krē’āt issue 1

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/krē’āt/ mountain arts + culture quarterly

Published by Breckenridge Creative Arts | ISSUE NO. 1, Winter 15+16


/krē’āt/

contents

: to make or produce

features

: to cause to exist

FIRE AS MEDIUM, FIRE AS TOOL

: to bring into being Launched in December 2015, /krē’āt/ is

CAPTURING THE ART OF SNOWBOARDING

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HISTORY SPEAKS

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an online magazine published quarterly by Breckenridge Creative Arts. Each issue

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profiles a creative individual or business, cultural organization, event, and object of art in a thoughtfully curated visual journey that aims to highlight and promote the greater creative community of Breckenridge. Creative Director Robb Woulfe, Breckenridge Creative Arts

Editor + Content Writer Erica Marciniec

Art Director + Designer Kate Hudnut, GatherHouse Inc.

Contributing Photographers Liam Doran, Jenise Jensen, Chad Otterstrom

Additional Photo Credits Breckenridge Heritage Alliance, Summit Historical Society: John Topolnicki Collection; Maureen Nicholls collection, Daniel Dunn, So-Gnar collection, Bernadette Foley, Erica Ohmes

Cover Artwork Photo by Liam Doran Special thanks to the Town of Breckenridge for its generous support.

@breckcreate // breckcreate.org

departments Foreward

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Conversations WICKS, WAX, WONDERFUL

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Scene STREET ART MEETS STREET STYLE

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DECKS BECOME CANVAS

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Around Town SNOWSHOE INTO THE PAST

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Portrait JANET SUTTERLEY, ARCHITECT 30 Objectified OLD MASONIC HALL

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Sourced

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FOREWARD


/krē’āt/ winter 2015 + 2016 Our first issue of /krē’āt/ glows with the red-hot flames of a fire festival, set against a Colorado backdrop of sparkling white snow. From there, we chase our crystalline muse through generations— from the early pioneers of ski country to our modern obsession with slicing through its many forms on a single, creative edge. To stand on a mountain peak, strapped into a snowboard or skis, and pick one of a thousand lines to descend is arguably creativity in and of itself. Through the lens of a local pro-snowboarder turned photographer, that perspective is illuminated a level further. Supporting the feature stories are short pieces celebrating the places where art and snow culture, history and nature, fire and creative process intersect. We hope you enjoy this first issue of /krē’āt/ as we enjoyed creating it. That as you wander you find wonder—not only in the breathtaking beauty of our mountains and town, but also in the arts and culture they inspire.

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FEATURED EVENT FIRE ARTS FESTIVAL

The Fire Arts Festival is a multi-day exhibition featuring burning sculptures, fiery performances, and other spark-filled attractions at the Breckenridge Arts District from Jan. 28–31.


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Fire as medium, fire as tool

A counterpoint to sculptures in snow

Fire. It’s one of life’s essential elements, a thing that makes us human. Licking flames enchant, a personality all their own. Harnessed, they fuel empires; unleashed, they destroy. No wonder art would embrace such power—as both a medium and a tool to create.

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As a medium, fire is relatively new. It’s mostly a fringe art, the majority of venues being unwilling to showcase giant, flaming sculpture. Even so, a generation of fire artists has emerged in recent years, its epicenter across the bridge from San Francisco in Oakland, where large-scale, flaming art is constructed in monster warehouses. Now, some of that art is headed east to grace the second annual Fire Arts Festival, taking place in Breckenridge January 28-31 during the Budweiser International Snow Sculpture Championships. “A natural complement to snow is fire,” said the festival’s director, Robb Woulfe. “The two add a dynamism, a dichotomy, a yin and yang.” So, while sculptors from around the world are shaping snow next to the Riverwalk Center, the Fire Arts Festival will light up the arts campus across Main Street on Washington Avenue. After exhibiting his fire flowers last year, sculptor Jamie Vaida returns with “The Burning Pink Organ”—a 16x10-foot wide, 13-foot tall organ that shoots flames from its pipes. The new piece will be interactive; hit a button and the flames grow in size, play the keys and it whistles and sings. It will be circus-like in character, with Victorianesque, scrolled woodwork making it look like something from a Dr. Seuss storybook. Although fire has its appeal, Vaida is most drawn to working with metal. “Metal is fascinating, mysterious, mystical. It lasts forever, and there’s so much depth to it as far as being from the earth,” he said. “I love working with it. I love to bend metal—you can feel the energy coming out of it—and there’s so much I can do with it structurally.” He is building the organ in Grand Junction, Colorado with his partner, Alvin Sessions. An 18-year former resident of Colorado, Vaida hopes to head to the Rockies for good someday soon.


The Seattle-based sculptor James Reinhardt will make his Breckenridge debut this year with “The Pyred Eye,” an interactive, flaming piece with a crank arm spectators can operate. Ryon Gesink, also new to Breckenridge, will show “Oscillation II,” a large-scale rendition of an earlier idea that uses two slotted metal spheres, one spinning in an opposite direction inside the other. When gas is released inside the nucleus and lit on fire, the action creates vortexes and wind patterns that eventually send 15- to 20-foot fire tornadoes shooting out the top. The concept was a bit of “a happy accident,” that came from playing with fire, Gesink said. “It’s kind of a long process; you start doing sculptures and they’re much simpler when you begin, then you go further and further down the road and become more and more intrigued, and get greater effects,” he said. “It’s kind of hard to see in the beginning where you’ll end up. I played with fire a lot, and started noticing the effects and trying to magnify them. I had a metal sphere and I put paper towels in there and set it on fire. It was intriguing enough that I pursued it.” Although Gesink is “the real Wizard of Oz behind the scenes pulling all the levers,” the sculpture appears to be manned by “Sylth,” which he describes as “a sort of minion creature, a metallic alien-looking creature, a humanoid, biomechanoid robotic being.” The three sculptors will unveil their work at the Telluride Fire Festival, also in its second year, before coming to Breckenridge. Arts groups in both Colorado towns came up with the idea to showcase fire arts, then decided to partner with one another on their respective events. Each has its unique features, of course— Telluride adds a parade aspect with lit-up art cars, whereas Breckenridge showcases demonstrations by local artists whose mediums depend on fire.

Jamie Vaida // jamievaida.com

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Thus in addition to the giant, flaming works of art that will transform the Arts District campus from 5-9 p.m. each night of the Breckenridge festival, guests can also observe fiery artistic processes—from glowing raku pottery firings at the outdoor Kiln Yard and candle making with Bernadette Foley to silversmithing with Martha Peterson-Glomb and essential oils with Erica Ragusa. Local glass artist Todd Brower will demonstrate lampworking with flaming torches, and Victoria Eubanks will provide a window into encaustics, which uses molten, pigmented wax to create layered works of art. Fire performances by the Boulder-based troupe, Fractal Tribe, and Denver’s DJ Stretch round out the event. “Fire in the snow—I think you’ve got a lot of nice extremes,” said Gesink, who looks forward to seeing his sculpture against a snowy backdrop, or better yet, while snow is falling. That is, as long as it doesn’t cause too many technical issues. The large, metal sculptures depend on propane to run; if the tanks get too cold they lose fuel pressure and the fire effects diminish. “This year we’re experimenting with heating blankets for the tanks,” Vaida said. “It’s a great challenge.” “Fire art? In the snow? At first it seemed absurd, but on second thought, of course!” blogged Tom Sepe, who assisted sculptor Orion Fredericks with his installation of Gillaptourous Corvus (“Gilly” for short) last year. “Seeing ‘Gilly’ in the snow was surreal and beautiful, a marvelous juxtaposition of fire and ice, the impermanence of snow and weather and the everlasting hardness of the stainless steel.” “What a perfect juxtaposition of opposites—and who doesn’t want warmth when it’s cold outside?”

James Reinhardt // jamesreinhardt.com

Ryon Gesink // ryongesink.com PAGE

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/conversations/


Wicks, wax, wonderful Candle Cabin makes art of light Why Breckenridge Candle Cabin? We were living in a cabin with no electricity. Without electricity in Colorado in the winter, you use A LOT of candles. When we were burning them for hours in our tiny cabin we would both get headaches, itchy eyes, and sore throats. I did some research and discovered that some candles can release harmful chemicals. That is why we make ours with only U.S. grown, non GMO soy, essential oils, and cotton wicks. How did you decide on your materials and techniques? We spent months and months testing different waxes, oils, wicks, containers. Then whenever we changed one factor we had to test everything all over again. My husband has worked in kitchens since he was a kid and I think that really helps. He treats the candles like he would a sauce, adding a little of this, a little of that. He understands how all the ingredients, the temperatures, even the speed at which you mix it, need to come together to create the finished product. What part of the process involves the most creativity? Almost every part involves creativity and that’s why I love it. We get to be creative with our scent combinations. Designing our own labels is a creative process. Even setting up displays at shops and markets is creative. Taxes, though— lots of taxes—that is the only part I can think of that is not creative AT ALL.

Tell us about the candle aroma, “thieves.” There is a legend that during the Black Plague in Europe, grave robbers would put this blend of essential oils on themselves and they did not get the plague. Now people seek it out as an immunity defense in the modern age. What do participants learn in your Arts District classes? When people come to a candle making class they get to see the wax and oil in its raw form, then how we heat them and blend them together. They learn how to put together all the parts of the candle—the wick and tab and container. They get to design their own labels too. What is it you enjoy most about your craft? Candle making and the use of essential oils are both such ancient arts. I like being a part of a continuing history. I like the idea of connecting to these simple practices that haven’t changed all that much for thousands of years. Any last words? I know most people can buy a candle anywhere. The fact that people care about what is in their candle and where it is made and who is making it is so encouraging. It gives me hope for the future of my town, my community, and the world.

Bernadette Foley owns and operates Breckenridge Candle Cabin with her husband and ‘number one candle maker’ Christopher Simoni. Find their waxwork at breckenridgecandlecabin.com, or check out their demonstration at the Fire Arts Festival.

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FEATURED ARTIST CHAD OTTERSTROM

Chad Otterstrom is an emerging local photographer and longtime Breckenridge-based professional snowboarder.


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Capturing the art of snowboarding: BEHIND THE LENS WITH CHAD OTTERSTROM

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Ask a snowboarder about his or her sport, and you might hear it’s more of an art. Ask a skater and the answer’s the same— a street becomes more than something you walk down. It becomes a canvas to be painted, the board the brush, the surface 3D.


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For longtime pro-snowboarder Chad Otterstrom, who moved to Breckenridge in 1995 and spent 15 years competing and making video parts—it was always about the art. “I’ve never thought of snowboarding as an athletic sport, you got into it to be creative,” he said. “I grew up in Minnesota where there was a lot of football and hockey; you did what the coach told you. With snowboarding I can be my own person.” Now, he tries to portray the creative side of snowboarding through his photography. “I’m looking for the individualism of the snowboarder, you know what I mean? It’s not hard to take a picture of a snowboarder, it’s hard to capture their personal style,” he said. “I think of snowboarding as more of an art form, and taking pictures of that extends it onto a photograph.” Otterstrom has been shooting photos since the darkroom-days of high school, and later with a crew of local friends in the backcountry, many of whom he credits for inspiring his work. Within snowboarding, his favorite subjects are the “all-natural stuff” like cliff drops into pow and urban hand rails. “Anything but park,” Otterstrom says. “The kind of stuff when you do your trick nobody else can replicate it.”

But it’s the world outside of snowboarding that’s piqued his interest of late, particularly as seen through the camera lens. “I like to take the dogs out when it’s snowing really hard, and take pictures of them,” he said. “I like it in the morning when the snow is just kind of glowing, that feeling. All of a sudden it just hit me.” So between judging contests like X Games and Dew Tour, writing trick tips for “Transworld Snowboarding,” coaching at Woodward, and riding every day of winter, he lets his camera take him on journeys. “The other day I hiked to the top of Maroon Bells just to take pictures. It gives you an excuse to make your own adventures,” he said. “That’s a huge part of it—going on an adventure with my camera. I’m not going to get into real estate photography any time soon.” On the practical side, he hopes to make photography more of a career, something to do as he gets older. His take on creativity on this: “Almost everything’s already been done. You think you’re creative? Someone did it 20 years ago. It’s about doing your own thing, not taking the direct path to the top of the mountain. Finding your own way up and your own way down.” Like snowboarding—a matter of perspective.

Chad Otterstrom photography // instagram.com/chadotterstrom

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/scene/

Street art meets street style Fusing art + snow culture at the Dew Tour On Friday, December 11, just before the Nike Snowboard Streetstyle in downtown Breckenridge, local shop Fun vs. Awesome unveils a new mural by Pat Milbery and Patrick McKinney of So-Gnar. Milbery is a longtime Breckenridge pro-snowboarder who founded So-Gnar as a creative umbrella for a range of projects—from screen-printed posters for big-name musicians, DJ mixtapes, and murals to behind-the-scenes podcasts on So-Gnar TV and product collaborations with everyone from Nitro to 686. “Ultimately we like to create,” Milbery said. “You’ll find a common bond between everything we do—using creativity to branch between different genres like art, music, snow, skate, and apparel.” So-Gnar’s screen-printed clothing and headwear is featured at Fun vs. Awesome, which offers “an urban/street meets-the-mountains kind of vibe with a focus on art,” said Matt Royer, who opened the shop in 2013 with his wife Rianna. “We work on curating up-and-coming brands while also carrying the best of the best from well-known snow/skate/lifestyle brands.”

So-Gnar paints murals around the country, including the work inside Woodward at Copper’s retail space, terrain park features at Loveland Ski Area, and give-away canvas installations for Zumiez’ Couch Tour, to name a few. The Breckenridge piece will feature “a mountain scene with a forest electrified through really vibrant tones of color,” Milbery said, using “geometric layered trees” to give it “an animated forest feel.” Then on Saturday, December 12, it’s all hands on art as Pat Milbery and Patrick McKinney invite the community to collaborate on a second, edgier mural at Old Masonic Hall, located at 136 S. Main Street in Breckenridge. “We will create the basic subject matter, then leave space for people to get creative with the piece, to add their details,” Milbery said. For Royer, getting together with So-Gnar to promote the arts in Breckenridge made sense. “I wanted to remind people of the importance of snowboarding’s artistic roots,” he said.

So-Gnar // @sognarofficial - instagram / twitter Patrick McKinney // @pat.mckinney - instagram / twitter Pat Milbery // @patmilbery - instagram / twitter Fun vs. Awesome // facebook.com/funvsawesome


Decks become canvas Here in the high country, we burn through our skate decks, snowboards, and skis with each passing season. But local artists Erica Ohmes and Christian Tai Leach give them second lives as canvases to be painted. “Anything from a tin can to a dead tree can inspire my artwork,” says Ohmes, who uses acrylics and decoupage on skis and boards. “I use color and line to mimic the patterns and textures I find in nature, such as the veins of a leaf or ripples in water.” Being in nature is part of her creative process. The two will show their work through the month of December at Old Masonic Hall, located at 136 S. Main Street in Breckenridge. At the artists’ reception on Saturday, December 12, Tai Leach will demonstrate the technique he uses for turning snow equipment into works of art.

Christian Tai Leach // instagram.com/tai_tamera Erica Ohmes // blueriverfineartgallery.com/erica-ohmes.html

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FEATURED ORGANIZATION BRECKENRIDGE HERITAGE ALLIANCE

Founded in 2006, the Breckenridge Heritage Alliance is a non-profit organization focused on protecting and promoting the town’s unique and colorful history.


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HISTORY SPEAKS We are hippies + ski bums, we are the Wild West.

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To step back into another era and experience life as it was lived before is possible only to the extent we make it. Ignore the relics of past generations and they crumble to the ground, no longer capable of telling their stories. Lift them up and give them context, however, and they can contribute in a real and lasting way to our understanding of the past, and thereby, ourselves. It’s why the Breckenridge Heritage Alliance, a non-profit organization dedicated to protecting and promoting our local historical treasures, works so diligently to stabilize historic sites now—from the remnants of the Reiling Gold Dredge afloat in French Gulch and weather-worn headstones in the park-like Valley Brook Cemetery, to mining camps like Lincoln City, which served first as home to nearly 2,000 fortune-seekers, and later as a sort of hippie haven in the 1970’s. “We’re not trying to save every last cabin, but there are some that really tell a good story to people today,” said Larissa O’Neil, executive director of the BHA. The story of Lincoln City is one that has yet to be told. Like the old town site of Tiger, which was torn down in the 1970’s, Lincoln City experienced a second life when new arrivers to the area made temporary homes there. In fact, some of the historic structures owe their existence to improvements made on them during this era.

“Breckenridge has changed more in the past 50 years than in the first 100 years,” O’Neil said. “We often focus on our mining history, but it is part of our long range plan to help tell that more modern history story too.” The tale rollicks from the earliest Ute inhabitants to the boom-and-bust mining days, with narrow-gauge railroads making harrowing journeys over Boreas Pass in the deep snow, to a small, up-and-coming ski town with a colorful cast of characters that continues to enliven Breckenridge today. To voice these stories, BHA offers historical interpretations that appeal to all types—from history buffs seeking to experience living history in one of the best-preserved historic towns in the country, to locals who pass by that narrow stone structure across from La Cima Mall on Ridge Street without knowing its significance. (Known as the “dipping station,” it was a large tank where pipes produced for area mining operations were coated in an anti-rust solution. It is all that remains of the Gold Pan Shops, once one of largest machine shops west of the Mississippi River.) At the Carter museum, also on Ridge Street, the exhibits are hands-on and kid-friendly, turning the traditional “don’t touch” museum-ethic on


its head while delivering the colorful tale of an early naturalist who used taxidermy—that’s right, hunting and stuffing—to preserve the Rockies’ unique fauna. Those interested in the seedier side of Breckenridge history can knock one back on the Saloon Tour, which stops in at the Breckenridge Distillery tasting room. In contrast, the Historic Walking Tour and the new public archive facility— where much of the Summit Historical Society’s collection can now be viewed—are geared for more traditional history-lovers. Then there’s the Arts District, a large-scale restoration of an entire campus of historic structures which honors the purposes they once served while giving them new life as creative spaces for the community. And families might head to the High Line Railroad Park on Boreas Pass Road for the new playground, only to find they’ve ridden their imaginations straight into the past after viewing the historic flat car and replica C&S caboose hosted there. After all, O’Neil says, “every kid loves a train.” I could go on like this but you get the picture—it’s not just one exhibit or tour that makes Breckenridge special. This entire place is living history. You can’t help but see it, and be a part of it, simply by strolling through. And as our present continues to unfold into a new past, we can count on our dedicated historians to make sure these stories are heard, even when we don’t realize we’re listening.

Founded in 2006, the Breckenridge Heritage Alliance builds upon preservation work begun by the town and the Summit Historical Society. The archives are made available to the public through a partnership between BHA and SHS.

Breckenridge Heritage Alliance // breckheritage.com

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/around town/


Snowshoe into the past But whatever you do, don’t walk backwards

Whether you’re in the market for a snowshoe lesson with history sprinkled on top, or a local history lesson where you get to hike through nature on snowshoes with poles, a guided tour to Iowa Hill or French Gulch is a cool—no pun intended—way to learn about the area’s mining history. Iowa Hill is shorter but steeper, and French Gulch is gradual but longer. Both require some amount of lung capacity, due to the fact that it’s ascending from 9,600 feet, so prior acclimation is recommended. But each tour is different, spotlighting various forms of mining from gold panning to giant fire hose-style hydraulics to the dragon-like dredge boats that tore up local rivers and spit out massive piles of stone in their wake. You can take the same tours in summer, but in snow they are a soft and lovely white, hedged

with boreal forest. And they require snowshoes, which in and of itself is an adventure. “It’s basically walking,” said Rob Dollars, a guide who’s had his fair share of falling folks, always in good fun, mind you. “I tell people if they want to turn around, they should walk forward in a circle. When people try to walk backwards, their heels dig in and it takes ‘em right over,” he said. “It can be an adventure sometimes, keeping snowshoes on everybody.” At the same, the guides take their responsibility of historical accuracy seriously. All participants snowshoe through the past—glimpsing the mission, the mines, the lives of those who worked them, and the environmental legacy they left behind—before returning to the present and what it means for those of us today. Plus did I mention you get to snowshoe?

Sign up for a snowshoe tour with the Breckenridge Heritage Alliance at the Welcome Center, 203 S. Main Street, or call 970.453.9767. BHA // breckheritage.com

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/portrait/


Janet Sutterley, architect Background Home: Historic District, Breckenridge Family: Husband Randy Kilgore, kids Johnny 29, Jackie 27, & Liam 18, dog Hank Education: Syracuse University, Bachelor of Architecture 5-year professional degree Why Breckenridge? Came for the winter, stayed for the summer and the library

Art Medium: Architectural design Latest project: Old Masonic Hall Favorite creative space: My historic shed Source of inspiration: Beautiful old buildings Creativity is: A passion for design combined with problem solving

Insights Personal hero: Jack Sutterley (my dad) Favorite book: “Harry Potter” (all of them) and “The Power of One” Favorite restaurant: Mountain Flying Fish Song in your head right now: “Take it Easy” Unique home or office decor: Painted brown paper bag wallpaper Favorite movie: “Forrest Gump” (I know, but it really is.) Favorite cause: Designing hospital facilities in Rwanda Favorite way to spend free time: Hiking with friends & hangin’ out with those kids

Confessions What keeps you up at night? Something is, for sure, but I can’t put my finger on it. Pet peeve: Those annoying stickers that are on everything you buy, and

dysfunctional turn signals First job: Filing & organizing markers in an architect’s office First choice for a new career: I want to be Anthony Bourdain. What do you do to recharge your batteries? Road trip with Randy Guilty pleasure: Cheese, chocolate drinks, and a massage

Local architect Janet Sutterley has drawn plans for many of the historic restoration projects in town. She also serves on the board of the Breckenridge Heritage Alliance. J.L. Sutterley Architect // jlsutterleyarchitect.com

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/objectified/ An object of art


Old Masonic Hall Serving as a Masonic Lodge in the early 1900’s and later as a church, Old Masonic Hall reopened in 2015 as a multi-purpose arts facility that houses visual and performing arts classes, workshops, exhibition spaces, artist studios, and administrative offices. The historic building was renovated based on a design by architect Janet Sutterley.

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/sourced/ A guide to creative businesses and organizations in and around Breckenridge Cultural Organizations Breckenridge Backstage Theatre 121 S. Ridge St. backstagetheatre.org Breckenridge Creative Arts 150 W. Adams Ave. breckcreate.org Breckenridge Film Festival 103 S. Harris St. breckfilmfest.com Breckenridge Heritage Alliance 309 N. Main St. breckheritage.com Breckenridge Music Festival 217 S. Ridge St. Alley breckenridgemusicfestival.com Breckenridge Tourism Office 111 Ski Hill Rd. gobreck.com National Repertory Orchestra 111 S. Main St. nromusic.com

Branding + Design The Brandon Agency 235 S Ridge St. #2A thebrandonagency.com GatherHouse Inc. 110 Second Ave., Frisco gatherhouse.com KL Creative Design 304 Illinois Gulch Rd. klcreativedesign.com McGraphix Creative & Consulting 201 S Ridge St. mcgraphixcreative.com Nikki LaRochelle Design nikkilarochelle.com

Squeeze Designz squeeze-designz.com Straughn Design 552 97 Circle straughndesign.com Summit Creations 102 Continental Ct. summitcreations.com

Galleries

Museums + Historic Sites Alice G. Milne House and Memorial Park 102 N. Harris St. breckheritage.com Barney Ford House Museum 111 E. Washington Ave. breckheritage.com Breckenridge Sawmill Museum Boreas Pass Rd. breckheritage.com

Arts Alive 500 S. Main St. summitarts.org

William H. Briggle House 104 N. Harris St. breckheritage.com

Art on a Whim 100 N. Main St. artonawhim.com

Country Boy Mine 542 French Gulch Rd. countryboymine.com

Blue River Fine Art Gallery 411 S. Main St. blueriverfineartgallery.com

Edwin Carter Museum 111 N. Ridge St. breckheritage.com

Breckenridge Art Supply 201 S. Ridge St. artsupplybreck.com

High Line Railroad Park 189 Boreas Pass Rd. breckheritage.com

Breckenridge Fine Art Gallery 421 S. Main St. vailfineart.com Breckenridge Gallery 124 S. Main St. breckenridge-gallery.com Colorado Scenics 421 S. Main St. coloradoscenics.com Exclusive Collections 421 S. Main St. ecgallery.com Gary Soles Gallery 300 S. Main St. breckenridgephotoshop.com The Photo Shop 300 S. Main St. breckenridgephotoshop.com

Lomax Gulch 301 Ski Hill Rd. breckheritage.com Mountain Top Children’s Museum 605 S. Park Ave. mtntopmuseum.org Prospector Park 112 N. Main St. townofbreckenridge.com Red White and Blue Fire Museum 308 N. Main St. breckheritage.com Summit Ski Exhibit 308-B S. Main St. breckheritage.com


Boutiques + Specialty

Architecture

Breckenridge Photographics 500 S. Main St. breckphoto.com

Allen Guerra Architecture 1915 Airport Rd. allen-guerra.com

The Glass Art Company 411 S. Main St. #16 theglassartcompany.com

Arapahoe Architects 322-C N. Main St. arapahoearchitects.com

Global Candle Gallery 326 S. Main St. globalcandlegallery.com

bhh Partners 160 E. Adams Ave. bhhpartners.com

JK Studio 100 S. Main St., 2nd floor jkstudiollc.com

Equinox Architecture, LLC 520 S. Main St. equinoxarchitecture.com

Magical Scraps 310 S. Main St. magicalscraps.com

J.L. Sutterley Architect 500 S. Ridge St. jlsutterlyarchitect.com

Marigolds Farmhouse Funk + Junk 215 S. Main St. marigoldsfarmhousefunkandjunk.com

Matthew Stais Architects 108 N. Ridge St. staisarchitects.com

Ole Man Berkins 326 S. Main St. olemanberkins.com Portiera Designs 326 S. Main St. portieradesigns.com Ready Paint Fire 323 N. Main St. readypaintfireco.com Ruby Jane 232 S. Main St. valleygirlboutique.com Wandering Daisy 326 S. Main St. Young Colors 226 S. Main St., Unit 1 youngcolors.com

Breweries + Craft Beverages Après Handcrafted Libations 130 S. Main St. apreslibations.com Breckenridge Brewery 600 S. Main St. breckbrewpub.com Breckenridge Distillery 1925 Airport Rd. breckenridgedistillery.com Broken Compass Brewing 68 Continental Ct. brokencompassbrewing.com

Cafes + Coffee Houses Amazing Grace 213 Lincoln Ave. amazinggracebreck.com

Michael F. Gallagher Architect michaelgallagher.com

Cabin Coffee Company 222 S. Main St. cabincoffeecompany.com

Neely Architecture 1705 Airport Rd. neelyarchitecture.com

Clint’s Bakery & Coffee House 131 S. Main St. clintsbakery.com

Healing Arts

Cuppa Joe 118 S. Ridge St.

Alpine Spa and Salon 500 S. Main St., 3rd floor alpinespaandsalon.com Ambika Healing 435 N. Park Ave. ambika.massagetherapy.com

Mug Shot Café 435 N. Park Ave. Starbucks 225 S. Main St. starbucks.com

Blue Sage Spa 224 S. Main St. bluesagespa.com Breckenridge Bliss Massage Therapy 325 S. Main St. breckenridgeblissmassage.com Meta Yoga Studios 118 S. Ridge St. metayogastudios.com

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BRECKENRIDGE CREATIVE ARTS

WINTER 15+16

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Randall Barn, printing + textile studio Breckenridge Arts District