinem Freund Adolf Paul am 14. September 1900 die Lage: „Wir müssen hier ungefähr 80.000 [Fmk] sammeln, um [die Ausgaben für] unsere Reise abzudecken. Wie Du Dir vorstellen kannst, komme ich nicht mit einer kleinen Kompositionsarbeit davon. Das ist der Schlamassel, in dem ich mich befinde.“54 Die „kleine Kompositionsarbeit“ war Snöfrid. Über den Entstehungsprozess sind wenige Informationen überliefert. Wesentlich später, 1943, erzählte Sibelius seinem Schwiegersohn Jussi Jalas: „Ich komponierte Snöfrid mehr oder weniger in einer Sitzung, nachdem ich von einem dreitägigen Gelage heimgekommen war.“55 Sibelius vertonte nicht das ganze Gedicht Rydbergs. Aus der ersten Abteilung wählte er lediglich den Dialog zwischen den beiden Protagonisten, Gunnar und Snöfrid, aus; die zweite Abteilung erscheint in Gänze als Schlusschor (ab Takt

285). So gibt Sibelius’ Vertonung den Hörern am Anfang keinen verbalen Zugang: die stürmische Nacht als Grundfarbe des Gedichts wird beispielsweise nur in der Musik dargestellt. Auch das Verhältnis der Protagonisten zueinander erklärt sich nicht aus den Ausschnitten, die Sibelius vertont hat. Das Programm, das Anfang des 20. Jahrhunderts dem Publikum bei vielen Aufführungen ausgehändigt wurde, enthielt jedoch das ganze Gedicht Rydbergs und nicht nur die Passagen, die Sibelius verwendet hat.56 In den Anzeigen, die die Soiree ankündigten, wurde Snöfrid als Hauptattraktion dargestellt: „Wir können und wollen nicht alles vorab aufzählen, was in dem Programm vorgestellt wird, aber wir erlauben uns darauf hinzuweisen, dass Sibelius nur für diese Gelegenheit eine grandiose Musik zu ,Snöfrid‘, Viktor Rydbergs schönem Gedicht, komponiert hat. Allein diese Nummer soll genügen, unser Interesse zu wecken. Wir sind inzwischen gewohnt, von jeder neuen SibeliusKomposition ergriffen und bezaubert zu werden, da er sein kreatives Genie auf immer höhere Perfektionsebenen hebt.“57 Die Ankündigung war wirkungsvoll: das Gesellschaftshaus (Seurahuone) war voll und alle 12.000 Lotterielose wurden verkauft. Die Soiree begann mit einer gekürzten Fassung von Orfeo ed Euridice von Christoph Willibald Gluck, auf die Szenen (tableaux vivants) einiger finnischer Künstler folgten. Die beiden letzten Nummern im Programm waren Franz Listzs Ungarische Fantasie (den Soloklavier-Part spielte Karl Ekman [1869–1947]) und Sibelius’ Snöfrid. Neun Tage später, am 29. Oktober, wurden die beiden großen Musikstücke, Orfeo und Snöfrid, erneut in einem Konzert gespielt. Die Berichte – sowohl zur Soirée als auch zur Konzertaufführung – lobten die Musik in Snöfrid. Die Beiträge des Chors (einstudiert von Thérèse Hahl [1842–1911]) und des Sprechers Katri Rautio (1864–1952) ernteten ebenfalls höchstes Lob. Über Snöfrid schrieb Evert Katila in Uusi Suometar: „Die wild-bewegte Atmosphäre zu Beginn, das Melodrama mit einer eigentümlichen Blechbläserbegleitung und der himmlisch strahlende, von warmer Inspiration geprägte Schluss, in dem das Streichorchester das großartig weite und außergewöhnlich tiefe Lied im Unisono singt, fanden zu einem friedlichen, harmonischen Ganzen mit herausragenden Merkmalen zusammen.“58 Der anonyme Kritiker in Päivälehti äußerte auch einen Wunsch: „Hoffentlich erleidet dieses Melodrama nicht ein ähnliches Schicksal wie so viele andere Werke von Sibelius, die nach der Uraufführung nicht mehr zu hören waren. Viele dieser Gelegenheitskompositionen desselben Meisters sind solche Perlen und Schätze unserer Musikliteratur, dass sie nicht im Trubel eines festlichen Abends verschwinden sollten. Was dieses letzte Erzeugnis von Sibelius angeht, so zeigt es Fortschritte unter allen Aspekten: die herzliche Wärme, die Atmosphäre als Ganzes, die deskriptiven Qualitäten und die Verwendung des Chores.“59 Der Wunsch des Kritikers wurde erfüllt. Snöfrid wurde in Helsinki nur einen Monat später, am 15. November 1900, wieder aufgeführt, und es blieb danach in den Konzertprogrammen einiger finnischer Städte. In den Folgejahren wurde es beispielsweise im Dezember 1902 in Turku, im März 1903 in Tampere, im Dezember 1904 in Pori und Oulu, im April 1905 in Viipuri, im Januar und Dezember in Vaasa sowie im Dezember 1906 in Oulu gespielt.60 Trotz der verschiedenen erfolgreichen Aufführungen und des vorläufigen Interesses, das der Verleger Karl Wasenius in Helsinki zeigte, blieben die Orchesterpartitur und die Stimmen von Snöfrid lange Zeit unveröffentlicht – nur die Chorpartitur erschien als Lithographie 1904 im Druck.61 Sibelius verkaufte die Verlagsrechte 1915 für die Summe von 1.000 Fmk an den Verlag A. E. Lindgren in Helsinki. Der Vertrag führte letztlich zu keinem Ergebnis, und die Rechte gingen im Oktober 1917 an Sibelius zurück.62 Ein Jahr später verkaufte Sibelius das Werk erneut, diesmal an den Verlag R. E. Westerlund in Helsinki. Der am 7. Mai 1918 geschlossene Vertrag beinhaltet sowohl die Partitur als auch die Klavierbearbeitung (für insgesamt 1.500 Fmk).63 Die Veröffentlichung verzögerte


XX sich indes. Vier Jahre später informierte Westerlund Sibelius darüber, dass die Ausgabe im Herbst 1922 endlich gedruckt werden könne. Der Verlag hatte Übersetzungen ins Deutsche und ins Finnische in Auftrag gegeben, um sie dem schwedischen Text beizugeben, und die Klavierbearbeitung (wohl von Karl Ekman) war für Sibelius zur Durchsicht fertig.64 Aus unbekannten Gründen veröffentlichte Westerlund Snöfrid aber zu dieser Zeit in keiner Form, sondern verkaufte die Auslandsrechte 1927 an die Edition Wilhelm Hansen. Ohne Zögern begann Hansen mit der Arbeit, und im September 1927 las Sibelius die ersten Korrekturfahnen. Wie viele Korrekturabzüge Sibelius las, ist nicht bekannt, aber Wilhelm Hansen bat Sibelius noch im April 1929 um die Rücksendung der Partiturabzüge, damit man mit dem Stich der darauf zurückgehenden Orchesterstimmen beginnen könne.65 Sibelius las auch die Abzüge für Karl Ekmans Klavierbearbeitung, die im April 1929 herauskam.66 Die Erstausgabe von Orchesterpartitur und Stimmen (einschließlich der Chorstimmen) erfolgte im Dezember 1929 – fast 30 Jahre nach der Uraufführung.67 Die Partitur enthielt nur die originale schwedische Textunterlegung, die finnische und die deutsche Übersetzung waren hingegen in den Vokalstimmen und in dem ein halbes Jahr zuvor erschienenen Klavierauszug eingefügt. Westerlund, der die finnischen Rechte an Snöfrid zurückbehalten hatte, druckte 1930 die Chorpartitur in zwei Fassungen: eine mit finnischer und eine mit schwedischer Textunterlegung.68 1943 unternahm Wilhelm Hansen einen Nachdruck der Orchesterpartitur, ohne Sibelius zu benachrichtigen. Nachdem dieser die neu gedruckte Partitur erhalten hatte, schickte er dem Verleger einen Brief, in dem er verschiedene Druckfehler kommentierte.69 Der Verleger entgegnete, dass es ihm „in den gegenwärtigen Umständen“ (d. h. in Kriegszeiten) nicht möglich sei, Korrekturabzüge zu verschicken, man aber mit dem Druck nicht habe warten wollen. Bei diesem Briefwechsel fragte Wilhelm Hansen Sibelius auch, ob er eine englische Übersetzung von Snöfrid habe, da man nach Kriegsende eine Orchesterpartitur mit finnischer, deutscher und englischer Übersetzung herausbringen wolle.70 Der letzte Abschnitt (ab Takt 285) war im April 1902 einzeln zur Eröffnung des Nationaltheaters Helsinki aufgeführt worden. Zu diesem Anlass hatte man den Schriftsteller Volter Kilpi (1874–1939) mit einem neuen Text beauftragt. Kilpis Text war keine Übersetzung von Rydbergs Vorlage, sondern eine vollständig neue Fassung mit dem Titel Taiteelle (An die Kunst). Einige Zeitungen berichteten irrtümlich, Sibelius habe Kilpis Text zu diesem Anlass neu vertont. Infolgedessen dachte man später, ebenso fälschlich, die Sibelius-Komposition mit dem Titel Taiteelle sei verloren gegangen – bis Fabian Dahlström 1985 das Missverständnis aufklärte.71 Islossningen i Uleå älv op. 30 Sibelius vertonte Zacharias Topelius’ Gedicht Islossningen i Uleå elf (Eisgang auf dem Uleå-Fluss) für einen festlichen Abend, der am 21. Oktober 1899 stattfand. Diese Soiree wurde von Savo-Karjalainen Osakunta (Verbindung der an der Universität Helsinki Studierenden aus Savonia-Karelien) organisiert, um Geld für die Volksaufklärung zu sammeln, die sich in ihrer Heimat im Aufbau befand.72 Über den Kompositionsprozess ist sehr wenig bekannt, so ist beispielsweise bisher nur eine kurze Skizze identifiziert, die Material zu Islossningen i Uleå älv enthält.73 Jalmari Finne, einer der Organisatoren des Abends, erinnerte sich später, dass Islossningen i Uleå älv kurz vor der Soiree fertig wurde, womit die Musiker ihre Stimmen gerade noch rechtzeitig erhielten, während der Sprecher Axel Ahlberg sich mit der Musik nicht mehr vertraut machen konnte.74 Am Tag vor der Uraufführung veröffentlichte Karl Flodin einen ausführlichen Einführungstext zu dem Werk, der dessen Form und Inhalt

beschreibt. Nach Flodin „hat Herr Sibelius mit ,Islossningen i Uleå älv‘ eine wundervolle, imaginär schöne Musik zu einer der wundervollen lyrischen Naturgemälde von Topelius geschaffen“. Flodin hielt vor allem die Adagio-Passage für bemerkenswert: „Dieser Abschnitt erzeugt eine ergreifende Wirkung und führt die ganze musikalische Komposition zum Höhepunkt. Jeder gewöhnliche Komponist hätte den stolzen Sieg des Flusses zweifellos mit fröhlichen FortissimoAkkorden untermalt – Sibelius aber ist imstande, bei seiner Beschreibung die höchste Steigerung auf eine viel effektivere Art hervorzurufen, indem er ein bezaubernd mildes und friedliches Pianissimo-Licht beibehält, das so unerwartet wie seltsam gegen das aufschäumend wilde Naturgemälde brandet, das ihm vorausgegangen ist.“75 Die Soiree fand im Gesellschaftshaus in Helsinki statt. Das musikalische Programm enthielt zwei Sibelius-Werke: Zusätzlich zur Uraufführung von Islossningen i Uleå älv dirigierte er auch Athenarnes sång, das sechs Monate zuvor erstmals erklungen war.76 Die Soiree war erfolgreich, wenn auch ein Ausfall der Elektrik die Organisatoren dazu zwang, in letzter Minute die Programmfolge zu ändern. Islossningen i Uleå älv wurde von einem begeisterten Publikum empfangen, das den Komponisten mehrfach auf die Bühne rief.77 Nach der Uraufführung wurde Islossningen i Uleå älv innerhalb eines Monats in Vaasa aufgeführt. Diese Darbietung war Teil der Pressefeiern, eines dreitägigen Festivals (3.–5. November), das in verschiedenen finnischen Städten organisiert wurde, um Geld für die Pressepensionskasse zusammenzubringen.78 Islossningen i Uleå älv war am 5. November die Hauptattraktion in der Stadthalle von Vaasa. Die ursprüngliche Instrumentierung wurde geändert, um das Werk dem kleineren Ensemble in Vaasa anzupassen. Die Änderungen sind in Sibelius’ autographer Orchesterpartitur sichtbar, stammen aber nicht von ihm selbst: sie gehen wahrscheinlich auf Ferdinand Neisser zurück, der die Aufführung dirigierte.79 Islossningen i Uleå älv wurde auch an diesem Ort enthusiastisch gefeiert und sofort da capo gespielt. Nur einen Monat später wurde es in Vaasa erneut aufgeführt, als es am 2. Dezember 1899 in dem Programm des sogenannten Populärkonzerts erklang. Nach dem Erfolg in Vaasa wurde das Werk einige Monate später in ein Programm in Turku aufgenommen,80 danach aber verschwand es aus dem Konzertrepertoire. Um 1910 hegte Sibelius Pläne, Islossningen i Uleå älv zu überarbeiten, und er schrieb „sollte revidiert werden“ (bör omarbetas) auf die Titelseite. Das Werk blieb jedoch unrevidiert und unveröffentlicht.81 Der vorliegende Band enthält die Erstausgabe der Orchesterpartitur des Werkes. Interpretationen des Untertitels Improvisation Sandels, Snöfrid und Islossningen i Uleå älv erscheinen in Sibelius’ Werkverzeichnissen vom dem ersten Jahrzehnt des 20. Jahrhunderts an mit den Opuszahlen 28–30. In einem Werkverzeichnis aus dem Jahr 1914 ergänzte Sibelius zu jedem der drei Werke den Untertitel Improvisation. Im Folgejahr fasste er diese drei Improvisationen unter der Opuszahl 28 zusammen und gab ihnen den Titel Tre improvisationer för kör och orkester (Drei Improvisationen für Chor und Orchester). Diese geänderte Opuszählung erschien in keinem gedruckten Werkverzeichnis und auch in keiner gedruckten Partitur, da Sibelius letztlich auf seinen ursprünglichen Plan zurückkam und jedem Werk eine eigene Opuszahl gab. Den Untertitel Improvisation behielt er jedoch für jedes Werk bei.82 Viele Sibelius-Biographen machten sich über die mögliche Bedeutung des Untertitels Improvisation Gedanken. Erik Furuhjelm interpretiert in der allerersten Sibelius-Biographie (1916) den Begriff als Ableitung aus dem Wort/Ton-Verhältnis, bei dem die Musik dem Inhalt des programmatischen Textes, den sie beschreibt, untergeordnet ist. Furuhjelm schreibt: „Islossningen i Uleå älv bemüht sich nicht, als musikalische Einheit gesehen zu werden. Der Komponist hat nämlich


XXI in seinem Werk der literarischen Komponente – d. h. dem Melodrama – einen sehr prominenten Platz zugewiesen. Seine Bedeutung liegt in der symbolischen Naturschilderung, die durch starkes Pathos dargestellt wird und ihren Höhepunkt im eindrucksvollen, dur-geprägten Orchesterbrausen findet.“ Über Snöfrid schreibt er: „Was in Rydbergs Gedicht allegorisch ist, wird in Sibelius’ Komposition fasslicher.“ Über Sandels hingegen urteilt er, dieses Werk sei „stark geprägt von einer durchgehenden, realistischen Darstellung [des Gedichts]“.83 Cecil Gray verfolgt die Idee, das Wort/Ton-Verhältnis sei im Zentrum dessen, was der Begriff Improvisation bedeute, in seiner Sibelius-Biographie (1931) weiter. Er beschreibt die drei Werke folgendermaßen: „Sie sind tatsächlich eher Intensivierungen der Poesie als Werke von eigenständiger musikalischer Bedeutung. Die Worte besitzen größere Tragweite als die Musik, folglich werden kontrapunktische Kunstgriffe, die dazu tendieren, den natürlichen Fluss und die Bewegung zu behindern, komplett vermieden, und die Chortextur bewegt sich häufig im Unisono und in Oktaven, während das Orchester einen klanglichen Hintergrund oder eine Begleitung liefert, die keine große Unabhängigkeit aufweist. Davon abgesehen sollten diese Werke bei ihrer Aufführung höchst wirkungsvoll sein.“84 In seiner einflussreichen Sibelius-Biographie gibt Erik Tawaststjerna eine abweichende Interpretation von der Bedeutung des Untertitels; er weist darauf hin, dass die drei Improvisationen von geringerem künstlerischem Wert seien, weil sie ursprünglich als Gelegenheitswerke komponiert wurden. Aus seiner Sicht „sollte der Untertitel wahrscheinlich anzeigen, dass sich der Komponist dessen bewusst war“.85 Tawaststjerna betont in seiner Lesart der Improvisationen auch den Patriotismus. Neben den Runeberg- und Topelius-Vertonungen sieht er auch Snöfrid in erster Linie als patriotische Äußerung: „Wieder hatte Sibelius ein Gedicht vertont, um seine Landsleute zum Freiheitskampf zu ermutigen.“ Tawaststjernas patriotische Lesart erstreckt sich auch auf Impromptu: „Mit seiner Textwahl wollte Sibelius vielleicht betonen, dass sich im Angesicht drohender Unterwerfung Finnen ebenso gut wie Hellenen zu einem panathenäischen Fest versammeln können.“86 Obwohl Gelegenheitswerke oft außerhalb des Hauptrepertoires eines Komponisten angesiedelt sind, betont Jalmari Finne – ein finnischer Autor und Theaterintendant, der bei mehrfachen Gelegenheiten mit Sibelius zusammenarbeitete –, dass Gelegenheitsmusik wie die drei Improvisationen eine bedeutende Rolle spielten, wenn man sich bei den Zuhörern Anerkennung verschaffen wollte: „Diese Anlässe gaben einem begabten [Komponisten] Gelegenheit, schnell ein Zeichen zu setzen, weil in jener Zeit die großen Veranstaltungen alle bedeutenden Vertreter des kulturellen Lebens zusammenbrachten.“87 Allen, die zum Entstehen des vorliegenden Bandes beigetragen haben, sei gedankt, vor allem aber meinen Kollegen Kari Kilpeläinen, Kai Lindberg, Anna Pulkkis, Tuija Wicklund und Timo Virtanen, sowie ebenso Joan Nordlund, Tove Djupsjöbacka, Pertti Kuusi, Turo Rautaoja und Joanna Rinne. Darüber hinaus gilt mein Dank den Mitarbeitern der Finnischen Nationalbibliothek (Tarja Lehtinen, Petri Tuovinen, Inka Myyry) und des Sibelius-Museums (Sanna Linjama-Mannermaa). Helsinki, im Frühjahr 2018

Sakari Ylivuori (Übersetzung: Frank Reinisch)

11 Rydbergs Gedichte waren zuvor in zwei getrennten Sammlungen veröffentlicht worden. Obwohl die Ausgabe von 1899 als dritte Ausgabe bezeichnet ist, ist sie die erste, die alle seine Gedichte in einem Band enthält. Diese Ausgabe enthält am Ende des Bandes auch einen Kommentar des Verlegers Karl Warburg. Die Nummerierung in den gesammelten Werken ist nicht chronologisch; Dikter ist also nicht die früheste Veröffentlichung innerhalb der gesammelten Werke, obwohl sie die Nummer 1 trägt. 12 Dikter enthält auch einige andere Gedichte, die Sibelius in den ersten beiden Jahrzehnten des 20. Jahrhunderts vertonte.

13 Runeberg veröffentlichte 1860 eine erweiterte Fassung, Sandels wurde jedoch in die erste Fassung aufgenommen. 14 Zu Johan August Sandels siehe Veli-Matti Syrjö, Sandels, Johan August (Kansallisbiografia-verkkojulkaisu, Studia Biographica 4), Helsinki: Suomalaisen Kirjallisuuden Seura 1997 [= Syrjö 1997]. Zum Hintergrund des Gedichts siehe Yrjö Hirn, Runeberg-gestalten, Helsingfors: Schildts 1942 [= Hirn 1942]. Zu der Funktion von Fänrik Ståls sägner bei der Entstehung nationaler finnischer Identität siehe Johan Wrede, Jag såg ett folk ... Runeberg, Fänrik Stål och nationen, Helsingfors: Söderström & Co. 1988, S. 9–14 (speziell zu Sandels siehe S. 107–117). 15 Topelius hatte auch eine akademische Lauf bahn. Er war von 1854 bis 1878 Professor für Geschichte an der Kaiserlichen Alexander-Universität in Finnland (heute: Helsinki University) und von 1875 bis 1878 deren Rektor. 16 Zu weiteren Informationen siehe z. B. Carola Herberts [Hrsg.], Zacharias Topelius Skrifter I, Helsingfors: Svenska litteratursällskapet i Finland 2010, S. XXXI–XXXV. 17 Vgl. z. B. Harold E. Johnson, Jean Sibelius, New York: Alfred A. Knopf 1959, S. 102f., und Erik Tawaststjerna, Jean Sibelius 2, Helsinki: Otava 1967 [= Tawaststjerna 1967]), S. 211. (Schwedische Ausgabe: Jean Sibelius. Åren 1893–1904, Helsingfors: Söderström & Co. 1993, S. 163.) Fabian Dahlström datiert auf ,,Frühjahr 1902“; vgl. Fabian Dahlström, Jean Sibelius. Thematisch-bibliographisches Verzeichnis seiner Werke, Wiesbaden: Breitkopf & Härtel 2003 [= SibWV], S. 78. 18 Zu Details siehe den Critical Commentary, List of Sketches. 19 Sibelius schrieb die Worte ,memento mori“ auch auf die undatierte Skizze HUL 1593, die wohl auf 1903–1906 zu datieren ist – so Kari Kilpeläinen, The Jean Sibelius Musical Manuscripts at Helsinki University Library, Wiesbaden: Breitkopf & Härtel 1991, S. 405. 10 Ein früher Hinweis auf die Verbindung zwischen Impromptu und dem Streichtrio findet sich bei Erik Furuhjelm, Jean Sibelius: hans tondiktning och drag ur hans liv, Helsingfors: Holger Schildts Förlag 1916 [= Furuhjelm 1916], S. 34. Das Trio ist wahrscheinlich auf „um 1894“ zu datieren, trotz Sibelius’ späterer Angabe, es sei 1885 entstanden; siehe Kari Kilpeläinen, Tutkielmia Jean Sibeliuksen käsikirjoituksista (Studia musica universitatis helsingiensis III), Helsinki: Helsingin yliopiston musiikkitieteen laitos 1992, S. 130f. Andererseits geht das Trio auf Material zurück, das sich ursprünglich in Skizzen aus den Jahren 1888/89 findet (siehe z. B. Andrew Barnett, Sibelius, Cambridge: Yale University Press 2007, S. 148 [= Barnett 2007]). 11 Der Chor wurde von Thérèse Hahl einstudiert, aber dies wird in keiner Quelle erwähnt. 12 Ähnlich positive Berichte finden sich zum Beispiel in Hufvudstadsbladet vom 9. März und in Suomen Kansa vom 11. März. Päivälehti, vom 9. März 1902, O.[skar Merikanto]: „Köörin tehtävä oli erittäin kaunis ja orkesterin ynnä harpun pehmeä säestys, kuin myöskin kastanjettien näppäilyt silloin tällöin, antoivat teokselle ikäänkuin etelämaalaisen viehkeyden. […] Kieltämättä on tästä teoksesta pianon säestyksellä tuleva hyvin suosittu numero.“ 13 Uusi Suometar vom 11. März 1902, E.[vert] K.[atila]: „[…] waan täytenumeroiksi tässä konsertissa […]. Impromptu naisköörille ja orkesterille on kyllä warsin huwittawa waikka se ei todista erityisempää sywentymistä Rydbergin runon henkeen. Orkesterisäestys perustuu sangen karakteristisille aiheille ja on korwia hiwelewällä herkullisuudella wäritetty, mutta köörin deklamatoorinen käsittely ei oikein wastaa sanojen dityrambista luonnetta.“ 14 Für das kleinere Ensemble in Vaasa (1902) wurde die Instrumentation leicht umgearbeitet. Die Änderungen sind in der autographen Partitur skizziert, sie stammen aber nicht von Sibelius’ Hand. Wahrscheinlich wurde die Orchestrierung von Ferdinand Neisser überarbeitet, der das Orchester in Vaasa leitete. Zu Details der Vaasa-Partitur vgl. den Critical Commentary. Aus der Korrespondenz zwischen Sibelius und Neisser hat sich einiges erhalten (Nationalarchiv Finnland, Sibelius-Familienarchiv [= NA, SFA], Kasten 24), aber es betrifft nicht das fragliche Werk. 15 1913 wurde die erste Fassung des Impromptu in Pori aufgeführt. Für diese Aufführung richtete Ewald Niegisch das Werk für das Ensemble in Pori passend ein. Er informierte Sibelius über seine neue Orchestrierung, Sibelius bekam die Partitur aber wahrscheinlich nie zu Gesicht. Niegisch wusste von der Existenz der revidierten Fassung von 1910, als er seine Bearbeitung der ersten Fassung machte (Niegisch an Sibelius am 22. September 1913 in NA, SFA, Kasten 24; Niegischs Partitur befi ndet sich im YLE-Archiv [YLE = Finnischer Rundfunk], vgl. den Critical Commentary).


XXII 16 Sibelius hat die Liste nicht datiert. An dieser Stelle schrieb er seine Tagebucheinträge jeweils auf die recto-Seiten, und die Liste erscheint auf einer verso-Seite, und zwar an einer Stelle, wo die Tagebucheinträge vom 5. bis 18. Februar auf der entsprechenden recto-Seite stehen. Möglicherweise ist die Liste aus diesem Grund im veröffentlichten Tagebuch auf den 5. Februar datiert (Fabian Dahlström [Hrsg.], Jean Sibelius. Dagbok 1909– 1944, Helsingfors: Svenska Litteratursällskapet i Finland 2005, S. 40). Das originale Tagebuch wird auf bewahrt in NA, SFA, Kasten 37–38. 17 Sibelius an B&H am 15. Februar 1910 (B&H-Archiv, Wiesbaden). B&H an Sibelius am 19. Februar 1910 (NA, SFA, Kasten 42). 18 In memoriam wurde zwischen dem 18. Februar und dem 25. März überarbeitet. Impromptu wurde zwischen dem 16. und 19. April abgeschlossen – Sibelius erwähnt im Tagebucheintrag vom 16. April, er habe mit der Reinschrift begonnen, die er am 19. April an den Verlag schickte. 19 Sibelius an B&H am 19. April 1910 (B&H-Archiv, Wiesbaden). 20 Zur Verlängerung der Wechsel siehe die Tagebucheinträge vom 3. und 8. April. Zu Geldproblemen und Impromptu, siehe z. B. die Tagebucheinträge vom 16. April und 2. Mai sowie auch Sibelius’ Brief an Carpelan vom 11. Mai 1910 (NA, SFA, Kasten 120). Der Schriftverkehr zwischen Sibelius und Carpelan ist veröffentlicht in Fabian Dahlström (Hrsg.), Högtärade Maestro! Högtärade Herr Baron! Korrespondensen mellan Axel Carpelan och Jean Sibelius 1900–1919, Helsingfors: Svenska Litteratursällskapet i Finland 2010. 21 B&H an Sibelius am 13. Mai 1910 (NA, SFA, Kasten 42). 22 Sibelius verlangte 2.000 Rmk für die Orchesterpartitur und 500 für den Klavierauszug (Sibelius an B&H am 19. April 1910, B&H-Archiv, Wiesbaden). 23 Tagebuch, 16. Mai 1910: „I dag af B. et H. mycket nedprutade förslag. Måste följaktligen börja ,refva‘ åter.“ 24 Im Brief vom 20. Mai 1910 (NA, SFA, Kasten 42) verspricht B&H, im Laufe des kommenden Herbstes mit der Herstellung des Klavierauszugs und der Chorstimmen zu beginnen. Tagebuch, 25. Mai 1910: „Då jag erhöll endast 1000 Rmk af B. et H. måste ,brödarbetet‘ åter fram. Sånger?!“ 25 Sowohl Boruttau als auch Newmarch schrieben ihre Übersetzungen als Textunterlegungen in Sibelius’ autographen Klavierauszug. Der Begleitbrief (von B&H an Sibelius) vom 17. Oktober 1910 ist erhalten (NA, SFA, Kasten 42). Zur Datierung der Erstausgaben siehe auch SibWV, S. 79, und Sibelius’ Brief an Carpelan vom 13. November 1910 (NA, SFA, Kasten 120). Die englische Übersetzung wurde in der 1912 veröffentlichten Erstausgabe der Chorstimmen weggelassen. Darüber hinaus enthält eines der erhaltenen Manuskripte der Orchesterpartitur auch die singbare finnische Übersetzung eines unbekannten Verfassers (vgl. die Critical Remarks). 26 B&H an Sibelius am 10. Februar 1912. Der Originalbrief ist verloren, im B&H-Archiv, Wiesbaden, existiert aber eine Kopie. Der Aufenthaltsort der bei der Uraufführung verwendeten Stimmen ist nicht bekannt. 27 Dagens Tidning vom 30. März 1912, Anon.: „Utförandet af symfonin led något af nervositet; däremot hedrade sig orkestern – och särskildt dess blåsare – i de båda suiterna; i körkompositionen tjusades man af de medverkande damernas utmärkta röster. Kompositören själf inlade som dirigent hela sin personlighet i utförandet af sina verk.“ 28 In Nya Pressen vom 1. April 1912 merkt der Kritiker mit dem Kürzel A. S. an, der Chor habe im zweiten Konzert mit größerer Präzision gesungen, als er vor dem Orchester platziert war. Zu den Berichten über das erste Konzert siehe z. B. Dagens Tidning, Hufvudstadsbladet und Nya Pressen vom 30. März 1912. Im Umfeld der Veröffentlichung des Klavierauszugs verfasste Bis [Karl Wasenius] am 8. Dezember 1910 in Hufvudstadsbladet eine Beschreibung des Werks. 29 Laut SibWV, S. 79, befindet sich die autographe Reinschrift der Orchesterpartitur im B&H-Archiv, Wiesbaden. Sie existiert dort jedoch nicht. 30 Zu den erhaltenen Partituren siehe den Critical Commentary. Kalle Katrama erstellte 1981 eine handschriftliche Kopie, die auf zwei ältere Exemplare zurückgeht, die bis dahin als Leihmaterial in Gebrauch waren. Es sei angemerkt, dass Niegischs neu orchestrierte Partitur (im YLEArchiv) auf der ersten Fassung basiert, obwohl sie nach Sibelius’ Überarbeitung entstanden ist (siehe den oben stehenden Abschnitt, in dem die späteren Aufführungen der ersten Fassung besprochen werden). 31 Am 19. April 1910 bezog sich Sibelius in seinem Tagebuch erstmals auf das Impromptu als Opus 19. Diese Opuszahl taucht auch im Februar 1910 in der Liste der zu revidierenden Werke auf, die Zahl selbst wurde jedoch später hinzugefügt. Die Opuszahl 19 wird auch in der Korrespondenz zwischen Sibelius und B&H gebraucht (siehe oben zum Veröffentlichungsprozess). Zu den Werkverzeichnissen von Sibelius, siehe SibWV,

32

33

34 35

36

37

38

39

40 41 42

43

44

S. 693–696. Das Verzeichnis, in dem das Impromptu als Opus 34 geführt wird, ist in SibWV als „Sib 1905–09“ bezeichnet. Zu einer kurzen Einführung in die Zweisprachigkeit in Finnland siehe z. B. Glenda Dawn Goss, A Composer’s Life and the Awakening of Finland, Chicago: The University of Chicago Press 2009, beispielsweise S. 33–41. Die Ankündigungen des Wettbewerbs wurden nach dem 15. Januar 1898 in verschiedenen Zeitungen – sowohl in Schwedisch als auch in Finnisch und auch über Helsinki hinaus – veröffentlicht (z. B. in Hufvudstadsbladet, Abo Underrättelser, Päivälehti, Wasa Tidning Aamulehti und Uusi Aura). Die erste Änderung, um die Sibelius am 13. April bat, ist in der Partitur nicht sichtbar, weil er die neue Überarbeitung ausführte, indem er einen Korrekturstreifen über die Chorsysteme klebte. In der Korrespondenz ist die geforderte Änderung jedoch überliefert. Wann er den Streifen in der Orchesterpartitur hinzufügte, ist nicht bekannt, aber es muss vor der Uraufführung (1900) gewesen sein, weil der für die Proben produzierte Klavierauszug keine Änderung aufweist und Sibelius die neue Lesart direkt niederschrieb. Zu musikalischen Details siehe die Critical Remarks zu T. 9 und 3–11. Jeans Briefe an Aino (1893–1904) befinden sich in NA, SFA, Kasten 95, und Ainos Briefe an Jean in Kasten 27. Der Briefwechsel aus dieser Zeit ist veröffentlicht in SuviSirkku Talas (Hrsg.), Tulen synty. Ainoja Jean Sibeliuksen kirjeenvaihtoa 1892–1904, Helsinki: Suomalaisen Kirjallisuuden Seura 2003. Jean an Aino am 27. April 1898 (NA, SFA, Kasten 95): „Tuleekohan Sandelssista mitään. Pitäisi ainakin jotain.“ Ein regelrechter Bericht ist nicht überliefert, aber Mikko Slöör (ein Chormitglied) kolportierte Sibelius am 16. Mai 1898 brieflich die Gerüchte, die über die Diskussionen in der Jury verbreitet wurden (National Library of Finland [= NL], Coll.206.36). Der zweite Preis wurde nicht vergeben. Armas Järnefelts Suomen synty (Die Geburt Finnlands) für Männerchor und Orchester erhielt den dritten Preis (300 Fmk) und Ernst Fabritius Barcarole für Männerchor a cappella den vierten (200 Fmk). Zusätzlich bekamen Karl Flodin (Häämme, Unsere Hochzeit) und Selim Palmgren (Drömmen, Der Traum) jeweils einen Sonderpreis (200 Fmk). Die Ergebnisse wurden in verschiedenen Zeitungen bekanntgegeben. Siehe z. B. Nya Pressen vom 27. Mai 1898. Jean an Aino am 17. März 1900 per Postkarte. Der Brief vom selben Tag erwähnt auch den Erfolg von Sandels (beide Quellen in NA, SFA, Kasten 95). Auch Päivälehti vom 17. März verriss die Aufführung. Aftonposten vom 16. März 1900, der Kritiker mit dem Kürzel V.: „Kort sagdt: ett oväntadt fiasko.“ Nya Pressen, 17. März 1900, K.[arl Flodin]: „Ja, den är död och upplöst, kören MM.!“, Uusi Suometar vom 17. März 1900, E.[vert] K.[atila]. Der Begriff „Tongemälde“ (tonmålning) wurde auch in Aftonposten vom 17. März verwendet. Päivälehti zufolge war Sandels „ein sehr anschauliches Gemälde“ (hyvin kuvaava maalaus). Hufvudstadsbladet vom 1. April verwendet das Adjektiv „målande“ (es bedeutet „beschreibend“, ist aber abgeleitet von „måla“ = malen). Am 17. März schreibt Hufvudstadsbladet: „Der Komponist hat die verschiedenen Ereignisse des patriotischen Gedichts in musikalische Bilder eingefangen […]” (Den fosterländska diktens olika situationer har kompositören fångat i musikaliska bilder […]). Nya Presssen, 17. März 1900, K.[arl Flodin]: „,Sandels’ är en tonmålning, som vi utan betänkande ställa främst bland alla de kompositioner inom samma genre, som hr Sibelius skapat. […] Utan att förfalla i ett detaljmåleri, som skulle söndra stycket i stycken, har han fattat sitt ämne episkt, och dock dramatiskt lefvande och lyriskt värkningsfullt.“ Zur Reise des Orchesters der Philharmonischen Gesellschaft von Helsinki im Jahr 1900 vgl. unten zu Snöfrid. E.[vert] K.[atila] beklagt z. B. nach der Uraufführung am 17. März in Uusi Suometar, dass der Chor zu klein war. Der gesetzte Chorpart wurde 1899 gedruckt. Die Aufführung 1908 erfolgte im Gedenken an den Finnischen Krieg (1808–1809, auch bekannt als Russisch-Schwedischer Krieg). Die Revisionspläne werden in den Tagebucheinträgen vom 18. März 1913 und 23. Juni 1914 erwähnt, sowie zudem in einem Brief an Carpelan vom 27. Juli 1914 (NA, SFA, Kasten 120): „den är ej plastisk nog.“ Zum Briefwechsel über den Auftrag vgl. NL, Coll.206.40, Coll.206.47 und NA, SFA, Kasten 23. Die Aufträge wurden von Olof Wallin, dem künstlerischen Leiter von MM, und von Verner Hougberg, dem Sekretär


XXIII

45 46

47 48

49

50

51 52

53

54

55 56

57

des Chores, verhandelt. Zu weiteren Einzelheiten siehe die Einleitung zu JSW VII/2 (op. 84). Sibelius kommt auf das Werk auch als op. 79 zurück. Insgesamt 13 Tagebucheinträge erwähnen die Skizzenphase im April/Mai 1915. Lifslust och lifsleda enthält Zeilen, die von verschiedenen Menschen oder Gruppen rezitiert werden, darunter sind auch Junge Hellenen (Unga hellener). Am 21. Mai 1915 schrieb Sibelius, er habe sich „für die Backoståget [die Prozession der Bacchus-Priester] op. 79 entschieden“ (Beslutit mig för Backoståget Op 79). Die Backospräster (Bacchus-Priester) stellen eine Gruppe in Rydbergs Gedicht dar. Sibelius hatte jedoch die Textzeilen der Bacchus-Priester 1910, also vor der Einleitung in der revidierten Fassung des Impromptu op. 19, vertont. Daher ist nicht ganz klar, auf welchen Text sich Sibelius bezieht. Hougberg an Sibelius am 26. Juli 1915 (NA, SFA, Kasten 23). Dieselbe Quelle enthält auch den Verlagsvertrag. Dieser nennt nicht die Summe, die dem Komponisten bezahlt wurde, sie ist aber im Brief erwähnt. Warum Sibelius das Jahr 1897 in Spiel bringt, ist nicht bekannt; kein Dokument weist darauf hin, dass er Sandels vor dem Frühjahr 1898 komponierte. Tagebuch, 23. Juli 1915: „Beslutit att ej omarbeta Sandels. Den må bli ett document humain af 1898. Rättare 97.“ Einzelheiten des Geburtstagskonzerts wurden in einem Chortreffen am 10. September 1915 entschieden, und die Pläne wurden in verschiedenen Zeitungen veröffentlicht (siehe z. B. Dagens Press vom 11. September, Uusi Suometar vom 12. September und Keski-Savo vom 16. September 1915). Die Anfrage an ehemalige Mitglieder, bei der Aufführung mitzuwirken, wurde auch in einigen Zeitungen außerhalb der Region Helsinki veröffentlicht (siehe z. B. Dagens Press vom 11. September, Uusi Suometar vom 12. September und Keski-Savo vom 16. September 1915). In Athenarnes sång wurde der erweiterte Chor durch einen Knabenchor unterstützt, der aus Zöglingen von vier Schulen bestand. Auf der Bühne waren etwa 350 Sänger (Hufvudstadsbladet vom 15. Dezember 1915). Hufvudstadsbladet vom 15. Dezember 1915, Bis [Karl Wasenius]: „Hade kören varit än manstarkare, skulle slutet ha imponerat än mer.“ Die Frühstücksszene beschreibt kein historisches Ereignis, obwohl der wirkliche Sandels den Ruf eines Bonvivant hatte. Zu Einzelheiten siehe Syrjö 1997 und Hirn 1942. Uusi Suometar vom 15. Dezember 1915, der Kritiker mit dem Kürzel H.: „,Sandels’, tuo Sibeliuksen verraton sävelkuvaus Runebergin tuttuun runoon suorastaan haltioitti kulijakunnan [sic]. Sävellys elävöittää mestarillisella tavalla Sandelsin herkuttelemisen, hänen ajutanttinsa [sic] kiihkeän mielentilan ja sodan melskeet Partalasillalla. Miten huolettoman hauska onkaan orkesterin veikeä kuvailu ,kenraalin‘ ja ,pastorin‘ historiallisista aamiaisista! […] Alallaan se on eittämättömästi Sibeliuksen paras tuote.“ Hufvudstadsbladet vom 15. Dezember 1915, Bis [Karl Wasenius]: „Det fina, äkta svenska, det blixtrande spirituella draget, den med sin af en liten epikureisk krydda pikantgjorda, intelligens och heroism hos Sandels, detta fängslande och soliga, denna vinnande svenskhet i ordets bästa bemärkelse har Sibelius fått fram. Hans skildring af Sandels i Pardala by är utmärkt. Taflan är målad i lifliga färger.“ Sibelius an Paul am 14. September 1900 (Uppsala University Library, AP3 131, 132, 133): „Wi måste samla åt oss här att betäcka vår resa etwa 80.000. Du kan tänka Dig att jag ej slipper härifrån med litet komponistskap. I denna smet måste jag nu vara.“ Der Briefwechsel ist veröffentlicht in Fabian Dahlström (Hrsg.), Din tillgifvne ovän. Korrespondensen mellan Jean Sibelius och Adolf Paul 1889–1943, Helsingfors: Svenska Litteratursällskapet i Finland 2016. Jalas’ Notiz vom 31. Dezember 1943 (NA, SFA, Kasten 1): „Sävelsin Snöfridin suunnilleen yhdeltä istumalta tultuani kotiin kolmen päivän viftiltä.“ Das überlieferte Programm des Konzerts am 29. Oktober 1900 enthält den Text nicht, aber es ist möglich, dass er als separates Blatt ausgeteilt wurde. Das Programm des (von Sibelius dirigierten) Konzerts am 14. Dezember 1902 ist das erste erhaltene Programm mit Text. Beide Programme befinden sich im Sibelius-Museum, Turku. Hufvudstadsbladet vom 14. Oktober 1900, Anon.: „Vi hvarken kunna eller vilja i förväg yppa alt hvad programmet kommer att bjuda på, men så mycket äro vi berättigade att skvallra om, att Sibelius enkom för detta tillfälle komponerat en storslagen musik till Viktor Rydbergs vackra dikt ,Snöfrid‘. Ensamt denna nummer på programmet är egnad att väcka vårt intresse. Vi ha blifvit vana att för hvarje ny komposition af Sibelius intagas och hänföras af hans skapande snilles utveckling mot en alt större

58

59

60

61

62

63

64

65 66 67 68

69

fulländning.“ Eine Anzeige mit ähnlichem Inhalt erschien z. B. in Uusi Suometar vom 16. Oktober 1900. Uusi Suometar vom 30. Oktober 1900, E.[vert] K.[atila]: „Teoksen alkuosan winha myrskyinen tunnelma, omituisen torwisäestyksen seuraama melodrama ja taiwaallisen kirkas ja lämminhenkinen loppu, jossa jouhiorkesteri laulaa werrattoman leweää sywätunteisen waltawaa unisoono-lauluaan, tulivat rauhallisen ehjäksi kokonaisuudeksi, joka oli mieltäylentäwää laatua.“ Päivälehti vom 21. Oktober 1900, Anon.: „Toivottavasti ei tämän melodraaman käy samoin kuin niin useiden Sibeliuksen sävellysten, että niitä sen koommin ei saa kuulla. Monet tällaiset tilapäiset sävellykset samalta mestarilta ovat sellaisia helmiä ja musiikkikirjallisuutemme aarteita, että niiden ei pitäisi yhden juhla illan humuun kadota. Mitä tähän Sibeliuksen uusimpaan tuotteeseen tulee, on se kouraantuntuvasti edistystä joka puolelta, sekä sydämmellisyyden ja tunnelman ehjyyden että kuvaamataiteen ja köörin käyttämisen puolesta.“ Es gibt zwei kurze Artikel, in denen sich Choristen an die ersten Aufführungen und Proben mit Sibelius erinnern. Hanna Stenius in: Tidning för musik 16 (1915), S. 211f., und Maria Beaurain, Eräs Sibelius-muisto, in: Aulos, säveltaiteellis-kirjallinen julkaisu (1925), S. 12. In der Lithographie ist der Verlag nicht erwähnt (vgl. den Critical Commentary). Wasenius an Sibelius am 2. November 1900 (NA, SFA, Kasten 47). Auch Carpelan ermutigte Sibelius, für Snöfrid einen Verlag zu finden (Brief vom 17. April 1902, NA, SFA, Kasten 120). Es gibt keine Dokumente darüber, warum Lindgren nicht mit der Veröffentlichung vorankam. Es könnte mit dem Krieg zusammenhängen, weil Lindgren normalerweise den Notenstich in Deutschland ausführen ließ. Der Vertrag zwischen Sibelius und Lindgren ist nicht erhalten, aber er wird in einem undatierten Tagebucheintrag (vom Dezember 1915) und in einem Eintrag vom 4. Oktober 1917 erwähnt. Robert Kajanus dirigierte Snöfrid 1915 und forderte bei Sibelius Material an (Postkarte von Kajanus an Sibelius vom 2. Juli 1915, NA, SFA, Kasten 21), was Sibelius motiviert haben könnte, das Werk veröffentlichen zu lassen. Zu Sibelius’ Anmerkungen über das Konzert von Kajanus siehe den Tagebucheintrag vom 1. November 1915. Thérèse Hahl, die den Chor für die Uraufführung einstudiert hatte, spornte Sibelius schon 1901 an, eine Bearbeitung für Klavier oder für Klavier und Harmonium zu verfassen (Brief vom 8. Januar 1901, NL, Coll.206.14). Sibelius’ Exemplar des Verlagsvertrags mit R. E. Westerlund ist nicht erhalten, aber seine Einzelheiten (auch die Beträge und die Datierung) finden sich in der Abrechnung über die Verkäufe (NA, SFA, Kasten 47). Die deutsche Übersetzung wurde bei „Mrs. Bourain“ in Auftrag gegeben, die finnische bei Jussi Snellman. Ob Snellman den Auftrag 1922 ausführte, ist nicht bekannt (vgl. Anmerkung 68). Die Klavierbearbeitung wird in dem Brief nicht erwähnt, aber es war wahrscheinlich dieselbe, die Wilhelm Hansen später veröffentlichte (siehe unten). Westerlund an Sibelius am 13. Mai 1922 (NA, SFA, Kasten 47). Wilhelm Hansen an Sibelius am 20. September 1927 und am 18. April 1929 (NA, SFA, Kasten 45). Alle erhaltenen Korrekturabzüge befinden sich in NL unter der Signatur HUL 1821 (a–d sind die Chorstimmen, e ist die Klavierbearbeitung). Zu genauen Daten der Veröffentlichung siehe auch SibWV, S. 132f. Die finnische Übersetzung, die 1929 und 1930 erschien, stammt von Lauri Pohjanpää und nicht von Jussi Snellman, den Westerlund 1922 mit einer Übersetzung beauftragt hatte. Die autographe Reinschrift (aus dem Jahr 1900) enthält eine singbare finnische Übersetzung von Severi Nyman. Der Dirigent Simon Parmet erklärte Sibelius nach einer Aufführung von Snöfrid 1936 in Stockholm, dass „die Orchesterretuschen in ,Snöfrid‘ ausgezeichnet seien […]. Wenn Hansen noch nicht die Zeit gefunden hat, die Partitur zu drucken (die Stimmen sind schon gedruckt), wäre es gut, wenn diese kleinen Änderungen eingearbeitet werden könnten.“ Es bleibt unklar, worauf sich die „Retuschen“ und „kleinen Änderungen“ beziehen und ob die erwähnten Änderungen auf Sibelius oder auf Parmet zurückgehen. Parmet hatte sich im Januar oder Februar 1936 mit Sibelius getroffen, um über viele Einzelheiten in dessen Partituren zu sprechen, aber Snöfrid wird in dem Briefwechsel, der auf das Treffen folgte, nicht erwähnt. Parmet an Sibelius am 7. April 1936 (NL Coll.206.28): „Orkesterretuscherna i ,Snöfrid‘ voro utmärkta […]. Om Hansen ännu ej hunnit trycka partituret (stämmorna äro redan tryckta) vore det bra, om dessa små ändringar kunde införas.“


XXIV 70 Wilhelm Hansen an Sibelius am 16. Juni 1943, 29. Juli 1943, 3. August 1943 und 26. April 1946 (NA, SFA, Kasten 47). Der zuletzt genannte Brief enthielt auch eine singbare englische Übersetzung von D. Miller Craig, die der Komponist genehmigen sollte. Wilhelm Hansen an Sibelius am 29. Juli 1943: „under de nuvaerende Forhold.“ 71 Die Fehlinformation erschien z. B. in Uusi Aura vom 12. April 1902. Darüber hinaus erwähnt keiner der Berichte, dass die Musik von Taiteelle einen Teil von Snöfrid darstellt. Kilpis Text ist im Critical Commentary abgedruckt. Dahlström identifizierte im Sibelius-Museum, Turku, ein Exemplar der bei der Aufführung 1902 verwendeten Chorpartitur, das die Verwirrung auflöste. Zu Details siehe Fabian Dahlström, Onko Sibeliuksen kuoroteos ,Taiteelle‘ olemassa?, in: Pieni musiikkilehti, 1985, Nr. 3 (S. 16). Jalmari Finne vergrößerte die Verwirrung, indem er behauptete, Sibelius habe Snöfrid ursprünglich für Orchester und Sprecher geschrieben und die Chorpartie später hinzugefügt. Jalmari Finne, Muistelmia Sibeliuksen töistä, in: Aulos. Säveltaiteellis-kirjallinen julkaisu (1925) [= Finne 1925], S. 20. 72 Das Archiv von Savo-Karjalainen Osakunta befindet sich in NL. Die Dokumente zur Planung des Ereignisses tragen die Signaturen S:Hc1 und S:Ca 14. 73 Der Anfang der Adagio-Passage (die Melodie beginnt in T. 187 mit „Nejden andas“) findet sich in HUL 1490 (S. 23). Sibelius unterlegte den Text in der Skizze nicht, aber das Wort Nejden steht auf dieser Seite. 74 Finne 1925, S. 20. Das Werk wurde am 6. Oktober 1899 in Zeitungen erwähnt (z. B. in Uusi Suometar), aber das bedeutet nicht unbedingt, dass es vollendet war. 75 1913 bearbeitete Sibelius diese Passage für Kinderchor a cappella; vgl. Nejden andas in JSW VII/1. Kürzere Beschreibungen erschienen in einigen anderen Zeitungen (z. B. in Uusi Suometar und Hufvudstadsbladet vom 19. Oktober 1899). Aftonposten, 20. Oktober 1899, K.[arl] Flodin: „Med ,Islossningen i Uleå älf ‘ har hr Sibelius skapat en ståtlig, illusoriskt vacker musik till en af Topelius ståtligaste lyriska naturmålningar.“ „Denna episod är af en gripande effekt och bildar kulmen i hela den musikaliska kompositionen. En vanlig tonsättare skulle utan tvifvel med glada fortissimoackorder illustrerat älfvens stolta segersång, men Sibelius förmår på ett mycket värkningsfullare sätt framkalla den högsta stegringen i skildringen genom att hålla denna i en tjusande mild och lugn pianissimodager, hvilken lika oväntadt som sällsamt bryter af mot alt det föregående, jäsande vilda naturmåleriet.“ 76 Athenarnes sång wurde als tableau vivant aufgeführt, arrangiert von den Künstlern Eero Järnefelt, Jalmari Finne und Yrjö Blomstedt. Weitere musikalische Werke in dem Programm waren die Dramatische Ouvertüre von Ernst Mielck, die Suite für Orchester von Armas Järnefelt, die Finnische Rhapsodie von Robert Kajanus und vier patriotische Chorwerke für Männerchor a cappella. Kajanus dirigierte die Orchesterwerke, Heikki Klemetti die a-cappella-Chorwerke. Eine Kunstausstellung und eine Lotterie waren ebenfalls Teil des Soireeprogramms. 77 Zu diesem Ereignis siehe Nya pressen vom 22. und Aftonposten vom 23. Oktober 1899. 78 Diese Pressefeiertage waren auch eine Reaktion auf die Zensur und ein eher allgemeiner Protest gegen das Februar-Manifest, das der regierende General Nikolai Bobrikow erlassen hatte, um Finnlands Autonomie zu beschneiden. Für das Hauptereignis in Helsinki komponierte Sibelius die Musik zu den Pressefeiern JS 137. Tawaststjerna 1967, S. 157, bezeichnete Islossningen i Uleå älv als Vorstudie zu Finlandia. Diese Auslegung findet sich auch bei Barnett 2007, S. 128.

79 Zu Details siehe die Critical Remarks. 80 Das Werk wurde im Januar 1900 in Turku dreimal aufgeführt: am 12. dirigierte Sibelius, am 14. Eliel Kylén, der auch den Chor einstudiert hatte, und am 17. José Eibenschütz, der Dirigent des Orchesters der Philharmonischen Gesellschaft von Turku. 81 Tagebuch, 5. Februar 1910 (vgl. auch oben Impromptu, Die revidierte Fassung). 82 Das Verzeichnis von 1914 wird in SibWV, S. 694, als „Sib 1914“ geführt. Die geänderte Opusnummerierung taucht in zwei Verzeichnissen auf: in dem handschriftlichen Verzeichnis, das Sibelius 1912 begann und bis 1931 behielt (in SibWV, S. 694, „Sib 1912–31“), und in einem Verzeichnis aus dem Jahr 1915, das Sibelius’ Tochter Katarina handschriftlich anfertigte (in SibWV, S. 694, „Sib1915b“). Das Verzeichnis Sib 1912–31 rubriziert die Improvisationen als op. 28 Nr. 1, 2 und 3, wohingegen Sib 1915b sie als op. 28 a, b und c führt. In der letzteren Quelle ist Snöfrid irrtümlich auf 1896 datiert und Islossningen i Uleå älv auf 1897. 83 Furuhjelm 1916, S. 181: „Islossningen i Uleå älv har inga pretentioner på att bli betraktad som en musikalisk helhet. Det litterära elementet – d.v.s. melodramen – har nämligen komponisten i detta alster berett en mycket framskjuten plats. Verkets betydande värde ligger i den sinnebildliga naturmålningen, som får sin färg av ett starkt patos och som kulminerar i ett imponerande durpräglat orkesterbrus.“ S. 182: „Det Rydbergs dikt äger av allegori får mera påtaglighet i Sibelius komposition.“ S. 180: „[…] en mycket på sak gående, realistisk skildring.“ 84 Gray 1931, S. 91: „They are, in fact, intensifications of poetry rather than works of inherent musical significance. The words are of greater moment than the music, consequently contrapuntal devices which tend to impede their natural flow and movement are wholly avoided, and the choral writing is frequently in unisons and octaves, with the orchestra providing a tonal background or accompaniment of no great independent interests. They should prove highly effective in performance, none the less.” 85 Tawaststjerna 1967, S. 131: „Aliotsikon tarkoituksena lienee osoittaa, että säveltäjä on ollut tästä tietoinen.“ Tawaststjernas abwertende Haltung gegenüber den Improvisationen ist durchweg präsent. Er beschreibt Sandels so (S. 131): „[…] die Komposition ist völlig uninteressant […] die vorantreibenden Rhythmen und die melodische Gestaltung rufen Sibelius’ Jugendwerke in Erinnerung“ (sävellys on jokseenkin epäkiintoisa […] mutkaton rytmiikka ja melodianmuodostus tuo mieleen Sibeliuksen nuoruuden työt), und zu Snöfrid äußert er (S. 189): „Der Orchestersturm und die ersten Chorzeilen sind edel und gleichzeitig eine poetische Initialzündung. Aber das Niveau bleibt nicht so hoch, wenn die programmatischen Abschnitte kommen“ (Orkesterimyrsky ja kuoron ensi repliikit ovat uljas ja samalla runollinen alkunousu. Mutta taso ei pysy yhtä korkeana, kun tullaan ohjelmallisempiin jaksoihin). Wie oben erwähnt, betrachtete Tawaststjerna (S. 157) Islossningen i Uleå älv als Vorstudie zu Finlandia. 86 Tawaststjerna 1967, S. 189: „Jälleen Sibelius oli sävelittänyt runon kannustaakseen maanmiehiään kamppailuun apauden puolesta.“ Und S. 248: „Tekstinsä valinnalla Sibelius kenties halusi tähdentää, että suomalaiset yhtähyvin kuin helleenit saattoivat kokoontua panateenalaiseen juhlaan tuhon uhatessa.“ 87 Finne 1925, S. 20: „lahjakkaalle sellainen antoi tilaisuuden tulla nopeasti tunnetuksi, sillä suuret juhlat kokosivat aikoinaan kaikki henkisen elämän huomattavimmat jäsenet yhteen.“


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


340

Facsimile I Impromptu [Op. 19/1902] Page 21, bb. 185–192, autograph fair copy The National Library of Finland (HUL 0953)


347

Facsimile VIII Islossning i Uleå älv Op. 30 Page 5, bb. 211–218, the Vl. I part in Röllig’s hand with Sibelius’s revision The National Library of Finland (HUL 0961)


Haben wir Ihr Interesse geweckt? Bestellungen nehmen wir gern Ăźber den Musikalienund Buchhandel oder unseren Webshop entgegen.


Profile for Breitkopf & Härtel

SON 632 – Sibelius, Works for Choir and Orchestra Opp. 19, 28, 29, 30  

SON 632 – Sibelius, Works for Choir and Orchestra Opp. 19, 28, 29, 30  

Profile for breitkopf