Page 1


JEAN SIBELIUS Complete Works

Sämtliche Werke


JEAN SIBELIUS Complete Works Published by The National Library of Finland and The Sibelius Society of Finland

Series I Orchestral Works Volume 22

Sämtliche Werke Herausgegeben von der Finnischen Nationalbibliothek und der Sibelius-Gesellschaft Finnland

Serie I Orchesterwerke Band 22


JEAN SIBELIUS

Orchestral Works

Orchesterwerke

Finlandia Op. 26 Valse triste Op. 44 No. 1, Scen med tranorna Op. 44 No. 2 Canzonetta Op. 62a, Valse romantique Op. 62b Valse lyrique Op. 96a, Valse chevaleresque Op. 96c edited by / herausgegeben von

Timo Virtanen

2019


Editorial Committee

Redaktionskomitee

Esko Häkli

Chair / Vorsitz

Kalevi Aho · Gustav Djupsjöbacka · Lauri Suurpää Eero Tarasti · Erik T. Tawaststjerna Editorial Board

Editionsleitung

Timo Virtanen Editor-in-Chief / Editionsleiter

Folke Gräsbeck · Kari Kilpeläinen · Veijo Murtomäki · Risto Väisänen (†)

The edition was made possible with the financial support of the Finnish Ministry of Education and of the following foundations:

Die Ausgabe wurde durch die Unterstützung des Finnischen Unterrichtsministeriums und der folgenden Stiftungen ermöglicht:

Alfred Kordelinin yleinen edistys- ja sivistysrahasto, Föreningen Konstsamfundet r. f., Jenny ja Antti Wihurin rahasto, Niilo Helanderin säätiö, Suomen Kulttuurirahasto, Svenska kulturfonden, The Legal Successors of Jean Sibelius

Bestellnummer: SON 630 ISMN 979-0-004-80357-8 Notengraphik: ARION, Baden-Baden Textsatz: Ansgar Krause, Krefeld Druck: Beltz, Bad Langensalza © 2019 by Breitkopf & Härtel, Wiesbaden Printed in Germany


Contents / Inhalt Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . VI Vorwort . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . VII Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . VIII Einleitung . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . XVI

Finlandia Op. 26 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1

Valse triste Op. 44 No. 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

25

Scen med tranorna Op. 44 No. 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

37

Canzonetta Op. 62a . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

41

Valse romantique Op. 62b . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

47

Valse lyrique Op. 96a . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

61

Valse chevaleresque Op. 96c . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

93

Appendix Finlandia; ending from early 1900 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

129

Facsimiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

135

Critical Commentary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

151


VI

Preface

In the critical edition Jean Sibelius Works (JSW) all the surviving works of Jean Sibelius, including early versions and his own arrangements, are published for the first time. Some of the earlier editions have run out of print, some works – even some of the central ones – have never been published, and many of the published editions are not entirely unquestionable or reliable. Thus, the aim of the present edition is to provide an overview of Sibelius’s œuvre in its entirety, through musical texts based on a thorough study of all known sources, and prepared in accordance with modern editorial and text-critical principles. The edition serves to illuminate various aspects of the works’ sources and history, as well as Sibelius’s notational practices. It is intended for both scholarly use and performances. The Jean Sibelius Works is divided into nine series: Series I: Orchestral Works Series II: Works for Violin (Cello) and Orchestra Series III: Works for String Orchestra and Wind Orchestra Series IV: Chamber Music Series V: Works for Piano Series VI: Works for the Stage and Melodramas Series VII: Choral Works Series VIII: Works for Solo Voice Series IX: Varia Each volume includes an introduction, which sheds light on the genesis, first performances, early reception, publication process and possible revisions of each work; it also offers other information on the works in their historical context. Significant references to the compositions in the biographical sources and the literature, such as those concerning dates of composition and revisions, as well as Sibelius’s statements concerning his works and performance issues, are examined and discussed on the basis of the original sources and in their original context. In the Critical Commentary, all relevant sources are described and evaluated, and specific editorial principles and problems of the volume in relation to the source situation of each work are explained. The Critical Remarks illustrate the different readings between the sources and contain explanations of and justifications for editorial decisions and emendations. A large body of Sibelius’s autograph musical manuscripts has survived. Because of the high number of sketches and drafts for certain works, however, it would not be possible to include all the materials in the JSW volumes. Those musical manuscripts – sketches, drafts, and composition fragments, as well as passages crossed out or otherwise deleted in autograph scores – which are relevant from the point of view of the edition, illustrate central features in the compositional process or open up new perspectives on the work, are included as facsimiles or appendices. Sibelius’s published works typically were a result of a goal-oriented process, where the printed score basically was intended as Fassung letzter Hand. However, the composer sometimes made, suggested, or planned alterations to his works after publication, and occasionally minor revisions were also included in the later printings. What also makes the question about Sibelius’s “final intention” vis-à-vis the printed editions complicated is that he obviously was not always a very willing, scrupulous and systematic proofreader of his works. As a result, the first editions, even though basically prepared under his supervision, very often contain copy-

ists’ and engravers’ errors, misinterpretations, inaccuracies and misleading generalizations, as well as changes made according to the standards of the publishing houses. In comparison with the autograph sources, the first editions may also include changes which the composer made during the publication process. The contemporary editions of Sibelius’s works normally correspond to the composer’s intentions in the main features, such as pitches, rhythms, and tempo indications, but they are far less reliable in details concerning dynamics, articulation, and the like. Thus, if several sources for a work have survived, a single source alone can seldom be regarded as reliable or decisive in every respect. JSW aims to publish Sibelius’s works as thoroughly re-examined musical texts, and to decipher ambiguous, questionable and controversial readings in the primary sources. Those specifics which are regarded as copyists’ and engravers’ mistakes, as well as other unauthorized additions, omissions and changes, are amended. The musical texts are edited to conform to Sibelius’s – sometimes idiosyncratic – notation and intentions, which are best illustrated in his autographs. Although retaining the composer’s notational practice is the basic guideline in the JSW edition, some standardization of, for instance, stem directions and vertical placement of articulation marks is carried out in the JSW scores. If any standardization is judged as compromising or risking the intentions manifested in Sibelius’s autograph sources, the composer’s original notation is followed as closely as possible in the edition. In the JSW the following principles are applied: – Opus numbers and JS numbers of works without opus number, as well as work titles, basically conform to those given in Fabian Dahlström’s Jean Sibelius. Thematisch-bibliographisches Verzeichnis seiner Werke (Wiesbaden: Breitkopf & Härtel, 2003). – Instruments and vocal parts are designated by their Italian names. – Repetitions indicated with the symbol [ and passages annotated with instructions such as col Violino I are written out. – Unpitched percussion instruments are notated on a single line each. – As a rule, only the text to which Sibelius composed or arranged a vocal work is printed in the score. Modern Swedish (as well as German) orthography was established during Sibelius’s lifetime, in the early twentieth century. Therefore, the general orthography of the texts is modernized, a decision that most profoundly affects the Swedish language (resulting in spellings such as vem, säv, or havet instead of hvem, säf, hafvet), but to some degree also texts in Finnish and German. Other types of notational features and emendations are specified case by case in the Critical Commentary of each volume. Editorial additions and emendations not directly based on primary sources are shown in the scores by square brackets, broken lines (in the case of ties and slurs), and/or footnotes. Since the editorial procedures are dependent on the source situation of each work, the specific editorial principles and questions are discussed in each volume. Possible additions and corrections to the volumes will be reported on the publisher’s website. Helsinki, Spring 2008

Timo Virtanen Editorial Board


Vorwort In der textkritischen Ausgabe Jean Sibelius Werke (JSW) werden erstmals alle überlieferten Kompositionen von Jean Sibelius einschließlich der Frühfassungen und eigener Bearbeitungen veröffentlicht. Da einige ältere Ausgaben vergriffen sind, einige, darunter auch zentrale Werke, nie gedruckt wurden und viele Editionen nicht ganz unumstritten und zuverlässig sind, verfolgt die Ausgabe das Ziel, Sibelius’ Œuvre in seiner Gesamtheit vorzulegen – und dies mit einem Notentext, der auf einer sorgfältigen Auswertung aller bekannten Quellen basiert und auf der Grundlage moderner textkritischer Editionsprinzipien entstanden ist. Die Ausgabe geht dabei auf verschiedene Fragen zu Quellenlage, Werkgeschichte und zu Sibelius’ Notationspraxis ein. Sie soll gleichzeitig der Forschung wie der Musikpraxis dienen. Die Ausgabe Jean Sibelius Werke gliedert sich in neun Serien: Serie I Orchesterwerke Serie II Werke für Violine (Violoncello) und Orchester Serie III Werke für Streichorchester und Blasorchester Serie IV Kammermusik Serie V Klavierwerke Serie VI Szenische Werke und Melodramen Serie VII Chorwerke Serie VIII Werke für Singstimme Serie IX Varia Jeder Band enthält eine Einleitung, die zu jedem Werk über Entstehung, erste Aufführungen und frühe Rezeption, Veröffentlichungsgeschichte und eventuelle Überarbeitungen berichtet. Darüber hinaus stellt die Einleitung die Werke in ihren historischen Kontext. Biographisches Material und weitere Literatur, die z. B. für die Datierung der Komposition und späterer Revisionen wesentlich ist, sowie Sibelius’ eigene Aussagen zu seinen Werken und zu den jeweiligen Aufführungen werden in der Einleitung auf der Grundlage der Originalquellen und in ihrem ursprünglichen Kontext geprüft und bewertet. Der Critical Commentary beschreibt und bewertet alle wesentlichen Quellen. Er erläutert darüber hinaus besondere Editionsprinzipien und Fragestellungen des jeweiligen Bandes in Bezug auf die Quellenlage jedes Werks. Die Critical Remarks stellen die unterschiedlichen Lesarten der Quellen dar; sie enthalten Erklärungen und Begründungen der editorischen Entscheidungen und Eingriffe. Sibelius’ Notenhandschriften sind in großem Umfang erhalten. Weil die Zahl an Skizzen und Entwürfen für einige Werke hoch ist, ist die vollständige Aufnahme des gesamten Materials in die JSW-Bände nicht möglich. Soweit es aus editorischer Sicht relevant erscheint, den Kompositionsprozess erläutert oder neue Einsichten in ein Werk vermittelt, werden Skizzen, Entwürfe, Fragmente sowie im Autograph gestrichene oder anderweitig verworfene Passagen als Faksimiles oder in den Anhang aufgenommen. Sibelius’ veröffentlichte Werke waren üblicherweise das Ergebnis eines zielgerichteten Prozesses, bei dem die gedruckte Partitur grundsätzlich als Fassung letzter Hand gelten sollte. Dennoch änderte der Komponist bisweilen seine Werke nach der Drucklegung, regte Retuschen an oder plante diese, und gelegentlich wurden in späteren Auflagen auch kleinere Revisionen berücksichtigt. Die Frage, inwieweit die gedruckten Ausgaben Sibelius’ „endgültige Intention“ wiedergeben, ist nicht eindeutig zu klären, da Sibelius offensichtlich nicht immer ein bereitwilliger, gewissenhafter und systematischer Korrekturleser seiner eigenen Werke war. Infolgedessen enthalten die Erstausgaben, wenngleich sie im Wesentlichen unter seiner Aufsicht entstanden, sehr oft Fehler, Missverständnisse, Ungenauigkeiten und

VII

irreführende Vereinheitlichungen, die auf Kopisten und Stecher zurückgehen, sowie Abweichungen aufgrund der jeweiligen Verlagsgepflogenheiten. Im Vergleich mit den Autographen können die Erstausgaben auch Änderungen enthalten, die der Komponist erst während der Druckvorbereitungen vornahm. Die Editionen zu Sibelius’ Lebzeiten folgen in der Regel der Absicht des Komponisten, was Hauptmerkmale wie Tonhöhe, Rhythmus und Tempoangaben betrifft, bei Dynamik, Artikulation etc. sind sie jedoch in Details weitaus weniger zuverlässig. Folglich kann eine einzige Quelle selten als unter jedem Aspekt verlässlich oder ausschlaggebend gelten, wenn für ein Werk mehrere Quellen überliefert sind. Die JSW zielt darauf ab, Sibelius’ Werke in gründlich geprüften Notentexten zu veröffentlichen und vieldeutige, fragliche und widersprüchliche Lesarten der Primärquellen zu entschlüsseln. Fehler von Kopisten und Stechern sowie andere nicht autorisierte Zusätze, Auslassungen und Änderungen werden berichtigt. Die Edition der Notentexte folgt der – manchmal eigentümlichen – Notation und Intention des Komponisten, so wie sie am unmittelbarsten aus seinen Autographen hervorgehen. Wenngleich die Notationspraxis des Komponisten die grundlegende Richtschnur der JSW ist, wird diese in einigen Punkten, zum Beispiel bei der Ausrichtung der Notenhälse und der Platzierung der Artikulationszeichen, vereinheitlicht. Wenn eine solche Standardisierung jedoch Sibelius’ Absicht zu widersprechen scheint, dann hält sich die Edition so eng wie möglich an die Notation des Komponisten. Für die Jean Sibelius Werke gelten folgende Richtlinien: – Die Opuszahlen und die JS-Nummerierungen der Werke ohne Opuszahl sowie Werktitel entsprechen grundsätzlich den Angaben in Fabian Dahlströms Jean Sibelius. Thematisch-bibliographisches Verzeichnis seiner Werke (Wiesbaden: Breitkopf & Härtel, 2003). – Instrumente und Vokalstimmen sind mit italienischen Namen bezeichnet. – Abbreviaturen mit dem Zeichen [ und Stellen mit Anweisungen wie col Violino I sind ausgeschrieben. – Schlaginstrumente ohne bestimmte Tonhöhe sind auf einer Notenlinie notiert. – In der Regel ist bei Vokalwerken nur der Text wiedergegeben, den Sibelius vertont bzw. bearbeitet hat. Die neue schwedische (ebenso wie die neuere deutsche) Orthographie wurde im frühen 20. Jahrhundert, also zu Sibelius’ Lebzeiten, eingeführt. Die Orthographie der Texte ist daher modernisiert. Diese Entscheidung betrifft vor allem die schwedische Sprache (Schreibweisen wie vem, säv oder havet statt hvem, säf, hafvet), sie wirkt sich aber zuweilen auch auf finnische oder deutsche Texte aus. Andere Notationseigenheiten und Eingriffe sind von Fall zu Fall im Critical Commentary beschrieben. Editorische Ergänzungen und Korrekturen, die nicht direkt auf Primärquellen zurückgehen, werden in den Partituren durch eckige Klammern, Strichelung (im Falle von Halte- und Bindebögen) und/oder Fußnoten gekennzeichnet. Da das editorische Prozedere von der Quellensituation jedes einzelnen Werks abhängt, werden spezielle Editionsprinzipien und -fragen in jedem Band eigens erörtert. Mögliche Ergänzungen und Korrekturen der Bände werden auf der Website des Verlages aufgeführt.

Helsinki, Frühling 2008

Timo Virtanen Editionsleitung


VIII

Introduction The present volume contains seven orchestral works, five of which Jean Sibelius originally composed as stage music but later separated from the incidental-music connection to be performed as individual compositions in concerts. The tone poem Finlandia Op. 26 originates from the “Music for the Press Celebration Days” ( JS 137, 1899). Valse triste and Scen med tranorna (“Scene with the Cranes,” Op. 44 Nos. 1 and 2) were composed for the 1903 premiere of Arvid Järnefelt’s (1861–1932) play Kuolema (“Death,” incidental music JS 113); Canzonetta and Valse romantique (Op. 62a and 62b) were additions to a 1911 stage production of Kuolema. The two waltzes under the opus number 96 (1920–1921), Valse lyrique (Op. 96a) and Valse chevaleresque (Op. 96c), are orchestral versions of works also known as compositions for piano.1 Of the works only Scen med tranorna remained unpublished during Sibelius’s lifetime. It was also probably intended to be published – the autograph score is preserved under Breitkopf & Härtel tenure in the Sächsisches Staatsarchiv in Leipzig – but the first edition of the score and the parts were not printed until 1973. This print was made from a scribal copy by an unknown copyist, and the edition of Scen med tranorna based on Sibelius’s autograph is available for the first time in the present volume. Finlandia Op. 26 Early performances and their reception In the aftermath of the “February Manifesto” given on 15 February by the Russian Emperor Nicholas II, artists expressed their support for the press and freedom of speech in diverse cultural events arranged in Finnish cities on 3–5 November 1899.2 On 4 November, a group of artists joined forces in Helsinki in arranging a performance of six historical tableaus under the title Kuvaelmia muinaisajoilta (“Scenes from ancient times”) in Nya teatern (“The New Theatre,” nowadays Svenska teatern, “The Swedish Theatre”).3 Jean Sibelius composed “Music for the Press Celebration Days” for this occasion, which consisted of an overture (Preludio) and six movements to be performed in connection with each of the tableaus. After revisions the music composed for the last tableau, Suomi herää (“Finland Awakens”), became known as the tone poem Finlandia.4 After the premiere played by the Philharmonic Society Orchestra under the composer’s baton, selected numbers from “Music for the Press Celebration Days” were performed in orchestral concerts as suites consisting of four, five or six movements. As soon as on 14 December, Robert Kajanus (1856–1933) conducted Nos. 1, 2, 5, 4, and 7 (entitled Preludio, All’Ouvertura [sic], Scéne [sic], Quasi Bolero, and Finale) under the title Kuvaelmamusiikkia – Tablåmusik (“Tableau Music”) in Helsinki. A four-movement compilation consisting of Nos. 2, 5, 4, and 7 was also performed on 3 January 1900 under Kajanus’s baton in a “Popular Concert” given by the Philharmonic Society Orchestra. Sibelius conducted Nos. 1–5 and 7 in Vyborg (Viipuri) on 2 April and Turku on 7 and 8 April 1900. The Finale, or Suomi herää – also under the titles Finland uppvaknar and Suomen herääminen (“Finland’s Awakening”) – of the “Music for the Press Celebration Days” did not generally attract particular attention or admiration in the newspapers published in November 1899, but it was mentioned as part of the tableau music as a whole. Following the performance of the tableau music suite on 14 December 1899, Karl Flodin wrote enthusiastically about the Finale in Aftonposten, specifically concentrating on the hymn-like passage of the movement (later known as the “Finlandia hymn”): “In the Finale, the fifth and the last number of the Suite, Sibelius’s melodic genius culminates in a moment of touching effect. It is the new, young Finland that will be described, and the composer gives us the description in the form of a song, a simple, four-part chorus, peculiar due to certain rhythmic

accents that come out as if the composer had imagined a particular text to that song. But a more touching melody is hard to find. It is a whole new folk song, or more correctly, a song of a folk, a song of the honest, faithful folk dressed in frieze, our own, the song of our democratic Finnish folk.”5 Flodin’s review could be understood as reflecting the contemporary political situation and atmosphere in the Grand Duchy of Finland after the February Manifesto. Another reference to the political situation was published in Wiborgsbladet after the performance of Finlandia, under the heading Finlands uppvaknande (“Finland’s Awakening”) in Vyborg on 3 April 1900: “The last tableau, ‘Finland’s Awakening,’ made an overwhelming impression, naturally also because in these times it plucked a very sensitive string. The whole suite is indicative of the most brilliant music with a purpose one can readily get to hear.”6 In the spring 1900, Finlandia was included in the plans for the Philharmonic Society Orchestra’s tour of Europe in the summer, culminating with concerts in connection with the Paris World Exhibition at the end of July and the beginning of August. In his very first letter to Sibelius from March 1900, signed under the pseudonym X, Axel Carpelan (1858–1919) gave a suggestion for a patriotic work to be composed for the tour: “It is just because of the planned orchestra tour that I cannot refrain – one is still so ill-mannered in our country! – from asking you whether you have thought of writing an introduction overture (or an overture fantasy) for the first concert in Paris. But perhaps it is already finished? If not, get down to business at once so that the score will be ready by the middle of May. The overture or the hymn, whatever one wants to call the introductory number, should be built entirely or partly on Finnish motives, or given that one does not compose according to a recipe, written as your inspiration prompts and advises you. But something damned devilish should be put into the overture! Rubinstein wrote an introduction fantasy, built entirely on Russian motifs, for the Russian concert at the exhibition of 1889, and gave it the title ‘Rossija’. Your overture will be called ‘Finlandia’ – isn’t that right?” 7 Neither the subsequent correspondence between the composer and his patron nor other literary documents reveal the extent to which Carpelan’s initiative and opinions influenced Sibelius’s decision to revise Finlandia and to propose that it be performed on the tour. Performances in 1900–1901, and the title Finlandia was performed for the first time in Helsinki separately from the other movements of the “Music for the Press Celebration Days”, in the latter of the two farewell concerts (on 1 and 2 July) before the Philharmonic Society Orchestra’s European tour under Kajanus’s baton. The work was now referred to in the newspaper announcements and reviews as Suomi and Finlandia. Its reception, like the program of the tour as a whole, was enthusiastic. Only Karl Flodin in Nya Pressen had some reservations, regarding the title of Sibelius’s tone poem in particular: “The concert began with the last movement from Sibelius’s tableau music at the celebration on the press days. The composition was now an independent piece, entitled ‘Suomi, a symphonic tone picture.’ As is known, the composition should depict a young, awakening Finland, and it is excellent as a vivid picture of patria rediviva; the broad, simple, and folk-like melody featured in it is one of the most touching that Sibelius has created. Nevertheless, the number would seem to be too short to be an independent piece, and to ensure the right interpretation of it, some explanatory words should be included in the program, or then the tableau-music character of the piece should somehow be brought out more. ‘Symphonic tone picture’ no doubt says too much: the piece should have been entitled ‘Suomi, a hymn’, or something like that.”8 Finlandia was included in the concert programs of the Philharmonic Society Orchestra’s tour alongside works by Armas Järnefelt (1869–


IX 1958), Kajanus, Oskar Merikanto (1868–1924), and Ernst Mielck (1877–1899), as well as Sibelius’s Symphony No. 1 (Op. 39), Kung Kristian II Suite (Op. 27), Tuonelan joutsen and Lemminkäinen palaa kotitienoille (from Lemminkäinen Op. 22). The reviews published in foreign newspapers and quoted in the Finnish press referred to Sibelius’s “tone poem” or “symphonic poem” as Suomi, La Patrie, Vaterland (in the newspapers also in the Finnish translation, Isänmaa) or, in the concerts in Sweden and Norway, as Finlandia.9 Although the title Finlandia appeared in the edition of the arrangement for piano as early as in November 1900, it did not become established very quickly. The work was still performed as La Patrie in Vyborg at the end of February 1901, but after the publication of the orchestral score in 1901, no title other than the definitive Finlandia appeared in the Finnish newspapers or concert programs.10 The three endings and publication The performances of Finlandia in 1900 were probably conducted from Sibelius’s autograph score of the movement separated from the “Music for the Press Celebration Days” (see the Critical Commentary, source A*); any other copies of the score remain unknown. Sibelius revised the ending of Finlandia, the passage beginning at rehearsal letter O, twice during the same year. He most likely wrote the revisions directly on his autograph score – the revisions focused on the ending of the work, and the pages could be replaced with new ones without extensive changes in the manuscript as a whole. Players’ annotations in the orchestral parts of “Music for the Press Celebration Days” copied by Ernst Röllig (1858–1928; see the Critical Commentary, source B) reveal that the ending was performed in its original 1899 form in the concerts in Viborg and Turku on 2, 7, and 8 April 1900, respectively. At some point, probably between the Turku performances and the Philharmonic Society Orchestra’s farewell concert in Helsinki on 2 July, Sibelius revised the ending of the work for the first time. Röllig also copied the new ending in the orchestral parts, with the exception of some of the string parts in which the ending does not appear. Because the revised ending was not copied in all the string parts, and because none of the other parts include players’ markings in the ending, it is possible that it was never performed. Both the original 1899 ending and the revised endings of Finlandia can be reconstructed on the basis of the orchestral parts. The passage from rehearsal letter O (b. 202) to the end covered 18 bars in the 1899 version. The corresponding passage in the first revised version was 28 bars, featuring a repetition of the entire “hymn theme” (bb. 132–155; for the first of the revised endings, see the Appendix and Facsimile I). The exact date of the second and final revision of the ending remains uncertain, but because Sibelius copied it in the parts, and there were no known performances of Finlandia in the fall of 1900, it was probably made before the Philharmonic Society Orchestra’s tour (beginning on 3 July 1900). Sibelius wrote the final ending, which featured its abridgement to the present 13 bars, on the original orchestral parts of “Finland Awakes.” The first edition of the piano arrangement of Finlandia, published in November 1900, included the final ending.11 Sibelius took the autograph score with him on his journey to Germany in the fall of 1900, but he lost it at the beginning of November. He wrote to Röllig: “Dear Mr. Röllig! Can you imagine the scandal! My score of Patrie (Vaterland, you know it) is lost. It has to be printed – and what to do? Would you help me and compile the score from the parts that are in the library? You would be doing me a great favor.”12 The publishing contract with Helsingfors Nya Musikhandel Fazer & Westerlund was dated 23 November 1900. 13 Röllig copied the score, and the copy (source D*) was used as the Stichvorlage for the first edition of the score (source E), which was published together with the orchestral parts (source F) by Helsingfors Nya Musikhandel Fazer & Westerlund in 1901.14 The current whereabouts of the Stichvorlage remains unknown, and Sibelius’s participation in the publication process is not documented. Sibelius travelled with his family in Italy dur-

ing the winter and spring of 1901, and this had some effect on his ability to apply himself to proofreading.15 The first edition of Finlandia did not contain any opus number. Together with Valse triste, the two first symphonies, and a number of other works, Finlandia was sold in 1905 to Breitkopf & Härtel, who printed a Titelaufl age of the tone poem in the same year with the opus number 26 No. 7.16 Breitkopf & Härtel published Finlandia as a miniature score in 1930 (on Sibelius’s instruction for a metronome indication to be added, see the Critical Commentary). Finlandia in Sibelius’s concert programs and his comments on the work Following the concerts in Vyborg and Turku in April 1900, Sibelius conducted Finlandia only once in his homeland, on 6 July 1920 in the closing concert of the Finnish Fair in Helsinki.17 Yet, together with Valse triste, he often included it in his concerts abroad, typically as the last number. The last performance of Finlandia under the composer’s baton took place on 2 October 1926 in Copenhagen: this was also his last appearance as a conductor in front of an audience. Although Finlandia became an immensely popular work, Sibelius’s comments about it are rather few, and they are typically reactions to its reception. He reflected on the success of Finlandia in his diary on 23 December 1911, writing in a marginal insertion in his entry about the reception of the work in a Berlin performance under Arthur Nikisch’s (1855–1922) baton: “Finlandia. Why does this tone poem resound? Presumably because of its ‘plein air’ style. Really, it is solely built on themes bestowed upon me. Pure inspiration! Wonderful, wonderful! If only I could achieve such a style in general – serene, controlled and harmonious.”18 His tone was more bitter in an entry written eight days later: “Strange that all those critics who are admirers of my music now dislike the performance of Finlandia in Berlin. But all the others cheer for this, which in comparison with my other works is an insignificant composition.”19 The patriotic narrative connected to Finlandia became a frequent subject for discussion following the early reception of the work. The Danish music critic Gunnar Hauch (1890–1937) asked Sibelius about Finlandia in April 1913: “Concerning ‘Finlandia’ I would like to ask Mr Sibelius to tell me whether the work was inspired by certain political circumstances and whether it is correct that its performances in Finland were prohibited – in other words, whether in such a case it really was a question – of unique music censorship. If this is the case, does the Philharmonic Orchestra’s trip to Western Europe in 1900 have some connection to that?”20 Sibelius’s answers were rather laconic: “Finlandia was originally composed for a tableau with a patriotic content. It has been banned in Russia, but not here in Finland. The Philharmonic Orchestra’s trip in 1900 had nothing to do with this.”21 The predominance of Finlandia over other works by Sibelius in concert programs over the decades did not seem to please the composer. In October 1943, he wrote in his diary: “In the evening I listened to a Europe Concert from Germany. All the composers were represented with their best works – I with Finlandia. From now on, people probably take me as – yes, as a ‘fait accompli’.”22 Moreover, according to the biography of Sibelius written by his secretary Santeri Levas (1899– 1987), the composer was irritated by the interest in and praise focused exclusively on Finlandia and Valse triste in the letters he received in his late years, but after all he acknowledged the worth of the two works: “‘This [sender] only talks about Finlandia and Valse triste,’ was a very typical statement [in Ainola]. One evening, the master became thoughtful and suddenly stated: ‘Well, let us not say so. Really, they are both good compositions’.”23 Valse triste and Scen med tranorna Op. 44 Nos. 1 and 2 Arvid Järnefelt’s play Kuolema (“Death,” 1903), with six musical numbers composed by Sibelius, was premiered at the Finnish National


X Theater (Helsinki) on 2 December 1903. The eerie waltz from the first act (annotated “scene I” in Sibelius’s autograph score) was praised in particular in the newspaper reviews following the first performances. Sibelius reworked the waltz as an individual orchestral composition in spring 1904. In its original form, as used in the fi rst scene of Kuolema, without a title but with the tempo indication Tempo di valse lente, the waltz was instrumented for strings only and comprised 188 bars. In addition to the numerous changes in the details that he made in the revised version, which was to be known as Valse triste, Sibelius added a flute, a clarinet, two horns and timpani, and expanded the composition to 202 bars. Valse triste was first performed on 25 April 1904 in Helsinki, in a concert given by the Philharmonic Society Orchestra in which Sibelius conducted two of his new works, the other one being Andante for strings, later known as Romanze (Op. 42).24 Valse triste became an immediate success. As Karl Flodin wrote in the following day’s Helsing fors-Posten: “The latter piece [Valse triste] had to be played again immediately: it was of the kind of piece that burned itself into your consciousness in the wink of an eye. A strange mixture of pale-blue fantasy and swaying waltz rhythm, shadows of the dead dressed up in ball gowns and floating in silent circles. Such was the scene in Järnefelt’s play, and such was the vision that Sibelius’s music conjured up. In fact, it was so descriptive that when you listened to the waltz you could easily, without knowing what the play was about, imagine something similar. The few orchestral instruments were handled with outstanding skill.”25 The music played in the second act of Järnefelt’s Kuolema, later known as Scen med tranorna (“Scene with the Cranes,” music to “scenes III and IV” in Sibelius’s autograph score) 26 consisted of fragmentary musical moments that did not cohere into a unified whole, and the music was not mentioned in the reviews of the premiere. Sibelius probably compiled Scen med tranorna (Op. 44 No. 2) in the fall of 1906 for concerts he organized in Vaasa on 14 and 15 December. As in the case of Valse triste, the instrumentation of Scen med tranorna was changed from the original string ensemble to accommodate a small orchestra consisting of two clarinets and timpani in addition to the strings. In addition to Scen med tranorna, the concerts in Vaasa included Snöfrid (Op. 29), five movements from the incidental music Belsazars gästabud ( JS 48), Vapautettu kuningatar (Op. 48, performed under the title Kantaatti Helsingin Snellman-juhlaan [“Cantata for Snellman Festival in Helsinki”]), and Pan och Echo (Op. 53a). Scen med tranorna was not given wide coverage in the newspaper reviews, but the brief comments that focused on the composition were positive: “From the music to ‘Kuolema,’ the scene with the cranes was performed, which through the poetically fine atmosphere as a whole appeared vision-like.”27 Scen med tranorna was not played again for decades – not until February 1956 in Helsinki City Orchestra’s “concert for school children” conducted by Ole Edgren (1898–1962), then later in the same year, on Sibelius’s birthday (8 December), the composer’s son-in-law Jussi Jalas (1908–1985) conducted it again. These were the only performances during Sibelius’s lifetime, and Scen med tranorna remained a rarity in concert programs long after his death. Publication The publishing contracts for both the piano arrangement and the orchestral score of Valse triste were signed with Helsingfors Nya Musikhandel K. G. Fazer in spring 1904, and the first edition of the score (source C) and the parts (source D) appeared in October. The whereabouts of Sibelius’s autograph score (source A*, possibly also the Stichvorlage for the score) remain unknown: according to the publisher’s editorial markings, copies of the orchestral parts used by the Philharmonic Society Orchestra (source B) were used as Stichvorlagen for the parts. The copyright of Valse triste and all the incidental music to Kuolema were transmitted to Breitkopf & Härtel on 20 July 1905, and there was also some discussion about publishing other move-

ments from the Kuolema music. However, Sibelius wrote to Breitkopf & Härtel: “As I have already said to Mr. Fazer, the ‘Kuolema music’ is – except for ‘Valse triste’ – not at all suitable for the concert hall. It is only for the theater.”28 Although Scen med tranorna had been performed in concerts in December 1906, Sibelius still expressed certain doubts about its use as a concert piece in November 1909: “From it [the Kuolema music] I shall arrange a scene – ‘with the cranes’ – for the concert hall. The music is very much bound up with the action on the stage, however.”29 Unlike Valse triste, Scen med tranorna was not performed very often during Sibelius’s lifetime, and even though he sent the autograph score to Breitkopf & Härtel with the obvious intention of getting the composition published, it was printed only posthumously, in 1973, by the Fazer publishing company.30 Canzonetta Op. 62a and Valse romantique Op. 62b Arvid Järnefelt revised his play Kuolema for the performances staged in March 1911. In an interview published in Hufvudstadsbladet on 8 March, the day of the premiere, Järnefelt answered the journalist’s questions thus: “– And now Mr Järnefelt should mount a horse again? – Yes, with Kuolema! We rehearsed last night until three o’clock. In the last act there is a blaze and it is very difficult to arrange. – Is not the play revised? – Totally. From the beginning to the end. And Sibelius has composed entirely new music for it.”31 The “entirely new music” consisted of two pieces, Canzonetta and Valse romantique, which were included in the second act; Valse triste was played in its original place in the first act. The other musical numbers in the 1903 production were not included in the 1911 performances. Sibelius probably composed Canzonetta and Valse romantique during January and February 1911, the first mention of the “music to Kuolema” appearing in his diary entry for 24 January. At that point, Sibelius named the two pieces inconsistently in his diary: before deciding on the title Canzonetta he referred to the piece as “Werkkoleikki” (“net play”), “Rondino,” and “Rondino der Liebenden”. Valse romantique appeared under the working titles “Vals-intermezzo” and “Valse-episod.”32 Sibelius travelled to Sweden, Berlin, and various Baltic cities during 1–20 February. Clearly, he had to complete the new music for Kuolema in haste: as he wrote in his diary entry for 20 February: “[I] must get the music to Arvid’s ‘Kuolema’ ready!”33 According to his diary he completed Valse romantique on 25 February, but he left the door open for revisions: “Ready with ‘Valse romantique.’ Although not yet definitively. What a difficult job it is to take these themes from years ago and to rework them. [I] live entirely in the wonderful mood that the canzonetta gives me. A man of moods!”34 Canzonetta was completed two days later: “‘Canzonetta’ ready. [I] worked with my head – not with my ‘heart’ today. That is to say, I fair-copied.”35 The first performance of Järnefelt’s play with Sibelius’s Canzonetta and Valse romantique took place in the Finnish National Theater: Alexei Apostol conducted his “Concert Orchestra,” which Sibelius had rehearsed, as he wrote in his diary: “Been in Helsinki. Rehearsed, quasi, with Apostol’s orchestra. Canzonetta lovely. The waltz rather good, but hardly a piece of repertoire. Small changes necessary. A few bars!”36 The reviewer in Nya Pressen described the unfortunate acoustic circumstances in the theater: “Jean Sibelius has written enchanting music to the various ballet numbers, beginning with the already worldfamous ‘Valse triste’ in the first act, and ending with a fascinating ‘Canzonetta’ (new, in G sharp minor) in the second act. There is also ‘Valse romantique,’ which is likewise new. Unfortunately, the two lastmentioned compositions were not heard at all, because the orchestra


XI was hidden behind the scenery.”37 Sibelius put his disappointment in words in his diary: “The music was a fiasco in the Finnish theater. You could hear nothing.”38 In spite of the problems in the performance, however, Sibelius’s music was received rather positively. Otto Kotilainen of Suomalainen kansa wrote: “As is known, Jean Sibelius composed the music for the abovementioned play, and of the various numbers the gloomily beautiful Valse triste is the best-known, admired all over the musical world. The other numbers have been left out of the new version of ‘Kuolema’, and instead, Sibelius has composed two more numbers for the second act: Valse romantique and Canzonetta. Both take the same unpretentious form as Valse triste, and are also similar in their powerful emotional tone. Canzonetta for string orchestra in particular is atmospherically magnificent, and in print it will probably also be as popular as Valse triste. […] Using the gloomy key of G sharp minor in 6/4 time, the composer lets the muted first violins carry the impressive, yearning theme, while the other strings accompany with bleakish chords. When the same theme transfers to the viola after a short bridge, the first violins moan in scalar octave progression, undulating alternately upwards and downwards. A blissful pianissimo ending in the fifth position closes this old-fashioned, fine, and moving dance tone. Valse romantique for small orchestra is in E major. Right from the beginning here, too, the peculiarly hobbling waltz theme is with the first violins. The horns give an impressive background resonance to the harmonization in long chord progressions. […] Although the waltz in my opinion does not equal Canzonetta, in one sense at least it shows the composer’s impressive modus operandi.”39 Pseudonym A. S. of Nya Pressen wrote about the performance: “The music at the performance in the Finnish Theater was played by Apostol’s concert orchestra under the baton of Apostol, although the composer had personally coached the orchestra and expressed his great satisfaction with its performances.”40 Even if Sibelius was satisfied with the performances, in the days following the premiere he expressed varying opinions about Valse romantique. On 12 March he wrote in his diary: “I find ‘Valse romantique’ not bad at all. On the contrary!”41 And on the following day: “Once more I have fallen into a pit! This is with ‘Valse romantique.’ An irrelevancy! Absolutely, in fact, not ‘me’.”42 Sibelius conducted Canzonetta for the first time in his profile concert on 3 April 1911, which also included the premiere of Symphony No. 4 and the first performances in Finland of Die Dryade (Op. 45 No. 1), Nächtlicher Ritt und Sonnenaufgang (Op. 55), and In memoriam (Op. 59). The premieres in particular were noted in the press, but Canzonetta was encored in the concert, and it was also reviewed very positively in the newspaper. Sibelius sent possibly a scribal fair copy of Canzonetta and probably the autograph score of Valse romantique to Breitkopf & Härtel in March 1911; the whereabouts of these manuscripts, which were used as Stichvorlagen, are currently unknown.43 The publisher’s input was positive: “The charming and simple waltz becomes a good counterpart to ‘Valse triste.’ Also, the beautiful, expressive melody of ‘Canzonetta’ pleases us very much.”44 Canzonetta and Valse romantique were published in July and September 1911, respectively. Valse lyrique Op. 96a Valse lyrique for piano was completed in August 1919, and the version for orchestra in February 1920.45 It seems from his letter to R. E. Westerlund that Sibelius had some thoughts about orchestrating the waltz soon after he completed the version for piano, but the orchestral version came about six months later.46 The orchestration progressed rather quickly, only the tremor in Sibelius’s hands causing some trouble: “Orchestrated ‘Valse lyrique.’ This orchestration has cost me a lot of work, because my hands tremble, and thus I am immediately

hindered in writing it down. Only wine helps – and at this price!”47 Sibelius signed a publishing contract for Valse lyrique with Westerlund, and started to make plans for a concert to be given the following year in Bergen, Norway: “[I have] Written to Sverre Jordan, Bergen, about a concert in March 1921 […]”48 The concert in Bergen materialized, but before that, in February 1921, Sibelius conducted ten concerts in Britain: London, Bournemouth, Birmingham, and Manchester. The programs included Symphonies Nos. 3, 4, and 5, the Karelia Suite, En saga, Aallottaret (The Oceanides), Finlandia, Valse triste, Tuonelan joutsen (The Swan of Tuonela), Romanze (Op. 42), and movements from the Kung Kristian II Suite.49 The score of Valse lyrique was sent to London, possibly in the hope that the London publishers Hawkes & Son would publish it. They did not do so, however, but during his stay in Britain, Sibelius apparently decided to include the waltz in the concert programs, and wrote to his wife: “I shall perform Valse lyrique. They are making fair copies [copying the parts].”50 The first performance of Valse lyrique took place on 20 February 1921 in Birmingham; Sibelius conducted the City of Birmingham Orchestra. The other orchestral works in the program were En saga, Symphony No. 3, Valse triste, and Finlandia; in addition, four songs and the slow movement of the Violin Concerto with piano accompaniment were performed. The concert was briefly reviewed in the Birmingham Daily Gazette, and the reception of Valse lyrique was not very positive: “We have to thank Mr. Appleby Matthews for the visit of Sibelius to the Theatre Royal last night, when the famous Finlander conducted a number of his best-known compositions – ‘Finlandia,’ the ‘Sad Waltz,’ and the ‘Lyric Waltz’ – the last-named being the weakest piece in the programme, naturally earning an encore.”51 Seven days later, Sibelius performed Valse lyrique in London with the New Queen’s Hall Orchestra, but there are no known reviews of this concert that mention the waltz. Following its performances in Britain, Valse lyrique was played on 21 March 1921 in Bergen by Musikselskabet Harmonien, conducted by the composer. The other works in this program were Finlandia, Tuonelan joutsen, Valse triste, Symphony No. 2, and Elegie and Musette from the Kung Kristian II Suite. The newspaper reviews focused on the Symphony and Valse triste: the Bergen newspaper Dagen did not mention Valse lyrique at all, but it was welcomed rather warmly in Bergens tidende: “Valse triste, the world-famous demonic dance with death, with its ingeniously apposite horrific atmosphere had almost its artistic opposite in the newly composed Valse lyrique – an engaging and spring-like light atmosphere – an exception in the great melancholic’s tone poetry. It had to be played da capo.”52 Valse lyrique soon became popular in dance performances and in various arrangements. It was played by a “music trio” at the Finnish Opera (Helsinki) on 25 June 1921 as an accompaniment to a dance performance,53 and Nicolaï van Gilse van der Pals (1891–1966) conducted it in Helsinki on 3 April 1922, arranged for string orchestra as part of a celebration organized by “Finnlandkämpfer,” the German-Finnish Society.54 The first full orchestral performance of Valse lyrique in Finland took place on 6 April 1922 in the Solemnity Hall of the University of Helsinki, played by Helsinki City Orchestra under the baton of Karl Ekman (1869–1947). Publication The publication history of Valse lyrique seemed to be rather complex, and the documentation that could shed light on the chain of events contains significant gaps.55 Sibelius signed a publishing contract with Westerlund in February 1920, and he sold the copyright on to the London publishers Hawkes & Son, referring to publications in the British Empire; Wilhelm Hansen (Copenhagen) acquired the rights for publication outside the British Empire and Finland in 1921. Westerlund,


XII who had the Finnish rights, probably asked Emil Kauppi (1875–1930) to make a copy of the orchestral score.56 Wilhelm Hansen expressed its readiness to publish Valse lyrique in 1921 after the premieres in Britain and Norway: “Because we would very much like to print the orchestral edition of ‘Valse lyrique,’ we ask you to kindly send us the score. According to your request it was once sent to London.”57 The score in question was the copy made by Kauppi (source B), which was used as a source for the parts used in the performances in Britain and Norway (source C). Sibelius wrote in his diary entry of 29 June: “Sent yesterday the ‘Valse lyrique’ score to Hansen.”58 The publisher reported having received it soon after that date.59 Sibelius had probably sent his autograph score (source A), because the publisher added the date 13 July in pencil on the title page.60 The autograph score remained in Wilhelm Hansen’s possession.61 At some point, the copy that Kauppi made was also sent to Copenhagen, and it was used as model for another set of parts (source D) to make a performance of Valse lyrique on 9 September 1921 in Tivoli possible.62 Apparently, Wilhelm Hansen sent Kauppi’s copy again to Sibelius in the fall of 1921. The composer may well have made some revisions to the score, which he finally sent to Wilhelm Hansen, probably in December 1921. The publisher confirmed having received the score and the parts of Valse lyrique, and preparations for publication could proceed.63 Kauppi’s copy was then used as the Stichvorlage for the first edition of the score, but before being engraved it was sent – together with the score of Autrefois (Op. 96b) – to the U.S. to be revised for the registration of copyright.64 The parts for the first performances (in Britain and Norway) served as Stichvorlagen for the orchestral parts. The engraving of the score and the parts began in April 1922, and Sibelius received the proofs in May.65 The first edition was released in the late fall of 1922. Valse chevaleresque Op. 96c The exact dates of completion of the piano and the orchestral versions of Valse chevaleresque remain somewhat uncertain. Sibelius referred to Valse chevaleresque in his diary entries between November 1921 and February 1922 only by the title, without identifying the version in question. According to current understanding, the waltz was first completed as a version for piano in November 1921, and the orchestral version was probably completed by mid-December. In his diary, Sibelius mentioned having revised the composition in January 1922, and on 10 January he was ready to send the score to Wilhelm Hansen: “I send herewith a new waltz: ‘Valse chevaleresque’ for orchestra or piano, to be published. […] Yes, the waltz is popular, and I believe it will be a success.”66 According to Sibelius’s diary, Wilhelm Hansen announced the publication of Valse chevaleresque at the end of January 1922. In February, he wrote to Sibelius: “Four or five days ago we […] sent the manuscript of ‘Valse chevaleresque’ to America [for the registration of copyright], and it is therefore possible for us to send you a copy of the score. It is our intention to have the score and the parts printed as soon as possible.”67 However, in spite of the publisher’s intentions, the publication process proceeded slowly. It was only at the end of December 1922 that the publisher could confirm: “In reply to your letter we inform you that the orchestral score and the parts to AUTREFOIS and VALSE CHEVALERESQUE are printed in Germany. Today we have written to the printing house inquiring whether you could have a copy of each sent in January.”68 Sibelius’s profile concert in February 1923 was approaching, and he was anxious to get the materials of Autrefois (Op. 96b), Valse chevaleresque, and Suite champêtre (Op. 98b) printed and available in time. Obviously, the Leipzig printing house Oscar Brandstetter was asked first to pro-

duce and send the orchestral parts – possibly the proofs – to Sibelius to be used at the premiere, meanwhile the engraving of the scores could wait. The orchestral materials of Autrefois and Valse chevaleresque were sent to Sibelius from Leipzig on 11 January, but something went wrong, and he only received the Autrefois materials after some time.69 On 8 February, after tense correspondence on the matter, Wilhelm Hansen wrote to Sibelius: “As we informed you in our letter from 31 January, the material related to Valse chevaleresque should have been sent to you on 11 January. In any case we hope that the materials sent today will come safely into your hands.”70 The engraving of Valse chevaleresque score could not be finished before the first performance, and Sibelius probably asked the publisher to send the engraver’s copy (by Röllig) to be used at the premiere. Wilhelm Hansen asked Sibelius to send the score back to the printing house after the first performances: “We have telegraphically asked the printing house in Leipzig to send you the score and hope that it arrives within some days. We ask you to send the score back to the Oscar Brandstetter printing house, Dresdenerstr. 11/13, Leipzig, immediately after the use. Roughly when do you think that the score could be sent back, because the printing house is at full speed with the engraving?”71 The first edition of the score and the parts eventually appeared in June 1923. The orchestral version of Valse chevaleresque was premiered at Sibelius’s profile concert on 19 February 1923 in the Solemnity Hall of the University of Helsinki. The program included Die Jagd Op. 66 No. 1, Autrefois (for two female voices and a small orchestra, with the title “Pastoral”), Valse chevaleresque, Suite caractéristique Op. 100, Suite champêtre, and Symphony No. 6 Op. 104. The two suites and the symphony were also heard for the first time. The composer conducted the Helsinki City Orchestra. The concert was repeated on 22 February. The main interest in the newspaper reviews was – quite expectedly – in the Symphony, but, both Autrefois and Valse chevaleresque were encored in the first concert. Evert Katila, the Helsingin Sanomat critic, heard echoes of shimmy and jazz in the two “small string-orchestra-suites”, and on Valse chevaleresque he wrote: “Valse chevaleresque, a delicate, cheerful waltz for a large orchestra à la Johann Strauß, even leads one to a ballroom; the composer-conductor emphasized this ideal with his foppish rhythmic patterns that are characteristic of the Viennese waltz.” 72 Toivo Haapanen, writing for Iltalehti, was more reserved, and somewhat surprised by the multiple stylistic dimensions of the concert program: “The following number, ‘Valse chevaleresque,’ should probably be understood as some kind of banter, because Sibelius cooks up an entirely ordinary, authentic Viennese waltz, perhaps just as good as many others in the genre, but naturally also fully lacking the noblesse of personality that one has come to consider characteristic of Sibelius’s music. One cannot deny that the tone manifesting itself in this composition and in the two miniature suites that followed was slightly surprising: the distance from ‘Valse triste’ to ‘Valse chevaleresque’ and, e.g., from the ‘Kung Kristian’ Suite to ‘Suite caractéristique’ is so long.” 73 I owe special thanks to my colleagues Kari Kilpeläinen, Kai Lindberg, Anna Pulkkis, Tuija Wicklund, and Sakari Ylivuori for their valuable opinions and suggestions. I am also very grateful to my students at the Sibelius Academy (University of the Arts) for the fruitful discussions on textual questions in Finlandia during critical-edition courses, and Petri Lehto (Sinfonia Lahti) for his valuable insights as an orchestral musician. I would like to thank Joanna Rinne, Pertti Kuusi, and Turo Rautaoja for their expert and thoughtful proofreading, and Joan Nordlund for revising the English texts. The following people were of great help when I was researching the various sources: Thekla Kluttig (Sächsisches Staatsarchiv), Andreas Sopart (archives of Breitkopf & Härtel); Tarja Lehtinen, Inka Myyry, and Petri Tuovinen (National


XIII Library of Finland); Inger Jakobsson-Wärn and Sanna Linjama (Sibelius Museum); Minna Cederkvist (Helsinki Philharmonic Orchestra); and the staff of the National Archives of Finland and Helsinki City Archives. I offer my thanks to them all. I dedicate this volume to the memory of Risto Väisänen (1947–2018). 11

Helsinki, spring 2019

Timo Virtanen

1

For the versions for piano, see JSW V/3. In addition to the two waltzes, Op. 96 contains the “Scène pastorale” Autrefois Op. 96b. 2 Among other russification actions, the Manifesto put the Finnish press under Russian censorship. 3 The texts were written by Jalmari Finne (1874–1938) and Eino Leino (1878–1926). 4 The genesis of Finlandia as well as of the other movements of the “Music for the Press Celebration Days” is discussed in JSW VI/6. 5 K.[arl] Flodin in Aftonposten, 15 December 1899: “I finalen, svitens femte och sista nummer, koncentrerar sig Sibelius melodiska snille i ett moment af gripande värkan. Det är det nya, unga Finland som skall skildras, och tonsättaren ger oss skildringen i form af en sång, en enkel, fyrstämmig kör, egendomlig genom vissa rytmiska aksenter, som taga sig ut som skulle komponisten tänkt sig en bestämd text till den sången. Men maken till gripande melodi får man leta efter. Det är en hel ny folksång, eller rättare, en folkets sång, det redbara, trofasta, vadmalsklädda folkets sång, vår egen, vårt demokratiska finska folks sång.” 6 Pseudonym –r. in Wiborgsbladet 3 April 1900: “Den sista tablån ‘Finlands uppvaknande’ gjorde ett öfverväldigande intryck, förklarligt nog äfven därför att i densamma anslogs en dessa tider synnerligen känslig sträng. Hela sviten utgjorde ett prof på den mest genialiska tendensmusik man gärna kan få höra.” 7 In fact, Anton Rubinstein (1829–1894) completed the “symphonic piece” Rossija (“Russia”) in 1882. Carpelan’s letter to Sibelius, dated 13 March 1900 (National Archives of Finland, Sibelius Family Archive [=NA, SFA], file box 18): “Det är just i anledning af den tilltänkta orkesterturnéen jag ej kan låta bli – man är ju ännu så obelefvad i vårt fosterland! – att fråga er, om ni ej tänkt skrifva en inledningsouverture (eller ouverturefantasi) för den första konserten i Paris. Men kanske är den redan färdig? Om ej, grip genast värket an så partituret kan vara klart till medlet af maj. Ouverturen eller hymnen, huru man nu vill benämna introduktionsnumret, bör helt eller delvis vara bygd på finska motiv, eller, då man ej komponerar efter recept, skrifvas såsom ingifvelsen bjuder och råder. Men någonting tusan dj[äf]la bör det inläggas i den ouverturen! Rubinstein skref en inledningsfantasi, helt och hållet bygd på ryska motiv, för den ryska konserten vid utställningen 1889 och gaf densamma namnet ‘Rossija’. Er ouverture skall heta ‘Finlandia’ – icke sant?” 8 K.[arl Flodin] in Nya Pressen, 4 July 1900: “Konserten inleddes med den sista afdelningen ur Sibelius tablåmusik vid festen på pressens dag[.] Kompositionen framträdde nu såsom en själfständig sådan under namnet ‘Suomi, sinfonisk tonbild.’ Såsom bekant skall tonsättningen illustrera det unga, vaknande Finland och är såsom en målande bild af patria rediviva ypperlig; den däri ingående, breda, enkla och folkliga melodin är en af de mest gripande som Sibelius skapat. Emellertid föreföll numret väl kort såsom ett själfständigt sådant, och i utlandet borde, för den rätta förståelsen af detsamma, några förklarande ord medfölja å programmen eller styckets karaktär af tablåmusik på något sätt antydas. ‘Sinfonisk tonbild’ säger utan tvifvel för mycket; ‘Suomi, en hymn’, eller någonting sådant, borde kompositionen ha benämts.” In the newspapers, Finlandia was subtitled sävelrunoelma and tondikt (“tone poem”). 9 On the reception of the concerts on the tour and at the Paris World Exhibition, see Marc Vignal, Jean Sibelius (Paris: Fayard, 2004), pp. 291–302; and Helena Tyrväinen, “Sibelius at the Paris Universal Exhibition of 1900,” in Veijo Murtomäki, Kari Kilpeläinen, and Risto Väisänen (eds.), Sibelius Forum. Proceedings from the Second International Jean Sibelius Conference, Helsinki November 25–29, 1995 (Helsinki: Sibelius Academy, 2001), pp. 114–128. Sibelius, who joined the tour as a “vice-conductor,” did not conduct a single performance. 10 However, in 1903 Georg Schnéevoigt (1872–1947) conducted the work in the Baltic countries as “Impromptu”, and according to Karl Ekman’s Sibelius biography (1935), the composer uttered: “When I guest conducted in the summer of 1904 in Tallinn and Riga, I had to call the piece Impromptu.” See Fabian Dahlström, Jean Sibelius. Thematisch-bibliogra-

12

13 14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

phisches Verzeichnis seiner Werke (Wiesbaden: Breitkopf & Härtel, 2003 [=SibWV]), p. 113; and Karl Ekman, Jean Sibelius. En konstnärs liv och personlighet (Helsingfors: Holger Schildts förlag, 1935 [=Ekman 1935]), p. 150: “Då jag sommaren 1904 gästdirigerade i Reval och Riga, måste jag kalla stycket Impromptu.” Sibelius conducted Finlandia, En saga, and the Second Symphony in Riga and Liepaja in August 1904. The autograph score of the version for piano (the archives of the National Library of Finland [=NL], signum HUL 0843) bears no clear sign of revisions made to the ending. The fact that the manuscript consists of nested bifolios, with the exception of the separate last bifolio that includes the ending from b. 200 on, could imply that Sibelius replaced the last (bi) folio with another, i.e., an earlier ending with the eventual one. The exact date of the autograph piano score remains unknown. Sibelius’s letter to Röllig, dated 2 November 1900 (Sibelius Museum): Lieber Herr Röllig! Denken Sie den Skandal! Meine Partitur von Patrie (Vaterland, Si[e] wissen) ist weg gekommen. Das muss gedruckt werden – und was zu thun. Wollten Sie mir helfen und von den Stimmen die in Bibliothek ist ein Partitur zusammen schreiben? Sie thun mir dadurch einen grossen Dienst.” Sibelius was possibly referring to the library of the Helsinki Philharmonic Society. Other sources do not shed additional light on the loss of the manuscript. NA, SFA, file box 47. According to Breitkopf & Härtel’s [=B&H] letter to Sibelius dated 3 January 1901, they had received the Stichvorlage of Finlandia (from Helsingfors Nya Musikhandel Fazer & Westerlund [=HNM]), and the score and the parts were ready for Sibelius’s proofreading on 29 January (B&H’s letter and postcard to Sibelius, NA, SFA, file box 42). B&H’s notification about the proofs dated 29 January did not reach the composer in Berlin, and according to another letter dated 12 March and addressed to Rapallo, the proofs were sent to music critic and merchant Karl Fredrik Wasenius (1850–1920) in Helsinki. Thus, Sibelius probably did not have the opportunity to read any proofs before his return to Finland from Central Europe. The exact date of publication of the orchestral score remains uncertain. Based on B&H’s accounting, Dahlström gives the date March 1901; see SibWV, p. 114. A list of new publications of HNM, including the orchestral score of Finlandia, appeared in Finnish newspapers only in November 1901 (see, for instance, the advertisements under the rubric Uutta! and Nytt! (“Novelties”) in Uusi Suometar and Hufvudstadsbladet 3 November 1901). Sibelius planned to publish other movements from the “Music for the Press Celebration Days” as Op. 26 Nos. 1–6. B&H published three movements as the Orchestral Suite Scènes historiques I (Op. 25 in 1912). On versions of the “Finlandia hymn” for male and mixed choir, see JSW VII/1 and VII/2. At the time, Finlandia was often played as an arrangement for various ensembles; the military conductor Alexei Apostol (1866–1927) had performed the work on the previous day (5 July) in an open-air concert with a military wind orchestra consisting of 150 musicians. Diary, 23 December 1911 (NA, SFA, file boxes 37–38) [=Diary]: “Finlandia. Hvarföre anslår denna tondikt? Antagligen på grund af dess ‘plein air’ stil. Den är faktiskt uppbygd på allenast undfångna temata. Ren inspiration! Härlige, härlige! Kunde jag öfverhufvud komma till en stil, – lugn, behärskad och hel.” Diary, 31 December 1911: “Egendomligt att alla de kritiker, hvilka äro beundrare af min musik, hafva ogillat Finlandias uppförande nu i Berlin. Men alla de andra hurra för denna, om man jämför med mina andra verk, obetydliga composition.” Hauch’s letter to Sibelius, dated 21 April 1913 (NA, SFA, file box 20): “Angående ‘Finlandia’ vil jeg bede Hr Sibelius sige mig om dette værk er inspiret af særlige politiske forhold og om det er rigtigt at opförelse deraf i Finland blev forbudt – med andre ord om det virkelig var tale om en – i så fald – enestående musikcensur. Hvis dette er tilfældet står da det filharmoniske orkesters rejse til Vesteuropa i 1900 i forbindelse hermed?” Sibelius’s letter to Hauch, dated 20 April 1913 (probably 20 May; NL, Coll. 206. 61): “Finlandia komponerades ursprungligen till en tablå med fosterländskt innehåll. Har blifvit förbjuden i Ryssland icke här i Finland. Filh. orkesterns resa 1900 har intet att skaffa härmed.” The date in Sibelius’s letter is erroneous. In his following letter to Sibelius, dated 27 May 1913 (NA, SFA, file box 20), Hauch thanks the composer for his reply, which had arrived only recently. Sibelius’s statements concerning the banning of Finlandia also seem somewhat ambiguous. According to Karl Ekman, the composer reminisced about performances of Finlandia in the years of “Russian oppression” (1899–1905 and 1908–1917; Ekman 1935, p. 150): “In Finland, performing it [Finlandia] was prohibited in the years of oppression, and in other parts of the empire it was not allowed to


XIV

22 23

24

25

26

27 28

29

30 31

32 33 34

35

36 37

be played under a title that somehow pointed to its patriotic character.” (“I Finland var dess uppförande förbjudet under ofärdsåren, och i andra delar av kejsardömet fick den icke spelas under ett namn, som på något vis antydde dess fosterländska karaktär.”) In fact, the tone poem was performed numerous times under the title “Finlandia” as early as in 1900 and 1901 in Helsinki, and also in several other Finnish cities. Diary, 5 October 1943: “Hörde i afton Europakonserten från Tyskland. Alla komponister voro representerade med sina bästa verk – jag med Finlandia. Man tar mig nog härefter som – ja som! Ett ‘fait accompli’.” Santeri Levas, Järvenpään mestari (Porvoo, Helsinki: Werner Söderström Osakeyhtiö, 1960), p. 284: “‘Tämä puhuu vain Finlandiasta ja Valse tristesta’, oli hyvin tavallinen toteamus. Eräänä iltana mestari tuli mietteliääksi ja virkkoi äkkiä: ‘Jaa, eipäs sanota niin. Kyllä ne ovat hyviä sävellyksiä molemmat’.” The other works in the concert, Symphony No. 6 (“Pathétique”) by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, Violin Concerto in E minor by Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy, and Till Eulenspiegels lustige Streiche by Richard Strauss, were performed under Robert Kajanus’s baton. K.[arl Flodin] in Helsing fors-Posten, 26 April 1904: “Det senare stycket måste genast bisseras; det var äfven af den art att det ögonblickligen brände sig in i uppfattningen. En sällsam blandning af blekblå fantastik och vaggande valsrytm, de dödas skuggor, iklädda baltoalett och sväfvande i ljudlösa ringar. Sådan var scenen i Järfelts [sic] skådespel och en sådan syn frammanade äfven Sibelius’ musik. Den var i själfva verket så målande, att man äfven utan kännedom om pjesens innebörd skulle vid åhörandet af valsen sett i fantasin någonting liknande. Med en utsökt konst voro de fåtaliga orkesterinstrumenten behandlade.” The title refers to Sibelius’s annotation in the autograph score (HUL 0848), connected to a passage of nine bars, corresponding to bb. 18–26 in Scen med tranorna: “Paavali: Let me go (the cranes)” (Paavali: Päästä minut [Kurjet]). Anonymous critic in Wasabladet, 15 December 1906: “Ur musiken till ’Kuolema’ utfördes scenen med tranorna, hwilken genom den poetiskt fina stämningen i sin helhet werkade visionartad.” Sibelius’s letter to B&H, dated 22 August 1906 (archives of B&H, Wiesbaden): “Wie ich den [sic] Herrn [K. G.] Fazer schon gesagt habe[,] eignet sich die ‘Kuolema-Musik’ – ausser ‘Valse triste’ – gar nicht für d. Conzertsaal. Die ist nur für die Bühne.” Sibelius’s letter to B&H, dated 19 November 1909 (archives of B&H, Wiesbaden): “Ich werde daraus eine Scene – ‘mit den Kraniche’ [sic] – für d. Concertsaal zu arrangieren. Die Musik ist doch mit der Handlung auf d. Bühne sehr verbunden.” Exactly when Sibelius sent the score to B&H remains unknown. At present, the score is preserved under B&H tenure in the Sächsisches Staatsarchiv in Leipzig. Pseudonym “Reportör” in Hufvudstadsbladet, 8 March 1911: “– Och nu får herr Järnefelt kasta sig i redet igen? – Med Kuolema, ja! Vi repeterade i natt till klockan 3. Där är en eldsvåda i sista akten och den är mycket svår att arrangera. – Pjäsen är ju omarbetad? – Helt och hållet. Från början till slut. Och Sibelius har komponerat en alldeles ny musik till den.” Diary, 24, 26, 27, 28, and 30 January 1911. The “net play” refers to the love scene (with a twinkling golden net on stage) at the end of the second act. Diary: “Måste ha musiken till Arvids ‘Kuolema’ färdig!” Diary: “Färdig med ’Valse romantique’. Ehuru ännu ej definitivt. Hvilket svårt arbete att ta’ ihop med dessa för åratal sedan fångna temata och utarbeta dem. Lefver helt i den underbara stämningen canzonettan ger mig. Stämningsmenniska!” Two sketches and a score draft for Valse romantique are known; the earlier of the sketches probably dates from 1900 (see Facsimile A and B, and the Critical Commentary). Diary, 27 February 1911: “‘Canzonetta’ färdig. Arbetat med hufvudet – icke med ‘hjärtat’ i dag. D.v.s. skrifvit rent.” Based on Sibelius’s handwriting as well as the red ink and paper type used in the autograph score (HUL 0926, source A), Kari Kilpeläinen proposes that Canzonetta might have been composed as early as in 1906, and that Sibelius only revised it in 1911; see the dissertation of Kari Kilpeläinen, Tutkielmia Jean Sibeliuksen käsikirjoituksista (Studia musicologica universitatis helsingiensis III, Helsinki: Helsingin yliopiston musiikkitieteen laitos, 1992), pp. 48–50; see also SibWV, p. 286. Sibelius’s diary entries seem to reveal unequivocally that the work was composed in 1911, however. Diary, 8 March 1911: “Varit i Hfors. Repeterat, quasi, med Apostols orkester. Canzonettan förtjusande. Valsen nog så bra men knapt nog ett repertoire nummer. Smärre ändringar nödiga. Några takter!” Pseudonym Habitué in Nya Pressen, 9 March 1911: “Till de inströdda balettnumren har Jean Sibelius skrifvit en bedårande musik, börjande med den redan världsberömda ‘Valse triste’ i första akten och slutande

38 39

40

41 42 43

44

45 46

47

48 49 50 51 52

53 54

med en hänförande ‘Canzonette’ [sic] (ny, giss-moll) i andra akten. Dessutom förekommer en ‘Valse romantique’, äfven den ny. Tyvärr hördes de två sistnämnda kompositionerna icke alls, utförda som de blefvo af den bakom sceneriet gömda orkestern.” Diary, 9 March 1911: “Musiken haft fiasco på finska teatern. Man hörde ingenting.” O.[tto] K.[otilainen] in Suomalainen kansa, 13 March 1911: “Kuten tunnettua, on yllämainittuun näytelmäkappaleesen [sic] Jean Sibelius säweltänyt musiikin, jonka eri numeroista synkänkaunis Walse triten [sic] on tunnettu ja ihailtu yli koko musiikkimaailman. ‘Kuoleman’ uudessa muowailussa owatkin toiset numerot entisestä musiikista jätetyt pois. Sitä wastoin on Sibelius säweltänyt toiseen näytökseen 2 uutta numeroa lisää: Valse romantique ja Canzonetta. Molemmat owat säwelletyt samaan waatimattomaan muotoon kuin Walse tristekin, mutta myös samansuuntaiseen woimakkaaseen tunnesäwyyn. Warsinkin Canzonetta jouhiorkesterille on tunnelmalleen waltawa ja tulee tämäkin painetutna [sic] warmaan tekemään kaikkialle yhtä onnistuneen kiertokulun kuin Walse triste. […] Synkkää Giss-moll-säwellajia käyttäen kuusineljäsosa tahdissa, antaa säweltäjä ensi wiulujen sordiiniwärityksessä wiedä waikuttawan, kaihoisan teeman toisten jousien synkänomaisilla soinnuilla säestäen. Kun pienen wälikkeen jälkeen sama teema siirtyy altolle, waikeroiwat ensi wiulut oktaawikulussa asteettain aalloten milloin ylös- milloin alaspäin. Ihana pianismo [sic] loppu kwinttitilassaan päättää tämän wanhatyylisen, hienon ja liikuttawan tanssisäwelmän. Walse romantique pienelle orkesterille käy E-duurissa. Ensi alustaan omituisesti onnahtawa walssiteema on tässäkin ensi wiuluilla. Harmoniseeraukseen antaa waikuttawan kaikutaustan pitkissä sointuyhdistyksissä olewat torwet. […] Waikk’ei walssi mielestäni olekaan Canzonettan weroinen, huomaa sentään tässäkin tekijässä waikuttawan tekotawan.” A. S. in Nya Pressen, 11 March 1911: “Vid föreställningen å Finska teatern utfördes musiken af Apostols konsertorkester under Apostols ledning. Komponisten personligen hade dock instruerad orkestern och slutligen uttalat sin stora tillfredsställelse med dess presentationer.” Diary: “Finner ‘valse romantique’ ej illa. Tvärtom!” Diary, 13 March 1911: “Återigen har jag fallit i en grop! Detta med ‘Valse romantique’. En obetydlighet! Absolut ej ‘mig’ egentligen!” The autograph score of Canzonetta (source A) is preserved in the NL (HUL 0926). A contemporary scribal copy exists in Helsinki City Archives (signum 2370); this copy does not include any of the composer’s autograph markings or the conductor’s annotations. B&H’s letter to Sibelius, dated 24 March 1911 (Archives of B&H): “Der anmutige und leichtverständliche Walzer wird ein gutes Gegenstück zu der ‘Valse triste’ sein. Auch die schöne, ausdrucksvolle Melodie der ‘Canzonetta’ gefällt uns sehr gut.” For early versions of Valse lyrique and the version for piano, see JSW V/2 and V/3. Sibelius’s letter to Westerlund, dated 17 August 1919 (archives of publishers Fennica Gehrman, Helsinki): “For the orchestra, the waltz must be made up ‘from the orchestra’.” (“För orkester måste valsen digtas ‘ur orkestern’.”) Diary, 11 February 1920: “Instrumenterat ‘Valse lyrique’. Denna instrumentation har kostat mig mycket arbete då mina händer skaka och jag därigenom hindras att i ett drag skrifva ner den. Endast vin hjälper – och med denna pris!” For the publishing contract, see JSW V/3. Diary, 20 February 1920: “Skrifvit till Sverre Jordan, Bergen om konsert i Mars 1921 […]” In addition, two songs and the slow movement of the Violin Concerto with piano accompaniment were performed in some of the concerts. Sibelius’s letter to his wife Aino, dated 7 February 1921 (NA, SFA, file box 97): “– Valse lyrique uppför jag. De hålla på att renskrifva.” Pseudonym R. J. B. in the Birmingham Daily Gazette, 21 February 1921. Appleby Matthews (1884–1948) was the conductor of the City of Birmingham Orchestra. Pseudonym X. in Bergens tidende, 22 March 1921: “Valse triste, den verdenskjendte dæmoniske dans med døden, med sin genialt trufne uhyggestemning, hade fast sin kunstneriske motsætning i en nykomponeret: Valse lyrique – en indsmigrende og foraarslys stemning – en undtagelse i det store tungsinds tonedigtning. Den maatte gis dacapo.” Advertisements in the newspapers Helsingin Sanomat, Uusi Suomi, and Iltalehti, 23 June 1921. Reviews in Hufvudstadsbladet and Svenska Pressen, 4 April 1922. According to the newspapers, this was “probably” (“antagligen”) the first performance of the waltz. “Finnlandkämpfer” was a society cherishing the memory of German soldiers who took part in the Finnish civil war.


XV 55 The whereabouts of Sibelius’s letters to Edition Wilhelm Hansen (=EWH) remain unknown for the most part. EWH’s letters and postcards to Sibelius are preserved at NA, SFA, file box 45. 56 Kauppi also arranged Valse lyrique for salon orchestra; for piano trio; and for violin/cello and piano. These arrangements were published by EWH in 1921 and 1922. 57 EWH’s postcard to Sibelius, dated 21 June 1921: “Da vi gerne vil trykke Orkesterudgaven af ‘Valse lyrique’, beder vi Dem venligst tilsende os partituret. Dette blev efter Deres Anmodning i sin Tid sendt til London.” 58 Diary, 29 June 1921: “Afsände till Hansen igår ‘Valse lyrique’ partituret.” 59 EWH’s letter to Sibelius, dated 2 July 1921. 60 The date was later erased, and the year is illegible, but in all probability it was 1921. 61 Together with several other Sibelius manuscripts, the autograph score and the parts used in the Tivoli concert were acquired for the archives of the University of Helsinki Library (signa Ö. 73 and 74) in 1997. 62 In SibWV, this performance, with the Tivolis konsertsals orkester conducted by Frederik Schnedler-Petersen, is erroneously given as the premiere of Valse lyrique. 63 EWH’s letter to Sibelius, dated 3 January 1922. 64 EWH’s letter to Sibelius, dated 22 February 1922. The fi rst edition of the score includes the annotation “edited and revised by Julia A. Burt, New York.” 65 See SibWV, p. 409, and EWH’s postcard to Sibelius, dated 23 May 1922. At some point, the Kauppi copy and the parts for the fi rst performances were restored to Sibelius, who lent or donated the materials to his son-inlaw, conductor Jussi Jalas (1908–1985). Jalas, in turn, donated the materials to Ylioppilaskunnan soittajat (Helsinki University Symphony Orchestra). Today, the materials are included in the archives of the NL (signum Coll. 727.3). 66 Sibelius’s letter draft to EWH, dated 10 January 1922 (NA, SFA, file box 46): “Sänder härhos en ny vals: ‘Valse chevaleresque’ för orkester eller piano i och för förlag. […] Valsen är ju populär, och jag tror den skall ha framgång.” For the revisions and the detailed publication history, see the Introduction in JSW V/3. Sibelius mentioned Valse chevaleresque several times in his diary, in entries dated in November and December 1921, and in January and February 1922. 67 EWH’s letter to Sibelius, dated 22 February 1922 (typed): “Vi har […] for 4–5 Dage siden sendt Manuskriptet til ‘Valse chevaleresque’ til Amerika, hvorfor det saaledes er os muligt, at sende Dem en Kopi af Partituret. Det

68

69

70

71

72

73

er vor Agt at lade Partituret [added below in ink:] og Stemmerne trykke snarest muligt.” The manuscript in question was probably the score copy made by Röllig (HUL 1816). The whereabouts of the autograph score remain unknown. EWH’s letter to Sibelius, dated 28 December 1922: “I Besvarelse af Deres Brev skal vi meddele Dem, at Orkester Partitur og Stemmer til AUTREFOIS og VALSE CHEVALERESQUE trykkes i Tyskland. Vi har idag tilskrevet Trykkeriet og forespurgt, hvorvidt det leder sig gøre, at De kan fas tilsendt et Eksemplar i Januar af disse.” Sibelius’s letter draft, probably to Brandstetter, undated (probably before mid-February 1923; NA, SFA, file box 45): “By accident you only sent me Autrefois a month ago. Please send the Valse chevaleresque material immediately.” (“Aus Versehen haben Sie vor ein Monat nur Autrefois gesendet. Bitte material zu Valse chevaleresque sofort zu senden.”) EWH’s letter to Sibelius, dated 8 February 1923: “Som vi meddelte Dem i vort Brev af 31. Januar skulde Materialet til Valse chevaleresque allerede være sendt til Dem den 11. Januar. Vi haaber imidlertid, at det i Dag afsendte Materiale vil komma Dem rigtig i Hande.” EWH’s letter (typed) to Sibelius, dated 19 January 1923: “Vi har telegrafisk anmodet Trykkeriet i Leipzig om at sende Dem Partituret og haaber, at dette indtræffer i Løbet af nogle faa Dage. Vi beder Dem straks efter Brugen tilbagsende Partituret til Trykkeriet Oscar Brandstetter, Dresdenerstr. 11/13, Leipzig. Naar omtrent mener De at Partituret kan tilbagesendes, idet nemlig Trykkeriet er i Ferd med Stikningen?” E.[vert] Katila in Helsingin Sanomat, 20 February 1923: “Suorastaan salonkiin siirtää Valse chevaleresque, sorea, hywäntuulinen walssi suurelle orkesterille Johann Straussin tapaan, jonka esikuwan waikutusta säweltäjä-johtaja wielä korosti keikailevalla wienerwalssille kuwaawalla rytmiikalla.” T.[oivo] H.[aapanen] in Iltalehti, 20 February 1923: “Seuraava sävellys, ‘Valse chevaleresque,’ on kai ymmärrettävä jonkunlaiseksi leikinlaskuksi, Sibelius kun on siinä tekaissut aivan tavallisen, väärentämättömän wiener-valssin, lajissaan ehkä yhtä hyvän kuin moni muukin, mutta luonnollisesti myös täysin sitä persoonallisuuden aateluutta puuttuvan, jota on tottunut pitämään Sibelius-musiikin tunnusmerkkinä. Ei voi kieltää, että tässä sävellyksessä sekä kahdessa sitä seuraavassa miniatyyrisarjassa ilmenevä sävy oli vähän yllättävä, – välimatka ‘Valse tristestä’ ‘Valse chevaleresque’iin ja esim. ‘Kuningas Kristian’ -sarjasta ‘Suite characteristique’iin on siksi suuri.”


XVI

Einleitung Der vorliegende Band enthält sieben Orchesterwerke, von denen Jean Sibelius fünf ursprünglich als Bühnenmusik komponiert hatte. Er trennte diese Werke dann aber später aus der Verbindung mit der Schauspielmusik heraus, damit sie in Konzerten als eigenständige Kompositionen aufgeführt werden konnten. Die Tondichtung Finlandia op. 26 entstammt der „Musik zu den Pressefeiern“ JS 137 (1899). Valse triste und Scen med tranorna („Szene mit Kranichen“) op. 44 Nr. 1 und 2 entstanden als Schauspielmusik ( JS 113) für die Premiere von Arvid Järnefelts (1861–1932) Theaterstück Kuolema („Tod“), die 1903 stattfand; Canzonetta und Valse romantique op. 62a und 62b waren Ergänzungen zu einer Bühnenproduktion von Kuolema im Jahr 1911. Die beiden Walzer mit der Opuszahl 96 (1920/21), Valse lyrique op. 96a und Valse chevaleresque op. 96c, sind Orchesterfassungen von Werken, die auch als Klavierkompositionen bekannt sind.1 Von diesen Werken blieb nur Scen med tranorna zu Sibelius’ Lebzeiten unveröffentlicht. Es war wohl beabsichtigt, das Stück herauszubringen – die autographe Partitur wird im Breitkopf-Bestand im Sächsischen Staatsarchiv in Leipzig aufbewahrt –, die Erstausgabe von Partitur und Stimmen wurde jedoch erst 1973 gedruckt. Dies erfolgte auf der Grundlage der Abschrift eines unbekannten Kopisten; die auf Sibelius’ Autograph zurückgehende Ausgabe von Scen med tranorna wird im vorliegenden Band erstmals veröffentlicht. Finlandia op. 26 Frühe Aufführungen und ihre Rezeption Zu den Nachwirkungen des am 15. Februar 1899 erlassenen „FebruarManifests“ des russischen Zaren Nikolaus II. zählen die Solidaritätsbekundungen von Künstlern zugunsten der Presse- und der Redefreiheit, die vom 3. bis 5. November 1899 bei verschiedenen kulturellen Ereignissen in finnischen Städten organisiert worden waren.2 Am 4. November bündelte eine Künstlergruppe ihre Kräfte und brachte im Nya teatern („Das Neue Theater“, heute: Svenska teatern, „Das Schwedische Theater“) unter dem Titel Kuvaelmia muinaisajoilta („Szenen aus alter Zeit“) sechs historische Tableaus zur Aufführung.3 Jean Sibelius komponierte zu diesem Anlass die „Musik zu den Pressefeiern“ JS 137. Diese bestand aus einer Ouvertüre (Preludio) und sechs Sätzen, von denen jeweils einer zu den Tableaus aufgeführt wurde. Nach einigen Überarbeitungen wurde die Musik zum letzten Tableau, Suomi herää [„Finnland erwacht“], als Tondichtung Finlandia bekannt.4 Nach der Uraufführung durch das Orchester der Philharmonischen Gesellschaft unter der Leitung des Komponisten wurden in Orchesterkonzerten einige Stücke aus der „Musik zu den Pressefeiern“ als vier-, fünf- oder sechssätzige Suiten aufgeführt. Schon am 14. Dezember dirigierte Robert Kajanus (1856–1933) in Helsinki unter dem Titel Kuvaelmamusiikkia – Tablåmusik [Tableaumusik] die Nummern 1, 2, 5, 4 und 7 (mit den Titeln Preludio, All’Ouvertura [sic], Scéne [sic], Quasi Bolero und Finale). Zudem wurde eine viersätzige Zusammenstellung der Nummern 2, 5, 4 und 7 unter Kajanus’ Leitung am 3. Januar 1900 in einem „Populärkonzert“ gespielt, das das Orchester der Philharmonischen Gesellschaft gab. Sibelius selbst leitete die Nummern 1–5 und 7 am 2. April 1900 in Vyborg (Viipuri) und am 7. und 8. April in Turku. Das Finale oder Suomi herää – es finden sich auch die Titel Finland uppvaknar und Suomen herääminen („Finnlands Erwachen“) – aus der „Musik zu den Pressefeiern“ zog in den Zeitungen, die im November 1899 erschienen, keine spezielle Aufmerksamkeit oder Bewunderung auf sich, wurde aber als Teil der gesamten Tableaumusik erwähnt. Nach der Aufführung der Tableaumusik-Suite am 14. Dezember 1899 schrieb Karl Flodin in Aftonposten enthusiastisch über das Finale und hob dabei besonders die (später als „Finlandia-Hymne“ bezeichnete) hymnenähnliche Passage des Satzes hervor: „Im Finale, der fünften

und letzten Nummer der Suite, gipfelt Sibelius’ melodischer Genius in einem Moment berührender Wirkung. Hier wird das neue, junge Finnland beschrieben, und der Komponist vermittelt uns diese Beschreibung in Form eines Liedes, eines schlichten vierstimmigen Satzes, der durch bestimmte rhythmische Akzente seine Eigenart hat. Sie wirken, als hätte der Komponist bei diesem Lied an einen bestimmten Text gedacht. Eine bewegendere Melodie lässt sich indes kaum denken. Es ist ein ganz neues Volkslied, oder korrekter, ein Lied des Volkes, ein Lied des redlichen, treuen Volkes, in einen Fries gefasst, unser eigen, das Lied unseres demokratischen, finnischen Volkes.“5 Flodins Bericht konnte nach dem Februar-Manifest als Reflexion der damaligen politischen Situation und Stimmung im Großfürstentum Finnland verstanden werden. Ein weiterer Bezug zu der politischen Lage wurde unter der Überschrift Finlands uppvaknande („Finnlands Erwachen“) nach der Aufführung von Finlandia am 3. April 1900 in Vyborg im Wiborgsbladet veröffentlicht: „Das letzte Tableau, ,Finnlands Erwachen‘, machte einen überwältigenden Eindruck, auch weil es naturgemäß in diesen Zeiten eine sehr sensible Saite berührt hat. In der ganzen Suite lugt überall die brillanteste Musik hervor, deren Bestimmung leicht zu erfassen ist.“6 Im Frühjahr 1900 wurde Finlandia in die Planungen einbezogen, die das Orchester der Philharmonischen Gesellschaft für seine Europatournee im Sommer machte. Als Höhepunkt sollten Ende Juli und Anfang August Konzerte in Verbindung mit der Pariser Weltausstellung stattfinden. Im allerersten Brief, den Axel Carpelan (1858–1919) im März 1900 an Sibelius richtete und mit dem Pseudonym X unterschrieb, gab er die Anregung für ein patriotisches Werk, das für die Tournee komponiert werden sollte: „Es ist nur wegen der geplanten Orchestertournee, dass ich mich nicht zurückhalten kann – man ist noch so unhöflich in unserem Land! –, Sie zu fragen, ob Sie einmal überlegt haben, für das erste Konzert in Paris eine einleitende Ouvertüre (oder eine Fantasie-Ouvertüre) zu schreiben. Aber vielleicht ist sie ja schon vollendet? Falls nicht, gehen Sie sofort an die Arbeit, damit die Partitur Mitte Mai fertig sein kann. Die Ouvertüre oder die Hymne, wie auch immer man das Einleitungsstück nennen mag, sollte ganz oder teilweise auf finnischen Motiven aufbauen, oder sie sollte, falls sich nicht nach Rezept komponieren lässt, so geschrieben sein, wie Ihre Eingebung Sie herausfordert und leitet. Aber etwas verdammt Teuflisches sollte in die Ouvertüre gepackt werden! Rubinstein schrieb für das russische Konzert bei der Ausstellung 1889 eine Fantasie-Introduktion, ganz auf russischen Motiven basierend, und nannte sie ,Rossija‘. Ihre Ouvertüre wird ,Finlandia‘ heißen – nicht wahr?“7 Weder die darauffolgende Korrespondenz zwischen dem Komponisten und seinem Förderer noch andere literarische Dokumente erhellen, in welchem Maße Carpelans Anregung und Ansichten Sibelius’ Entscheidung beeinflusst haben, Finlandia zu überarbeiten und das Werk für die Aufführung auf der Tournee vorzuschlagen. Die Aufführungen 1900/1901 und der Titel Getrennt von den anderen Sätzen der „Musik zu den Pressefeiern“ wurde Finlandia erstmals in Helsinki unter Kajanus’ Leitung aufgeführt, und zwar im zweiten der beiden Abschiedskonzerte, die am 1. und 2. Juli stattfanden, bevor das Orchester der Philharmonischen Gesellschaft auf Europatournee ging. In den Vorankündigungen und Kritiken in den Zeitungen wurde es nun als Suomi und Finlandia bezeichnet. Dieses Werk, wie auch das gesamte Tourneeprogramm, wurde enthusiastisch aufgenommen. Nur Karl Flodin äußerte in Nya Pressen einige Vorbehalte und dies insbesondere, was den Titel von Sibelius’ Tongedicht anging: „Das Konzert begann mit dem letzten Satz aus Sibelius’ Tableaumusik zu den Pressefeiern. Jetzt war die Komposition ein unabhängiges Stück mit dem Titel ‚Suomi, ein symphonisches Tongemälde‘. Wie bekannt, sollte die Komposition das


XVII junge, erwachende Finnland beschreiben, und sie ist ausgezeichnet als lebendiges Bild der patria rediviva; die breite, einfache und volksliedhafte Melodie, die darin verwendet wird, ist eine der bewegendsten, die Sibelius geschaffen hat. Nichtsdestotrotz scheint die Nummer für ein unabhängiges Stück zu kurz zu sein, und um ihre richtige Interpretation zu sichern, sollten einige erklärende Worte ins Programm aufgenommen werden, oder der Tableaumusik-Charakter des Stücks sollte irgendwie mehr herausgestellt werden. ,Symphonisches Tongemälde‘ sagt ohne Zweifel zu viel; die Komposition sollte ,Suomi, eine Hymne‘ heißen – oder so ähnlich.“ 8 Zusammen mit Werken von Armas Järnefelt (1869–1958), Kajanus, Oskar Merikanto (1868–1924) und Ernst Mielck (1877–1899) sowie – von Sibelius – der 1. Symphonie op. 39, der Kung Kristian II.-Suite op. 27, Tuonelan joutsen und Lemminkäinen palaa kotitienoille (aus Lemminkäinen op. 22) wurde Finlandia in die Konzertprogramme der Tournee des Orchesters der Philharmonischen Gesellschaft aufgenommen. Die in den ausländischen Zeitschriften veröffentlichten Kritiken, die in der finnischen Presse zitiert wurden, nannten Sibelius’ „Tongedicht“ oder „Symphonische Dichtung“ Suomi, La Patrie, Vaterland (in den Zeitungen auch in der finnischen Übersetzung Isänmaa), bei den Konzerten in Schweden und Norwegen hingegen Finlandia.9 Obwohl der Titel Finlandia schon im November 1900 in der Ausgabe der Klavierbearbeitung auftaucht, etablierte sich dieser Titel nicht so schnell. Das Werk wurde noch Ende Februar 1901 in Vyborg als La Patrie aufgeführt, aber nach der Veröffentlichung der Orchesterpartitur im Jahr 1901 erschien in den finnischen Zeitungen und in Konzertprogrammen nichts anderes mehr als der endgültige Titel Finlandia.10 Die drei Schlüsse und die Veröffentlichung Die Finlandia-Aufführungen im Jahr 1900 wurden wahrscheinlich aus Sibelius’ Autograph dirigiert, wobei der Satz aus der „Musik zu den Pressefeiern“ herausgetrennt worden war (siehe den Critical Commentary, Quelle A*); Partiturabschriften sind nicht bekannt. Sibelius überarbeitete noch im selben Jahr zweimal den Schluss von Finlandia, d. h. die Passage, die beim Probebuchstaben O beginnt. Aller Wahrscheinlichkeit nach trug er die Neufassungen direkt in die autographe Partitur ein; die Überarbeitungen konzentrierten sich auf den Schluss des Werks, und so konnten die Seiten durch neue ersetzt werden, ohne dass größere Änderungen im Manuskript als Ganzem entstanden wären. Anmerkungen von Musikern in den von Ernst Röllig (1858–1928) geschriebenen Orchesterstimmen der „Musik zu den Pressefeiern“ (siehe den Critical Commentary, Quelle B) lassen erkennen, dass der Schluss in seiner ursprünglichen Form von 1899 bei den Konzerten in Viborg und Turku am 2., 7. bzw. 8. April 1900 noch gespielt wurde. Zu einem bestimmten Zeitpunkt, vermutlich zwischen den Aufführungen in Turku und dem Abschiedskonzert des Orchesters der Philharmonischen Gesellschaft am 2. Juli in Helsinki, überarbeitete Sibelius zum ersten Mal den Schluss des Werks. Röllig fügte den neuen Schluss in die Orchesterstimmen ein – mit Ausnahme einiger Streicherstimmen, in denen der Schluss nicht auftaucht. Da der überarbeitete Schluss nicht in alle Streicherstimmen übertragen wurde und sich in keiner Stimme am Werkschluss Eintragungen der Musiker finden, ist es möglich, dass diese Schlussfassung nie gespielt wurde. Sowohl der ursprüngliche Schluss von 1899 als auch die überarbeiteten Schlüsse von Finlandia lassen sich auf der Grundlage der Orchesterstimmen rekonstruieren. Die Passage vom Probebuchstaben O (Takt 202) bis zum Ende umfasste 18 Takte in der Fassung von 1899. Die entsprechende Passage in der ersten revidierten Fassung war 28 Takte lang und enthielt dabei eine Wiederholung des gesamten „Hymnenthemas“ (T. 132–155; zum ersten revidierten Schluss siehe Appendix und Faksimile I). Der genaue Zeitpunkt der zweiten und endgültigen Revision des Schlusses ist nicht bekannt; da Sibelius diesen aber in die Stimmen

eintrug und aus dem Herbst 1900 keine Finlandia-Aufführungen bekannt sind, entstand der neue Schluss vermutlich, bevor sich das Orchester der Philharmonischen Gesellschaft (am 3. Juli 1900) auf seine Tournee begab. Sibelius schrieb den endgültigen Schluss, der die Verkürzung auf die heute gültigen 13 Takte mit sich brachte, in die ursprünglichen Stimmen von „Finnland erwacht“. Die im November 1900 veröffentlichte Erstausgabe der Klavierbearbeitung von Finlandia erhielt den endgültigen Schluss.11 Sibelius nahm die autographe Partitur im Herbst 1900 mit auf seine Reise nach Deutschland, verlor sie aber Anfang November. Er schrieb an Röllig: „Lieber Herr Röllig! Denken Sie den Skandal! Meine Partitur von Patrie (Vaterland, Si[e] wissen) ist weg gekommen. Das muss gedruckt werden – und was zu thun. Wollten Sie mir helfen und von den Stimmen die in Bibliothek ist ein Partitur zusammen schreiben? Sie thun mir dadurch einen grossen Dienst.“12 Der Verlagsvertrag mit Helsingfors Nya Musikhandel Fazer & Westerlund ist auf den 23. November 1900 datiert.13 Röllig erstellte eine Abschrift der Partitur, und diese Kopie (Quelle D*) wurde für die Erstausgabe der Partitur (Quelle E), die zusammen mit den Stimmen (Quelle F) 1901 bei Helsingfors Nya Musikhandel Fazer & Westerlund erschien, als Stichvorlage benutzt.14 Wo sich die Stichvorlage heute befindet, ist unbekannt, und Sibelius’ Anteil am Veröffentlichungsprozess ist nicht belegt. Sibelius bereiste mit seiner Familie im Winter und Frühling 1901 Italien, und dies hatte Auswirkungen auf seine Möglichkeiten, Korrektur zu lesen.15 Die Erstausgabe von Finlandia enthält keine Opuszahl. Zusammen mit Valse triste, den ersten beiden Symphonien und etlichen anderen Werken wurde Finlandia 1905 dem Verlag Breitkopf & Härtel verkauft, der im selben Jahr eine Titelauflage des Tongedichts mit der Opuszahl 26 Nr. 7 herausbrachte.16 1930 veröffentlichte Breitkopf & Härtel Finlandia als Studienpartitur (zu Sibelius’ Anweisung, eine Metronomangabe hinzuzufügen, vgl. den Critical Commentary). Finlandia in den Konzertprogrammen von Sibelius und seine Kommentare zum Werk Nach den Konzerten in Vyborg und Turku im April 1900 dirigierte Sibelius Finlandia nur noch einmal in seinem Heimatland, und zwar am 6. Juli 1920 in Helsinki beim Abschlusskonzert der FinnlandMesse.17 In seinen Konzerten im Ausland hingegen setzte er das Werk zusammen mit Valse triste gern aufs Programm und dann meistens als Finalstück. Die letzte Aufführung von Finlandia unter der Leitung des Komponisten fand am 2. Oktober 1926 in Kopenhagen statt; dies war auch sein letzter öffentlicher Auftritt als Dirigent. Obwohl Finlandia ein ungemein beliebtes Werk wurde, waren Sibelius’ Kommentare dazu eher spärlich, und sie waren dann eher Reaktionen auf die Rezeption. Im Tagebuch vom 23. Dezember 1911 reflektierte er in einer Randnotiz den Erfolg des Werkes bei einer Aufführung in Berlin unter der Leitung von Arthur Nikisch (1855–1922): „Finlandia. Warum erzeugt dieses Tongedicht so eine Resonanz? Vermutlich wegen seines ,Plein-air‘-Stils. Es ist tatsächlich nur auf Themen gebaut, die mir zugeflossen sind. Reine Eingebung! Herrlich, herrlich! Wenn ich diesen Stil nur generell erreichen könnte – ruhig, beherrscht und harmonisch.“18 Acht Tage später schlug er einen bittereren Ton an: „Befremdlich, dass alle jene Kritiker, die meine Musik bewundern, nun die Aufführung von Finlandia in Berlin geringschätzen. Alle anderen aber bejubeln sie, die im Vergleich zu meinen anderen Werken eine unbedeutende Komposition ist.“19 Der mit Finlandia verbundene patriotische Gehalt wurde ein häufiges Diskussionsthema, das die frühe Rezeption des Werks begleitete. Der dänische Musikkritiker Gunnar Hauch (1890–1937) befragte im April 1913 Sibelius zu Finlandia: „Was ,Finlandia‘ angeht, so möchte ich Herrn Sibelius bitten, mir zu sagen, ob das Werk durch bestimmte politische Umstände angeregt wurde und ob es richtig ist, dass dessen Aufführungen in Finnland verboten waren – mit anderen Worten, ob


XVIII es in einem solchen Fall tatsächlich eine Frage von einmaliger musikalischer Zensur war? Falls dem so sein sollte, hatte die Reise des Philharmonischen Orchesters nach Westeuropa im Jahr 1900 damit etwas zu tun?“20 Sibelius’ Antworten waren ziemlich lakonisch: „Finlandia wurde ursprünglich für ein Tableau mit patriotischem Inhalt komponiert. Das Stück war in Russland verboten, nicht aber hier in Finnland. Die Reise des Philharmonischen Orchesters im Jahr 1900 hat damit nichts zu tun.“21 Die jahrzehntelange Vorherrschaft von Finlandia gegenüber anderen eigenen Werken in den Konzertprogrammen schien dem Komponisten nicht zu gefallen. Im Oktober 1943 schrieb er in sein Tagebuch: „Am Abend hörte ich ein Europakonzert aus Deutschland. Alle Komponisten waren mit ihren besten Werken vertreten – ich mit Finlandia. Von nun an werden mich die Leute als – ja, als ,fait accompli‘ betrachten.“22 Folgt man der Sibelius-Biographie seines Sekretärs Santeri Levas (1899–1987), so war der Komponist irritiert von dem Interesse und dem Lob, das sich in den Briefen, die er in seinen letzten Lebensjahren erhielt, ausschließlich auf Finlandia und Valse triste bezog, erkannte aber letztlich den Wert der beiden Werke an: „,Der [Absender] spricht nur über Finlandia und Valse triste‘ – das war [in Ainola] eine äußerst typische Feststellung. Eines Abends wurde der Meister nachdenklich und bemerkte plötzlich: ‚Gut, sagen wir es nicht so. Eigentlich sind sie beide gute Kompositionen.‘“23 Valse triste und Scen med tranorna op. 44 Nr. 1 und 2 Zu Arvid Järnefelts Theaterstück Kuolema („Tod“, 1903) komponierte Sibelius sechs Musiknummern – die Premiere fand am 2. Dezember 1903 im Finnischen Nationaltheater in Helsinki statt. Der schauerliche Walzer aus dem ersten Akt (in Sibelius’ Partiturautograph als „Szene 1“ bezeichnet) wurde nach den ersten Aufführungen in den Zeitungsberichten besonders gelobt. Im Frühjahr 1904 arbeitete Sibelius den Walzer zu einer eigenständigen Orchesterkomposition um. In seiner ursprünglichen Form, wie er in der ersten Szene in Kuolema verwendet wurde, trägt der Walzer keinen Titel, wohl aber die Tempoangabe Tempo di valse lente; er ist nur für Streicher instrumentiert und umfasst 188 Takte. Über zahlreiche Detailänderungen hinaus fügte Sibelius in der revidierten Fassung, die als Valse triste bekannt wurde, eine Flöte, eine Klarinette, zwei Hörner und Pauken hinzu und erweiterte die Komposition auf 202 Takte. Die Uraufführung der Valse triste fand am 25. April 1904 in Helsinki statt – in einem Konzert, das die Philharmonische Orchestergesellschaft gab, in dem Sibelius ein weiteres seiner neuen Werke dirigierte: ein Andante für Streicher, das später als Romanze op. 42 bekannt wurde. 24 Valse triste war sofort erfolgreich. Am folgenden Tag schrieb Karl Flodin in Helsing fors-Posten: „Das letztere Stück [Valse triste] musste sofort wiederholt werden; es ist von jener Art, die sich einem in Nullkommanichts ins Bewusstsein einbrennt. Eine seltsame Mischung von hellblauer Fantasie und schaukelndem Walzerrhythmus, Schatten des Todes, in Ballkleidern herausgeputzt und in stillen Kreisen dahingleitend. So sah die Szene in Järnefelts Stück aus, und so war die Vision, die Sibelius’ Musik heraufbeschwor. Sie war in der Tat derart plastisch, dass man sich beim Hören des Walzers, ohne zu wissen, was das Stück beinhaltet, leicht etwas Ähnliches vorstellen konnte. Die wenigen Orchesterinstrumente wurden mit überragender Fertigkeit behandelt.“25 Die Musik, die im zweiten Akt von Järnefelts Kuolema gespielt und später als Scen med tranorna („Szene mit Kranichen“, im Partiturautograph: die Musik zu den „Szenen III und IV“) 26 bekannt wurde, bestand aus fragmentarischen Musikhäppchen, die sich nicht zu einem Ganzen fügten, und diese Stücke wurden in den Premierenberichten nicht erwähnt. Im Herbst 1906 fügte Sibelius vermutlich Scen med tranorna op. 44 Nr. 2 für Konzerte zusammen, die er in Vaasa für den 14. und 15. Dezember organisiert hatte. Wie im Fall der Valse triste änderte

sich die Instrumentierung der Scen med tranorna vom ursprünglichen Streicherensemble zu einem kleinen Orchester, das über die Streicher hinaus aus zwei Klarinetten und Pauken bestand. Über Scen med tranorna hinaus wurden bei den Konzerten in Vaasa Snöfrid op. 29, fünf Sätze aus der Bühnenmusik zu Belsazars gästabud JS 48, Vapautettu kuningatar op. 48 (unter dem Titel Kantaatti Helsingin Snellman-juhlaan [„Kantate zum Snellman-Festival in Helsinki“]) und Pan och Echo op. 53a aufgeführt. Die Scen med tranorna wurde in den Zeitungsberichten nicht ausführlich beachtet, aber die kurzen Kommentare, die der Komposition gewidmet waren, fielen positiv aus: „Aus der Musik zu ,Kuolema‘ wurde die Szene mit den Kranichen aufgeführt, die insgesamt durch die großartige poetische Atmosphäre wie eine Vision erschien.“27 Scen med tranorna wurde jahrzehntelang nicht wieder gespielt, bis das Stadtorchester Helsinki das Werk unter Leitung von Ole Edgren (1898–1962) im Februar 1956 bei einem Schulkonzert aufführte und im selben Jahr Jussi Jalas (1908–1985), der Schwiegersohn des Komponisten, zu Sibelius’ Geburtstag am 8. Dezember das Stück erneut dirigierte. Dies waren die einzigen Aufführungen zu Lebzeiten des Komponisten, und Scen med tranorna blieb noch lange nach dessen Tod eine Seltenheit auf den Konzertprogrammen. Veröffentlichung Die Verlagsverträge zu Valse triste – sowohl für die Klavierbearbeitung als auch für die Orchesterfassung – wurden im Frühjahr 1904 mit dem Helsingfors Nya Musikhandel K. G. Fazer abgeschlossen, und die Erstausgabe der Partitur (Quelle C) und der Stimmen (Quelle D) erschienen im Oktober. Der Verbleib des Partiturautographs (Quelle A*, die möglicherweise auch die Stichvorlage für die Partitur war) ist unbekannt: den Editionsanmerkungen des Verlags zufolge dienten die Orchesterstimmen, die das Orchester der Philharmonischen Gesellschaft benutzt hatte (Quelle B), als Stichvorlage für die Stimmen. Das Copyright zu Valse triste und zur gesamten Schauspielmusik zu Kuolema wurde Breitkopf & Härtel am 20. Juli 1905 übertragen, wobei es auch Überlegungen zur Veröffentlichung anderer Sätze aus der Kuolema-Musik gab. Sibelius schrieb jedoch an Breitkopf & Härtel: „Wie ich den Herrn [K. G.] Fazer schon gesagt habe[,] eignet sich die ,Kuolema-Musik‘ – ausser ,Valse triste‘ – gar nicht für d. Conzertsaal. Die ist nur für die Bühne.“28 Obwohl Scen med tranorna im Dezember 1906 in Konzerten aufgeführt worden war, äußerte Sibelius im November 1909 immer noch Zweifel an der Verwendung als Konzertstück: „Ich werde daraus [aus der Musik zu Kuolema] eine Scene – ,mit den Kraniche‘ – für d. Concertsaal zu arrangieren. Die Musik ist doch mit der Handlung auf d. Bühne sehr verbunden.“29 Anders als Valse triste wurde Scen med tranorna zu Sibelius’ Lebzeiten nicht oft aufgeführt, und obwohl er das Partiturautograph an Breitkopf & Härtel gerade mit der klaren Absicht geschickt hatte, die Komposition veröffentlichen zu lassen, wurde diese erst 1973 posthum im Verlag Fazer gedruckt.30 Canzonetta op. 62a und Valse romantique op. 62b Arvid Järnefelt überarbeitete sein Theaterstück Kuolema für die Aufführungen im März 1911. In einem Interview, das am 8. März, dem Tag der Premiere, im Hufvudstadsbladet veröffentlicht wurde, beantwortete er die Fragen des Journalisten wie folgt: „– Und jetzt steigt Herr Järnefelt wieder richtig in den Sattel? – Ja, mit Kuolema! Wir haben gestern Nacht bis drei Uhr geprobt. Im letzten Akt gibt es ein Feuer – und das ist sehr schwer einzurichten. – Wurde das Stück nicht überarbeitet? – Völlig. Vom Anfang bis zum Ende. Und Sibelius hat eine ganz neue Musik dazu komponiert.“31 Die „ganz neue Musik“ bestand aus zwei Stücken, Canzonetta und Valse romantique, die im zweiten Akt eingesetzt wurden; Valse triste


XIX wurde an seinem ursprünglichen Platz im ersten Akt gespielt. Die anderen Musiknummern aus der Produktion von 1903 wurden bei den Aufführungen 1911 nicht berücksichtigt. Wahrscheinlich komponierte Sibelius Canzonetta und Valse romantique im Januar und Februar 1911, denn die erste Erwähnung der „Musik zu Kuolema“ taucht in seinem Tagebuch am 24. Januar auf. Zu dieser Zeit benannte Sibelius die beiden Stücke im Tagebuch noch uneinheitlich: bevor er sich für den Titel Canzonetta entschied, erwähnte er das Stück als „Werkkoleikki“ („Netzspiel“), „Rondino“ und „Rondino der Liebenden“. Valse romantique erschien unter den Arbeitstiteln „Vals-intermezzo“ und „Valse-episod“.32 Vom 1. bis 20. Februar reiste Sibelius nach Schweden, nach Berlin und in verschiedene Städte im Baltikum. Offensichtlich musste er die neue Musik zu Kuolema in Eile vervollständigen, wie er am 20. Februar in seinem Tagebuch schrieb: „[Ich] muss die Musik zu Arvids ,Kuolema‘ fertig kriegen!“33 Laut Tagebuch schloss er Valse romantique am 25. Februar ab, behielt sich aber eine Überarbeitung vor: „Fertig mit ,Valse romantique.‘ Aber noch nicht definitiv. Was ist das für eine schwere Aufgabe, Themen, die mir nach Jahren wieder eingefallen sind, wieder aufzunehmen und auszuarbeiten. [Ich] lebe ganz in der wundervollen Stimmung, die mir die Canzonetta schenkt. Ein ,stimmungsvoller Mann‘!“34 Canzonetta wurde zwei Tage später vollendet: „,Canzonetta‘ fertig. [Ich] arbeitete heute mit dem Kopf und nicht mit meinem ,Herzen‘. Das heißt, ich habe die Reinschrift gemacht.“35 Die Erstaufführung von Järnefelts Theaterstück mit Sibelius’ Canzonetta und Valse romantique fand im Finnischen Nationaltheater statt: Alexei Apostol dirigierte sein „Konzertorchester“, mit dem Sibelius geprobt hatte, wie er im Tagebuch schrieb: „War in Helsinki. Mit Apostols Orchester, sozusagen, geprobt. Canzonetta entzückend. Der Walzer ziemlich gut, aber wohl kaum ein Repertoirestück. Einige Änderungen notwendig. Ein paar Takte!“36 Der Rezensent in Nya Pressen beschrieb die ungünstigen akustischen Bedingungen im Theater: „Jean Sibelius hat zu den verschiedenen Ballettnummern zauberhafte Musik geschrieben, beginnend mit der schon weltberühmten ,Valse triste‘ im ersten Akt und abschließend mit einer faszinierenden ,Canzonetta‘ (neu, in gis-moll) im zweiten Akt. Dort gibt es auch die ebenfalls neue ,Valse romantique‘. Unglücklicherweise waren die beiden zuletzt genannten Kompositionen gar nicht zu hören, weil das Orchester hinter der Szene versteckt war.“37 Sibelius drückte seine Enttäuschung im Tagebuch wie folgt aus: „Die Musik war im Finnischen Theater ein Fiasko. Es war nichts zu hören.“38 Trotz der Aufführungsprobleme wurde Sibelius’ Musik ziemlich positiv aufgenommen. Otto Kotilainen schrieb in Suomalainen kansa: „Die Musik für das oben genannte Theaterstück wurde bekanntlich von Jean Sibelius komponiert, und unter den verschiedenen Nummern ist die Valse triste mit ihrer düsteren Schönheit am bekanntesten und wird in der ganzen musikalischen Welt bewundert. Die anderen Nummern wurden bei der neuen Fassung von ,Kuolema‘ weggelassen. An ihrer Stelle hat Sibelius zwei weitere Nummern für den zweiten Akt komponiert: Valse romantique und Canzonetta. Beide besitzen dieselbe einfache Form wie Valse triste und ähneln ihr auch in ihrem kraftvollen, emotionalen Ton. Vor allem die Canzonetta für Streichorchester ist atmosphärisch großartig, sie wird wohl im Druck genauso populär werden wie Valse triste. [...] Unter Verwendung der düsteren Tonart gis-moll im 6/4-Takt lässt der Komponist das eindrucksvollsehnsüchtige Thema von den gedämpften ersten Geigen vortragen, während die übrigen Streicher mit trüben Akkorden begleiten. Wenn das Thema nach einer kurzen Überleitung in die Bratschen übergeht, klagen die ersten Geigen in aufwärts- und abwärtswogenden oktavierten Tonleiterfortschreitungen. Mit einem glückseligen Pianissimo auf der Quinte schließt diese altväterliche, vornehme und bewegende Tanzweise ab. Die Valse romantique für kleines Orchester steht in E-dur. Auch hier wird das eigentümlich hinkende Walzerthema gleich von Anfang an von den ersten Geigen vorgetragen. Die Hörner geben

der Harmonisierung mit langen Akkordfortschreitungen einen beeindruckenden Klanghintergrund. […] Obwohl der Walzer meiner Meinung nach nicht an die Canzonetta heranreichen kann, zeigt er doch wenigstens in gewissem Sinn die beeindruckende Arbeitstechnik des Komponisten.“39 Unter dem Kürzel A. S. war über die Aufführung in Nya Pressen zu lesen: „Die Musik zur Aufführung im Finnischen Theater wurde von Apostols Konzertorchester unter dessen Leitung gespielt, obwohl der Komponist selbst mit dem Orchester geprobt und seine große Zufriedenheit mit den Leistungen bekundet hatte.“40 Auch wenn Sibelius mit den Aufführungen einverstanden war, äußerte er in den darauffolgenden Tagen verschiedentlich seine Meinung über Valse romantique. Am 12. März schrieb er in seinem Tagebuch: „Ich finde ,Valse romantique‘ gar nicht schlecht. Im Gegenteil!“41 Und einen Tag später: „Einmal mehr bin ich in ein Loch gefallen! Es geht um ,Valse romantique‘. Eine Belanglosigkeit! Das bin nicht ,ich‘, ganz und gar nicht.“42 Selbst dirigierte Sibelius die Canzonetta erstmals in seinem Portraitkonzert am 3. April 1911, in dem auch die Uraufführung der 4. Symphonie sowie die finnischen Erstaufführungen von Die Dryade op. 45 Nr. 1, Nächtlicher Ritt und Sonnenaufgang op. 55 und In memoriam op. 59 stattfanden. Diese Premieren wurden in der Presse hervorgehoben, die Canzonetta jedoch wurde im Konzert wiederholt und in den Zeitungen sehr positiv besprochen. Im März 1911 schickte Sibelius von der Canzonetta die Reinschrift (möglicherweise die Abschrift eines Kopisten) und von der Valse romantique wahrscheinlich das Partiturautograph an Breitkopf & Härtel; der Verbleib dieser Manuskripte, die als Stichvorlagen dienten, ist heute unbekannt.43 Die Reaktion des Verlags war positiv: „Der anmutige und einfache Walzer wird ein gutes Gegenstück zu der ,Valse triste‘ sein. Auch die schöne, ausdrucksvolle Melodie der ,Canzonetta‘ gefällt uns sehr gut.“44 Canzonetta und Valse romantique wurden im Juli bzw. im September 1911 veröffentlicht. Valse lyrique op. 96a Die Valse lyrique für Klavier wurde im August 1919, die Fassung für Orchester im Februar 1920 vollendet.45 In einem Brief an R. E. Westerlund klingt an, dass Sibelius über die Orchestrierung des Walzers nachdachte, kurz nachdem er die Fassung für Klavier abgeschlossen hatte – dennoch entstand die Orchesterfassung erst ungefähr sechs Monate später.46 Die Instrumentierung ging ziemlich rasch voran, nur das Zittern der Hände bereitete Sibelius einige Schwierigkeiten: „Habe ,Valse lyrique‘ orchestriert. Diese Orchesterfassung hat mich eine Menge Arbeit gekostet, weil meine Hände zittern, und so wurde ich direkt daran gehindert, sie aufzuschreiben. Nur Wein hilft – aber was für ein Preis!“47 Sibelius unterschrieb bei Westerlund den Verlagsvertrag zur Valse lyrique und begann mit den Planungen für ein Konzert im darauffolgenden Jahr in Bergen (Norwegen): „[Ich habe] Sverre Jordan, Bergen, wegen eines Konzerts im März 1921 geschrieben […]“48 Das Konzert in Bergen fand statt – zuvor aber, im Februar 1921, dirigierte Sibelius zehn Konzerte in England: in London, Bournemouth, Birmingham und Manchester. Die Programme umfassten die Symphonien 3, 4 und 5, die Karelia-Suite, En saga, Aallottaret [Die Okeaniden], Finlandia, Valse triste, Tuonelan joutsen [Der Schwan von Tuonela], die Romanze op. 42 sowie Sätze aus der Kung Kristian II.-Suite.49 Die Partitur der Valse lyrique wurde nach London geschickt, möglicherweise in der Hoffnung, dass der Londoner Verlag Hawkes & Son sie veröffentlichen würde. Dies geschah nicht – Sibelius beschloss jedoch während seines Aufenthalts in England, den Walzer in die Konzertprogramme aufzunehmen, und schrieb seiner Frau: „Ich werde Valse lyrique aufführen. Sie machen Reinschriften [Abschriften der Stimmen].“50 Die Uraufführung der Valse lyrique fand am 20. Februar 1921 in Birmingham statt; Sibelius leitete das City of Birmingham Orchestra. Die anderen Orchesterwerke im Programm waren En saga, die 3. Sym-


XX phonie, Valse triste und Finlandia; außerdem wurden vier Lieder sowie der langsame Satz aus dem Violinkonzert (mit Klavierbegleitung) aufgeführt. Das Konzert wurde in der Birmingham Daily Gazette kurz besprochen; die Resonanz auf Valse lyrique fiel nicht sehr günstig aus: „Wir müssen Herrn Appleby Matthews für den Besuch von Sibelius im Königlichen Theater am gestrigen Abend danken, als der berühmte Finne einige seiner bekanntesten Kompositionen dirigierte: ,Finlandia‘, den ,Traurigen Walzer‘ und den ,Lyrischen Walzer‘ – letzterer war das schwächste Stück im Programm –, was natürlich eine Wiederholung verdiente.“51 Eine Woche später dirigierte Sibelius Valse lyrique in London mit dem New Queen’s Hall Orchestra; über dieses Konzert liegen allerdings keine Berichte vor, die den Walzer erwähnen. Nach den Aufführungen in England wurde Valse lyrique am 21. März 1921 in Bergen von den Musikselskabet Harmonien unter Leitung des Komponisten gespielt. Die anderen Werke in diesem Programm waren Finlandia, Tuonelan joutsen, Valse triste, die 2. Symphonie sowie Elegie und Musette aus der Kung Kristian II.-Suite. Die Zeitungsberichte konzentrierten sich auf die Symphonie und auf Valse triste: die dortige Zeitung Dagen erwähnte Valse lyrique überhaupt nicht, das Stück wurde aber in Bergens tidende recht warmherzig aufgenommen: „Valse triste, der weltberühmte dämonische Tanz mit dem Tod, mit dieser genial getroffenen, entsetzlichen Atmosphäre hatte beinahe sein künstlerisches Gegenstück in der neu komponierten Valse lyrique – eine bezaubernde und frühlingshaft helle Atmosphäre – eine Ausnahme in der Tondichtung des großen Melancholikers. Das Stück musste wiederholt werden.“52 Valse lyrique wurde bald sowohl in getanzter Form als auch in verschiedenen Bearbeitungen ein beliebtes Stück. Es wurde am 25. Juni 1921 von einem „Music trio“ an der Finnischen Oper in Helsinki als Begleitung zu einer Tanzaufführung gespielt,53 und Nicolaï van Gilse van der Pals (1891–1966) dirigierte es am 3. April 1922 in Helsinki als Beitrag zu einer Feier der deutsch-finnischen Gesellschaft „Finnlandkämpfer“ in einer Bearbeitung für Streichorchester.54 Die finnische Erstaufführung der Orchesterfassung der Valse lyrique fand am 6. April 1922 im Festsaal der Universität Helsinki statt; es spielte das Stadtorchester Helsinki unter der Leitung von Karl Ekman (1869–1947). Veröffentlichung Die Veröffentlichungsgeschichte der Valse lyrique erscheint ziemlich verwickelt, und die Nachweise, die Licht auf die Ereigniskette werfen könnten, enthalten bemerkenswerte Lücken.55 Sibelius unterzeichnete im Februar 1920 einen Verlagsvertrag mit Westerlund, und dieser verkaufte das Copyright für Veröffentlichungen innerhalb des British Empire an den Londoner Verlag Hawkes & Son; Wilhelm Hansen (Kopenhagen) erwarb 1921 die Veröffentlichungsrechte außerhalb des britischen Weltreichs und Finnlands. Westerlund, der die Rechte für Finnland besaß, beauftragte wahrscheinlich Emil Kauppi (1875–1930) mit der Abschrift der Orchesterpartitur.56 Nach den Erstaufführungen in England und Norwegen äußerte Wilhelm Hansen 1921 seine Bereitschaft, Valse lyrique zu veröffentlichen: „Da wir sehr gern die Orchesterausgabe der ,Valse lyrique‘ herausbringen würden, bitten wir Sie, uns freundlicherweise die Partitur zuzuschicken. Ihrer Auskunft zufolge wurde sie damals nach London geschickt.“57 Die fragliche Partitur war die Abschrift, die Kauppi angefertigt hatte (Quelle B); sie diente als Vorlage zu den Stimmen, die bei den Aufführungen in England und Norwegen verwendet worden waren (Quelle C). Sibelius schrieb am 29. Juni in sein Tagebuch: „Gestern Partitur von ,Valse lyrique‘ an Hansen geschickt.“58 Kurz darauf bestätigte der Verlag den Erhalt der Partitur.59 Vermutlich hatte Sibelius die autographe Partitur (Quelle A) geschickt, da der Verlag auf der Titelseite das Datum „13. Juli“ in Bleistift ergänzte.60 Die autographe Partitur blieb in Wilhelm Hansens Besitz.61 Auch Kauppis Abschrift wurde irgendwann nach Kopenhagen geschickt, und dieses Exemplar diente als Vorlage für einen wei-

teren Stimmensatz (Quelle D), mit dem eine Aufführung der Valse lyrique am 9. September 1921 in Tivoli ermöglicht wurde.62 Offenbar schickte Wilhelm Hansen Kauppis Abschrift im Herbst 1921 an Sibelius zurück. Der Komponist dürfte einiges in der Partitur überarbeitet haben, bevor er sie letztlich, vermutlich im Dezember 1921, Wilhelm Hansen zurückschickte. Der Verlag bestätigte den Eingang der Partitur und der Stimmen zu Valse lyrique, und die Vorbereitungen zur Veröffentlichung konnten fortgesetzt werden.63 Kauppis Abschrift diente dann als Stichvorlage für die Erstausgabe der Partitur, doch bevor der Notenstich erfolgte, wurde die Stichvorlage – zusammen mit der Partitur von Autrefois op. 96b – in die USA geschickt, damit dort die Revision für die Registrierung des Copyrights erfolgen konnte.64 Die Stimmen für die ersten Aufführungen (in England und Norwegen) dienten als Stichvorlagen für die Orchesterstimmen. Mit dem Stich von Partitur und Stimmen wurde im April 1922 begonnen; Sibelius erhielt die Korrekturabzüge im Mai.65 Die Erstausgabe kam im Spätherbst 1922 heraus. Valse chevaleresque op. 96c Wann genau die Klavier- und die Orchesterfassung der Valse chevaleresque abgeschlossen wurden, ist nicht gesichert. Sibelius erwähnt die Valse chevaleresque in den Tagebucheinträgen zwischen November 1921 und Februar 1922 nur mit ihrem Titel und geht nicht auf die fragliche Fassung ein. Allgemein nimmt man an, dass der Walzer im November 1921 zunächst als Klavierfassung entstand und die Orchesterfassung wohl Mitte Dezember abgeschlossen wurde. Im Tagebuch erwähnte Sibelius, er habe die Komposition im Januar 1922 überarbeitet; am 10. Januar war er in der Lage, die Partitur Wilhelm Hansen zuzusenden: „Ich schicke anbei zur Veröffentlichung einen neuen Walzer: ,Valse chevaleresque‘ für Orchester oder Klavier. […] Ja, der Walzer ist eingängig, und ich glaube, dass er ein Erfolg wird.66 Sibelius’ Tagebuch zufolge kündigte Wilhelm Hansen Ende Januar 1922 die Veröffentlichung der Valse chevaleresque an. Im Februar schrieb er Sibelius: „Vor vier, fünf Tagen haben wir […] das Manuskript der ,Valse chevaleresque‘ nach Amerika [zur Registrierung des Copyrights] geschickt, und wir sind daher in der Lage, Ihnen eine Abschrift der Partitur zuzusenden. Wir beabsichtigen, die Partitur und die Stimmen so bald wie möglich zu drucken.“67 Der Veröffentlichungsprozess ging jedoch entgegen den Intentionen des Verlags langsam voran. Erst Ende Dezember 1922 konnte der Verlag versichern: „Als Antwort auf Ihren Brief informieren wir Sie darüber, dass die Orchesterpartitur und die Stimmen von AUTREFOIS und VALSE CHEVALERESQUE in Deutschland gedruckt werden. Heute haben wir der Druckerei geschrieben und sie darum gebeten, dass man Ihnen im Januar von allem ein Exemplar zuschickt.“68 Sibelius’ Portraitkonzert im Februar 1923 rückte näher und der Komponist war besorgt, ob die Materiale zu Autrefois op. 96b, Valse chevaleresque und Suite champêtre op. 98b rechtzeitig gedruckt und lieferbar sein würden. Offenbar war die Leipziger Druckerei Oscar Brandstetter damit beauftragt worden, zunächst die Orchesterstimmen eventuell nur als Korrekturabzüge zu produzieren, sie Sibelius zur Verwendung bei der Erstaufführung zuzuschicken und mit dem Stich der Partituren noch zu warten. Am 11. Januar wurden Sibelius aus Leipzig die Orchestermateriale zu Autrefois und zu Valse chevaleresque geschickt, aber etwas ging schief, sodass dieser einige Zeit später nur die Materiale zu Autrefois erhielt.69 Am 8. Februar schrieb Wilhelm Hansen nach einer angespannten Korrespondenz in dieser Sache an Sibelius: „Wie wir Ihnen in unserem Brief vom 31. Januar mitgeteilt hatten, hätte Ihnen das Material zu Valse chevaleresque am 11. Januar zugeschickt werden sollen. Auf jeden Fall hoffen wir, dass die Materiale, die wir heute abgeschickt haben, sicher bei Ihnen ankommen.“70 Der Stich der Partitur der Valse chevaleresque konnte nicht vor der Uraufführung abgeschlossen werden, und wahrscheinlich bat Sibelius


XXI den Verlag um die Zusendung der Kopistenabschrift (von Röllig) für die Verwendung bei der Premiere. Wilhelm Hansen bat Sibelius, die Partitur nach den ersten Aufführungen an die Druckerei zurückzuschicken: „Wir haben die Leipziger Druckerei telegrafisch gebeten, Ihnen die Partitur zuzusenden, und hoffen, dass sie in einigen Tagen ankommt. Wir bitten Sie, die Partitur sofort nach Verwendung an das Druckhaus Oscar Brandstetter, Dresdenerstr. 11/13, Leipzig, zurückzuschicken. Können Sie schon ungefähr sagen, wann Sie denken, dass die Partitur zurückgeschickt werden kann, denn die Druckerei arbeitet mit Hochdruck am Notenstich?“71 Die Erstausgabe von Partitur und Stimmen erschien schließlich im Juni 1923. Die Orchesterfassung der Valse chevaleresque wurde am 19. Februar 1923 bei Sibelius’ Porträtkonzert im Festsaal der Universität Helsinki uraufgeführt. Das Programm umfasste außerdem Die Jagd op. 66 Nr. 1, Autrefois (für zwei Frauenstimmen und kleines Orchester unter dem Titel „Pastoral“), Valse chevaleresque, Suite caractéristique op. 100, Suite champêtre und die 6. Symphonie op. 104. Die beiden Suiten und die Symphonie kamen dabei ebenfalls zur Uraufführung. Der Komponist leitete das Stadtorchester Helsinki. Am 22. Februar wurde das Konzert wiederholt. Das Hauptinteresse in den Zeitungsberichten galt – ganz wie erwartet – der Symphonie, aber es wurden sowohl Autrefois als auch Valse chevaleresque im ersten Konzert wiederholt. Evert Katila, der Kritiker von Helsingin Sanomat, vernahm Shimmy- und Jazz-Anklänge in den beiden „kleinen Streichorchester-Suiten“ und schrieb weiter: „Valse chevaleresque, ein zarter, heiterer Walzer für großes Orchester à la Johann Strauß, entführt einen in einen Ballsaal; der Komponist-Dirigent betonte dieses Ideal mit geckenhafter Rhythmik, die für den Wiener Walzer charakteristisch sind.“72 Toivo Haapanen, der für Iltalehti berichtete, war zurückhaltender und etwas überrascht von der vielfältigen stilistischen Spannweite des Konzertprogramms: „Die folgende Nummer, ,Valse chevaleresque‘, sollte wohl als eine Art Scherz verstanden werden, weil Sibelius einen ganz normalen, authentischen Wiener Walzer aufwärmt, vielleicht ähnlich gut wie viele andere dieser Gattung, aber es mangelt natürlich vollständig an der vornehmen Persönlichkeit, die man inzwischen für die Musik von Sibelius als charakteristisch erachtet. Man kann nicht leugnen, dass der Ton, der sich in dieser Komposition und in den beiden darauffolgenden Miniatursuiten zeigt, etwas überraschend war: der Abstand von der ,Valse triste‘ zur ,Valse chevaleresque‘ und, beispielsweise, von der ,Kung Kristian‘-Suite zur ,Suite caractéristique‘ ist so groß.“73 Besonderen Dank schulde ich meinen Kollegen Kari Kilpeläinen, Kai Lindberg, Anna Pulkkis, Tuija Wicklund und Sakari Ylivuori für ihre wertvollen Ratschläge und Anregungen. Ebenso danke ich meinen Studenten an der Sibelius Academy (University of the Arts) für ihre fruchtbaren Diskussionen über Textfragen bei Finlandia während der Editionsseminare sowie Petri Lehto (Sinfonia Lahti) für seine wertvollen Einblicke aus der Perspektive eines Orchestermusikers. Gern danke ich ferner Joanna Rinne, Pertti Kuusi und Turo Rautaoja für ihre sachkundigen und sorgfältigen Korrekturen, außerdem danke ich Joan Nordlund für ihre Durchsicht der englischen Textfassung. Folgende Personen waren mir bei der Suche nach den verschiedenen Quellen eine große Hilfe: Thekla Kluttig (Sächsisches Staatsarchiv), Andreas Sopart (Archiv Breitkopf & Härtel), Tarja Lehtinen, Inka Myyry und Petri Tuovinen (Finnische Nationalbibliothek), Inger Jakobsson-Wärn und Sanna Linjama (Sibelius-Museum), Minna Cederkvist (Philharmonisches Orchester Helsinki), sowie die Mitarbeiter des Nationalarchivs Finnland und des Stadtarchivs Helsinki. Ihnen allen gilt mein Dank. Dieser Band sei dem Andenken an Risto Väisänen (1947–2018) gewidmet. Helsinki, Frühjahr 2019

Timo Virtanen (Übersetzung: Frank Reinisch)

1

Vgl. zu den Klavierfassungen den Band JSW V/3. Zusätzlich zu den beiden Walzern umfasst Opus 96 auch die „Scène pastorale“ Autrefois op. 96b. 2 Durch das Manifest, das zu einigen anderen russifi zierenden Aktionen gehörte, wurde die finnische Presse der russischen Zensur unterstellt. 3 Die Texte hatten Jalmari Finne (1874–1938) und Eino Leino (1878–1926) verfasst. 4 Die Entstehung von Finlandia und den anderen Sätzen der „Musik zu den Pressefeiern“ wird in JSW VI/6 erläutert. 5 K.[arl] Flodin in Aftonposten vom 15. Dezember 1899: „I finalen, svitens femte och sista nummer, koncentrerar sig Sibelius melodiska snille i ett moment af gripande värkan. Det är det nya, unga Finland som skall skildras, och tonsättaren ger oss skildringen i form af en sång, en enkel, fyrstämmig kör, egendomlig genom vissa rytmiska aksenter, som taga sig ut som skulle komponisten tänkt sig en bestämd text till den sången. Men maken till gripande melodi får man leta efter. Det är en hel ny folksång, eller rättare, en folkets sång, det redbara, trofasta, vadmalsklädda folkets sång, vår egen, vårt demokratiska finska folks sång.“ 6 Unter dem Kürzel –r. in Wiborgsbladet vom 3. April 1900: „Den sista tablån ,Finlands uppvaknande‘ gjorde ett öfverväldigande intryck, förklarligt nog äfven därför att i densamma anslogs en dessa tider synnerligen känslig sträng. Hela sviten utgjorde ett prof på den mest genialiska tendensmusik man gärna kan få höra.“ 7 Tatsächlich vollendete Anton Rubinstein (1829–1894) das „symphonische Stück“ Rossija („Russland“) 1882. Carpelan an Sibelius am 13. März 1900 (Nationalarchiv Finnland, Sibelius-Familienarchiv [=NA, SFA], Kasten 18): „Det är just i anledning af den tilltänkta orkesterturnéen jag ej kan låta bli – man är ju ännu så obelefvad i vårt fosterland! – att fråga er, om ni ej tänkt skrifva en inledningsouverture (eller ouverturefantasi) för den första konserten i Paris. Men kanske är den redan färdig? Om ej, grip genast värket an så partituret kan vara klart till medlet af maj. Ouverturen eller hymnen, huru man nu vill benämna introduktionsnumret, bör helt eller delvis vara bygd på finska motiv, eller, då man ej komponerar efter recept, skrifvas såsom ingifvelsen bjuder och råder. Men någonting tusan dj[äf]la bör det inläggas i den ouverturen! Rubinstein skref en inledningsfantasi, helt och hållet bygd på ryska motiv, för den ryska konserten vid utställningen 1889 och gaf densamma namnet ,Rossija‘. Er ouverture skall heta ,Finlandia‘ – icke sant?“ 8 K.[arl Flodin] in Nya Pressen vom 4. Juli 1900: „Konserten inleddes med den sista afdelningen ur Sibelius tablåmusik vid festen på pressens dag[.] Kompositionen framträdde nu såsom en själfständig sådan under namnet ,Suomi, sinfonisk tonbild‘. Såsom bekant skall tonsättningen illustrera det unga, vaknande Finland och är såsom en målande bild af patria rediviva ypperlig; den däri ingående, breda, enkla och folkliga melodin är en af de mest gripande som Sibelius skapat. Emellertid föreföll numret väl kort såsom ett själfständigt sådant, och i utlandet borde, för den rätta förståelsen af detsamma, några förklarande ord medfölja å programmen eller styckets karaktär af tablåmusik på något sätt antydas. ,Sinfonisk tonbild‘ säger utan tvifvel för mycket; ,Suomi, en hymn‘, eller någonting sådant, borde kompositionen ha benämts.“ In den Zeitungen wurde Finlandia mit den Untertiteln sävelrunoelma und tondikt („Tongedicht“) versehen. 9 Zur Rezeption der Konzerte während der Tournee und bei der Pariser Weltausstellung siehe Marc Vignal, Jean Sibelius, Paris: Fayard 2004, S. 291–302, und Helena Tyrväinen, Sibelius at the Paris Universal Exhibition of 1900, in: Sibelius Forum. Proceedings from the Second International Jean Sibelius Conference, Helsinki November 25–29, 1995, hrsg. von Veijo Murtomäki, Kari Kilpeläinen und Risto Väisänen, Helsinki: Sibelius Academy 2001, S. 114–128. Sibelius, der an der Tournee als „Vize-Dirigent“ teilnahm, leitete keine einzige Aufführung. 10 In den baltischen Staaten dirigierte Georg Schnéevoigt (1872–1947) das Werk jedoch 1903 als „Impromptu“, und laut Karl Ekmans SibeliusBiographie (1935) äußerte sich der Komponist wie folgt dazu: „Als ich im Sommer 1904 in Tallinn und Riga als Gastdirigent auf Tournee war, musste ich das Stück Impromptu nennen.“ Siehe Fabian Dahlström, Jean Sibelius. Thematisch-bibliographisches Verzeichnis seiner Werke, Wiesbaden: Breitkopf & Härtel 2003 [=SibWV]), S. 113, und Karl Ekman, Jean Sibelius. En konstnärs liv och personlighet, Helsingfors: Holger Schildts förlag 1935 [=Ekman 1935]), S. 150: „Då jag sommaren 1904 gästdirigerade i Reval och Riga, måste jag kalla stycket Impromptu.“ Sibelius dirigierte Finlandia, En saga und die 2. Symphonie im August 1904 in Riga und in Liepaja. 11 Das Autograph der Klavierfassung (Archiv der Finnischen Nationalbibliothek [=NL], Signatur HUL 0843) weist keinen klaren Hinweis auf eine Überarbeitung des Schlusses auf. Die Tatsache, dass das Manuskript aus ineinander gefalteten Doppelblättern besteht bis auf das letzte Doppel-


XXII

12

13 14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

blatt, das den Schluss ab Takt 200 enthält, könnte bedeuten, dass Sibelius das letzte (Doppel-)Blatt durch ein anderes, d. h., einen ursprünglichen Schluss durch den definitiven ersetzte. Die genaue Datierung des Klavierautographs ist unbekannt. Sibelius an Röllig am 2. November 1900 (Sibelius-Museum). Sibelius bezog sich dabei wohl auf die Bibliothek der Philharmonischen Gesellschaft Helsinki. Andere Quellen tragen keine zusätzlichen Informationen zum Verlust des Manuskripts bei. NA, SFA, Kasten 47. Dem Brief von Breitkopf & Härtel [=B&H] an Sibelius vom 3. Januar 1901 zufolge hatte der Verlag die Stichvorlage von Finlandia (von Helsingfors Nya Musikhandel Fazer & Westerlund [=HNM]) erhalten; Partitur und Stimmen waren am 29. Januar für Sibelius zum Korrekturlesen fertig (B&H mit Brief und Postkarte an Sibelius, NA, SFA, Kasten 42). B&H’s Mitteilung vom 29. Januar über die Korrekturabzüge erreichte den Komponisten in Berlin nicht; einem weiteren Brief – vom 12. März und nach Rapallo adressiert – zufolge wurden die Abzüge an den Musikkritiker und Kaufmann Karl Fredrik Wasenius (1850–1920) nach Helsinki geschickt. Daher hatte Sibelius vermutlich keine Gelegenheit zum Korrekturlesen gehabt, bevor er aus Mitteleuropa nach Finnland zurückkehrte. Das genaue Veröffentlichungsdatum der Orchesterpartitur ist unbekannt. Dahlström datiert auf März 1901 und legt dafür die Rechnungsbücher von B&H zugrunde; siehe SibWV, S. 114. Eine Liste mit neuen Veröffentlichungen von HNM, die auch die Orchesterpartitur Finlandia enthielt, erschien in finnischen Zeitungen aber erst im November 1901 – siehe z. B. die Anzeigen unter den Rubriken Uutta! und Nytt! („Neuheiten”) in Uusi Suometar und in Hufvudstadsbladet vom 3. November 1901. Sibelius plante, weitere Sätze aus der „Musik zu den Pressefeiern“ als op. 26 Nr. 1–6 zu veröffentlichen. B&H veröffentlichte drei Sätze als Orchestersuite Scènes historiques I op. 25 (1912). Zu den Fassungen der „FinlandiaHymne“ für Männerchor und für gemischten Chor siehe JSW VII/1 und VII/2. Zu dieser Zeit wurde Finlandia oft in Bearbeitungen für unterschiedliche Ensembles gespielt; der Militärkapellmeister Alexei Apostol (1866–1927) hatte das Werk am Tag zuvor (5. Juli) in einem Open-Air-Konzert mit einem Militärblasorchester aufgeführt, das aus 150 Musikern bestand. Tagebuch, 23. Dezember 1911 (NA, SFA, Kasten 37–38) [=Tagebuch]: „Finlandia. Hvarföre anslår denna tondikt? Antagligen på grund af dess ,plein air‘ stil. Den är faktiskt uppbygd på allenast undfångna temata. Ren inspiration! Härlige, härlige! Kunde jag öfverhufvud komma till en stil, – lugn, behärskad och hel.“ Tagebuch, 31. Dezember 1911: „Egendomligt att alla de kritiker, hvilka äro beundrare af min musik, hafva ogillat Finlandias uppförande nu i Berlin. Men alla de andra hurra för denna, om man jämför med mina andra verk, obetydliga composition.“ Hauch an Sibelius am 21. April 1913 (NA, SFA, Kasten 20): „Angående ,Finlandia‘ vil jeg bede Hr Sibelius sige mig om dette værk er inspiret af særlige politiske forhold og om det er rigtigt at opförelse deraf i Finland blev forbudt – med andre ord om det virkelig var tale om en – i så fald – enestående musikcensur. Hvis dette er tilfældet står da det filharmoniske orkesters rejse til Vesteuropa i 1900 i forbindelse hermed?“ Sibelius an Hauch am 20. April 1913 (wahrscheinlich am 20. Mai; NL, Coll. 206. 61): „Finlandia komponerades ursprungligen till en tablå med fosterländskt innehåll. Har blifvit förbjuden i Ryssland icke här i Finland. Filh. orkesterns resa 1900 har intet att skaffa härmed.“ Das Datum im Brief ist ein Irrtum. Im darauffolgenden Brief an Sibelius vom 27. Mai 1913 (NA, SFA, Kasten 20) dankt Hauch dem Komponisten für seine Antwort, die gerade eingetroffen war. Sibelius’ Bemerkungen zum Verbot von Finlandia erscheinen etwas zweideutig. Karl Ekman zufolge erinnerte sich der Komponist an Aufführungen von Finlandia in den Jahren der „russischen Unterdrückung“ (1899–1905 und 1908–1917; Ekman 1935, S. 150): „In den Jahren der Unterdrückung war eine Aufführung [von Finlandia] in Finnland verboten, und in anderen Teilen des Zarenreichs durfte das Stück nicht mit einem Titel gespielt werden, der in irgendeiner Weise auf seinen patriotischen Charakter gedeutet hätte.“ („I Finland var dess uppförande förbjudet under ofärdsåren, och i andra delar av kejsardömet fick den icke spelas under ett namn, som på något vis antydde dess fosterländska karaktär.“) Tatsächlich aber wurde das Tongedicht schon 1900 und 1901 in Helsinki und auch in anderen finnischen Städten häufig unter dem Titel „Finlandia“ gespielt. Tagebuch, 5. Oktober 1943: „Hörde i afton Europakonserten från Tyskland. Alla komponister voro representerade med sina bästa verk – jag med Finlandia. Man tar mig nog härefter som – ja som! Ett ,fait accompli‘.“

23 Santeri Levas, Järvenpään mestari, Porvoo und Helsinki: Werner Söderström Osakeyhtiö 1960, S. 284: „,Tämä puhuu vain Finlandiasta ja Valse tristesta‘, oli hyvin tavallinen toteamus. Eräänä iltana mestari tuli mietteliääksi ja virkkoi äkkiä: ,Jaa, eipäs sanota niin. Kyllä ne ovat hyviä sävellyksiä molemmat‘.“ 24 Die anderen Werke in diesem Konzert – die 6. Symphonie („Pathétique“) von Pjotr Iljitsch Tschaikowsky, das Violinkonzert e-moll von Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy und Till Eulenspiegels lustige Streiche von Richard Strauss – wurden unter der Leitung von Robert Kajanus aufgeführt. 25 K.[arl Flodin] in Helsing fors-Posten vom 26. April 1904: „Det senare stycket måste genast bisseras; det var äfven af den art att det ögonblickligen brände sig in i uppfattningen. En sällsam blandning af blekblå fantastik och vaggande valsrytm, de dödas skuggor, iklädda baltoalett och sväfvande i ljudlösa ringar. Sådan var scenen i Järfelts [sic] skådespel och en sådan syn frammanade äfven Sibelius’ musik. Den var i själfva verket så målande, att man äfven utan kännedom om pjesens innebörd skulle vid åhörandet af valsen sett i fantasin någonting liknande. Med en utsökt konst voro de fåtaliga orkesterinstrumenten behandlade.“ 26 Der Titel bezieht sich auf Sibelius’ Anmerkung im Partiturautograph (HUL 0848) in Verbindung mit einer neuntaktigen Passage, die den Takten 18–26 in Scen med tranorna entspricht: „Paavali: Lass mich gehen (die Kraniche)“ (Paavali: Päästä minut [Kurjet]). 27 Anonymer Kritiker in Wasabladet vom 15. Dezember 1906: „Ur musiken till ,Kuolema’ utfördes scenen med tranorna, hwilken genom den poetiskt fina stämningen i sin helhet werkade visionartad.“ 28 Sibelius an B&H am 22. August 1906 (B&H-Archiv, Wiesbaden). 29 Sibelius an B&H am 19. November 1909 (B&H-Archiv, Wiesbaden). 30 Wann genau Sibelius die Partitur an B&H schickte, ist nicht bekannt. Heute wird die Partitur im B&H-Bestand im Sächsischen Staatsarchiv in Leipzig auf bewahrt. 31 Järnefelt mit dem anonymen „Reportör“ in Hufvudstadsbladet vom 8. März 1911: „– Och nu får herr Järnefelt kasta sig i redet igen? – Med Kuolema, ja! Vi repeterade i natt till klockan 3. Där är en eldsvåda i sista akten och den är mycket svår att arrangera. – Pjäsen är ju omarbetad? – Helt och hållet. Från början till slut. Och Sibelius har komponerat en alldeles ny musik till den.“ 32 Tagebuch, 24., 26., 27., 28. und 30. Januar 1911. Das „Netzspiel“ bezieht sich auf die Liebesszene (mit einem glitzernden goldenen Netz auf der Bühne) am Ende des zweiten Akts. 33 Tagebuch: „Måste ha musiken till Arvids ,Kuolema‘ färdig!“ 34 Tagebuch: „Färdig med ,Valse romantique‘. Ehuru ännu ej definitivt. Hvilket svårt arbete att ta’ ihop med dessa för åratal sedan fångna temata och utarbeta dem. Lefver helt i den underbara stämningen canzonettan ger mig. Stämningsmenniska!“ Zu Valse romantique sind zwei Skizzen und ein Partiturentwurf überliefert; die frühere der beiden Skizzen stammt wohl aus dem Jahr 1900 (siehe Faksimile A und B, und den Critical Commentary). 35 Tagebuch, 27. Februar 1911: „,Canzonetta‘ färdig. Arbetat med hufvudet – icke med ,hjärtat‘ i dag. D.v.s. skrifvit rent.“ Ausgehend von Sibelius’ Handschrift und sowohl von der roten Tinte als auch von der Papiersorte, die im Papierautograph (HUL 0926, Quelle A) benutzt wird, nimmt Kari Kilpeläinen an, dass die Canzonetta schon 1906 komponiert worden war und Sibelius sie 1911 nur revidiert hat; siehe die Dissertation von Kari Kilpeläinen, Tutkielmia Jean Sibeliuksen käsikirjoituksista (= Studia musicologica universitatis helsingiensis III, Helsinki: Helsingin yliopiston musiikkitieteen laitos 1992), S. 48–50; siehe auch SibWV, S. 286. Sibelius’ Tagebucheinträge scheinen jedoch unmissverständlich deutlich zu machen, dass das Werk 1911 komponiert wurde. 36 Tagebuch, 8. März 1911: „Varit i Hfors. Repeterat, quasi, med Apostols orkester. Canzonettan förtjusande. Valsen nog så bra men knapt nog ett repertoire nummer. Smärre ändringar nödiga. Några takter!“ 37 Pseudonym Habitué in Nya Pressen vom 9. März 1911: „Till de inströdda balettnumren har Jean Sibelius skrifvit en bedårande musik, börjande med den redan världsberömda ,Valse triste‘ i första akten och slutande med en hänförande ,Canzonette‘ [sic] (ny, giss-moll) i andra akten. Dessutom förekommer en ,Valse romantique‘, äfven den ny. Tyvärr hördes de två sistnämnda kompositionerna icke alls, utförda som de blefvo af den bakom sceneriet gömda orkestern.“ 38 Tagebuch, 9. März 1911: „Musiken haft fiasco på finska teatern. Man hörde ingenting.“ 39 O.[tto] K.[otilainen] in Suomalainen kansa vom 13. März 1911: „Kuten tunnettua, on yllämainittuun näytelmäkappaleesen [sic] Jean Sibelius säweltänyt musiikin, jonka eri numeroista synkänkaunis Walse triten [sic] on tunnettu ja ihailtu yli koko musiikkimaailman. ,Kuoleman‘ uudessa muowailussa owatkin toiset numerot entisestä musiikista jätetyt pois. Sitä


XXIII

40

41 42 43

44 45 46 47

48 49 50 51

52

53 54

55 56 57

wastoin on Sibelius säweltänyt toiseen näytökseen 2 uutta numeroa lisää: Valse romantique ja Canzonetta. Molemmat owat säwelletyt samaan waatimattomaan muotoon kuin Walse tristekin, mutta myös samansuuntaiseen woimakkaaseen tunnesäwyyn. Warsinkin Canzonetta jouhiorkesterille on tunnelmalleen waltawa ja tulee tämäkin painetutna [sic] warmaan tekemään kaikkialle yhtä onnistuneen kiertokulun kuin Walse triste. […] Synkkää Giss-moll-säwellajia käyttäen kuusineljäsosa tahdissa, antaa säweltäjä ensi wiulujen sordiiniwärityksessä wiedä waikuttawan, kaihoisan teeman toisten jousien synkänomaisilla soinnuilla säestäen. Kun pienen wälikkeen jälkeen sama teema siirtyy altolle, waikeroiwat ensi wiulut oktaawikulussa asteettain aalloten milloin ylös- milloin alaspäin. Ihana pianismo [sic] loppu kwinttitilassaan päättää tämän wanhatyylisen, hienon ja liikuttawan tanssisäwelmän. Walse romantique pienelle orkesterille käy E-duurissa. Ensi alustaan omituisesti onnahtawa walssiteema on tässäkin ensi wiuluilla. Harmoniseeraukseen antaa waikuttawan kaikutaustan pitkissä sointuyhdistyksissä olewat torwet. […] Waikk’ei walssi mielestäni olekaan Canzonettan weroinen, huomaa sentään tässäkin tekijässä waikuttawan tekotawan.“ A. S. in Nya Pressen vom 11. März 1911: „Vid föreställningen å Finska teatern utfördes musiken af Apostols konsertorkester under Apostols ledning. Komponisten personligen hade dock instruerad orkestern och slutligen uttalat sin stora tillfredsställelse med dess presentationer.“ Tagebuch: „Finner ,valse romantique‘ ej illa. Tvärtom!“ Tagebuch, 13. März 1911: „Återigen har jag fallit i en grop! Detta med ,Valse romantique‘. En obetydlighet! Absolut ej ,mig‘ egentligen!“ Das Partiturautograph der Canzonetta (Quelle A) ist in der NL (HUL 0926) auf bewahrt. Eine zeitgenössische Abschrift befindet sich im Stadtarchiv Helsinki (signum 2370); dieses Exemplar enthält weder autographe Einträge des Komponisten noch Anmerkungen des Dirigenten. B&H an Sibelius am 24. März 1911 (B&H-Archiv). Zu Frühfassungen und zur Klavierfassung der Valse lyrique siehe JSW V/2 and V/3. Sibelius an Westerlund am 17. August 1919 (Archiv des Verlags Fennica Gehrman, Helsinki): „Für Orchester muss der Walzer ,aus dem Orchester‘ herauskommen.“ („För orkester måste valsen digtas ,ur orkestern‘.“) Tagebuch, 11. Februar 1920: „Instrumenterat ,Valse lyrique‘. Denna instrumentation har kostat mig mycket arbete då mina händer skaka och jag därigenom hindras att i ett drag skrifva ner den. Endast vin hjälper – och med denna pris!“ Zum Verlagsvertrag siehe JSW V/3. Tagebuch, 20. Februar 1920: „Skrifvit till Sverre Jordan, Bergen om konsert i Mars 1921 […]“ Darüber hinaus wurden in einigen der Konzerte zwei Lieder sowie der langsame Satz des Violinkonzerts (mit Klavierbegleitung) aufgeführt. Sibelius an seine Frau Aino am 7. Februar 1921 (NA, SFA, Kasten 97): „– Valse lyrique uppför jag. De hålla på att renskrifva.“ Unter dem Kürzel R. J. B. in Birmingham Daily Gazette vom 21. Februar 1921. Appleby Matthews (1884–1948) war der Dirigent des City of Birmingham Orchestra. “We have to thank Mr. Appleby Matthews for the visit of Sibelius to the Theatre Royal last night, when the famous Finlander conducted a number of his best-known compositions – ‘Finlandia,’ the ‘Sad Waltz,’ and the ‘Lyric Waltz’ – the last-named being the weakest piece in the programme, naturally earning an encore.” Pseudonym X. in Bergens tidende vom 22. März 1921: „Valse triste, den verdenskjendte dæmoniske dans med døden, med sin genialt trufne uhyggestemning, hade fast sin kunstneriske motsætning i en nykomponeret: Valse lyrique – en indsmigrende og foraarslys stemning – en undtagelse i det store tungsinds tonedigtning. Den maatte gis dacapo.“ Laut Anzeigen in den Zeitungen Helsingin Sanomat, Uusi Suomi und Iltalehti vom 23. Juni 1921.* Berichte in Hufvudstadsbladet und in Svenska Pressen vom 4. April 1922. Den Zeitungen zufolge war dies „wahrscheinlich“ („antagligen“) die erste Aufführung des Walzers. „Finnlandkämpfer“ war eine Gesellschaft, die die Erinnerung an die im Finnischen Bürgerkrieg beteiligten deutschen Soldaten aufrechterhielt. Der Verbleib der Briefe von Sibelius an die Edition Wilhelm Hansen (=EWH) ist zum größten Teil nicht bekannt. Die EWH-Briefe und -Postkarten werden auf bewahrt in NA, SFA, Kasten 45. Kauppi bearbeitete Valse lyrique auch für Salonorchester, für Klaviertrio und für Violine (Violoncello) und Klavier. EWH veröffentlichte diese Bearbeitungen 1921 und 1922. Postkarte von EWH an Sibelius am 21. Juni 1921: „Da vi gerne vil trykke Orkesterudgaven af ,Valse lyrique‘, beder vi Dem venligst tilsende os partituret. Dette blev efter Deres Anmodning i sin Tid sendt til London.“

58 Tagebuch, 29. Juni 1921: „Afsände till Hansen igår ,Valse lyrique‘ partituret.“ 59 EWH an Sibelius am 2. Juli 1921. 60 Das Datum wurde später ausradiert und das Jahr ist nicht mehr lesbar, aber aller Wahrscheinlichkeit nach war es 1921. 61 1997 erwarb die Bibliothek der Universität Helsinki das Partiturautograph und die in Tivoli verwendeten Stimmen (signa Ö. 73 and 74) zusammen mit einigen anderen Sibelius-Manuskripten. 62 In SibWV wird diese Aufführung mit dem Tivolis Konsertsals Orkester unter der Leitung von Frederik Schnedler-Petersen irrtümlicherweise als Uraufführung der Valse lyrique bezeichnet. 63 EWH an Sibelius am 3. Januar 1922. 64 EWH an Sibelius am 22. Februar 1922. Die Erstausgabe der Partitur enthält den Hinweis „edited and revised by Julia A. Burt, New York“. 65 Vgl. SibWV, S. 409, und die Postkarte von EWH an Sibelius vom 23. Mai 1922. Irgendwann erhielt Sibelius die Kauppi-Abschrift und die Stimmen der ersten Aufführungen zurück, und er verlieh oder verschenkte sie an seinen Schwiegersohn, den Dirigenten Jussi Jalas (1908–1985). Jalas wiederum überließ die Materiale der Ylioppilaskunnan soittajat (Symphonieorchester der Universität Helsinki). Heute sind die Materiale in das NL-Archiv integriert (signum Coll. 727.3). 66 Sibelius’ Briefentwurf an EWH vom 10. Januar 1922 (NA, SFA, Kasten 46): „Sänder härhos en ny vals: ,Valse chevaleresque‘ för orkester eller piano i och för förlag. […] Valsen är ju populär, och jag tror den skall ha framgång.“ Zu den Revisionen und zur ausführlichen Veröffentlichungsgeschichte siehe die Einleitung in JSW V/3. Sibelius erwähnte Valse chevaleresque in seinem Tagebuch mehrmals in Einträgen im November und Dezember 1921 bzw. im Januar und Februar 1922. 67 EWH (maschinenschriftlich:) an Sibelius am 22. Februar 1922: „Vi har […] for 4–5 Dage siden sendt Manuskriptet til ,Valse chevaleresque‘ til Amerika, hvorfor det saaledes er os muligt, at sende Dem en Kopi af Partituret. Det er vor Agt at lade Partituret [darunter mit Tinte ergänzt:] og Stemmerne trykke snarest muligt.“ Das fragliche Manuskript war wohl die Partiturabschrift von Röllig (HUL 1816). Der Verbleib des Partiturautographs ist unbekannt. 68 EWH an Sibelius am 28. Dezember 1922: „I Besvarelse af Deres Brev skal vi meddele Dem, at Orkester Partitur og Stemmer til AUTREFOIS og VALSE CHEVALERESQUE trykkes i Tyskland. Vi har idag tilskrevet Trykkeriet og forespurgt, hvorvidt det leder sig gøre, at De kan fas tilsendt et Eksemplar i Januar af disse.“ 69 Sibelius’ Briefentwurf, vermutlich an Brandstetter, undatiert (vermutlich vor Mitte Februar 1923; NA, SFA, Kasten 45): „Aus Versehen haben Sie vor ein Monat nur Autrefois gesendet. Bitte material zu Valse chevaleresque sofort zu senden.“ 70 EWH (maschinenschriftlich) an Sibelius am 8. Februar 1923: „Som vi meddelte Dem i vort Brev af 31. Januar skulde Materialet til Valse chevaleresque allerede være sendt til Dem den 11. Januar. Vi haaber imidlertid, at det i Dag afsendte Materiale vil komma Dem rigtig i Hande.“ 71 EWH an Sibelius am 19. Januar 1923: „Vi har telegrafisk anmodet Trykkeriet i Leipzig om at sende Dem Partituret og haaber, at dette indtræffer i Løbet af nogle faa Dage. Vi beder Dem straks efter Brugen tilbagsende Partituret til Trykkeriet Oscar Brandstetter, Dresdenerstr. 11/13, Leipzig. Naar omtrent mener De at Partituret kan tilbagesendes, idet nemlig Trykkeriet er i Ferd med Stikningen?“ 72 E.[vert] Katila in Helsingin Sanomat vom 20. Februar 1923: „Suorastaan salonkiin siirtää Valse chevaleresque, sorea, hywäntuulinen walssi suurelle orkesterille Johann Straussin tapaan, jonka esikuwan waikutusta säweltäjä-johtaja wielä korosti keikailevalla wienerwalssille kuwaawalla rytmiikalla.“ 73 T.[oivo] H.[aapanen] in Iltalehti vom 20. Februar 1923: „Seuraava sävellys, ,Valse chevaleresque‘, on kai ymmärrettävä jonkunlaiseksi leikinlaskuksi, Sibelius kun on siinä tekaissut aivan tavallisen, väärentämättömän wiener-valssin, lajissaan ehkä yhtä hyvän kuin moni muukin, mutta luonnollisesti myös täysin sitä persoonallisuuden aateluutta puuttuvan, jota on tottunut pitämään Sibelius-musiikin tunnusmerkkinä. Ei voi kieltää, että tässä sävellyksessä sekä kahdessa sitä seuraavassa miniatyyrisarjassa ilmenevä sävy oli vähän yllättävä, – välimatka ,Valse tristestä‘ ,Valse chevaleresque‘iin ja esim. ,Kuningas Kristian‘ -sarjasta ,Suite characteristique‘iin on siksi suuri.“


XXIV

Facsimile A Early sketch for Valse romantique Op. 62b (staves 12–17) The National Library of Finland (HUL 1527, p. [2])


XXV

Facsimile B Sketch for Valse romantique Op. 62b The National Library of Finland (HUL 0928, p. [1])


Finlandia Op. 26


Instrumentation Flauto I, II Oboe I, II Clarinetto (Bj) I, II Fagotto I, II Corno (F) I, II, III, IV Tromba (F) I, II, III Trombone I, II, III Tuba Timpani Triangolo Piatti Gran cassa Violino I, II Viola Violoncello Contrabbasso


Finlandia Op. 26

Andante sostenuto Flauto

I II

Oboe

I II

Clarinetto in B

I II

Fagotto

I II

a2

I II Corno in F III IV a2

I II Tromba in F III

I II Trombone III

Tuba

* Timpani

Triangolo Piatti Gran cassa

Andante sostenuto I Violino II

Viola Violoncello

Contrabbasso * See the Critical Remarks.

© 1905 by Breitkopf & Härtel, Leipzig Revised edition © 2019 by Breitkopf & Härtel, Wiesbaden


4 12

I II Cor. (F)

sempre

III IV sempre a2

(a 2)

I II Tr. (F)

sempre

III

I II

sempre

Tbn. III

sempre

Tb. sempre

Timp. dim.

* Cb. sempre

24

Fl.

I II

Ob.

I II

A

Cl. (B ) I II

Fg.

I II

Timp.

I Vl. II

Va.

Vc.

Cb. * See the Critical Remarks.


5 35

Fg.

I II

I II Cor. (F) III IV I Vl.

[

]

II

Leseprobe

Va. Vc.

Cb.

44

Fl.

I II

Ob.

I II

B espress.

dim.

espress.

*

Cl. (B ) I II

cresc.

Fg.

espress.

dim.

I II

I II Cor. (F) III IV Tb.

Timp.

dim.

Sample page dim.

I

dim.

dim.

dim.

ten.

ten. ten.

ten.

dim.

ten.

ten. ten.

ten.

dim.

ten.

ten. ten.

dim. ten.

ten.

ten. ten.

ten.

dim.

Vl. II

Va. [dim.]

dim.

Vc. dim.

[dim.] ten.

ten. ten.

ten.

Cb. [dim.] * For performance indications in B, see the Critical Remarks.

dim.


6

C

55

Fl.

I II

Ob.

I II

cresc.

Cl. (B ) I II

I II

Fg.

cresc. a2

Leseprobe cresc.

I II Cor. (F) III IV

cresc.

cresc.

I II Tr. (F) III

I II Tbn. III

Tb. [

]

cresc.

*

Timp.

Sample page dim.

Piatti

I Vl. II

Va.

Vc.

Cb. * See the Critical Remarks.


7 65

I II

Fl.

[

]

[

]

[

]

I II

Ob.

Cl. (B ) I II

I II

Fg.

I II Cor. (F) III IV

(a 2)

a2

a2

Leseprobe [

]

[

]

[

]

[

]

I II Tr. (F) III

I II Tbn. III

Tb. [

Timp.

Sample page dim.

Piatti

I Vl. II

Va.

Vc.

Cb.

]

dim.

[

]


8 74

Fl.

I II

Ob.

I II

D Allegro moderato

Cl. (B ) I II

I II

Fg.

I II Cor. (F) III IV

(a 2)

Leseprobe

I II Tr. (F) III

I II Tbn. III

Tb.

Timp.

Sample page sempre

Piatti

Allegro moderato I Vl. II

Va.

Vc.

Cb.

poco

a


9

E

82

Fl.

I II

Ob.

I II

a2

a2

[

]

più

[ (a 2)

]

più

[

]

Cl. (B ) I II

I II

Fg.

I II Cor. (F)

Leseprobe più

più

III IV

più

I II Tr. (F) III

I II Tbn. III

Tb. [

]

[ più

]

[

]

Sample page

( )

Timp.

poco

Piatti

I Vl.

cresc.

sempre cresc.

più

II più

Va. più

Vc. più

Cb. più

[

]


10 90

I II

Fl.

più

I II

Ob.

Cl. (B ) I II

I II

Fg.

(a 2)

cresc.

I II cresc.

Cor. (F) III IV

cresc.

I II

cresc.

Leseprobe cresc.

cresc.

più

Tr. (F) III

più

I II Tbn.

più

III più

Tb. cresc.

cresc.

( )

Timp. Piatti

I

Sample page 3

3

3

cresc.

Vl.

3

II

3

cresc.

3

3

cresc.

3

cresc.

Va. 3

3

cresc.

3

3

cresc.

Vc. cresc.

cresc.

cresc.

cresc.

Cb.


11 93

Fl.

I II

Ob.

I II

Allegro *

Cl. (B ) I II (a 2)

I II

Fg.

cresc. molto

Leseprobe

I II Cor. (F) III IV

I II Tr. (F) III

I II Tbn. III

Tb. cresc. molto ( )

Timp.

Sample page

dim.

Piatti

cresc. molto

Allegro *

I Vl. II

Va.

Vc. cresc. molto

Cb. cresc. molto * Sibelius’s metronome indication added to the editions after 1930: = 104. See also the Critical Commentary.


12

F

Fl.

I II

Ob.

I II

99

Cl. (B ) I II

I II

Fg.

I II Cor. (F) III IV

I II

(a 2)

Leseprobe

Tr. (F) III

I II Tbn. III

Tb.

Timp.

Piatti

Sample page ten.

I

[ ]

Vl.

ten.

[ ]

ten.

ten.

II [ ]

[ ] ten.

ten.

Va. [ ]

Vc.

Cb.

[ ]


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe Valse triste Op. 44 No. 1

Sample page


Leseprobe Instrumentation Flauto Clarinetto (A) Corno (in F) I, II Timpano Violino I, II Viola Violoncello Contrabbasso

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


31 109

Fl. dolce

Cl. (A)

I Cor. (F) II pizz.

I Vl.

Leseprobe

II

Va.

pizz.

Vc.

Cb.

118

Fl. dim.

cresc.

Cl. (A) dolce

I Cor. (F) II

cresc.

Sample page cresc. un poco al

arco

I

cresc.

Vl. II

cresc.

Va. cresc. arco

Vc. cresc.

Cb. cresc.


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe Scen med tranorna Op. 44 No. 2

Sample page


Leseprobe Instrumentation Clarinetto (Bj) I, II Timpano Violino I, II Viola Violoncello Contrabbasso

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe Canzonetta Op. 62a

Sample page


Leseprobe Instrumentation Violino I, II Viola Violoncello Contrabbasso

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe Valse romantique Op. 62b

Sample page


Leseprobe Instrumentation Flauto I, II Clarinetto (A) I, II Corno (E) I, II Timpani Violino I, II Viola Violoncello Contrabbasso

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Leseprobe

Sample page


Dies ist eine Leseprobe. Nicht alle Seiten werden angezeigt. Haben wir Ihr Interesse geweckt? Bestellungen nehmen wir gern Ăźber den Musikalienund Buchhandel oder unseren Webshop entgegen.

This is an excerpt. Not all pages are displayed. Have we sparked your interest? We gladly accept orders via music and book stores or through our webshop.


Profile for Breitkopf & Härtel

SON 630 – Sibelius, Sämtliche Werke, Serie I, Bd. 22  

SON 630 – Sibelius, Sämtliche Werke, Serie I, Bd. 22  

Profile for breitkopf