krē’āt issue 2

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/krē’āt/ mountain arts + culture quarterly

Published by Breckenridge Creative Arts | ISSUE NO. 2, Spring 2016


/krē’āt/ : to make or produce : to cause to exist : to bring into being Launched in 2015, /krē’āt/ is an online magazine published quarterly by Breckenridge Creative Arts. Each issue profiles a creative individual or business, cultural organization, event, and object of art in a thoughtfully curated visual journey that aims to highlight and promote the greater creative community of Breckenridge. Creative Director

contents features MAKING WAVES

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ART IN THE ELEMENTS

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A SPOTLIGHT SHINES

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departments Foreward

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Scene CHASING RIVERS

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Portrait CECILE FORSBERG, ARTS ADMINISTRATOR + VIOLINIST

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Objectified COLORADO RIVER ROCK BRIDGE

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Conversations DARE TO BARE

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courtesy of Ryan Patrick Griffin

Around Town THE ART OF THE CREATIVE ECONOMY

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Cover Artwork

Sourced

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Robb Woulfe, Breckenridge Creative Arts

Editor + Content Writer Erica Marciniec

Art Director + Designer Kate Hudnut, GatherHouse Inc.

Contributing Photographers Liam Doran, Pete McBride, Marisa Orlandi

Additional Photo Credits Breckenridge Backstage Theatre, Christopher Willard; Amy Evans; “The Pool” photos courtesy of Jen Lewin, by Frank Lanza, Denise Leong and Aaron Rogosin; “Light Origami” photos courtesy of Masakazu Shirane, by Moto and Destination NSW; “My Your Our Water” photos courtesy of Erin V. Sotak, by Sean Deckert; “Projected Visions” photos

Photo by Liam Doran Special thanks to the Town of Breckenridge for its generous support. @breckcreate // breckcreate.org



FOREWARD


/krē’āt/ spring 2016 Our second issue of /krē’āt/ flows with spring’s thaw, bearing witness to the annual metamorphosis of mountain snowpack to rushing river, its waves connecting communities through a complex web of watersheds. A new contemporary arts festival, ‘WAVE: Light + Water + Sound,’ explores such links using digital media in the modern context, where water is not only elemental to the raw beauty of our alpine landscapes, but also a limited resource. Artists featured in this issue interpret water, waves, and the intersection of art and place from a range of perspectives. We conclude with a look at our local theater, the renovation of which juxtaposes Breckenridge’s history as a rough-and-tumble saloon town with a contemporary take on who we are now, where we aim to go, and how art will help us get there.

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FEATURED EVENT WAVE: Light + Water + Sound

WAVE is a new festival of contemporary, interactive art curated around the themes of water, light, and sound, taking place in downtown Breckenridge June 2-5, 2016.


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Making waves

Contemporary art festival fuses light, water, sound + people



W

hat if the water around us were reconceived as an artistic medium? Or light itself, cast intentionally upon a landscape to transform it before our very eyes? What if a piece of art depended fully on the audience, reacting to individual touch—or better yet, collective collaboration—to reveal its true intent?

Orchestra and aerial dancers from Boulder’s Frequent Flyers Productions.

Guests are invited to reflect on such marvels of contemporary art as they play with the public installations at a new arts festival called WAVE: Light + Water + Sound, taking place in downtown Breckenridge June 2-5, 2016.

The idea for the medium came to him while sketching people at cafes in the Parisian style as part of a class he took at Arizona State University in Phoenix. “I would draw and people would be curious about it; they wanted to see,” he said. At the same time, he was experimenting with contemporary tools. “I stumbled across combining a graphic tablet connected to a computer and projector so I could have a kind of public canvas to do this live art,” he said. “It just kind of exploded from there. This was in 2008. I’ve been hooked on it ever since.”

Modeled after Canal Convergence in Scottsdale, Arizona, WAVE is the newest signature event from the local arts organization, BreckCreate. It will feature interactive art installations curated around the themes of water, light, and sound in and around Blue River Plaza, the Riverwalk Center, and the river itself, temporarily repurposing these areas into canvases and exhibition spaces. ‘Projected Visions at the Blue River’ Los Angeles-based artist Ryan Patrick Griffin will project live art using digital media on the façade of the Riverwalk Center and adjacent lawn in collaboration with performances by experimental sonic and movement artists, including musicians from the Breckenridge-based National Repertory

“I use projected light as a vehicle to activate the environment in a poetic way,” explained Griffin, who uses a graphic pen tablet to translate his place-based inspiration into an “unfolding artwork in projected light.”

Griffin plans to arrive in the high country early to get a feel for the place so he can “figure out the best possible elements to combine” for a piece that’s “specific to Breckenridge.” ‘My Your Our Water’ Also arriving early is Erin V. Sotak, who will be the artist-in-residence at the Robert Whyte House for the month prior to WAVE. The residency is funded by BreckCreate, the


nonprofit group putting on the WAVE festival, in collaboration with the Town of Breckenridge Water Division. Sotak will spend a good amount of time tricycling along the Blue River—snow cover permitting—outfitted in an embroidered jumpsuit and crazy helmet, with the sole intent of chatting folks up about water. “If you look too much like a hardcore crazy activist, people won’t have a conversation with you,” she said. “That’s not what I’m trying to do. I’m trying to make it seem like I’m an okay person to have a conversation with.” Sotak describes her project — a social engagement piece entitled “My Your Our Water”—as a “conversation” intended to raise awareness about water. “How is water used in your life?” she asks. “Do you know where your water comes from?” Key to the discussion is the concept of watersheds—how one waterway affects the next and the next. For example, the Blue River in Breckenridge feeds into the Colorado River, which in turns supplies water to many communities in the desert Southwest where the artist resides. Sotak’s project consists of four parts—the tricked-out tricycle and rider, a blog, a community Facebook page, and a floating, illuminated sign. The sign, which will likely be set adrift in the pond by The Dredge restaurant, reads “My Your Our” in large aluminum-and-acrylic, LED-lit letters daisy-chained together to total approximately 45 feet in length. “Part of the beauty is the movement of the sign in water,” said Robb Woulfe, the WAVE festival’s director. “As this project evolves, I learn things from people with whom I have conversations,” Sotak said. “It becomes a sort of swapping of water information.” People she meets are invited to

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continue participating by submitting photos and snippets of text about water, to be included at her blog. If they are inspired to take action, there are links to resources that provide simple steps that citizens concerned about water issues can take. “I’m really excited about bringing the project to Breckenridge,” Sotak said. “For me it’s an opportunity to have that dialog with more people about water in their lives and water in their community—if it’s important to them, or if not. Both perspectives are valid. It’s something that connects all of us.” ‘The Pool’ In turn, connections are key to another piece slated to grace the inaugural WAVE festival—an internationally-renowned, illuminated, interactive work titled “The Pool,” by Boulder-based artist Jen Lewin. The sculpture consists of 106 platforms or “pucks,” as she calls them, arranged outdoors in a sort of nested circle. Visitors are invited to walk and run on these platforms, each of which reacts to their footsteps when they do so— either by changing color, creating trails of light behind the person, or even changing the color palette of the sculpture. In essence, it does whatever the artist chooses to program for the installation. “We are really cognizant about what the overall experience should be,” said Lewin, a self-taught programmer with a background in dance. “We really think about that, and then design and change the piece based on the installation. We are not trying to wow everyone with all the whizzbang technology, although it’s there,” she said. “Our goal is to make it a natural, beautiful experience.” “One of the things that’s really interesting and amazing about a sculpture like this is that there

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are very few examples of art in the world where 100 people interact at the same time,” Lewin added. “Bringing people together around the arts is a fundamental desire I have. I always want the audience to participate, and I always want them to connect to one another as well,” she said, describing how people from all walks of life, young and old, are drawn to play in “The Pool” together. “It’s very relevant to the world we live in now,” she said. “As people we are always connecting and communing with each other; I think it’s important that the art we make in this time connects that kind of experience.” ‘Light Origami’ Yet another illuminated, interactive exhibit will be “Light Origami” by Japanese artist Masakazu Shirane. The spiky, domed structure uses more than 320 origami shapes constructed of aluminum composite panels. As people walk through, their reflections combine with projected light to create the feeling of being inside a giant, three-dimensional kaleidoscope. “I wanted to make an interactive space that people could design for themselves,” Shirane explains. The structure was designed using digital 3D computer modeling. It is the latest of three kaleidoscope prototypes he has created. A study in contrasts “Public art is always somewhat controversial, and it can also be dry,” said Woulfe, CEO of BreckCreate, which is presenting the festival in partnership with the Breckenridge Tourism Office as a way to promote creative tourism in June, generally a quiet month in the town’s event calendar.

“What I liked at Canal Convergence is how family-friendly and accessible it was,” Woulfe said. “It didn’t feel like a public art event, but more like a festival. With WAVE, I wanted to build on that model while making it relevant to our mountain community.” Part of what makes WAVE an interesting choice for Breckenridge is the contrast between cutting-edge digital art and the spectacular natural vistas of the Ten Mile Range, whose peaks will likely be draped in a mantle of snow in June. That, and the juxtaposition between modern art and a town steeped in a history. “I love that you have that body of work against the backdrop of a historic, Victorian Colorado town,” Woulfe said. “I love the mix of traditional with contemporary, how these artists will be able to use the history of Breckenridge in this very contemporary work.” Indeed, a number of the pieces depend on the place itself—which is why Sotak and Griffin plan to arrive early to study the town and its local and natural history to inform their installations. Lewin, too, will base decisions about how her piece responds to human touch on an assessment of how guests and locals will interact with it. Several of the works use art to explore the ecological implications of how we make use of our natural resources. “The WAVE festival supports BreckCreate’s commitment to programs that focus on both environmental and place-based relevancy,” Woulfe said. “It’s not just blinking lights and bright, shiny eye-candy. There’s definitely some depth to this work. I think this will be a very special event, and very unique for our community.”

Ryan Patrick Griffin // changerpg.com Erin V. Sotak // myyourourwater.com Jen Lewin // jenlewinstudio.com Masakazu Shirane // kaz-shirane.net

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PETE MCBRIDE


PETE MCBRIDE

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Chasing rivers A study in film and photo, from source to sea

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oaring Fork Valley native Pete McBride grew up on a cattle ranch on the banks of the Colorado River. He skied mountains at the river’s source, watching as the years eroded the snowpack that feeds it. Eventually the photographer-filmmaker decided to pursue the Colorado River from start to finish—taking aerial shots from above with the help of his bush-pilot father, and floating down it in turn with his brother and his friend Jon Waterman, who became the first to paddle its entire length. One attempt to make it to the Sea of Cortez ended 90 miles before the sea, in a lagoon of sludge followed by cracked mud and dry sand. The Colorado River used to flow to the ocean. In fact, it did so for millions of years before ending shy of its mark in 1998, its once lush delta transforming into a barren wasteland. Then in 2014, the U.S. and Mexico worked together to unleash the river once more.

on to study other rivers around the world, raising awareness about the ecological and human impacts of “what happens when we ask too much of a limited resource.” On April 8, 2016, Breckenridge Creative Arts presents McBride as a featured speaker along with a screening of “Chasing Rivers: From the Colorado to the Ganges,” a National Geographic Live production featuring his work on the Colorado River as well as the Ganges River, lifeblood of India and Bangladesh. “Chasing Rivers” is the second in a three-part National Geographic Live speaker series, returning to the Riverwalk Center for its second year. It follows the March 4 presentation of “K2: Danger and Desire on the Savage Mountain” with mountaineer Gerlinde Kaltenbrunner, and the series concludes May 27 with “On the Trail of Big Cats: Tigers, Cougars, and Snow Leopards” with photographer Steve Winter.

McBride produced an award-winning short film, “Chasing Water,” based on his journeys, and went

Pete McBride // petemcbride.com Purchase tickets for ‘Chasing Rivers’ or the full National Geographic Live series at breckcreate.org.

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/portrait/


Cecile L. Forsberg, arts administrator + violinist Background Home: Breckenridge, Colorado Education: Drake University: bachelor’s in violin performance & music business;

Florida State University: master’s in arts administration Why Breckenridge? I moved to Breckenridge for my position with the National Repertory Orchestra—an incredible opportunity to do what I love in a place that I cherish.

Art Medium: Music Latest project: Developing arts administration and performer entrepreneurship

seminars for undergraduate performing arts students Favorite creative space: On Lake Dillon Source of inspiration: My violin students, the environment, and talented colleagues Creativity is: Courage and a willingness to commit in the face of unpredictable outcomes

Insights Personal hero: My grandmother, Alberta Poland Favorite book: “Les Miserables” by Victor Hugo Favorite restaurant: Twist Song in your head right now: Stevie Wonder’s “Sir Duke” Unique home or office decor: Rodeo cyclist poster from Artcrank (by Lisa Rivard) Favorite movie: “Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels” Favorite causes: Education and the environment Favorite way to spend free time: Cooking and hiking

Confessions What keeps you up at night? Ideas and unfinished projects Pet peeve: People who don’t own their mistakes, and who don’t use a turn signal First job: Record store clerk First choice for a new career: Chamber music performer and arts entrepreneurship educator,

or a baker—depends on the day What do you do to recharge your batteries? Go out for a cup of coffee and take a long walk Guilty pleasure: Homemade bread

Cecile L. Forsberg is the Artistic & Operations Director for the National Repertory Orchestra // nromusic.com /KRĒ'ĀT/

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FEATURED ARTIST AMY EVANS

Landscape painter Amy Evans uses oils to capture the emotion of high country vistas en plein air.


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Art in the elements: A COMMUNION WITH NATURE, DISTILLED IN PAINT

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T

o render a landscape on canvas might seem simple to some—dip brush into oils, match colors to vistas, and paint the scenery that lies ahead. But as any landscape painter knows, nature seldom sits still for a painting. Clouds roll in to obscure light that was bright only moments before, casting shadows upon previously well-lit subjects. Reflections on water metamorphose as sun drifts across sky.


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“I’m trying to pick what appeals to me at a particular time—what stops me in my tracks,” said Amy Evans, a local Breckenridge oil painter who hikes deep into the mountains, weather permitting, to capture high country vistas “en plein air.” Because natural landscapes are ever-changing, it’s not so much about making a photo-quality replica of the scene—although she often takes photographs to reference later. Instead, like the French Impressionist painters who evolved her chosen style, Evans is more interested in the emotion of a landscape, and thus her painting. “If you want to get into depth about what the scene is really about, you only have a short window of time on a sunny day,” she said. “You usually have about two hours. After that you notice that the light changes. The trees and plants have sometimes opened up more. It becomes a different subject.” Evans relies on brushwork to capture the feeling of a landscape. “I paint alla prima, which means all at once,” she said. “If I’m trying to achieve softness, I do it with blending. Strong contrast can be done in a different way. These are techniques the Impressionists introduced to painting.” In recent years she has become a fan of water-soluble oils, which create less hazardous waste—not to mention fumes—than traditional oils, because toxic solvents are not required. They are easier to use in the backcountry, and count as regular oils for juried art shows. The latest water-soluble oils are better than earlier formulas, said Evans, who teaches a course on them at the Breckenridge Arts District. One of her big discoveries has been

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that acrylic-type, synthetic brushes work better with water-soluble oils than the hog bristle or sable brushes generally used with traditional oils because they don’t absorb water. “If the brush absorbs water, it turns it into a mop, and makes it harder to manipulate the paint,” she said. She also teaches introductory oil painting classes, how to paint snow, and plein air painting for the Arts District, in addition to private and semi-private lessons. “Learning some sort of art, or creating something as a hobby, is a really important part of having a full life,” Evans said. “It quiets you down; it causes you to observe things. You can learn something like this at any age. To me painting is an excellent way of getting away from it all and expressing myself, especially in this age we are in now.” To paint the wild, of course, we need to have wild spaces—which is why Evans continues to participate in plein air events that donate a portion of proceeds from paintings and workshops to land conservation efforts. “People need to commune with nature,” she said. “We are discovering that more and more—so by helping land trusts, we are helping everyone. These places preserve the quiet and solitude that is a balance to all the noisy places in the world.” Although she also paints in her studio, the connection with nature that occurs just by being out there, by spending at least two hours taking notice of the environment, is a constant source of inspiration.

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“Painting from life outdoors really teaches us to see,” she says. It allows us to notice the subtle changes—how light strengthens as the sun rises high in the sky, and how it transforms from white to gold and often pinks and purples as it descends into sunset. “I really like early morning and late afternoon light,” she said. “I like the long shadows, the drama they portray. It’s fun to see how the colors shift, how the light changes from moment to moment.” The light, in turn, plays with other elements in Evans’ dramas—such as water, a subject she returns to time and time again. “I love the sound of it, and I like the movement of it,” she said. “I love mountain streams, how sometimes they’re soft and quiet, and sometimes rushing. You can feel the energy in water,” she said. “I love that energy, and try to recreate it.” And then there’s how light and water interact in the atmosphere itself. “You can get a lot of moisture in the air on a foggy day, or a snowy day,” she said. “This changes how the landscape looks, and your reaction to it. It’s the same thing with light hitting water—it’s an emotion, a feeling I try to capture with paint.”

Amy Evans // amyevansart.com Breckenridge Gallery // breckenridge-gallery.com


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/objectified/ An object of art


Colorado River Rock Bridge Hewn of wood and steel, this artful pedestrian bridge by Steuart Bremner straddles Cucumber Creek just before the small tributary meets up with the Blue River. Each of the river stones on the inverted arch at its apex represents a tributary of the Colorado River—among them the Blue.

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/conversations/


Dare to bare Strange Soul Couture sews bikinis for ‘rebels, babes + weirdos’ How did you start out making bikinis? I have been a costume designer and seamstress for quite a few years now. I was in the habit of checking fabric suppliers for my clients and one day came across the most amazing swimwear fabrics I had ever seen. Around the same time, a new style of daringly cheeky and fully reversible bikini was just hitting the market. I’m intrigued by multi-functionality in clothing. I’m also a loud celebrator of the feminine form—so twice as many saucy little bikinis seemed like twice the fun! Tell us about the bikinis. Strange Soul Couture bikinis come in “dare to bare” designs highly influenced by Brazilian swimwear culture. Every suit is fully reversible with two unique prints. The debut 2015 collection theme was “Psychedelic Rainforest.” Suit combinations included rainbow parrot feathers reversing to neutral leopard print, photo-realistic orchids, and playful tie dyes. The crown jewel was a two-piece mermaid suit featuring holographic fish-scale booty-short bottoms and a hand-printed shell-bra top. I understand you had a fashion show this fall? I was scouted by the Denver coordinator for RAW, a rad independent arts organization that helps promote underground artists. They thought my flashy little bikinis would get a lot of attention in their November 2015 runway showcase. I was one of three Colorado-based fashion designers to be featured, and the only one doing mini swimwear in winter—big shocker there.

How has your education contributed to your business? The best advice I’ve gotten as a working artist was to forget about any fancy art degree, and get down to work on a degree in business. Colorado Mountain College is literally down the street, and is extremely affordable. My degree taught me how to pay myself a fair wage when selling my work. Art put me through business school—bikinis pay the bills. Are you concerned with sustainability? I love fashion, but I also love this blue planet. Textile production is unfortunately very chemical- and water-usage intensive. Many traditional methods are so polluting they are classified as eco-disasters. There is also a shamefully pervasive element of human abuse in the modern fashion industry. I strive to purchase only U.S.A.-produced spandex to keep jobs here and cut down on pollution from shipping. As a costume designer, I seek out organic and sustainable fabrics, almost exclusively organic cotton, hemp, and modal. Strange Soul Couture supports Charity: Water, which works to bring clean water and improve living conditions for people all over the world. What is your take on creative process? I believe we’re closest to being divine when we’re pouring ourselves into something we’re creating. For me, the urge to tackle what I want to make next is as unrelenting as the urge to breathe.

Marisa Orlandi, 24, launched Strange Soul Couture—her first collection under her own label—in 2015. strangesoulcouture.com // facebook.com/strangesoulcouture // Instagram: @StrangeSoulCouture

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FEATURED ORGANIZATION BRECKENRIDGE BACKSTAGE THEATRE

The Breckenridge Backstage Theatre troupe has been putting on community productions since the 1970’s. This year, the group moves into a renovated theater stocked with new audio, video, lighting, and production equipment.


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A SPOTLIGHT SHINES On a new era for local theater



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he Breckenridge Backstage Theatre troupe has long been a resourceful bunch, hosting quality community productions in a variety of make-do spaces—from the 1970’s when it occupied a stage with “barely enough room to fit a Volkswagen,” to the 2002 move to its current home in the Breckenridge Theater, located at 121 South Ridge Street in a renovated saloon once known as Shamus O’Toole’s Roadhouse. But recent years have seen the group selling out the small space—especially in summer, when upwards of 12,000 patrons visit the theater, according to BBT executive director Mark Lineaweaver. And that’s not to mention the bottlenecks at ticketing and concessions that happened during popular shows. So in 2012 the group requested assistance from the Town of Breckenridge, initiating $2.55 million in renovations and new equipment for the theater, which are scheduled to be complete in time for the opening of “Chicago” in June. “Overall, 3,000 square feet of new construction has been added to the building,” said Shannon Smith, civil engineer with the Public Works department. Amenities include a more spacious lobby that doubles as a gallery space, a bigger ticket booth and bar area, plus 33 additional seats. “The seats are nicely cushioned and even have cup holders for your favorite beverages,” she said.


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Although the BBT troupe calls it home, the renovated Breckenridge Theater is designed to be used by other cultural groups too. The new audio, video, lighting, and production equipment can accommodate a wide range of performances and functions, from acoustic concerts and chamber music to film screenings, live comedy, meetings, guest speakers, and family programs. Outside, the historic look of the 1960’s Butler-style building has been preserved, with the characteristic false front and wooden doors, plus a new storefront window reminiscent of the era. On the inside, however, the theater will have “a very clean and contemporary feel,” Smith said. It connects to the larger Arts District campus to the south through large garage doors that open to the small plaza between the Hot Shop and Ceramic Studio. Back of house improvements—including extended stage wings, green room, dressing rooms, and storage areas along with a raised ceiling for flying sets in and out, a set construction area, electrical upgrades, and a new HVAC system—will make it possible for cast and crew to explore exciting new directions while elevating guests’ experience. “This project is a great example of the collaboration between the town, Breckenridge Creative Arts, and the Breckenridge Backstage Theatre,” Smith said. “Everyone’s time and input throughout the process has greatly increased the quality of the project. The architect, bhh Partners, and general contractor, Base Building Solutions, have been an amazing team to work with through both the design and construction.” “More toys in the sandbox mean more imaginative play,” said Christopher Willard, the Backstage Theatre’s artistic director. “LED lighting technology gives us flexibility for more layered and complicated designs, similar to what bigger touring houses feature. So many possibilities are waiting with all the new amenities and opportunities we have been given.” Patrons can look


forward to “bigger and better shows” and “expanded programming,” with the new technical components allowing the crew “to reach further and go beyond our comfort zone with the types of shows we tackle,” he said. The first Backstage production in the new theater will be “Chicago,” running June 17-24; followed by “The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe” from July 1-24; and the Tony Award-winning “Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike” from July 29-August 24. In the meantime the ever-resourceful group has returned to its nomadic roots, hosting productions around town from Colorado Mountain College and Summit Middle School to the Summit County Courthouse while renovations are underway. “We’re excited about our new space,” Lineaweaver said. “The comfort level—from the air to the ambience to the new seats— is going to be really nice.” The aisle, for example, used to go through the middle of the audience. “Now it has moved to the sides, so the sight lines from all the seats are really great,” he said. “It’s going to be way cooler than it was. It’s literally a new and next stage for us; it’s going to be amazing.”

Breckenridge Backstage Theatre // backstagetheatre.org

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/around town/

The art of the creative economy A thriving arts scene high in the hills


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n an era of declining investment in the arts, a small town high in the Colorado mountains is going out of its way to embrace arts and culture —building up its existing cultural organizations, giving voice to little-known artistic visionaries, and styling contemporary festivals to breathe new life into a burgeoning creative culture. Already, its labors have begun to yield fruit. In 2015, Breckenridge was named the No. 4 small-to-medium city in the Arts Vibrancy Index from the National Center for Arts Research.

of the Breckenridge Theater, and the build-out of the Breckenridge Arts District campus. The town provides BreckCreate with an annual operating budget of just under $2 million. “It’s a rather unique model,” Gallagher said. “We wanted to be a leader and not a follower, to have other communities look at us and say, ‘Wow, look at what Breckenridge is doing.’ That was the thought.”

“I think we are seeing a real change to the view

An environmental tenet runs through some of the new programming—from the spotlight on

in our community; we are indeed a world-class resort,” said Gary Gallagher, who steps down from town council in April after four years championing both art and environmental causes.

deforestation that was part of last summer’s installation of “The Blue Trees,” to reflections on water as a shared resource in Erin V. Sotak’s “My Your Our Water,” coming June 2016.

During that time, the town voted to support the creation of a nonprofit organization to manage its existing cultural arts venues and resources, while also raising the level of programming. The result was Breckenridge Creative Arts—or BreckCreate for short—with experienced arts executive Robb Woulfe at the helm.

While the town pursues environmentally focused policy, such as raising water prices to encourage conservation, the art pieces take a less direct approach—allowing visitors and locals to engage on a spectrum of levels, from pure awe over cobalt-blue aspens to a source of inspiration for public action.

“We hired Robb because we wanted someone who was also an entrepreneur, not just to manage assets but also programming,” Gallagher said. “If you look at the programming he’s done—the town is more alive and vibrant, not just in summer, but in winter too. There were probably more people in town this year than ever before.”

“To me art is visual; art is fun and entertaining,” Gallagher said. “Sometimes the best way to get the message to people on some very important issues—like our forests, like our water—is to use the world of art and creativity to get the message across. If we can engage the viewer in a creative way, it lasts longer.”

The Town of Breckenridge also invested more than $25 million into its cultural assets, including acquiring and renovating the new Breckenridge Grand Vacations Community Center and Summit County South Branch Library, which includes the Speakeasy Theater, as well as Old Masonic Hall on Main Street. It funded facility and equipment upgrades to the Riverwalk Center, the renovation

“Breckenridge is on the move right now,” he concluded. “Compared to 3 or 4 years ago, it’s like night and day. People are just pouring into town. What we’re doing seems to be working; there’s more programming, more opportunities to do things. Everyone seems pretty happy with the results so far.”

Town of Breckenridge // townofbreckenridge.com /KRĒ'ĀT/

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/sourced/ A guide to creative businesses and organizations in and around Breckenridge Cultural Organizations Breckenridge Backstage Theatre 121 S. Ridge St. backstagetheatre.org Breckenridge Creative Arts 150 W. Adams Ave. breckcreate.org Breckenridge Film Festival 103 S. Harris St. breckfilmfest.com Breckenridge Heritage Alliance 309 N. Main St. breckheritage.com Breckenridge Music Festival 217 S. Ridge St. Alley breckenridgemusicfestival.com Breckenridge Tourism Office 111 Ski Hill Rd. gobreck.com National Repertory Orchestra 111 S. Main St. nromusic.com

Branding + Design The Brandon Agency 235 S Ridge St. #2A thebrandonagency.com GatherHouse Inc. 110 Second Ave., Frisco gatherhouse.com KL Creative Design 304 Illinois Gulch Rd. klcreativedesign.com McGraphix Creative & Consulting 201 S Ridge St. mcgraphixcreative.com Nikki LaRochelle Design nikkilarochelle.com

Squeeze Designz squeeze-designz.com Straughn Design 552 97 Circle straughndesign.com Summit Creations 102 Continental Ct. summitcreations.com

Galleries

Museums + Historic Sites Alice G. Milne House and Memorial Park 102 N. Harris St. breckheritage.com Barney Ford House Museum 111 E. Washington Ave. breckheritage.com Breckenridge Sawmill Museum Boreas Pass Rd. breckheritage.com

Arts Alive 500 S. Main St. summitarts.org

William H. Briggle House 104 N. Harris St. breckheritage.com

Art on a Whim 100 N. Main St. artonawhim.com

Country Boy Mine 542 French Gulch Rd. countryboymine.com

Blue River Fine Art Gallery 411 S. Main St. blueriverfineartgallery.com

Edwin Carter Museum 111 N. Ridge St. breckheritage.com

Breckenridge Art Supply 201 S. Ridge St. artsupplybreck.com

High Line Railroad Park 189 Boreas Pass Rd. breckheritage.com

Breckenridge Fine Art Gallery 421 S. Main St. vailfineart.com Breckenridge Gallery 124 S. Main St. breckenridge-gallery.com Colorado Scenics 421 S. Main St. coloradoscenics.com Exclusive Collections 421 S. Main St. ecgallery.com Gary Soles Gallery 300 S. Main St. breckenridgephotoshop.com The Photo Shop 300 S. Main St. breckenridgephotoshop.com

Lomax Gulch 301 Ski Hill Rd. breckheritage.com Mountain Top Children’s Museum 605 S. Park Ave. mtntopmuseum.org Prospector Park 112 N. Main St. townofbreckenridge.com Red White and Blue Fire Museum 308 N. Main St. breckheritage.com Summit Ski Exhibit 308-B S. Main St. breckheritage.com


Boutiques + Specialty

Architecture

Breckenridge Photographics 500 S. Main St. breckphoto.com

Allen Guerra Architecture 1915 Airport Rd. allen-guerra.com

The Glass Art Company 411 S. Main St. #16 theglassartcompany.com

Arapahoe Architects 322-C N. Main St. arapahoearchitects.com

Global Candle Gallery 326 S. Main St. globalcandlegallery.com

bhh Partners 160 E. Adams Ave. bhhpartners.com

JK Studio 100 S. Main St., 2nd floor jkstudiollc.com

Equinox Architecture, LLC 520 S. Main St. equinoxarchitecture.com

Magical Scraps 310 S. Main St. magicalscraps.com

J.L. Sutterley Architect 500 S. Ridge St. jlsutterlyarchitect.com

Marigolds Farmhouse Funk + Junk 215 S. Main St. marigoldsfarmhousefunkandjunk.com

Matthew Stais Architects 108 N. Ridge St. staisarchitects.com

Ole Man Berkins 326 S. Main St. olemanberkins.com Portiera Designs 326 S. Main St. portieradesigns.com Ready Paint Fire 323 N. Main St. readypaintfireco.com Ruby Jane 232 S. Main St. valleygirlboutique.com Wandering Daisy 326 S. Main St. Young Colors 226 S. Main St., Unit 1 youngcolors.com

Breweries + Craft Beverages Après Handcrafted Libations 130 S. Main St. apreslibations.com Breckenridge Brewery 600 S. Main St. breckbrewpub.com Breckenridge Distillery 1925 Airport Rd. breckenridgedistillery.com Broken Compass Brewing 68 Continental Ct. brokencompassbrewing.com

Cafes + Coffee Houses Amazing Grace 213 Lincoln Ave. amazinggracebreck.com

Michael F. Gallagher Architect michaelgallagher.com

Cabin Coffee Company 222 S. Main St. cabincoffeecompany.com

Neely Architecture 1705 Airport Rd. neelyarchitecture.com

Clint’s Bakery & Coffee House 131 S. Main St. clintsbakery.com

Healing Arts

Cuppa Joe 118 S. Ridge St.

Alpine Spa and Salon 500 S. Main St., 3rd floor alpinespaandsalon.com Ambika Healing 435 N. Park Ave. ambika.massagetherapy.com

Mug Shot Café 435 N. Park Ave. Starbucks 225 S. Main St. starbucks.com

Blue Sage Spa 224 S. Main St. bluesagespa.com Breckenridge Bliss Massage Therapy 325 S. Main St. breckenridgeblissmassage.com Meta Yoga Studios 118 S. Ridge St. metayogastudios.com

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The Blue River rollicks through downtown Breckenridge, passing the Riverwalk Center performing arts facility, which is home to two orchestras and myriad other events and performances. A rich green lawn meets a landscaped open plaza at their confluence, waves of spring melt meeting waves of music in this popular community gathering place.