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The official magazine of the Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University 2016

AN OSU WING MAN Injured bald eagles that end up at a tribal aviary can count on top-tier treatment


PHOTOGRAPHY BY PHIL SHOCKLEY / UNIVERSITY MARKETING

VET CETERA M A G A Z I N E  

W I N T E R   2 0 1 6 / V O L U M E

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ON THE COVER: Injured bald eagles and other majestic birds at the Grey Snow Eagle House in Perkins, Okla., get expert treatment from OSU alumnus Dr. Paul Welch, a volunteer there. (Photo courtesy Dr. Welch) Page 54

10 PA R T Y I N G W I T H A PA C E M A K E R Almost two dozen dogs are living better lives with pacemakers implanted by Dr. Ryan Baumwart. The Center for Veterinary Health Sciences graduates competent, confident, practice-ready veterinarians — a tradition it has proudly carried forward since the day the veterinary college opened its doors 68 years ago. Please join us at the CVHS website: www.cvhs.okstate.edu. The OSU homepage is located at www.okstate.edu. VET CETERA magazine is published each Winter by Oklahoma State University, 305 Whitehurst, Stillwater, OK 74078. The magazine is produced by University Marketing and the Center for Veterinary Health Sciences. Its purpose is to ­connect the college with its many alumni and friends, providing information on both c ­ ampus news and pertinent issues in the field of veterinary medicine. Postage is paid at Stillwater, OK, and additional mailing offices.

14 M I N I H O R S E , M A X A P P E A L Baby Donut (above) is undergoing treatment at OSU’s Veterinary Medical Hospital to fix his unusually angled legs — and his visits draw a crowd.

Christopher Ross, DVM, Ph.D.

Interim Dean, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences

Derinda Blakeney, APR

Public Relations and Marketing Coordinator

Sharon Worrell

Alumni Affairs Specialist

Heidi Griswold

Senior Director of Development

16 H E A LT H F O R A L L Three OSU researchers are leading studies that focus on herpes viruses that affect humans, primates and horses.

Dorothy L. Pugh

45 G O I N G N AT I O N A L The Student American Veterinary Medical Association has selected OSU’s Jeff Olivarez as its president-elect.

Phil Shockley / Gary Lawson

66 G O T A F A V O R I T E V E T E R I N A R I A N ? Katherine and Edwin Sain do — Dr. Mike Wiley. And the Sains have shown their appreciation for his expertise by endowing a scholarship in his name.

w w w . c v h s . o k s t a t e . e d u

Editor

Paul V. Fleming

Art Director / Designer Staff Photographers

Oklahoma State University, in compliance with Title VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Executive Order 11246 as amended, and Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (Higher Education Act), the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, and other federal and state laws and regulations, does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, genetic information, sex, age, sexual orientation, gender identity, religion, disability, or status as a veteran in any of its policies, practices or procedures. This provision includes, but is not limited to admissions, employment, financial aid and educational services. The Director of Equal Opportunity has been designated to handle inquiries regarding nondiscrimination policies. Contact the Director of Equal Opportunity at 408 Whitehurst, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078-1035; telephone 405-744-5371; or email eeo@okstate. edu. Any person (student, faculty, or staff) who believes that discriminatory practices have been engaged in based on gender may discuss his or her concerns and file informal or formal complaints of possible violations of Title IX with OSU’s Title IX Coordinator at 405-744-9154. This publication, issued by Oklahoma State University as authorized by the vice president of enrollment management and marketing, was printed by Royle Printing Co. at a cost of $1.71 per issue: 4,800/December 2016/#6405.Copyright © 2016, Vet Cetera magazine. All rights reserved.


JEAN E. SANDER , DVM, MAM, DACPV, HAS SERVED THE CENTER FOR VETERINARY H E A LT H S C I E N C E S A S D E A N F O R T H E PAST FIVE YEARS. SHE RESIGNED IN JULY TO ACCO M PA N Y H E R H U S B A N D AS H I S CAREER TAKES HIM TO WASHINGTON, D.C.

Thank you, Dean Sander “I promised my husband, Allen, when he followed me to Stillwater that the next ‘career move’ would be his,” Sander says. “Allen is an attorney who specializes in federal laws of patient confidentiality, particularly as applied to mental health and substance abuse patients. Changes in these federal laws have created the need for new national-level policy advisers in Washington. This is truly a career-capping opportunity for him.”

The first female dean of OSU’s Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Sander wasted no time building relationships with key audiences and growing Oklahoma’s only veterinary college. Here are just a few of her greatest accomplishments: ƒƒ

Bringing the Academic Center Office Faculty Building to fruition.

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Dedicating the Gaylord Center for Excellence in Equine Health.

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Streamlining and transferring the handling of all animal resources and the responsibilities of the university attending veterinarian to the Office of Research.

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Enhancing the services of the Oklahoma Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory through the recruitment of new leadership.

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Hiring 24 young, highly regarded faculty for various research and clinical programs.

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Offering veterinary medical care to the animal victims of the May 2013 Oklahoma tornadoes at no charge to their owners. THANK YOU, DEAN SANDER, AND BEST WISHES TO YOU AND ALLEN IN YOUR FUTURE ENDEAVORS.

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From the Office of the Dean Things are moving right along at the Center for Veterinary Health Sciences. We recently finished another very successful Fall Conference, complete with a number of alumni events. It was great meeting new (to me) faces and renewing some old acquaintances.

Some highlights of things that are keeping us busy right now:

ƒ ƒWe have started the soft launch of a fundraising project to enlarge and improve our

teaching facilities. The fundraising drive has been named in honor of Dr. Roger Panciera, PHIL SHOCKLEY / UNIVERSITY MARKETING

and we hope to use these private donations to supplement college resources on this project. More details will be available as they develop. Please contact us if you have questions or would like to participate.

ƒ ƒAt long last, we have occupied the Academic Center, which houses Veterinary Clinical

Sciences faculty and administration. The space vacated for badly needed teaching space,

offices for staff and house officers and other needs. Development of this facility will be an integral part of the project to improve our teaching facility.

ƒ ƒThe search for a permanent dean is underway. The Oklahoma A&M Board of Regents approved the position description Oct. 21, and the search committee held its first meeting

Oct. 24. Send comments and nominations to Denise Weaver in the provost’s office (denise. weaver@okstate.edu; 405-744-8782). Search committee chair Dr. Tom Coon is organizing a series of listening sessions around the state to get input as the search begins.

ƒ ƒIt has been an exciting and interesting experience serving as interim dean! I had not appreciated what a different set of skills is needed for this job. Dr. Margi Gilmour is doing an outstanding job as interim associate dean of academic affairs, and our supporting staff is working hard, as they always do.

ƒ ƒWe have our fingers crossed that the state budget treats us more kindly this year and next. Between midyear pullbacks and cuts going into this fiscal year, our state appropriation

is about $2 million less than in the previous year. This obviously has a major impact on our operations, but the veterinary center will persevere and improve. Our core missions have not changed, and we continue to graduate confident, competent, career-ready veterinarians every single year. Our graduating Class of 2016 had essentially 100 percent employment, a 98 percent national board pass rate, and are well on their way to becoming accomplished professionals.

ƒ ƒI need to give a special shout out to the faculty and staff who operate one of the most productive and efficient teaching hospitals in the country, especially given the relatively

small size of our faculty. Person for person, CVHS is amazingly productive, and all involved deserve special thanks.

Please let us know how we can serve the state and the profession better!

Sincerely,

CHRIS ROSS, DVM, PH.D. INTERIM DEAN, CENTER FOR VETERINARY HEALTH SCIENCES

2016 Oklahoma State University

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GARY LAWSON / UNIVERSITY MARKETING

A Big Win for a Tiny Colt JJ OVERCOMES SERIOUS OBSTACLES WITH OSU’S HELP

Premature birth. Underdeveloped bones. Pneumonia. And more. Any one of those problems would be a challenge for a colt. Poor JJ, born in April, had to overcome them all. Dharma’s colt weighed only 50 pounds at his birth in Newkirk, Okla. Within his first 12 hours, owner Karen Smith had rushed him to Oklahoma State University’s Veterinary Medical Hospital. “When he arrived in the hospital’s Gaylord Neonatal Care Wing, he was able to stand but had severe tendon laxity of all four limbs and suffered from partial failure of passive transfer due to inadequate colostrum intake,” says Dr. Jenna Young, equine intern on the case. “Nursing within the first few hours of birth is vital to the health of any foal, much less a premature one.”

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Foals rely on their mother’s antibody-rich milk or colostrum for protection from disease. Without it, the foal developed pneumonia. But that wasn’t his only problem. “He was born with incomplete ossification of his carpal and tarsal bones,” says Young. “He was at risk of crushing his underdeveloped bones and developing severe lameness and arthritis long-term if he were allowed to walk on them.”

Fourth year veterinary student

James Riggione holds Dharma while her foal stretches his legs.

OSU’s team placed a tube cast on each leg to ensure proper alignment of his bones. He then had to lie in a bed, standing solely for feedings. Weekly radiographs monitored his progress. The foal was in casts for 3½ weeks with round-theclock care to ensure he remained down and to help him change his position frequently. Smith decided to name the colt after one of the students assigned to his case — Jeff Henderson. According to Henderson, the colt would follow him everywhere. OSU faculty and staff started calling the colt JJ for Jeff Junior. “A little under one month after JJ was born, his bones had developed enough that we were able to take the casts off his legs,” says

Young. “It was great to be able to “We’ve had our registered quarsee him standing on his own and ter horses at OSU’s Veterinary interact with his mother as a nor- Medical Hospital before, and we’ve used the breeding services mal foal again.” at OSU’s ranch west of Stillwater,” JJ got to go out to the paddock says Smith. “JJ is doing great. He’ll and stretch his legs for short peribe back one more time to have a ods of time initially. screw removed from his back right Unfortunately in the meanhock. They put it in there to even time, JJ developed an abscess in his out his growth. OSU took super umbilicus that had to be removed. care of him. The kids even slept Luckily, he bounced back from this with him while his casts were on surgery in no time. to make sure he was okay.” There was one more hurdle to “It’s very rewarding to see him overcome. go from a premature 50-pound lit“JJ has been fed out of a pan tle colt who could barely walk to or bucket since he arrived. Soon a strong 150-pound guy who can after his casts came off, we began buck, kick, bite, and play as good trying to encourage him to nurse as the rest of them,” says Young. from his mother,” says Young. The Gaylord Center for Excel“Shortly thereafter, he latched on lence in Equine Health includes to Dharma for the first time and the Gaylord Neonatal Care Wing. never looked back to his milk The wing has three enlarged stalls bucket again!” with swinging half-Dutch doors JJ went home on May 31, after to accommodate mares and foals. more than six weeks in the hospital. Critically ill foals can be manA recheck 10 days later showed aged in the adjacent partitioned he had developed an angular limb stall region, which allows sepadeformity of his right hind hock. JJ rate access for veterinary medical underwent surgery to place a screw staff while mom looks over the across his growth plate to retard half-door. growth on the overgrown side. DERINDA BLAKENEY, APR

To support the Gaylord Center for Excellence in Equine Health contact Heidi Griswold at hgriswold@osugiving.com or 405-385-5656.

“ I T ’ S V E RY R E WA R D I N G TO SEE HIM GO FROM A P R E M AT U R E 50-POUND LITTLE C O LT W H O C O U L D B A R E LY WA L K TO A STRONG 150-POUND GUY WHO CAN BUCK, K I C K , B I T E , A N D P L AY AS GOOD AS THE R E S T O F T H E M .”

GARY LAWSON / UNIVERSITY MARKETING

Watch a video at okla.st/2dENBxq.

— DR. JENNA YOUNG

2016 Oklahoma State University

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“ W E A P P R OAC H CHARLIE’S DIET FROM AN EASTERN P E R S P E C T I V E .” — DR. LARA SYPNIEWSKI

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A Little Less, Please

CHARLIE SLIMS DOWN TO WORK WITH PETE’S PET POSSE PHOTOGRAPHY BY GARY LAWSON / UNIVERSITY MARKETING

C

harlie, Charles or Sir Charles, as he is commonly referred to, is walking with his head a little higher these days. Charlie is a member of Oklahoma State University’s

Pete’s Pet Posse, an on-campus pet therapy dog program. The 3½-year-old mixed-breed dog belongs to Kendria Cost of Westport, Okla., who rescued him in April 2013.

While he was a bit underweight at his rescue, that didn’t last too long.

“He had gained a little weight,” Cost says of Charlie’s physique about a year after his adoption. “I changed his food several times. He was exercising. We were walking every day, increasing our route, doing a lot of different things to try to help him lose weight, and it just was not coming off.

As an example, Charlie always “runs hot.” He consistently pants, seeks cool places to lie and avoids warm environments. To accommodate this need, Sypniewski recommended using cooling foods — items that would normally be eaten during the summer.

And Sypniewski says Charlie’s discomfort in his hips and elbows all went away as soon as he lost weight.

Within six months, Charlie had lost nearly 20 pounds.

and contribute to the success of being America’s Healthiest Campus®.

“And so that’s a big take home to most of my pet owners is that obesity causes arthritis,” adds Sypniewski. “It actually increases the risk “I don’t think you would go to the beach and of earlier death. So we really try to keep them “Probably the defining moment for me was eat a mutton sandwich for lunch,” says Syp- as thin as possible. Before and after pictures are when I brought him to Stillwater to stay with niewski. “But having a nice turkey sandwich profound. I give his Mom a lot of credit. She his trainer,” Cost remembers. “She had not seen wouldn’t be out of the question during the really worked hard and he just looks phenomhim in a while. I got out of the car with him summer months. Thinking seasonally helped enal. A great ambassador for wellness.” and she said, ‘Oh, my gosh, he is so fat. I’m so us to make the food choices we did to help Cost reports that Charlie loves being a Pete’s embarrassed. I’m not even taking him to cam- Charlie cool down. Mom finds new recipes Pet Posse therapy dog. pus.’ And so, honestly, I cried all the way home, all the time. She makes pupsicles with Greek “He thinks everyone needs to give him a big not even knowing what I could do, how I could yogurt and mango. She uses the balanced dehy- ol’ pat and a belly rub,” she says. “He spends a change his diet, how I could change his lifestyle drated diet as well as home-cooked food. We lot of energy doing that, actually. He just loves to make him healthy and happy.” really just switched him over a week’s period of people. He loves the attention that he gets. He “I suggested to Kendria that we approach time. Charles loved the food, which was good. loves making a difference. He’s very intuitive. Charlie’s diet from an Eastern perspective, eval- I mean he is a food hound, so he had no prob- He understands somebody who needs maybe uating his individual needs based on his per- lem eating. He was happy. a little bit of extra attention and he seeks those sonality, his environment, his stressors, his body “And after a couple of weeks, the difference people out, which is really interesting to watch type and his exercise program,” says Dr. Lara in him was phenomenal,” continues Sypniewski. and it makes me really proud of him.” Sypniewski, Charlie’s veterinarian at OSU’s Vet- “Not only was his hair coat starting to change, Pete’s Pet Posse dogs are trained to interact erinary Medical Hospital. “This allowed us to it was a lot softer hair coat, he had a little bit with people and provide affection and comfort choose the best proteins and carbohydrates to more glimmer in his eyes. He had more energy. in a variety of situations. The OSU Pet Therapy meet his nutritional requirements, while hon- And then all of a sudden, the weight just started Program has been designed and developed to to melt off.” oring those of his overall body type.” enhance the wellness of its campus population

Left: Charlie and owner Kendria Cost

“We did it very slowly, very gradually,” adds Cost. “Wellness is obviously a big focus. We did not want it to come off too quickly.”

Watch a video about Charlie at okla.st/2dUtuPi.

2016 Oklahoma State University

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“ O S U ’ S V E T E R I N A RY M E D I C A L H O S P I TA L … WA S FA N TA S T I C . E V E RYO N E H A S B E E N SO CONGENIAL. … I K N E W H E WA S B E I N G TA K E N C A R E O F.” — MARCENE WARFORD

Marley the puppy recovers well after a life-saving surgery at 6 months of age at OSU’s Veterinary Medical Hospital.

In Life or Death, Life Wins

OSU VETERINARIANS SAVE 6-MONTH-OLD PUPPY

PHOTOGRAPHY BY GARY LAWSON / UNIVERSITY MARKETING

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t was do or die for Marley. The 6-month-old puppy had a problem with his liver that desperately needed repair.

“Marley came to OSU’s Veterinary Medical Hospital by way of a secondary referral from a referral hospital in Tulsa,” says Dr. Ryan Baumwart, an OSU veterinary cardiologist.

to put a constriction device on that. The shunt was inside the liver so they gave us a call. They knew we had the equipment to do the procedure. Unfortunately, we had not done one to date here at OSU.”

“They found a shunt, a diversion of blood, in Marley’s liver that wasn’t operable by a traditional laparotomy, where they go in through the belly and try

Still, Marley’s owners, Marcene and Fred Warford of Muskogee, Okla., had faith the veterinarians would be able to help their golden retriever puppy.

C e n t e r f o r Ve t e r i n a r y H e a l t h S c i e n c e s


“The stent held the device in place that we I think a lot of pet owners are looking for needed to put into the abnormal blood ves- these types of procedures — minimally invasive sel. We also had a plugging device outside the — and we’re going to offer more and more of stent. The idea was to decrease the amount of these here at Oklahoma State as time goes on blood flow through this vessel that was a shunt and we learn more of these procedures. around the liver. The liver is the detoxification “Marley has a very good prognosis,” he adds. “I just had a lot of confidence in what they center of the body and blood was actually get- “He is expected to live a normal life after this were going to do,” she adds. “I felt real comfort- ting bypassed around the liver. So by closing procedure.” able with the fact that I thought they could do this shunt, we can put blood back into the liver “I would like to say thank you to Dr. Hogan it. This is where my vet, Dr. Lisa Jamison (’91), and allow the dog to act more normally once at Purdue University for coming and donating earned her degree. There was really no alterna- the detoxification occurs in the blood.” his time and expertise,” says Baumwart. “He was “This was the first time we have used OSU’s very instrumental in making all of this work. tive because he would die without it.” Baumwart and his colleague, Dr. Andrew Veterinary Medical Hospital,” says Warford. “It He’s an excellent cardiologist and very generHanzlicek, a small animal internal medicine was fantastic. Everyone has been so congenial. ous with his time.” specialist, invited Daniel Hogan, a Purdue Uni- They are marvelous. They kept me updated two “It took special pet owners in the Warfords or three times a day, which just made me very to make this happen and a very kind and skillversity cardiology professor, to help. “With the expertise of Dr. Daniel Hogan, Dr. comfortable knowing he’s here. I could let go; ful cardiologist in Dr. Hogan,” says Hanzlicek. “Thanks to all of them.” Hanzlicek and myself, we all went in on the sur- I knew he was being taken care of.”

“We noticed within the first week that something was wrong with Marley,” says Marcene Warford. “He was vomiting, had diarrhea. He would go into stupors, just really zone out to where he didn’t even know where he was. It was frightening.

gery and had a very good outcome,” says Baumwart. “We made a very small incision in the neck to put a catheter in that allowed us to inject dye to outline the abnormal blood vessel where we needed to try to decrease the amount of blood flow. Once we did that, we were able to size a stent that went into the vena cava.

“Not only was this the first time we had done the procedure, it was a minimally invasive procedure,” says Hanzlicek. “This dog, instead of having a big abdominal incision, had two very small incisions in his neck. We went through the vein and did the entire procedure. So the dog recovers more quickly and it is less painful.

DERINDA BLAKENEY, APR

To see a video of Marley, visit okla.st/29bDH9o.

Marley and his owners, Marcene and Fred Warford, thank Dr. Andrew Hanzlicek and his team at OSU for saving the pup’s life.

2016 Oklahoma State University

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Gigi, owned by Ken and Susie Sharp

Keeping The Beat PACEMAKER POSSE PARTIES AT REUNION PHOTOGRAPHY BY PHIL SHOCKLEY / UNIVERSITY MARKETING

Dr. Ryan Baumwart, veterinary cardiologist at Oklahoma State University’s Veterinary Medical Hospital, has created a unique group of canine survivors appropriately named the Pacemaker Posse. Over the last two years, he has placed pacemakers in 23 dogs, improving their quality of life and, in many cases, prolonging their days on the planet. In April, the pacemaker recipients were invited back to OSU. “ W E T H O U G H T T H I S WO U L D B E A G R E AT T I M E TO C E L E B R AT E T H E S U C C E S S O F T H E S E PAT I E N T S A N D S H OW OT H E R S A B R OA D E R V I E W O F V E T E R I N A RY M E D I C I N E .” — DR. RYAN BAUMWART

Owners Maureen Cancienne, Rebecca Dees,

IMAGE / CENTER FOR VETERINARY HEALTH SCIENCES

Ken and Susie Sharp, Patricia Wayman and Mary Jo Wipperfurth brought five Pacemaker Posse dogs to OSU’s Center for Veterinary Health Sciences’ Annual Open House. “When the veterinary center offers unique services such as this, we maintain our role as the premier specialty veterinary hospital in the state and region,” says Dr. Chris Ross, interim dean of the veterinary center. “Our faculty [members] have a chance to showcase their skills and knowledge; animal owners have access to lifesaving treatments; and our students

X-ray of pacemaker implanted inside a dog

are exposed to cutting-edge technologies.” CONTINUES

Left: Dr. Ryan Baumwart carries Abby, a pacemaker recipient owned by Patricia Wayman of Goltry, Okla.

2016 Oklahoma State University

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“OUR STUDENTS CAN G R A D UAT E W I T H A N AWA R E N E S S OF THE PRESENCE AND POSSIBILITIES IN CUTTING-EDGE T R E AT M E N T S AT T H E V E T E R I N A RY C E N T E R .” — DR. CHRIS ROSS

BIONIC DOG CHASING RABBITS Patricia Wayman of Goltry, Okla., wanted to celebrate with her dog, Abby, at the open house. “About a year ago, I really noticed that Abby would be moving and then she would just go down,” Wayman says. “I thought, well, she’s tired. “I was fortunate that my veterinarian, D r. Carey Bonds (OSU ’03) at Trinity Hospital, told me about Dr. Baumwart. We came over, and they ran all the tests.” Abby had sick sinus syndrome.

Some Pacemaker Posse reunion attendees took a horse-drawn carriage to a luncheon at the OSU Foundation. Seated in the wagon are (from left) Brandy Hutchings, veterinary assistant; Dr. Ryan Baumwart; Mary Jo Wipperfurth and Snoopy; and Susie and Kenneth Sharp with Gigi.

NEW LEASE ON LIFE Susie Sharp of Stillwater inherited her dog, GiGi, from her aunt.

”I had GiGi a while, and suddenly her health “The sinus node is the norwas failing,” Sharp recalls. “She was losing mal pacemaker in the heart,” weight. She couldn’t keep food down.” ABBY Baumwart says. “When that Sharp’s veterinarian did exploratory surgery normal pacemaker stops, to try to diagnose GiGi’s problem. they don’t have normal blood flow to their “My veterinarian called to say GiGi had died brain, and they pass out. on the operating table twice and been brought “We have had dogs that will pass out 20 or back twice — and she’s not going to come back 30 times a day.” a third time,” Sharp says. Baumwart suggested implanting a paceGiGi did survive, and it appeared there was maker; Wayman had to think about it. no brain damage. “My family is farmers,” she says. “Abby is not a “My vet suggested that we take GiGi to an farm dog; Abby’s my child. So we talked about intensive care unit rapidly — either in Edmond it and talked about it. or at OSU,” Sharp says. “Now in the small town that I live in, Abby’s The family chose OSU, where veterinarians the bionic dog. Everybody talks about, ‘Do you determined the muscles GiGi used in swalknow that we’ve got a dog in Goltry that has lowing were too weak to function, and a pacea pacemaker?’ I would do it 100 times again.” maker could help. Abby received her pacemaker in September “I didn’t know they did that,” Sharp says. 2015. She turned 11 in May. GiGi was originally diagnosed with a “She’s doing extremely well,” Wayman says. third-degree blockage. She recently had her “Her quality of life — she’s out chasing rabbits pacemaker replaced because its battery life was and squirrels in the backyard. I tell you, Brandy nearly depleted. Hutchings (cardiology veterinary assistant) and Sharp says her family is very thankful they Dr. Baumwart are just wonderful. I highly reclive in Stillwater. “We are very grateful to OSU.” ommend them.” 12

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TECHNOLOGY FUNDING Traditionally, human pacemakers — about the size of a silver dollar — are used in dogs. “We recently started using a company that provides animal pacemakers at a much reduced cost compared to the human pacemakers,” Baumwart says. “However, this can still be a large amount of money for the average pet owner.” Training in specialties such as cardiology takes years of work and study. “Our students can graduate with an awareness of the presence and possibilities in cutting-edge treatments at the veterinary center,” Ross says. “Some may also decide that they would like to pursue a career in specialties like cardiology.” DERINDA BLAKENEY, APR

To support the veterinary cardiology unit at OSU’s Veterinary Medical Hospital, contact Heidi Griswold at hgriswold@osugiving.com or 405-385-5656.

To watch a video about the OSU Center for Veterinary Health Sciences Open House, visit okla.st/2ba3I5R.


MAKING HEART HISTORY TULSA CAT UNDERGOES FIRST-OF-ITS-KIND SURGERY AT OSU

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inda Wheeler came to “We’ve got our game plan all tears the first time she saw lined out,” Dugat told Wheeler. Romano. The 6-month-old “We’re going to go into the chest kitten, a stray who popped up in on the left side and do an intercosthe yard of the Tulsa woman’s sis- tal thoracotomy. That’s the easiter, bore a striking resemblance to est access. We’re going to use a a cat Wheeler had recently lost. retractor to separate his ribs, and The only difference was Roma- the pulmonary artery will be sitno’s perfect heart on his nose. ting right there.”

Was it a sign? After all, it turned out that his heart had a hole in it, which was leading to congestive heart failure. But Oklahoma State University’s Veterinary Medical Hospital came to his rescue with a first-of-its-type-in-Oklahoma procedure.

After a lengthy discussion, Dugat asked, “So are you ready?” “I’m ready. I trust you more than you know,” confirmed Wheeler. The next day in surgery, Baumwart monitored Romano’s pressures while Dugat inserted a catheter into his pulmonary artery and placed a band around it. The trick was to tighten the band enough but not too much. Two days later, Romano was well enough to go home.

“Everything went the way it was supposed to because we all had our plan and everybody stuck to the plan,” Dugat says.

“ TO S E E S U C H J OY I N A N OW N E R ’ S E Y E S WHEN THE PROCEDURE YO U P E R F O R M IS SUCCESSFUL MAKES THIS A FULFILLING P R O F E S S I O N .” — DR. DANIELLE DUGAT

“That incision looks wonderful. You guys did great,” Wheeler says. “Thank you so much. Thank you so much.” The procedure performed on Romano will allow him to live a longer, healthier life. The only alternative would be to have (very rare) open-heart surgery to correct the hole in his heart. “To see such joy in an owner’s eyes when the procedure you perform is successful makes this a fulfilling profession,” says Dugat. “I could not have had the confidence I needed in performing this procedure for the first time if it was not for an owner who was willing to hand over the life of her baby into my hands. More so, developing a plan before surgery and understanding every individual’s important role to the success of the surgery made the execution seamless.”

Dr. Ryan Baumwart, veterinary cardiologist, and Dr. Danielle Dugat, small animal surgeon, of OSU’s Veterinary Medical Hospital, collaborated on the surgical procedure. The hole in the “It turned into a little bit of a feline’s heart was causing blood guessing game,” Baumwart says. to shunt, overworking the left side “We had to give Romano some of the heart. drugs to keep the pressures up to “The procedure hadn’t been avoid kidney damage and at the done in Oklahoma,” Wheeler says. same time try to adjust the pres“From just watching Dr. Baum- sures as Dr. Dugat placed the band wart in coming here four different around the artery.” DERINDA BLAKENEY, APR times, I can tell he’s very com“You’re going to get to live a litpetent. He did his research on To view a video tle longer,” Wheeler told Romano. of Romano, visit the procedure, and I very much “So just a handful of these have okla.st/1qxmmL6. trust him.” really been done across the U.S. I Fourth-year veterinary student knew you could do it.” Amy Tomcheck, of Milwaukee, examined the cat and reviewed Above: Linda Wheeler (third from left), Dr. Ryan Baumwart his medical history with Wheeler (fourth from left), Dr. Danielle Dugat (holding Romano) and a team the day before the surgery. Dugat of specialists at OSU’s Veterinary Medical Hospital are all smiles as talked his owner through what they surround Romano as he recovers after heart surgery. would take place during surgery. PHOTO BY GARY LAWSON / UNIVERSITY MARKETING

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“I’M V E RY PLEASED WITH T H E H O S P I TA L . I H AV E S O M E F R I E N D S W H O H AV E B R O U G H T A N I M A L S OV E R , A N D T H E Y W E R E V E RY PLEASED AND HAD N OT H I N G B U T G O O D TO S AY.” — ZACK DANIEL

Left: Dr. Patrick Foth nudges Baby Donut as veterinary students study the foal’s limbs. Below: Foth holds Baby Donut while Dr. Mike Schoonover trims his hooves.

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Mini Horse Draws a Crowd OSU VETERINARIANS ARE FIXING BABY DONUT’S UNUSUALLY ANGLED LEGS PHOTOGRAPHY BY PHIL SHOCKLEY / UNIVERSITY MARKETING

At 10 weeks old, Baby Donut isn’t very big. When you consider he’s the offspring of two miniature horses, you know he’s not even as big as one might expect from the word “foal.” And when he arrives to see the equine veterinarians at Oklahoma State University’s Veterinary Medical Hospital, a crowd quickly gathers to catch a glimpse of the tiny patient.

Zach and April Daniel of Enid, Okla., acquired Baby Donut’s parents for their children, Bailey and Wade, in the fall of 2015. The mare named Sprinkles gave birth In September, and shortly after the foal was born, Zach Daniel knew something was wrong. (His sire’s name is Cinnamon, hence the Donut name.)

“We’ll see how he does with that. I defithe shoes is prevent hyperextension of the coffin joints which will allow Baby Donut’s nitely feel Baby Donut has improved both in flexor tendons to strengthen,” Schoonover the angulation of his limbs and the degree of continues. “By trimming the hooves and tendon laxity since we first saw him,” Schooapplying the extensions, Baby Donut’s feet nover says. “We’ll probably take new radioare more stable, preventing the hyperex- graphs on his next recheck. Those will show tension and allowing the flexor tendons the progress we’ve made and help us deterto contract.” mine what our next steps will be.”

“About two weeks after he was born, we could tell his knees were going in,” Daniel says. “We called around and the other vets basically said that they won’t do anything because they specialize in other areas. I called over here to see what they could do, and they said bring him in.”

Daniel took Baby Donut home with instructions to keep the foal confined to a stall to restrict his exercise. Every three to four days, Daniel took the shoes off for a couple of hours before taping them back on. Two weeks later, he brought Baby Donut back to the hospital for a recheck.

Dr. Mike Schoonover, equine surgeon at OSU’s Veterinary Medical Hospital, and Dr. Patrick Foth, equine medicine and surgery intern, examined Baby Donut. Schoonover ordered radiographs of the foal’s legs.

The delighted foal gladly ran and walked around the hospital’s outdoor paddock while veterinarians checked his progress.

“Radiographs show that all four of the foal’s legs have severe abnormalities,” Schoonover says. “He has severe bilateral carpal and tarsal valgus. In other words, he’s knockkneed. All of his legs angle outward at about 25 degrees. He also suffers from tendon laxity in all four limbs, with the worst case being in his front limbs.”

Schoonover trimmed each of the foal’s hooves again and reapplied the shoes to his front hooves.

This is the first time Daniel has used the services at OSU’s Veterinary Medical Hospital. “I’m very pleased with the hospital,” Daniel says. “I have some friends who have brought animals over, and they were very pleased and had nothing but good to say.” OSU’s Veterinary Medical Hospital is home to several equine internal medicine and surgery specialists who see nearly 1,900 equine cases a year. DERINDA BLAKENEY, APR

Schoonover trimmed the foal’s hooves and placed special shoes with 3- to 4-centimeter extensions from the inside and heel on the front hooves. “Surgery is often indicated with this degree of angulation but because Baby Donut is so young, we are going to be somewhat conservative and see if the angulation will begin to correct on its own with confinement and physical therapy. What we hope to do with

Ian Frye, Class of 2017, listens to Baby Donut’s heart. 2016 Oklahoma State University

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One-World Research EXPERTS TACKLING VIRUSES THAT HIT HUMANS AND ANIMALS

Research is a key component of our mission at Oklahoma State University’s Center for Veterinary Health Sciences. Current collaborative efforts focus on herpes viruses that affect primates, humans and horses. BY DERINDA BLAKENEY, APR

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Three of the main researchers involved include RICHARD EBERLE, P h . D. , m o l e c u l a r b i o l o g y/v i ro l o g y p ro fe ss o r i n t h e D e p a r t m e n t o f Veterinary Pathobiology; LARA MAXWELL, DVM, Ph.D., American College of Veterinary Clinical Pharmacology diplomate and professor in the Department of Physiological Sciences; and GRANT REZABEK, MPH, DVM, assistant clinical professor in the Department of Veterinary Pat h o b i o l o g y a n d ve te r i n a r y p at h o l o g i st at t h e O k l a h o m a A n i m a l Disease Diagnostic Laboratory. PHOTOGRAPHY BY GARY LAWSON / UNIVERSITY MARKETING

“I have been very lucky to work with Dr. Eberle and his technician, Darla Black, since coming to Oklahoma State University in 2003,” Maxwell says. “Dr. Eberle is one of the world’s premier researchers in Monkey B virus and in Herpesvirus Papio 2 (HVP-2). HVP-2 affects baboons and Monkey B virus affects macaques.” While neither virus produces much disease in their host species, they can produce devastating neurological disease and death in the majority of people they infect.

“B virus is very closely related to herpes simplex virus (HSV) that people have,” Eberle says. “In monkeys, it’s just like HSV in humans; they get oral and genital lesions. But when (Monkey B virus) is transmitted to humans, it’s about 80 percent lethal. Because Monkey B virus is so dangerous, it is the primary zoonotic concern for people working with macaques, which are a really essential animal model for biomedical research like AIDS research.”

“So we are interested in preventing these devastating consequences of infection in people by figuring out which antiviral drugs will best protect people from developing disease if they are exposed to Monkey B virus or HVP-2,” Maxwell says. “Although HVP-2 has not been shown to be pathogenic to people, it is being used as a model for Monkey B virus because Monkey B virus is so dangerous to work with. Our research has shown that HVP-2 does parallel Monkey B virus in its drug sensitivity. CONTINUES

Drs. Richard Eberle (from left), Lara Maxwell and Grant Rezabek are collaborating on research on herpes viruses.

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“ T H E O N E T H I N G T H AT I WA N T P E O P L E TO K N OW I S T H AT W H E N I WA S A V E T E R I N A RY S T U D E N T, I WA S TO L D T H AT I F YO U W E R E EVER INFECTED WITH MONKEY B VIRUS FROM A N A N I M A L T H AT YO U A R E WO R K I N G W I T H I N A ZO O O R I N S O M E T Y P E O F P R I M AT E R E S E A R C H C O LO N Y, T H AT YO U W E R E B A S I C A L LY D E A D. T H E R E I S N O C U R E F O R I T A N D N O WAY TO P R E V E N T T H E I N F E C T I O N .” — DR. LARA MAXWELL

“We are exploring the use of different antiviral drugs in mice, either administering them systemically, throughout the whole body, or topically to the site of infection because, of course, we can’t actually study this in people,” she adds. “People are very rarely bitten by macaques and so are rarely affected by this disease. However, the disease has been documented and when it occurs, the effects are so devastating that we would really like to be able to offer better protection for these people.” The major documented cause of zoonotic B virus transmission is via monkey bites or scratches to animal care personnel. However, other inadvertent modes of infection including needle stick injuries could occur in research personnel.

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“The one thing that I want people to know is that when I was a veterinary student, I was told that if you were ever infected with Monkey B virus from an animal that you are working with in a zoo or in some type of primate research colony, that you were basically dead. There is no cure for it and no way to prevent the infection,” Maxwell says. “Based on our research in mice, we think we really could prevent people from developing the severe systemic illness and neurological disease that occurs with Monkey B virus infection. We think that prophylaxis is possible and doable and could be more effective than current CDC guidelines, which would be very important for those who are potentially exposed to Monkey B virus.”

The team’s research has shown that administering drugs such as ganciclovir and cidofovir early in the course of the disease can protect mice. Some preliminary evidence suggests that these drugs can be very effective when administered topically on a bite wound, which would be much less invasive for the patient. “Cidofovir, which hasn’t previously been used to treat Monkey B virus, seems to be much more effective than ganciclovir,” Eberle says. “You can use it at a much lower concentration. But still, once the virus is in the nervous system, cidofovir doesn’t work.”


“Our idea is that ultimately in any place where monkeys are housed, a treatment pack would be available,” Maxwell says. “Anyone who is scratched or bitten could immediately apply this topical antiviral to the skin. This would prevent the infection from ever getting established. If the infection does become established, systemic antiviral drugs are still recommended but at that point, they are far less successful. Even if people survive the infection, they are likely to have lasting neurological damage.” Eberle, Maxwell and Melanie Breshears, DVM, Ph.D. and an American College of Veterinary Pathologists (DACVP) diplomate, recently received a National Institutes of Health grant that will allow the team to work full time on this project. “We’ll finish the trials with cidofovir,” Eberle says. “There are a lot of different macaque species. They all have their own version of B virus. So will cidofovir or ganciclovir protect against all these different variants of B virus? Will it protect against extremely high doses of virus? How long after infection can you wait before starting the drug? We’ll want to look at combinations of drugs as well as other experimental drugs to see if maybe that will help with infections once the virus is in the nervous system.” “It’s a very rare illness and thus, understudied,” Maxwell adds. “Those people who are impacted are often those who are trying to help human health in other ways, such as in primate research or people who are trying to maintain the animals at zoos. I think those people deserve the highest level of protection that we can provide.” Maxwell is also involved with a multidisciplinary team that is studying the mitigation and prevention of equine herpesvirus myeloencephalopathy in horses. “It’s a disease that’s become increasingly important to the equine industry due to outbreaks that result in quarantines, closures of race tracks and horse shows, as well as individual horses that are affected,” she says. “Since the disease can be so devastating, it can result either in death or in damage to the career of a show horse or race horse.”

“The principal herpesvirus of concern is Equine Herpesvirus type 1 or EHV-1,” Rezabek says. “This is an endemic virus in the United States. It affects all kinds of horses in all regions. It’s been present a long time. The majority of the horses infected with EHV-1 develop an acute respiratory disease. A moderate number also suffer abortions. A small subset, however, develop a neurologic disease that’s typified by hind limb ataxia, urinary incontinence and some other neurologic signs. “Certainly the disease has been around for a long time,” he continues. “However, more recently in 2003, there was an outbreak in Ohio that had a high infection rate. That was followed by an outbreak in some show horses in Florida in the winter of 2006 where a large number of horses developed neurologic signs when acutely infected with herpes virus.” There have been other western horse show outbreaks of this disease culminating in an outbreak in Ogden, Utah, in May 2011. “It was a cutting show,” Rezabek says. “There were 421 primary horses that were exposed at that Ogden show and subsequent to that when they all went home, there were 1,685 secondary and tertiary exposed horses. The economic impact of that disease outbreak was significant on the industry because a lot of shows had to be canceled.” These disease outbreaks have continued intermittently at racetracks, horse shows and training centers throughout the nation; the most recent outbreak was in Sunland Park, a racetrack in New Mexico. “That outbreak started in January 2016 and was declared clear March 9,” Rezabek says. “There were 79 infected horses and six fatalities. The economic impact of that Sunland Park outbreak on racing in the state of New Mexico was estimated at $1.8 million.”

“We’ve done a pilot study where vaccination appeared to be protective and presented on that,” Maxwell says. “Some of the drugs we’ve investigated have been valacyclovir and ganciclovir. What we found with those drugs is that if we are able to administer the drugs very early in the course of disease, either before or immediately after infection, then we are able to prevent the disease with the oral drug valacyclovir. This is a more convenient drug that veterinarians can issue a prescription for and owners are able to get it from a pharmacy. If treatment didn’t occur until late in the course of the disease, then ganciclovir worked better. “So we have reason to think that both vaccination and the use of antiviral drugs can be protective for horses,” she concludes. “We think this approach can be helpful for the industry either in protecting individual horses at the time of outbreaks or in providing additional protection in horses that are already showing signs of equine herpesvirus myeloencephalopathy. An outcome that has already been realized due to this research is increasing use of valacyclovir in horses with exposure to EHV-1 during an outbreak. All of these measures together, we think, can mitigate the disease and prevent as many horses as possible from developing the most destructive effects of this virus.”

For more information on research being conducted at OSU’s Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, visit cvhs.okstate.edu/Research.

To watch a video on OSU’s research, visit okla.st/2fNmSAc.

The team, led by Maxwell and including Eberle; Rezabek; Lyndi Gilliam, DVM, Ph.D., American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (DACVIM) diplomate; Todd Holbrook, DVM, DACVIM, American College of Veterinary Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation diplomate; Dianne McFarlane, DVM, Ph.D., DACVIM; and Tim Snider, DVM, DACVP, Ph.D., is interested in preventing the disease either through vaccination or through the use of antiviral drugs.

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PHIL SHOCKLEY / UNIVERSITY MARKETING

S H I TA O L I

Fighting the Flu at OSU LI’S PROJECT AIMS TO MAKE VIRUS FAR LESS LETHAL

The flu is among the Centers for Disease Control’s top 10 causes of human deaths. Oklahoma State University is working to make the virus far less lethal. At OSU’s Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Shitao Li, Ph.D., is conducting biomedical research to develop new antiviral drugs to combat the flu virus.

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LI RECEIVES NIH GRANT Oklahoma State University’s Dr. Shitao Li has received $813,438 as a co-investigator on a National Institutes of Health Research Project (R01) grant. Li’s project is entitled, “Interferon-induced IFITM recruitment of ZMPSTE24 blocks viral endocytic entry.” Since virus entry is the first step of infection, impeding viruses at the entry point is important to help defend against their spread. Li’s proposal presents the discovery of a broad-spectrum antiviral protein that blocks virus entry. Li, who holds a doctorate in developmental biology from China’s Wuhan University, is an assistant professor in the Department of Physiological Sciences and an investigator with the Oklahoma Center for Respiratory and Infectious Diseases.

DERINDA BLAKENEY, APR / CVHS

“The flu virus is a highly transmissible pathogen that can cause epidemics and sometimes pandemics like the swine flu in 2009,” says Li, an assistant professor in the Department of Physiological Sciences and investigator with the Oklahoma Center for Respiratory and Infectious Diseases. “The virus is also zoonotic, which means it infects not only humans but animals as well, such as poultry, pigs, horses, etc. So this study will benefit human health as well as have a great impact on agriculture.”

Dr. Shitao Li and graduate student Girish Patil discuss OSU’s biomedical research.

Li joined OSU in 2015. During his first year, he made great progress in establishing his laboratory and moving forward with his research. His team includes Lingyan Wang, Ph.D., postdoctoral candidate, and Girish Patil, a first-year graduate student. “Currently we are working on the interaction between the flu virus and the host defense,” Li adds. “Specifically, we are studying the protein interactions between the host and the virus. We found that more than 300 host factors actually interact with the flu virus. So now we are focusing on one protein named PKP2. PKP2 is known as a cell junction protein, and now we find it is also an antiviral protein.”

“ T H I S S T U DY W I L L B E N E F I T H U M A N H E A LT H A S W E L L A S H AV E A G R E AT I M PAC T O N AG R I C U LT U R E .” — SHITAO LI, PH.D.

Li’s team found that this protein restricts the “Before we test the peptide in mice, we will The program includes funding and administravirus by inhibiting the viral polymerase activity. examine the effects of the peptide on viral infec- tive support as well. I have two mentors in Drs. “In other words, PKP2 impedes viral repli- tion in the tissue culture that includes human Liu and Clint Jones. As a junior faculty memcation and prevents the virus from spreading. cells and mouse cells,” he says. “Currently, we ber, I appreciate their guidance on writing proInterestingly, PKP2 has a peptide which mim- are testing only one peptide and may modify posals, how to recruit students and how to train them. I really appreciate their help and support.” ics one viral polymerase subunit, PB2,” he says. this peptide in the future.

“This peptide competes with PB2 for binding to other viral polymerase subunits, thereby disrupting the viral replication machinery. Now we are examining the antiviral efficacy of this peptide in human cells and mice.”

“With so many people affected by the flu virus, Originally from China, Li earned his Ph.D. the most important thing in my lab is to dis- from Wuhan University in 2000. He plans to cover new host defenses to the virus infection,” submit more proposals to continue funding says Li. “We are grateful to the Centers of Bio- his research. medical Research Excellence program under Dr. DERINDA BLAKENEY, APR Li’s project is still far from clinical studies, Lin Liu. The challenge for research is finding For more information the funding, which a CoBRE grant has provided. but the preliminary results are promising. on OSU’s biomedical research, visit www.cvhs.okstate.edu/research.

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GARY LAWSON / UNIVERSITY MARKETING

Symposium focuses on making the world safer They come from different educational backgrounds and represent different levels of expertise with one goal in common: making the world a safer place for people, animals and the environment. Meet the participants in the 2016 Interdisciplinary Toxicology Symposium, hosted by Drs. Carey Pope, Loren Smith and Dave Wallace. OSU’s Interdisciplinary Toxicology Program was developed to bring together experts from agriculture, engineering, human and veterinary medicine, forensic science, and toxicology to address complex issues related to chemical toxicity. This symposium provides a forum to share valuable research to better understand how chemicals interact with people, animals and the environment. Above: The FDA’s Peter Goering presented the

16th annual Sitlington Lecture in Toxicology.

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Minnesota’s McCue speaks at OSU Molly E. McCue, DVM, MS, Ph.D., DACVIM, an associate professor of veterinary population medicine at the University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine, spoke at the first Distinguished Equine Research Scientist Lecture in March at Oklahoma State University. McCue’s presentation focused on the role of genetics and environmental exposure in equine metabolic syndrome.

Molly McCue on the cover of NCRR Reporter magazine.

Seven graduate fellows presented summaries of their research: ƒƒ TIM ANDERSON, zoology master’s student,

the interaction between anticholinesterases and endocannabinoid signaling in toads.

ƒƒ CHRIS GOODCHILD, zoology doctoral

student, how contaminants can affect energy production, regulation and investment, using a zebra finch model.

ƒƒ SARAH HILEMAN, master’s student in

zoology, atmospheric deposition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons into soil from rooftop runoff and rainwater harvesting systems.

ƒƒ WILLIAM MIMBS, doctoral student in zoology,

the toxicokinetics of pesticides in mixtures with dermal exposure in amphibians.

ƒƒ SHANE MORRISON, zoology doctoral

student, measuring pulsed pesticide exposures in aquatic environments.

ƒƒ KIRSTIN POINDEXTER, doctoral

student in physiological sciences, the biochemical properties of a proteinnanoparticle complex that may protect against nerve agent intoxication.

ƒƒ ADAM SIMPSON, zoology doctoral

student, biochemical mechanisms of insecticide resistance in resurrected Daphnia or water fleas.

In her research, McCue views equine metabolic syndrome as a clustering of clinical signs. EMS predisposes horses toward certain risks, including laminitis. Laminitis is an inflammation of the lamina, which holds the hoof wall to

the bones of the hoof. It is very painful and usually worse in the front hooves than in the hind ones. Laminitis often causes horses to lose their athletic ability, she says, and can lead to the horses being euthanized. Her work is potentially a model for human metabolic syndrome, which often leads to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease in patients. The lecture was sponsored by the Ricks Rapp Endowed Chair in Equine Musculoskeletal Research, the June Jacobs Endowed Chair in Equine Medicine and the Veterinary Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program.

Three outside experts shared their research, including one who presented the 16th Annual Sitlington Lecture in Toxicology: ƒƒ AYUSMAN SEN, Ph.D., presented “Self-Powered Enzyme Pumps

for Detecting and Reacting with Specific Toxicants.” His research studies how chemicals react with a toxicant causing the molecules to turn over. This creates the energy to pump or remove harmful chemical agents and pathogens from our body. Sen is a chemist and a Distinguished Professor of Chemistry at Pennsylvania State University. He is also a fellow of both the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Royal Society of Chemistry.

ƒƒ GEORGE COBB, Ph.D., presented “Chemicals of Emerging Concern.”

He talked about a variety of toxic sources and the challenges with assessing risk. This includes looking at chemicals that are aging as well as new toxicants that we are just starting to see the effects of on people, animals and the environment. Cobb is a professor and chair of the Department of Environmental Science at Baylor University. He is also a fellow of the American Chemical Society.

ƒƒ PETER GOERING, Ph.D., presented the 16th Annual Sitlington

Lecture in Toxicology entitled, “Effects of Immobilized Surface Nanostructures on Tissue-Material Interactions.” Goering is the deputy director of the Division of Biology, Chemistry and Materials Science at the Centers for Devices and Radiological Health with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. His team is responsible for verifying that approved medical devices (implants, dialysis units, wheelchairs, etc.) interact well with various nanomaterials to avoid harming patients. Goering is a diplomate of the American Board of Toxicology, a fellow and past president of the Academy of Toxicological Scientists, and president of the Society of Toxicology, the largest scientific organization of toxicologists in the world.

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Means presents first Kerr Lecture in Biomedical Science

PHOTOGRAPHY BY GARY LAWSON / UNIVERSITY MARKETING

A

nthony Means, Ph.D., professor in the Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology at the Baylor University College of Medicine, presented the first Kerr Lecture in Biomedical Science in 2016 on “CaMKK2 as an Integral Mediator of inflammatory Disorders.” Means focused on calmodulin and calmodulin kinase-regulated processes. Calmodulin is a calcium-binding protein, for which a 3D structure is known that is present in all eukaryotic cells and implicated in virtually every biological process. Calmodulin binds to and regulates the activity of almost 120 cellular proteins. Among these proteins is a family of protein kinases (CaM kinases) including those that comprise a CaM kinase cascade. Means focused his talk on the most proximal of the cascade proteins, CaMKK2 (calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase 2). CaMKK2 is involved in regulating several physiological functions in a number of different tissues including brain, fat, liver, pancreas and the cardiovascular system to name a few. Through his research, Means has discovered that having less CaMKK2 helps protect against high fat diet-induced fatty liver, acute liver failure, and liver cancer. Outcomes research data shows that people with lower levels of CaMKK2 have a considerably better chance of surviving

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liver cancer than do those with higher levels of this enzyme. Means opined that drugs designed to inhibit CaMKK2 could be beneficial in treating patients with heaptocellular carcinoma (HCC), for which no effective treatment now exists. Means earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Oklahoma State University and his doctorate from the University of Texas. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts

and Sciences, the European Academy of Science and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. The Kerr Lecture in Biomedical Science was co-hosted by Jerry Malayer, MS, Ph.D., associate dean for research and graduate education, and Ashish Ranjan, BVSc, Ph.D., associate professor and Kerr Foundation Endowed Chair in the Department of Physiological Sciences.

Above: Drs. Ashish Ranjan (from left), Kerr Foundation Endowed Chair; Jerry Malayer, associate dean for research and graduate education; Anthony Means, Kerr Biomedical Sciences lecturer; and Martin Furr, Physiological Sciences department head. Left: Dr. Anthony Means delivers the first Kerr Lecture in Biomedical Sciences.


Cancer expert speaks at second Kerr Lecture

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY PHIL SHOCKLEY / UNIVERSITY MARKETING

he second Kerr Lecture in Biomedical Science focused on “The Future of Radiation Therapy: Altered Fractionation, Nanotechnology and Immunotherapy.” For the last 25 years, speaker P. Jack Hoopes (OSU Vet Med ’76) has been studying how radiation can work with other therapeutics to improve cancer treatment for humans and animals. In his federally funded research, Hoopes uses spontaneous oral canine melanoma in pet dogs that are referred by private veterinary practitioners as a model for human melanoma. Growing canine melanoma cells in transgenic mice has extended his research opportunity.

His experimental treatments involve combining magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia with an immunogenic virus and fewer but larger radiation doses. This technique has a greater effect on the primary tumor and creates an effective systemic anti-cancer response. Hoopes believes combining targeted heat with the immunogenic virus and larger radiation doses kills tumor cells in a manner that effectively stimulates the anti-cancer immune response. Earlier studies suggest that targeting the magnetic nanoparticles, with highly specific tumor antibodies, is capable of effectively treating some tumors without radiation. He believes this type of cancer targeting, which is currently being pioneered in a number of clinical cancer trials, will ultimately make a tremendous difference in cancer therapy.

Drs. Martin Furr (from left), Physiological Sciences department head; Chris Ross, interim dean of the veterinary center; P. Jack Hoopes, Kerr Biomedical Sciences lecturer; Jerry Malayer, associate dean for research and graduate education; and Ashish Ranjan, Kerr Foundation Endowed Chair, Department of Physiological Sciences.

Although Hoopes received all of his postgraduate education and training at veterinary institutions — OSU, Colorado State University and North Carolina State University — he has spent virtually all of his professional career at a medical school and an associated clinical cancer center. Still, Hoopes says his DVM degree from OSU has given him a very significant edge in conducting translational research and competing for federal research funding. Hoopes concluded his remarks saying, “My translational-based research road has been a little different; however, it is one that I think we, as veterinarians, should consider embracing a little more. Veterinarians are uniquely qualified to conduct and assess many types of biomedical research, and it is regularly demonstrated that such expertise expedites and improves the development of new mechanisms and therapies.”

He is a professor of surgery and radiation oncology and the director of the Center for Comparative Medicine and the Surgery and Radiation Research Laboratories at Dartmouth’s Geisel School of Medicine. He is also the director of the Imaging and Radiation Resource at Dartmouth’s Norris Cotton Cancer Center and an adjunct professor of engineering at Dartmouth’s Thayer School of Engineering. The Kerr Lecture in Biomedical Sciences was sponsored by the Center for Veterinary Health Sciences and Ashish Ranjan, BVSc, Ph.D., Kerr Foundation Endowed Chair and associate professor in the Department of Physiological Sciences.

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PHIL SHOCKLEY / UNIVERSITY MARKETING

“ I F W E C A N D E T E R M I N E W H AT TRIGGERS THESE TUMORS IN A N I M A L S , T H AT I N F O R M AT I O N I S T R A N S F E R A B L E TO H U M A N S .” — DR. RODNEY PAGE Dr. Chris Ross (left) and Dr. Thomas Loafmann (right), class representative for the Class of 1963, welcome Dr. Rodney Page to OSU.

Going to the Dogs LECTURESHIP PRESENTS EXPERT IN WAR ON CANCER Dr. Rodney Page, an oncology expert from Colorado State University’s Flint Animal Cancer Center, presented “One Health War on Cancer” as the 2016 Class of 1963 Distinguished Lecturer. Page shared the amazing research he has spearheaded with the Morris Animal Foundation. He is the principal investigator on the Golden Retriever Lifetime Study, which involves 3,000 dogs. “America has been trying to cure cancer for decades,” Page says. “Veterinarians have long embraced the ‘one health’ concept. This study focuses on comparative oncology. Dogs get cancer like humans do. We are looking at aging, the environment and cancer susceptibility in a naturally relevant patient population with semi-uniform genetics as we study these golden retrievers.”

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Tumors in animals are just as complex as tumors in humans, Page says. “If we can determine what triggers these tumors in animals, that information is transferable to humans,” he says.

Page says the results of the Golden Retriever Lifetime Study will be made available to other researchers, including what worked and what didn’t work in trying to prevent cancer.

Page earned his DVM degree from Colorado State University and completed specialty training in medical oncology in New York City. He was a faculty member at North Carolina State University and Cornell University, where he participated in nationally funded translational cancer research. He returned to Colorado as the director of the “Exposure to environmental issues in Flint Animal Cancer Center in 2010 and was humans takes decades to study,” Page says. recently conferred the Stephen J. Withrow “The same issue in dogs takes only years, Presidential Chair in Oncology. which means treatment will be available sooner.” The study includes about 50 dogs from Oklahoma as well as others from California, Florida and New England. Researchers are looking at several factors including early neuter equating to early disease, the risk of cancer with obesity, exposure to weed control or pest control and more.


Lundberg-Kienlen Lecture covers lung research Victor Thannickal, M.D., presented “Predisposition of the Aging Lung to Fibrosis” to faculty, staff and graduate students at the Center for Veterinary Health Sciences on Nov. 30 at the eighth annual Lundberg-Kienlen Lecture. Funded by the National Institutes of Health and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, Thannickal’s research focuses on cellular and molecular mechanisms of lung repair and regeneration.

“Fibrosis occurs in the context of failed tissue regeneration and aging is a risk factor for fibrosis,” he continues. “I think it is important to start at the bedside, bring it to the bench and research it, and then take it back to the bedside. Linking the biology of aging with chronic disease, called ‘geroscience,’ may offer novel therapeutic strategies for age-related diseases such as IPF.”

member of the American Association of Physicians and the recipient of the American Thoracic Society Recognition Award for Scientific Accomplishments in 2016. The Lundberg-Kienlen Lecture in Biomedical Sciences was co-sponsored by the Lundberg-Kienlen endowment and the Oklahoma Center for Respiratory and Infectious Diseases. OCRID director and host of the lecture, Lin Liu, Ph.D., holds the Lundberg-Kienlen Endowed Chair in Biomedical Research and is a Regents Professor in the Department of Physiological Sciences.

Thannickal is a professor of medicine and pathology and the director of the “The adult lung is very complex, making Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critcellular homeostasis in the adult lung very ical Care Medicine at the University of important,” Thannickal says. “As our pop- Alabama at Birmingham. He is an elected ulation ages and more people live longer, we will see an increase in the incidents of COPD, pneumonia and idiopathic pulmoL I N K I N G T H E B I O LO GY O F AG I N G W I T H C H R O N I C nary fibrosis (IPF).

D I S E A S E … M AY O F F E R N OV E L T H E R A P E U T I C S T R AT E G I E S F O R AG E - R E L AT E D D I S E A S E S … .” — VICTOR THANNICKAL, M.D.

GARY LAWSON / UNIVERSITY MARKETING

At the eighth annual Lundberg-Kienlen Lecture were (from left): Dr. Chris Ross, interim dean; Dr. Lin Liu, director of OCRID, Lundberg-Kienlen Endowed Chair in Biomedical Sciences and Regents Professor in the Department of Physiological Sciences; speaker Victor Thannickal, M.D.; and Dr. Martin Furr, head of the Department of Physiological Sciences.

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“ W H AT I S T R U LY R E M A R K A B L E … I S D R . R O G E R PA N C I E R A’ S ( L E F T ) I M PAC T O N G E N E R AT I O N S O F P R AC T I C I N G V E T E R I N A R I A N S A N D T H E I N S P I R AT I O N H E H A S P R OV I D E D TO H U N D R E D S O F V E T E R I N A RY PAT H O LO G I S T S .” — DR. JERRY RITCHEY

GARY LAWSON / UNIVERSITY MARKETING

Cattle Production Veterinarian Hall of Fame selects Panciera R

OGER PANCIERA, DVM, MS, Ph.D., DACVP, has been inducted as the 2016 Beef Award Recipient into the Cattle Production Veterinarian Hall of Fame by the American Association of Bovine Practitioners. Professor Emeritus at Oklahoma State University Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Panciera earned his DVM degree from OSU in 1953. After earning a master’s degree and a doctorate from Cornell University, he returned to OSU, where he has influenced generations of students, residents, practitioners and pathologists. He has provided both scientific contributions and education to veterinarians and producers on beef cattle production and disease control.

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Higher Ed Hall of Fame inducts Fulton OBERT FULTON, DVM, Ph.D., DACVM, EmeriR tus Regents Professor and McCasland Foundation Endowed Chair for Food Animal Research in the Department of Veterinary Pathobiology at OSU’s Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, has been inducted into the Oklahoma Higher Education Hall of Fame for 2016. The honor recognizes outstanding educators. Fulton is known for his research on bovine respiratory disease and making significant advances in bovine viruses and vaccinology. He has been recognized for his work on bovine viral diarrhea viruses, bovine coronaviruses and other respiratory viruses. In 2015, he received the Outstanding Service Award from the Academy of Veterinary Consultants and Merck Animal Health. Fulton earned his DVM degree from Oklahoma State University in 1966. He was a captain in the Air Force Veterinary Service before earning a master’s degree in veterinary sciences from Washington State University (1972) and a doctorate in microbiology from the University of Missouri-Columbia (1975). In 1976, he became a diplomate in the American College of Veterinary Microbiologists.

In 1982, Fulton joined the veterinary center. He retired after 33 years here. He has been named a Distinguished Alumnus of the veterinary center (2006), a Zoetis Research Award winner (2008) and a Regents Distinguished Research Award winner (2010). More than 200 leaders have been inducted into the Oklahoma Higher Education Hall of Fame since 1994.

“Dr. Panciera has a well-documented list of on the necropsy floor, working with students academic accomplishments related to decades and trainees, and squeezing every possible of productivity in research, teaching and diag- learning opportunity from each necropsy case. nostic pathology,” says Jerry Ritchey, DVM, Ph.D., There are two important testimonies to PanDACVP, head of the veterinary center’s Depart- ciera’s distinction as an educator. First, he has ment of Veterinary Pathobiology. “However, been recognized over the years by students and what is truly remarkable and immeasurable is faculty colleagues as a recipient of numerous his impact on generations of practicing veteri- teaching awards. Second, he has inspired many narians and the inspiration he has provided to others to become educators as well. hundreds of veterinary pathologists currently Panciera is a founding member of the Acadworking all over the world.” emy of Veterinary Consultants (AVC), a memThe hallmark of Panciera’s teaching philos- ber of the Oklahoma Higher Education Hall ophy was developing thought processes rather of Fame, a distinguished member of the Amerthan relying on memorization. He is legendary ican College of Veterinary Pathologists, and a

Distinguished Alumnus of Oklahoma State University. He is a member of the Oklahoma Veterinary Medical Association Hall of Fame and the first recipient of the OSU College of Veterinary Medicine Distinguished Alumnus Award. The Cattle Production Veterinary Hall of Fame is sponsored by Merck Animal Health, the American Association of Bovine Practitioners, the Academy of Veterinary Consultants, Bovine Veterinary magazine, and Osborn Barr.

2016 Oklahoma State University

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RETIREMENTS

O S U ’s C e n t e r f o r Ve t e r i n a r y Health Sciences is fortunate t o a t t ra c t s o m e o f t h e brightest faculty members, t h e i r c a re e r s o f t e n s p a n n i n g d e c a d e s . We a re b i d d i n g f a rewe l l t o t h o s e w h o h a ve re t i re d t h i s ye a r. BY DERINDA BLAKENEY, APR

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DR. KATHERINE KOCAN Katherine Kocan, Ph.D., OSU Regents Professor and the Walter R. Sitlington Endowed Chair in Food Animal Research, has retired after 42 years at OSU’s Center for Veterinary Health Sciences. During her career, she and her team brought in more than $6.8 million in research funding that led to many important contributions to the field of ticks and tick-borne pathogens. Kocan considers her ability to maintain a continuous research program for 42 years by adapting to funding and technology changes her greatest accomplishment. She says maintaining the program was possible thanks to productive

research teams, the most notable consisting of Drs. José de la Fuente, Ed Blouin and herself. “The economic downturn that occurred in the late 1990s reduced funding opportunities for research on the role of ticks in the transmission of bovine anaplasmosis,” she says. “We adapted and broadened our collaborations and the direction of our research, which allowed us to maintain our research productivity with a total of 328 publications in peer-reviewed journals. We hosted visiting scientists and students from South Africa, Argentina, the Czech Republic, Australia, Israel and Spain.” The research team’s highlights include:

Identifying Anaplasma marginale in the tick vector, describing ƒƒ the tick development cycle, demonstrating persistent A. marginale infections in ticks and defining the role of male ticks in transmission of A. marginale to cattle.

Defining molecular interactions between ticks ƒƒ and their Anaplasma pathogens. Developing the first cell culture system for A. marginale, expanding ƒƒ research opportunities on tick-borne pathogens worldwide. Applying the gene silencing technique RNA interference ƒƒ to the study of gene function in ticks. Discovering candidate antigens for developing vaccines ƒƒ for control of ticks and tick-borne pathogens, most notably the discovery of the tick protective protein, Subolesin.

Developing a sheep model for the study of ƒƒ human granulocytic anaplasmosis. Kocan has received numerous awards, including being Dedicatee of the 9th Biennial Conference of the Society for Tropical Veterinary Medicine in 2007.

Dr. Katherine Kocan’s 42 years of work at OSU included many important contributions to the field of ticks and tick-borne pathogens.

“My favorite memory is the great fun and productivity of our research team,” she says. “We worked hard but also have greatly enjoyed wonderful friendships. Our travels over the years took us to Kenya, South Africa, Israel, Guadalupe, Vietnam, Mexico, Argentina, Brazil, Peru and several European countries. All of these experiences have broadened my perspectives and enriched my life. “I hope to be remembered for being a good member and team player of the CVHS and for doing good science, promoting the Society for Tropical Veterinary Medicine and for making significant

contributions to graduate education and research on ticks and tick-borne diseases.” Before Kocan leaves to enjoy “downtime and time with my children and grandchildren along with gardening, wildlife photography, cooking, reading and quilting,” she offers this advice to up-and-coming faculty members: “Follow your passions for veterinary medicine teaching and research. Become a participant in the veterinary center and university community. Be a good collaborator with colleagues. I am grateful to have worked with an exceptional group of people. I very much appreciate their many kindnesses, friendship and support. You don’t maintain a research program for 42 years without the support of many colleagues and students.” CONTINUES

PHOTOGRAPHY BY PHIL SHOCKLEY / UNIVERSITY MARKETING 2016 Oklahoma State University

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RETIREMENTS

LISH RETIRES AFTER 27 YEARS AT OSU After 27 years with the Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, associate professor Jim Lish, Ph.D., is retiring with many fond memories. “My favorite memories are of the fun I had interacting with the freshmen and the teaching staff in the anatomy lab,” Lish says. “I consider my greatest accomplishment to be presenting a course that was academically challenging, interesting, valuable and, for most, fun. And I am very proud that over the years the students have rewarded me for my work with many teaching awards — thanks, guys!”

Lish hopes to be remembered for quality teaching that helped students achieve their career goals and improved the lives of animals. He offers this advice to incoming faculty:

Besides teaching, Lish is known for his work with birds of prey and his pencil drawings.

all the help, encouragement, great company, interesting conversations, and fond memories.”

“Over the years my work with birds of prey in some of the earth’s wildest places has provided more adrenaline rushes and exciting memories than I could ever count. But nothing has given me more satisfaction or sense of accomplishment than knowing I have helped some great young people achieve their goals and get where they want to be in life.

Lish has not made any special plans for his retirement and will “just see what life brings,” he says.

“Always be fair and consistent. Lish earned his bachelor’s, masTreat students like future colter’s and doctoral degrees at OSU. leagues. Be a role model for profesIn 2015, he authored Winter’s sional behavior and honesty. Stress Hawk: Red-tails on the Southern the basics. And remember, the stuPlains. The book has 200 color phodents are sacrificing and paying tographs of hawks taken by Lish considerably for this training. It’s and details important lessons in up to you to deliver a quality prodsouthern Great Plains biodiversity, uct worth their money. Or in the “And finally, I would like to give underscoring the place of the redwords of the country singer Johnny a warm thank you to my wonder- tailed hawk in Oklahoma’s tallLee — ‘If you want to make a living, ful colleagues here in the Center grass prairie ecology. you’ve gotta put on a good show.’” for Veterinary Health Sciences for

“ OV E R T H E Y E A R S M Y WO R K WITH BIRDS OF PREY … H A S P R OV I D E D M O R E ADRENALINE RUSHES AND E XC I T I N G M E M O R I E S T H A N I C O U L D E V E R C O U N T.” — JIM LISH

GARY LAWSON / UNIVERSITY MARKETING

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DERINDA BLAKENEY, APR / CVHS

STAFF RETIREMENTS From left: Betty Handlin, Joan Hubbard and Verlynda Beane are all retiring. BETTY HANDLIN has served the veterinary JOAN HUBBARD has been a research grants center for 18 years as a computer support per- and contracts specialist at the veterinary center son in the center’s IT Department. She holds a for 27½ years. Her bachelor’s degree in busibachelor’s degree in engineering mathematics ness administration is from OSU. (now applied mathematics) from North Caro“The veterinary center has been my home lina State University. away from home for much of my adult life,” Hub“My favorite memory is observing and learn- bard says. “I’ve seen many changes in those years. ing about a completely different type of sci- Many work relationships have developed into ence than I had practiced before,” Handlin says. close friendships. We have worked through She hopes to be remembered for the profes- problems, shared inside work jokes, told famsional work materials she provided for faculty ily stories — all of which combine to make my and students. She considers her greatest accom- favorite memories.”

VERLYNDA BEANE has spent 35 years at the veterinary center as an administrative associate in the business office. She holds a degree in management information systems from OSU.

“I have enjoyed the people I have worked with and the fun events I have attended,” Beane says. “There are too many favorite memories I have collected in 35 years to select one.”

She hopes to be remembered for her friendly attitude, her willingness to help and her flexibility to handle any task with a smile. She considers her greatest accomplishment to be the plishment to be creating innovative, profesHubbard hopes to be remembered for being privilege of working with four deans and three sional teaching materials with Drs. Charlotte a team player, being a conscientious worker, business directors. She has mastered the skills having the ability to get along with just about necessary to learn two major accounting softOwnby, Jim Lish and Michael Lorenz. everyone, and having a bit of a “warped sense ware changes implemented by OSU and even “I plan to work only part-time and start on of humor. ” She lists being selected for the Strat- worked with payroll for a time. the huge number of projects that I have stacked ton Staff Award as a professional highlight and up,” Handlin adds. “Thank you to so many peo“My goal in retirement is to just have the time having a loving husband, daughter, son and two to do anything,” she says. “I want to do more garple who gave me education and encouragement grandsons as her personal highlights. these many years.” dening, spend more time with my family and “I plan to work a couple days a week volun- travel more.” teering on some church projects and spending more time in my gardens. There are many places, even in Oklahoma, where I have not visited, so travel is definitely on my list,” she adds. “Working at the veterinary center has been a rewarding experience, and Vet Med will always hold a special place in my heart.” 2016 Oklahoma State University

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N E W A N D C H A N G I N G FAC E S

NEW FACULTY

DR. YOKO NAGAMORI Dr. Yoko Nagamori is a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Veterinary Pathobiology. Originally from Tokyo, Nagamori earned a bachelor’s degree in geosciences from Shizuoka University in Shizuoka, Japan, and another in biology and mathematics from Augustana University in Sioux Falls, S.D. In 2013, she earned her DVM degree from Iowa State University and in 2016 her Master’s in veterinary biomedical sciences from Oklahoma State University. Nagamori is interested in both diagnostics and zoonotic and tropical diseases. She teaches a parasitology portion of the fourth-year diagnostics rotation. She also lectures in parasitology to first- and second-year students as well as in some elective parasitology classes. When she is not teaching, Nagamori examines parasitology cases submitted through the Oklahoma Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory and OSU’s Veterinary Medical Hospital.

DR. MACKENZIE HALLMAN Dr. Mackenzie Hallman is an assistant professor in diagnostic imaging in the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences. Originally from Almena, Kan., she earned both a bachelor’s degree in biology and DVM degree from Kansas State University. She completed a small animal internship at Virginia Tech and a residency in diagnostic imaging at Kansas State.

DR. CLAY HALLMAN Dr. Clay Hallman is a lecturer in diagnostic imaging in the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences. Originally from Souderton, Pa., he earned a bachelor’s degree at Wake Forest University and his DVM degree at Kansas State University, were he met and married his wife, Dr. Mackenzie Hallman.

Hallman’s clinical interests focus on expanding the use of CT in imaging the thorax of critical patients and in small animal abdominal ultrasound. She loves teaching radiology in both the didactic and clinical setting and is interested in exploring different teaching styles in radiology, including systemic approaches versus pattern recognition and case-based learning.

Hallman’s clinical interests focus on researching advanced imaging for cardiac disease and canine musculoskeletal disease.

FACULTY PROMOTIONS JOHN GILLIAM , DVM, MS, DACVIM, DABVP,

has been promoted from associate professor to professor in the Department of Physiological Sciences. Her two major areas of research pertain to mitigation of herpes virus infections and improving patient outcomes through pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling.

ANDREW HANZLICEK , DVM, MS,

ASHISH RANJAN , BVSc, Ph.D., was

DACVIM, was promoted from assistant professor to associate professor and Kirkpatrick Chair in Small Animal Medicine with tenure in the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences. His current areas of research include investigating small animal kidney, urinary, infectious and hematologic diseases.

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LARA MAXWELL , DVM, Ph.D., DACVCP,

has been promoted from clinical assistant professor to clinical associate professor of food animal production medicine and field services in the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences. His professional interests include beef cattle production medicine, internal medicine and bovine theriogenology.

C e n t e r f o r Ve t e r i n a r y H e a l t h S c i e n c e s

promoted from assistant professor to associate professor with tenure in the Department of Physiological Sciences. His research focuses on nanocarrier-mediated targeted drug delivery, image-guided therapy and nanotoxicology.

ALL PHOTOGRAPHY BY GARY LAWSON / UNIVERSITY MARKETING


GENESSE PHOTO

Former Dean Dr. Jean Sanders presents Ron Kuehn with his 2016 Stratton Staff Award.

IT Support Matters TECH SPECIALIST KUEHN WINS STRATTON STAFF AWARD “What I like most about my job is Ron Kuehn of Stillwater is a senior support specialist in the IT depart- working with students and helping ment at Oklahoma State University’s them use computers and technology Center for Veterinary Health Sciences. to make their time in school easier,” “It was a great surprise and honor to he says. “The best advice for comreceive the 2016 Stratton Staff Award,” puter users is to backup your data says Kuehn. “I know several of the twice and often. There are two types employees who received it before of computer users — those who have I did and consider them to be role lost data and those who will lose data.”

“It’s humbling to receive an award voted on by those who have won it previously and to be nominated with many others who were so deserving as well,” he adds.

The Stratton Staff Award was established upon the retirement of Dr. Louie Stratton in 1989. The late Dr. Stratton, former director of the model employees.” Kuehn was born in Germany on Veterinary Medical Hospital, wanted Kuehn started working at OSU’s a U.S. Army base. He lived in Wash- to honor outstanding staff memveterinary center in December 1993 ington and Montana before he was bers for their dedicated service and in the bacteriology lab at the Okla- 5 years old. His family settled in many key contributions to the overhoma Animal Disease Diagnostic Duncan, Okla., where he graduated all success of the veterinary center. Laboratory. By 1996, he was involved from high school and met his wife, Nominations are accepted from any in computer support work at OADDL Michelle. He attended Murray State employee of the center and selected and has been helping computer users College and Southeastern Oklahoma by an ad hoc committee appointed State University and worked for the by the dean. for the last 20 years. Oklahoma Department of Wildlife for several years before he came to OSU to earn his master’s degree in zoology (’93).

2016 Oklahoma State University

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CLASS OF 2020

The Class of 2020 enjoys orientation before classes begin at OSU.

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To watch a video about the Class of 2020’s Orientation, visit http://okla.st/2f6Rm2a.


Welcome, Class of 2020 THE INCOMING CLASS OF 2020 AT OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY’S CENTER FOR VETERINARY HEALTH SCIENCES WAS WELCOMED TO THE STILLWATER CAMPUS WITH A TWO-DAY ORIENTATION PROGRAM IN AUGUST. PHOTOGRAPHY BY GARY LAWSON / UNIVERSITY MARKETING

WHO THEY ARE AND WHERE THEY COME FROM

13 58 30

75

M E N   

88

W O M E N   

TOTAL

OKLAHOMA RESIDENTS NON-RESIDENTS REPRESENTING ARIZONA, ARKANSAS, CALIFORNIA, COLORADO, DELAWARE, FLORIDA, KANSAS, MARYLAND, NEVADA, N E W J E R S E Y, N E W Y O R K , T E X A S A N D W I S C O N S I N

BY THE NUMBERS

3.609 CORE GPA 3.608 C U M U L AT I V E G PA 153 GRE VERBAL 152 G R E Q U A N T I TAT I V E 4 . 0 G R E A N A LY T I C A L 2016 Oklahoma State University

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GARY LAWSON / UNIVERSITY MARKETING

GENESSEE PHOTO

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Class of 2017: Rising Higher Members of the Class of 2017 prepare for their final year of veterinary school with a Transition Ceremony last April.

Congratulations, Class of 2016! The Class of 2016 took time out on Commencement Day for a class photo.

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“ I R E A L LY LOV E D M Y E Q U I N E M E D I C I N E R OTAT I O N . … T H E R E W E R E Q U I T E A F E W N I G H T S T H AT I S L E P T I N S TA L L S W I T H F OA L S .” — MORGAN PIERCE

Morgan Pierce, Class of 2017, received the 2016 Dean

Harry W. Orr Memorial Award at the CVHS annual banquet in April. She was granted $2,500.

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Orr Award goes to Morgan Pierce PHOTOGRAPHY BY GARY LAWSON / UNIVERSITY MARKETING

Morgan Pierce of Bellville, Texas, won the 2016 Dean Harry W. Orr Memorial Award for prominent academic achievement at the Center for Veterinary Health Sciences annual awards banquet in April — an accomplishment that well illustrates her intensive work thus far. “It was really exciting to get this award because it has so much history behind it regarding the vet school and the dean,” says Pierce, now a fourth-year veterinary student. “We don’t know which one we’re getting when we show up to the banquet,” she says. “It’s kind of fun because it’s unknown. You’re just sitting there kind of waiting for your name to be called — you know you won something, but it could be anything. This particular award was a part of the bigger scholarships online, so I just applied.”

“It’s fun to kind of be able to make those decisions but then also have somebody there just in case to be like, ‘Are you sure you want to do that? … Maybe we should try something else, or this would be better,’” she says. Pierce is pretty confident that when it’s time to walk across the stage, she’ll be ready to go out into the world as a veterinarian. SHELBY HOLCOMB

The Orr Award honors Oklahoma A&M School of Veterinary Medicine’s second dean. “Morgan received the Dean Harry W. Orr Award in recognition of her high academic standing,” says Dr. Chris Ross, professor and interim dean for the Center for Veterinary Health Sciences. “Monetary awards like this one help lessen student debt. We are very grateful for our donors, who allowed us to award more than $600,000 this past year.” Pierce didn’t always want to be a vet, even though she grew up around horses. One particular experience — caring for a severely injured horse while working for a horse trainer during high school — sparked her interest in animal science, and she pursued her career path from there.

Pierce helped care for a patient, Timmie, during one of her shifts in the CVHS Small Animal Critical Care Unit.

“My grandfather went here [to OSU],” she says. “He actually lived in the dairy barn and would walk back and forth to main campus. That kind of pushed me to go to OSU, and I really love it here.” There hasn’t been a dull moment for Pierce. She’s already learned so much and seen countless case types since the beginning of her fourth year. “I really loved my equine medicine rotation,” she says. “It was so busy. We had very few open stalls in the hospital. There were quite a few nights that I slept in stalls with foals.” In the clinical setting, Pierce gets true hands-on experience and feels like she’s a real doctor.

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DERINDA BLAKENEY, APR / CVHS

“BELIEVE IN YO U R S E L F. … YO U A R E E N T I R E LY C A PA B L E A S LO N G A S YO U ’ R E W I L L I N G TO WO R K H A R D.” — PAUL CUNNINGHAM

Cunningham earns Dean McElroy Award “I was probably 6 or 7 years old Paul Cunningham of Lawton, Okla., is the 2016 recipient of the the first time I went to the zoo,” Dean Clarence H. McElroy Award. Cunningham says. “When I was “I was in complete shock when around elephants and giraffes and they announced my name as the feeding the sharks and things like award winner,” he says. “I can think that at the Oklahoma City Zoo, I of a ton of other people in my class realized that my love for animals who are completely deserving. It was real and strong.” was even better because I was there with my parents. My mom was beside herself. All I could think to do was to stand up and hug her and then go receive the award. It was just really humbling.”

The Dean Clarence H. McElroy Award was established in 1954 to honor the first dean of OSU’s College of Veterinary Medicine. It is the highest award an Oklahoma State University senior veterinary student can earn. Recipients are selected by classmates and the fourth-year faculty. Cunningham knew early on he wanted to become a veterinarian.

“I think the best advice I can offer is to believe in yourself,” he would advise others. “I think that’s He chose to earn his DVM one of the things we, as vet studegree at Oklahoma State. dents, struggle with the most. The “I had my heart set on getting feeling of imposter syndrome is out of Oklahoma. I really wanted something they talk about in first to go far away and see some place year during our orientation, and new. But I came here and toured it’s very real. But if you want this at Oklahoma State and fell in bad enough, you just need to let love with the campus. It was new all that doubt leave your mind. You are entirely capable as long as enough for me.” Cunningham’s favorite mem- you’re willing to work hard.” And Cunningham did work ory of veterinary school is going to hard. The McElroy Award is given the Student Chapter of the Ameribased on academic performance, can Veterinary Medical Association leadership and clinical proficiency. Symposium in Denver. He was an ambassador all four “Going with all my classmates to years of veterinary college. He also see schools from around the nation, earned a Butch and Luella Ruth to learn and listen to speakers from all over the world who talk

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about their interest whether that be bovine medicine, acupuncture, toxicology — it was just an amazing weekend and I got to do it in a place that I had never seen.”

Curtis Educational Fund Award. The oldest of four children, he is the first to graduate from college. Cunningham is the son of Penny Lowry of Lawton and Paul Cunningham of Minco, Okla. Following graduation, Cunningham will be going to an internship at Michigan State University College of Veterinary Medicine. “It will be a small animal rotating internship,” adds Cunningham. “There may be a residency to follow that. I have not quite decided yet but I do have an interest in critical care and internal medicine. So I’m hoping this year at a different place in a new setting will kind of weed out what I want to do with the rest of my life.” DERINDA BLAKENEY, APR

To see a video of Cunningham, visit okla.st/2gds92Z.


ZAHRA MARIA

JENNIFER RUDD

K A LYA N I E K TAT E

3 Minute Thesis winners focus on One Health

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he winners of OSU’s Center for Veterinary Health Sciences’ 3 Minute Thesis Competition for 2016 and their presentations were: FIRST PLACE: Zahra Maria of Dhaka, Bangladesh, “Is Diabetes Breaking the Heart?” SECOND: Jennifer Rudd, DVM, of Perkins, Okla., “Battling Superinfections: A Body at THIRD: Kalyani Ektate of Nagpur, Maharashtra in India, “War Against Cancer.”

War.”

    She also won the People’s Choice Award .

Maria is working on her doctorate in Rudd would love to continue her research mechanical and aerospace engineering and and teaching. “Teaching is my favorite part of hopes to become a researcher in a national what I do,” Rudd says. “My dream job would be laboratory in the United States. She earned to stay right here at OSU.” her bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineerA doctoral student under the advisement of ing from the Bangladesh University of Engi- Dr. Narasaraju Teluguakula in the Department neering and Technology and a master’s degree of Physiological Sciences at OSU’s Center for in mechanical engineering from Oklahoma Veterinary Health Sciences, Rudd earned her State University. bachelor’s degree in biomedical sciences in “I wanted to bridge the gap between engineer- 2008 and a DVM degree in 2011, both from ing and biology,” she says. “Although I began OSU. She also completed an internship in small research in mechanical engineering, my inter- animal medicine and surgery at the University est led me to work in Dr. Veronique Lacombe’s of Missouri. Rudd spent a couple of years in prilab in the Department of Physiological Sciences vate veterinary practice before returning to OSU. at the veterinary center. I’m completing studies “My interest lies in respiratory infectious disregarding the effect of diabetes on cardiovascu- ease,” she continues. “I am fascinated by the lar disease including both the mechanical and complicated, generally efficient show of force physiological aspects.” that our bodies display when exposed to infection. Immunology and response to infectious disease is a field with so much potential and so much still unknown. Each time we collectively figure out a small part, we discover how many more things we have yet to explain.”

Ektate of Nagpur, Maharashtra in India, strives to stop the spread of cancer in both animals and humans and is working on her doctorate in veterinary biomedical sciences in the veterinary center’s Department of Physiological Sciences. Her adviser is Dr. Ashish Ranjan. Ektate earned her DVM degree equivalent from the Maharashtra Animal and Fishery Science University in India. “My long-term goal is to optimize and provide uniform intratumoral delivery of antitumor drugs with real-time control,” Ektate says. “I want to keep working on novel ideas to fight cancer in both animals and humans.”

“The multidisciplinary approach considers both animal health and biomedical research,” she says.“The specific focus of my work is nanomedicine and image guided drug delivery. The applicability of my research in nanomedicine and drug delivery for treating cancer is amazing.”

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ROBB COHEN PHOTOGRAPHY

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Livvy Jones receives Walther Leadership Award ivvy Jones of Pauls Valley, Okla., is the Oklahoma State University 2016 recipient of the Dr. Jack Walther Leadership Award. She is one of 33 recipients across North America.

The award recognizes veterinary students who portray leadership and promote a lifelong service to the profession. Recipients received $1,000 along with complimentary registration, lodging, airfare and daily stipend to attend the 88th Annual Western Veterinary Conference held in Las Vegas in March.

Jones is a third-year veterinary student. She is the Zoo, Exotic and Wildlife Club president, and the Parasitology and Small Ruminant Clubs’ secretary. Jones is also an ambassador for the veterinary center and tutors fellow veterinary students. She also received one additional complimentary registration to a future WVC Annual Conference to be used within five years following her graduation in 2017.

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Congratulating Livvy Jones are Greg Campbell (left), DVM, Ph.D., Oklahoma State University Center for Veterinary Health Sciences alumnus and Jon Pennell, DVM, MS EMT-l, immediate past president of the Western Veterinary Conference board of directors.


DERINDA BLAKENEY, APR / CVHS

SAVMA chooses Olivarez to lead

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eff Olivarez of Edmond, Okla., is about to And like many who attend Oklahoma’s only put Oklahoma State University’s Center for veterinary college, Olivarez likes the overall Veterinary Health Sciences in the national atmosphere. spotlight. Olivarez was recently selected as “I love the people the most. The faculty is president-elect of the Student American Veter- great here, all the staff. And then the clinicians inary Medical Association. He will spend the are always willing to help, always willing to next year preparing for his run as president of teach. I’ve built a small little family here. I’m SAVMA, the national organization of veteri- from Edmond, which isn’t that far away but in nary students. vet school just from all the work it’s hard to get While Olivarez has completed his second away. So I’ve kind of created my own little famyear of veterinary college at OSU, he didn’t ily here with friends. And they are my real supalways want a degree in veterinary medicine. port system and I really appreciate them for that.” “Going through college, I went to undergrad for human medicine,” Olivarez says. “But I was never really passionate about it so my senior year of my undergrad, I decided that vet school was actually what I wanted to do.

Olivarez says wanting to give back led him to run for SAVMA president. “I’ve always wanted to serve the students, and I thought the best opportunity for that would be to be SAVMA president.”

“I chose Oklahoma State because, to be honWhen he found out he had won, a moment est, it was the most affordable option,” he says. of panic set in. “They announced my name, and “I love the school. It’s the best in my opinion. I think my heart stopped.” “Vet school is going great so far. It’s been one Olivarez will spend his year as president-elect of the hardest things that I have ever done but learning everything the president does. it’s going well. I’ve never considered myself a great student but it’s amazing to me, seeing once I’m actually learning something I care about, how much my attitude toward academics has changed and my scores overall.”

“I travel with the president to all the AVMA board of directors meetings, any event that he’s at, I’m also at and just asking questions and learning what I really need to do. The president is supposed to be the voice of the students. “I love that I get the opportunity to serve the students and really find out what they need to be done and what they want out of their vet school experience and trying to help them with that. I like that everywhere I go I get to represent Oklahoma. People are asking me where are you from, and I get to say Oklahoma State University. “I’m really excited for this opportunity. I think it will change my life forever. And I want to do the best that I can. So I want the students to know that I’m available for them. And if they need anything, nothing is too small. They can reach out to us, the SAVMA exec board.” To watch a video on Olivarez, visit okla.st/2gz7fj7.

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COMMENCEMENT DERINDA BLAKENEY, APR / CVHS

Dr. Ron Guthrie of the Class of 1966 hooded his great-nephew, Andrew Willis, at the 2016 Center for Veterinary Health Sciences commencement in May.

Carrying on a Legacy WILLIS’ GRADUATION COMES ON 50 TH ANNIVERSARY OF FAMILY’S STREAK

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ndrew Willis of Woodward, Okla., is carrying on a family legacy. He earned his DVM degree in May 2016 and was hooded by his great-uncle, Dr. Ron Guthrie, who was in

Stillwater celebrating his 50-year reunion.

“To me, that’s a sense of nostalgia, I guess,” Willis says. “In the sense that 50 years ago, he received a degree that provided a livelihood for him and his family and a knowledge base that allowed him to help many patients over the years. So I hope to do the same thing.” Willis decided to become a veterinarian when he was about 14 years old. “I started working on a ranch over the summer,” he recalls. “I was really interested in the animals and in helping animals. Things just progressed from there.” As his relatives before him, Willis chose Oklahoma State for his DVM degree.

“Well, I was born and raised in Oklahoma, so Oklahoma is a special place to me. Additionally, OSU is cost effective, close to home, and I’ve had many relatives who have gone to school here and it’s provided a very good education for them.”

And for those who are considering a degree in veterinary medicine, Willis offers this advice.

“My biggest piece of advice would be to just be committed wholeheartedly from the beginning. All the information that you’re going to get in undergrad and in vet school, all those While at OSU, Willis was drawn to equine pieces will come together in a great puzzle to help your patients. So just try to be committed veterinary medicine. “I don’t know if I could pinpoint any one spe- to learning that information and retaining it.” Following graduation, Willis began an cific event in veterinary college that I enjoyed the most but I think since I am an equine ori- equine internship at Weatherford Equine Medented person, my equine rotations and my ical Center in Weatherford, Texas. externships that I did were pretty special to me. To watch a video of Willis, I felt like it provided a lot of skills and knowlvisit okla.st/2eNQr60. edge that I can utilize later in life.” Catch up with Dr. Ron Guthrie/page 57

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DERINDA BLAKENEY, APR / CVHS

At her graduation in May, Kimberlee Lenaburg was hooded by her husband, Dr. Trace Lenaburg, a member of the CVHS Class of 2013.

From Dreams to Reality LENABURG TURNS CHILDHOOD LOVE FOR STRAYS INTO VETERINARY CAREER

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Kimberlee has already passed her boards, imberlee Lenaburg of Bartlesville, Okla., who’s been through the stresses and the diffijust made her childhood dream a reality. culties of the curriculum and veterinary school,” licensing her to practice in Oklahoma right away. “My husband and I bought a practice in “My parents tell me I was obsessed Kimberlee says. “It’s also nice to have somewith animals as a child,” Lenaburg says. “I body there to remind you that there is a light Pawnee, Okla.,” Kimberlee says. “We took that brought everything home, every stray animal. at the end of the tunnel, and it does get better.” over May 1. So there are a lot of decisions and About 9 or 10 years old I understood the career, Kimberlee came to OSU for her DVM degree changes that we’ve been dealing with. I’m very excited to start that. It’s a mixed animal practice. what a veterinarian was and that’s when I real- for a couple of reasons. ized that’s what I wanted to do.” “Both my parents are graduates of OSU,” she They’ve been mostly doing large animal and so Lenaburg is among the 88 students who says. “They raised us to be very die-hard fans. As hopefully with us there, we’ll bring back some earned a DVM degree from Oklahoma State kids we would come up to campus and go to small animal medicine into it, too.” University’s Center for Veterinary Health Sciences on May 6. Hooding her was her husband, Dr. Trace Lenaburg, who earned his OSU degree in 2013. “Personally welcoming my wife into the profession that I am so passionate about gives me overwhelming pride and anticipation for our future,” Trace says. “It’s been a big help. Not necessarily with the information or the learning process, it’s more just having the moral support of somebody

the football games and basketball games. They always told us that we could go anywhere we wanted to go, but their money would only go to OSU. I did my undergraduate here and loved it. Loved the campus and the town so it made sense to come here for my DVM and in-state tuition kind of helps, too.”

Reflecting on having Trace hood her, Kimberlee says it’s really exciting because he’s been there from the beginning. The couple met on a blind date about a month before Kimberlee started veterinary school.

“Words cannot express how proud and excited I am to see the love of my life, my best friend achieve this great honor,” Trace adds. “She will be a blessing to the animal owners of Pawnee, an asset to the veterinary profession and forever the object of my affection.” Drs. Trace and Kimberlee Lenaburg are now operating the Pawnee Veterinary Hospital. For a video about Kimberlee Lenaburg, visit okla.st/2f0rK35.

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COMMENCEMENT

Taking on More THREE EARN MASTER’S OF PUBLIC HEALTH DEGREES ALONGSIDE DVMS

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any pet owners know their local veterinarian has an impact on animal health. However, few of these people realize the significant impact veterinarians have on global

health and safety — including the health of people, the environment and even food safety.

Three recent Oklahoma State University Center for Veterinary Health Sciences graduates — Kaitlin Agel of Yukon, Okla., Cyrena Neill of Hudson, Colo., and Mandy Hall of The Woodlands, Texas — decided to obtain a Master’s of Public Health degree while enrolled in the DVM program.

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“ I N T H E S U M M E R O F 2 0 1 4 , I WA S C O M P L E T I N G A L A B A N I M A L F E L LOW S H I P AT M I T. W H E N I M E N T I O N E D T H E M P H P R O G R A M TO M Y M E N TO R , S H E I M M E D I AT E LY S A I D S H E W I S H E D T H AT S H E H A D T H AT O P P O R T U N I T Y. S O I T M A D E M E T H I N K A B O U T I T. T H E O N LY E X T R A C O S T I S YO U R T I M E A S I T A D D S C L A S S E S TO A N A L R E A DY F U L L S C H E D U L E .” — KAITLIN AGEL

IT’S A HUGE TIME COMMITMENT, BUT NO EXTRA COST IN THE DUAL-DEGREE PROGRAM.

Mandy Hall (from left), Kaitlin Agel and Cyrena Neill celebrate their graduation with both a DVM and a Master’s of Public Health from the Center for Veterinary Health Sciences.

“The biggest challenges have been time man“I suppose I had never considered the global agement and being the ‘guinea pigs’ of the pro- impact that veterinarians have,” Hall says. “As gram,” Hall says. “It’s a brand-new program, so part of the vet med curriculum, we are required to take an epidemiology class along with one we are all figuring out the kinks together.” Agel adds, “I think it would have been easier or two food safety lectures. I was thoroughly to start during our second year. In your third intrigued. I am very passionate about One year, you have surgery schedules to work around Health and think it should be all health care and hope that DVM tests don’t fall the same providers’ mission to live by it. When I found time as the test schedules in the master’s classes. out OSU offered a joint MPH/DVM program, And remembering how to write papers is also I felt that it not only would help me to better challenging. It’s been a long time since I had a incorporate the One Health mission, but also expand my knowledge base on things like food 10-page research paper due.” The three came to the world of veterinary safety that are very important to me.” medicine in different ways. Neill says she wanted to become a veterinarian for as long as she can remember.

“While earning my bachelor’s degree in communications, I worked part-time as a receptionist at a veterinary clinic,” Hall says. “The veterinarians and veterinary technicians at the clinic were amazing. Their compassion and passion for their work inspired me to pursue veterinary medicine.”

One Health is the integrative effort of multiple disciplines working together to attain optimal health for people, animals and the environment.

“For me, it was about opening more doors and more job opportunities,” Neill says. “And the One Health concept interests me also. I hope to work where I can make a difference and help others understand why One Health is so important.”

“Getting the MPH degree is opening an entirely different door for me,” Agel says. “Pub“I taught high school for four years after lic health is very appealing to me, and from earning my bachelor’s degree in zoology,” Agel what I’ve seen career-wise, it is smart to get a recalls. “While in college, I worked at the Wild- master’s degree. So, why not get this master’s Care Foundation in Noble, Oklahoma, and degree that could lead to a job with the Food enjoyed the medicine. I liked treating, ban- Safety and Inspection Service or any other daging, suturing, performing surgeries — the USDA program?” Hall completed an externship with the parts of working there that were very medically driven. So when I wasn’t teaching during the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Sersummer, I would work at small animal clinics vice in the summer of 2015 and with the Cento gain experience and learn more about the ters for Disease Control in the spring of 2016. Agel was a teacher when she decided to pursue a DVM degree.

veterinary medicine profession.”

SO WHAT MADE THESE STUDENTS DECIDE TO TAKE ON THE DUAL DVM/ MPH DEGREE?

“In the summer of 2014, I was completing a lab animal fellowship at MIT,” Agel says. “When I mentioned the MPH program to my mentor, she immediately said she wished that she had that opportunity. So it made me think about it. The only extra cost is your time, as it adds classes to an already full schedule.”

“I would like to use my MPH to help me gain entry into public service, and I want to be in an environment where the people are just as passionate as I am,” Hall says.

Agel, Hall and Neill are the first veterinary students to enroll in the DVM/MPH dual degree designation. All three graduated in May. Neill is focusing on a position in a mixed animal clinic, and Agel and Hall are working in small animal clinics in Texas. DERINDA BLAKENEY, APR

DERINDA BLAKENEY, APR / CVHS

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NEWS BRIEFS

PHOTO / JOHN DOUGLAS PHOTOGRAPHY

GENESSEE PHOTO

Western Veterinary Conference Elects Howell President The Western Veterinary Conference recently elected Oklahoma State University alumnus Dr. Joe M. Howell of Oklahoma City as its president. His election follows decades of commitment to animal care and welfare. Howell, who earned his DVM degree from OSU in 1972, is a companion animal practitioner, a former owner of the Britton Road and Quail Creek Animal Hospitals in the Oklahoma City area, and a current partner in Montecito Animal Hospital in Las Vegas. He is president and CEO of Howell Investments Inc., a consulting, venture capital and investments firm. He is one of two ethicists for the American Humane Association and a former president of the American Veterinary Medicine Association. “It is an honor to serve as president of such a well-regarded organization with an unmatched continuing education program in the field of veterinary sciences,� he says.

Folsom Receives Award from AgriLabs Cattle veterinarian Dr. J.D. Folsom of Rexburg, Idaho, received one of two $5,000 Dr. Bruce Wren Continuing Education awards from AgriLabs during the 2016 American Association of Bovine Practitioners annual conference in Charlotte, N.C. Folsom earned his DVM degree from Oklahoma State University Center for Veterinary Health Sciences in 2015. The annual awards honor Bruce Wren, DVM, Ph.D., a longtime AgriLabs technical services veterinarian.

TVMA Recognizes Baker Oklahoma State University alumnus Dr. Andy Baker of McAllen, Texas, was recently named the 2016 Veterinary Medical Specialty Practitioner of the Year by the Texas Veterinary Medical Association. Baker earned his DVM degree from OSU in 1966. Baker co-owns Nolana Animal Hospital in McAllen. His peers nominated him for his dedication to advancing the profession of veterinary medicine.

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VETERANS

PHIL SHOCKLEY / UNIVERSITY MARKETING

Thanking Our Veterans COMMANDER ADDRESSES CVHS CEREMONY

“Veterans Day is our day to thank and remember all veterans and to let them know we appreciate them for their service and honor them for their sacrifices,” Air Force Lt. Col. Benjamin Dahlke told the audience at the 2016 Center for Veterinary Health Sciences’ Veterans Day observance. “Their service has been selfless … “An inscription at the Korean War Veterans Memorial says, ‘Our and their accomplishments have nation honors her sons and daugh- been extraordinary,” he said. ters who answered the call to “This generation of active guard defend a country they never knew and reserve service members, this and a people they never met.’ They 9/11 generation has maintained answered the call. These words our security during a hard and cerapply equally to many others, to tainly divisive time in our nation’s today’s service members who are history. These men and women tomorrow’s veterans.” have disproved the myth of apaDahlke, commander of Air thy in their generation. They chose Force ROTC Detachment 670 at to serve a cause greater than themOSU, a professor and head of the selves, they answered a call.” Department of Aerospace Studies Over the next five years, more in the College of Arts and Sciences, than 1 million will transition back offered his unique perspective on to civilian life, embracing a new tomorrow’s veterans. CVHS stu- role as veterans. dents, professors and alumni are “Certainly, they’ve earned their often affiliated with the military. place among the greatest of gen“The term the ‘Greatest Generation’ is used for those who lived through the Depression and fought and won World War II, and it’s the perfect name. Now we have Generations X, Y and Z, and as this generation alphabet has reached its end, many maintain that the sense of entitlement, apathy and narcissism has risen exponentially with each letter, but let me present a different view,” Dahlke said, noting more than 3 million have joined the military since 9/11.

erations,” Dahlke said.

“If there is anything that our veterans have taught us, it is that there is no threat we cannot meet and there is no challenge we cannot overcome. And for that inspiration, for all the sacrifices, and those of veterans’ families that have helped keep our country safe and free, we thank each and every veteran, not just today, but every day, for every day. God bless each of you and God bless America.” KAYLIE WEHR

Air Force Lt. Col.

Benjamin Dahlke

speaks at the

CVHS Veterans Day observance.

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Commitment to Excellence HAUSER CONSIDERS ‘BEING INVOLVED’ HER TOP ACCOMPLISHMENT

In Dr. Wendy Hauser’s 28-year career, she spent 26½ years in hospitals accredited by the American Animal Hospital Association. She values AAHA’s ongoing commitment to excellence in its hospitals and the difference that makes for clients, patients and teams. Her veterinary business, Peak Veterinary Consulting, is also committed to excellence by “Creating Happy Teams and Healthy Hospitals.”

PHOTO / HOLLAND STUDIOS

“I enjoy consulting and presenting workshops on hospital culture, leadership, client relations and operations,” says Hauser, a 1988 alumna of OSU’s Center for Veterinary Health Sciences. “I perform limited relief veterinary services as part of my consultancy. I believe it is critical to keep a finger on the pulse of veterinary medicine at its foundational level — the examination room. My approach to consulting is influenced by my realworld experiences as a veterinarian who built a successful hospital from the ground up.” Hauser’s volunteer efforts include: ƒƒ Southeast Pennsylvania local veterinary group leadership ƒƒ Medical advisory board for the corporate aggregator she

sold her hospital to in 2009 ƒƒ Collaborator and co-facilitator for the Colorado Veterinary

Medical Association Power of Ten Recent Graduate Leadership Academy ƒƒ Communications coach at Colorado State University’s

College of Veterinary Medicine ƒƒ AAHA task forces that created the AAHA business group

initiative and the regional associate development course ƒƒ Veterinarian director on the AAHA board of directors in 2012 ƒƒ AAHA board vice president in 2015

She calls “being involved” her greatest accomplishment with AAHA.

D R . W E N DY H A U S E R

“‘Self’ doesn’t exist on this board,” she says. “By being a thoughtful, hardworking board member, participation is centered on collaboratively making the best choices for our members and providing resources to help them continue to succeed. Serving in AAHA leadership is truly one of the highlights of my veterinary career. As part of a team that helps direct the vision and mission of AAHA, I have been inspired to continuously develop new perspectives and skill sets.” Hauser encourages others to follow in her footsteps.

“Please be involved,” she says. “The strength of any organization is the sum total of the commitment of its members. By participating, the individual brings a different set of experiences and perspectives that will help build a vibrant, sustainable organization and enriches the volunteer’s life.” Hauser (née Mohr) grew up in Claremore, Okla. She decided at age 9 to pursue a career in veterinary medicine. Her involvement with 4-H exposed her to Oklahoma State University. She completed her undergraduate studies at OSU and never considered attending veterinary school anywhere else. “At that time, I wasn’t aware of the common application process. I still ‘bleed’ orange to this day,” she adds.

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Fancying Felines

SMITH’S VOLUNTEER WORK HELPS COUNTLESS CATS AND MORE

Dr. Roy Smith of Round Rock, Texas, has been volunteering and giving back to the community ever since he earned his DVM degree from Oklahoma State in 1962.

Smith was president of the Texas Veterinary Medical Foundation and longtime treasurer of the Texas Veterinary Medical Association. He was president of the American Association of Feline Practitioners in 2012 and is the group’s current treasurer.

organization where hundreds of special-needs cats have found a safe haven over the last 20 years. He is also a strong proponent of TNR (trap, neuter and return) programs. Smith owns and operates Central Texas Cat Hospital in Round Rock. He has had the feline-exclusive, no-declawing practice for more than 13 years. He has owned three other small animal practices in his career.

“My greatest accomplishment has been with the AAFP advancing feline veterinary medicine,” Smith says. “We have worked to educate the public on the importance of good health for He also serves on the board of directors for their cats. People are beginning to recognize the the Veterinary Information Network. “VIN is vital role cats play in our lives as companions.” an online source for veterinary medicine that Smith also supports multiple animal welfare literally is accessible around the globe,” Smith organizations in his area. He has a special inter- says. “The information we provide goes all over est in feline leukemia cats, and in 2004, he and the world to veterinarians everywhere. It is parhis wife co-founded Shadow Cats, a charitable ticularly helpful in underserved areas where veterinarians can now access valuable information.”

Smith encourages others to volunteer. “There are things coming down the road that are trying to change how we practice veterinary medicine,” he says. “We need people to get involved locally and nationally to keep the profession strong. Get involved when you are in veterinary college or from day one when you graduate. My motto is, ‘get involved, stay involved and don’t be discouraged. Persevere. You can make a difference.’ Some may think their one vote or one action doesn’t matter, but it does. It all starts with one. Get involved and make difference in your community, your state, your region and the world.”

PHOTO COURTESY / DR. ROY SMITH

“ M Y M OT TO I S , ‘ G E T I N VO LV E D, S TAY I N VO LV E D AND DON’T BE D I S C O U R AG E D. PERSEVERE. YO U C A N M A K E A D I F F E R E N C E .’ ” — DR. ROY SMITH

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“ I H AV E TO R E M I N D M YS E L F T H AT N OT E V E RYO N E G E T S TO S E E A B A L D E AG L E U P - C LO S E I N T H E I R L I F E T I M E .” — DR. PAUL WELCH

Where Eagles Fly WELCH OFFERS EXPERTISE TO PERKINS AVIARY

Dr. Paul Welch earned his DVM degree from OSU in 1981. Once he figured out he didn’t really want to be a zoo veterinarian, he opened Forest Trails Animal Hospital in Tulsa — and he volunteers his veterinary services for the Grey Snow Eagle House in Perkins, Okla. “I have been working with Grey Snow Eagle House since the Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma opened it in January 2006,” Welch says. “I visit the aviary in Perkins at least four times a year. The rest of the time, they bring the birds to me. I can pin a broken wing in about 30 minutes.”

Welch also sees about 500 wildlife cases a year.

“I have been able to do a tremendous amount of work with wildlife cases including raptors like the bald and golden eagles cared for by the Iowa Tribe,” Welch says. “I have to remind myself that not everyone gets to see a bald eagle up-close in their lifetime. With the refuge housing about 48 bald eagles, I see them all the time. When one comes in the clinic, I try to remember to check the waiting room for clients. If there are any there, I invite them back. They are truly amazed at these magnificent birds.”

Welch has been involved with the AssoThe Grey Snow Eagle House is the ciation of Avian Veterinarians, serving as nation’s only facility that has the unique its president and on the board for 15 years. combination of permits that allows it to “I think when we get out of vet school, we carry out its mission — rehabilitation, relineed to do something a little extra with our gious use, education and research. Injured DVM degree,” he says. “Whether it’s wild- eagles are treated and released back into the life rehabbers or SPCA volunteers, do some- wild. Those unable to return to the wild thing where it isn’t about the money but are kept at the aviary, where their naturally the animals we treat. Some 30-plus years molted feathers are used in tribal ceremonies. Trained raptors help educate the publater, I’m still living the dream.” lic about the conservation of eagles, raptors and Native American beliefs. And research efforts support the conservation of eagles, our national bird. For more information about the Grey Snow Eagle House, visit eagles.iowanation.org. PHOTOS COURTESY / DR. PAUL WELCH

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CLASS OF 1966

50 years later … CLASS OF 1966 REUNITES IN STILLWATER BY DERINDA BLAKENEY, APR

When the members of the Class of 1966 graduated with their DVM degrees, they numbered 40, with 37 men and three women. In May 2016, 12 of the 27 living class members returned to Stillwater to celebrate the last 50 years. Here are brief summaries of their varied careers as OSU Cowboy veterinarians. GENESEE PHOTO

THE CLASS OF 1966 The Class of 1966 from OSU’s Center for Veterinary Health Sciences reunited with members seated from left: Drs. John Webster, Robert Fulton, Ernest Martin, John, Hahn, Ron Guthrie and Warren Newby. Standing, from left: Drs. Jerry Grant, Tony Fell, William Grantham, Ronald Roberts, Bill Barnum and Jack Roberson.

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DERINDA BLAKENEY, APR / CVHS

CATCH UP WITH THE CLASS OF

19 66

ANDY B. BAKER, DVM, became interested in veterinary medicine after spending time with the family veterinarian, Dr. Jack Bostwick (OSU ’51). Following graduation, Baker joined the Air Force as the base veterinarian and public health officer. He also obtained his pilot’s license. He specializes in small animal surgery and often flies to the location of his referral surgeries. The Texas Veterinary Medical Association awarded him the 2016 Medical Specialty Practitioner of the Year Award. BILL F. BARNUM, DVM, worked in the only veterinary clinic in Beaver, Okla., before joining the Oklahoma Department of Agriculture. He was director of its Food Safety Division until he retired in 2006. KAYE J. BOSE CHARLES, DVM, was one of three women in the 40-member class. After graduating, she joined a small animal practice in Kansas City, Kan., one of two female veterinarians in the Kansas City area then. She later switched to veterinary relief work until she retired in 2000.

JEFFERSON GARY EDWARDS, DVM,

practiced in Arkansas before joining Wayne Farms LLC, the sixth-largest poultry producer in the United States. Part of his responsibility included spending more than a year in Beijing to open the company’s Asian operation. He retired in 1999 and volunteers in his community. The Arkansas Hospital Association named him the 2011 Volunteer of the Year. EDWARD A. (TONY) FELL, DVM, joined a mixed animal practice in Pryor, Okla., which he bought 10 years later. During the next 31 years, it grew to three partners and six veterinarians. He especially enjoyed large animal medicine and retired in 2009. CONTINUES

DR. RON GUTHRIE

All in the Family Fifty years ago, DR. RON GUTHRIE of Woodward, Okla., had no idea he was starting a family legacy when he earned his DVM degree from Oklahoma State University. Younger brothers Darryl (’74) and W.E. (’76) followed suit. So did Guthrie’s oldest daughter, Kimber, and her husband, Jim Giles (both ’98). In May 2016, Guthrie welcomed another family member into the OSU Cowboy veterinarian line, hooding his great-nephew, Andrew Willis. “Andrew was born and raised in Woodward, so we were very close to him. As he grew up, he started coming around the clinic,” Guthrie says. “I didn’t know that I was going to get to hood him, but I knew that he was going to graduate. It’s an honor for me to be able to do that. I think he’ll make a great veterinarian.” He remembers well his own history. “I grew up in Burns Flat, Okla., on a dairy farm,” Guthrie says. “I saw the necessity for veterinarians and about the age of 10 or 11, I decided that I would like to be a veterinarian. I was on the judging team in FFA, and we made annual trips over here, so I was already familiar with OSU. I was a football and basketball fan, so

it was the only consideration I ever had as far as where to go to earn my DVM degree. I had no idea it would start such a legacy.” Following graduation, Guthrie served two years in the Army. He then worked at a mixed animal practice in Woodward for 38 years before retiring in 2006. “The highlight of my career was living in a relatively small community and becoming part of that community,” he says. “The friendships that you build and the service you provide, whether it’s large animal or small animal. It’s just a great, rewarding career.” Guthrie said the 50-year reunion has been fun, visiting and seeing how his classmates have lived their lives. “One of the challenges is just recognizing everybody after 50 years,” he says. “I’ve seen one or two that I would not have known but most of us still have at least a resemblance after 50 years. I’m very thankful for OSU and the veterinary school.”

Check out a video of Dr. Guthrie at OKLA.ST/gzdVtZ

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CLASS OF 1966

ROBERT W. FULTON, DVM, PH.D., served in the Air Force Veterinary Service before earning a master’s degree and a doctorate in veterinary microbiology. A critical thinker and scholar, he spent 34 years teaching and conducting bovine respiratory disease research at OSU’s veterinary center. He served as department head, a Regents Professor and the Endowed Chair in Food Animal Research. In 2015, he received the Outstanding Service Award from the Academy of Veterinary Consultants.

TERRY A. JACKSON, DVM, PH.D.,

worked for the U.S. Public Health Service. After becoming a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Pathology, he joined the USDA Animal Research Service pathology unit. He went on to conduct toxicology and pathology studies at Upjohn on compounds designed for humans. Several mergers and 24 years later, Pfizer ended the studies, and Jackson retired.

B E T T Y L . R E D D I C K , D V M , worked in small animal or mixed animal practices throughout her career. She also completed a residency in radiology at Kansas State University and did graduate program studies in oncology at Colorado State University. She served several years as a director in the New Mexico Veterinary Medical Association and is now retired.

ROBERT J. (JACK) ROBERSON, DVM,

was a worked 21 years at an AAHA-certified small commissioned officer for the U.S. Public Health animal hospital in Texas before moving to clinService as an epidemiologist for the Centers for ics in Missouri. He has served as the Class of GERRY L. GRANT, DVM, served two years in the Army before becoming the resident vet- Disease Control. In 1971, he opened a central 1966 representative and as president of the OSU erinarian for Beaver Dam Plantation, a purebred veterinary hospital and three outpatient clin- College of Veterinary Medicine Alumni Society. Angus ranch in north Mississippi. In 1971, he ics with three other veterinarians. This practice His other love involves plants and plant genetbecame the sole owner of a Clarksdale, Miss., grew into a 12-doctor, 60-plus staff operation ics. He is manager of product development at mixed animal practice. His practice became with four outpatient clinics and one central his 40-year-old company, American Daylily and the fifth American Animal Hospital Associa- hospital. Perennials, and has received several horticultion-certified practice in Mississippi at that time. ture awards and honors. He continues working there today. ERNEST S. MARTIN, DVM, worked at pridecided to focus on equine medicine and surgery. He worked for two racetrack practitioners before establishing his own equine practice in 1972. He serves several racetracks in northern California’s Bay Area today. WILLIAM A. GRANTHAM, DVM,

STEPHEN M. JONES, MS, DVM,

vate practices while attending Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary. He eventually opened a practice in Dallas, working there for 28 years. For 22 of those years, he also pastored a church. In addition, he did cancer research with Morton Cancer Hospital and Wadley Research Institute before retiring in 2003.

STAUFFER MILLER, DVM, served two NOLAN L. GROSS, DVM, served in the Army in charge of guard dogs and meat inspec- years in the Army Veterinary Corps. He also tions for Ohio and Pennsylvania. In 1969, he worked in small animal practices in West Virbuilt Mingo Road Veterinary Hospital in Tulsa ginia and in state diagnostic laboratories in and in 1981, he and his wife, Ginger, opened West Virginia and Maryland. In 1994, he moved Southern Agriculture, a retail store with “all to Cape Cod, Mass., and stopped practicing vetthings for all animals,” which grew to eight erinary medicine to focus on historical research. stores. He died in December 2009; his widow attended the 50-year reunion. His family still WARREN K. NEWBY, DVM, served two owns and operates Southern Agriculture. years at a research post in the Army. He then opened a solo mixed animal practice and later built a new clinic, both in Kansas, where he pracJOHN W. HAHN, DVM, MS, served two years in the Air Force. He worked at the St. ticed his entire career. He still practices some. Louis University School of Medicine doing surgical research for 12 years, then joined a small animal practice for five years. He then became a veterinary medical officer for the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Veterinary Services, serving as a poultry disease epidemiologist. After more than 20 years at USDA, he retired in 2005.

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RONALD Q. ROBERTS, DVM, served in the military for five years, including three on assignment in Berlin. After returning to the U.S., he owned and managed a small animal practice in Tulsa for 25 years before merging the practice with Dr. Ross Clark at Woodland Animal Hospital. He continued to practice there until retirement. JOHN R. WEBSTER, DVM, served two years in the Army Veterinary Corps. He returned to practice in North Carolina, doing mainly large animal work. He is retired and raises cattle on his farm. He enjoys checker tournaments and won the National Checker Championship in 2007.


REUNIONS In 2016, OSU Cowboy veterinarians and guests gathered at the Wes Watkins Center for the Corral Crawl. A great time was had by all, especially those celebrating class reunions.

Class of 1966

Drs. Tony Fell (left) and Robert Fulton PHOTOGRAPHY BY GARY LAWSON / UNIVERSITY MARKETING

Class of 197 1

Seated, from left: Drs. Sybil Heise, Gary Detrich, Lawrence McTague and Tim Woody Standing, from left: Drs. Wayne Sizelove, Jimmie Shipman, Glenn Huckabee, Robert Hall, Charles Jackson and John Scott

Class of 1976

Drs. Harold Haynes (left) and Jerry Pack

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Class of 1981

The Class of 1981 dedicated this bench in honor of their class and in memory of classmates who have passed away. Front row, from left: Drs. Paul Welch, Genie Bishop, Lynetta Freeman, Renee Hammer, Stephen Meyerdirk, Jeff Tidwell, Mark Kopit and Roger Panciera, emeritus professor Second row, from left: Drs. Dee Gragg, Larry Thompson, and Paula Bailey. Third row, from left: Drs. Art Quinn, emeritus professor; Kevin Allen; Bob Ables; Phillip Steinert; Rocky Bigbie and Tom Taggert

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Class of 1991

Seated, from left: Drs. Jerry Ritchey, Susan Harrington, Elizabeth Owen, Tracy Jenkins, Karen Kapp-Vance and Richard Hufnagel Standing, from left: Drs. Travis Mauldin, Troy Osborne, Steven Lucas, Christopher Schumpert, Mark Richards, Steven Giles and Mike Jones

Class of 1986

Seated, from left: Drs. Michelle Quinn, Karen Matlock, Leslie Cole, Diane Delbridge, Susanne Short, Tamara Dormire, Susan Gaffney and Susan

Tomlinson

Standing, from left: Drs. Joseph Quinn, Chris McMeans, Kenneth Powell,

Michael Nichols, Roddy Roberts, Keith Fuchs, Grant Rezabek, Richard Prather, Tim Wilkins, Martin Furr, Matt McQuade, William Boyd and Paul Robertson

Class of 1996

Drs. Timothy Snider and Kelly Cooper

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2016 DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI

Distinguished Alumni Award

LT. COL. MARK R. DUFFY

DONALD D. HOLMES

THOMAS G. LOAFMANN

DVM, MPH, DACVPM

DVM, MS, DACLAM

DVM

U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Mark R. Duffy, DVM, MPH, DACVPM, of Cibolo, Texas, earned his DVM degree from Oklahoma State University in 1994. He partnered in a rural western Montana practice before accepting an Air Force commission in 1999. In 2003, he earned a master’s degree in public health. He is an active diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Preventive Medicine.

Dr. Donald D. Holmes of Wichita, Kan., Dr. Thomas G. Loafmann of Glencoe, Mo., earned his DVM degree from OSU in 1954 and owns and operates Equine Medical Associates serves as class representative. Inc., one of the first equine medical and surgiHe worked in a mixed animal practice before cal clinics in the St. Louis area. He still practices serving in the U.S. Army (1955-59) as a first today, doing ambulatory calls and specializing lieutenant and receiving a letter of commenda- in dentistry.

In 2007, Duffy led a team of scientists in identifying and studying the first known Zika virus outbreak on Yap Island in Micronesia. Subsequently, his paper in the New England Journal of Medicine documented the outbreak. His published literature on Zika and other outbreaks has been cited by more than 1,000 peer-reviewed papers.

Again, he was the first lab animal veterinarian at both the VA and OUHSC, and both earned AAALAC accreditation under his leadership. He also assisted with pathology labs for OU medical and dental students and established a nationwide training program for VA animal

Born in Clayton, N.M., Loafmann grew up in Oklahoma and graduated from Prague High School as valedictorian. He earned a bacheDuffy currently serves as the public health He earned a master’s degree in veterinary lor’s degree in agriculture (1961) and a DVM officer for the Air Force Education and Training pathology from OSU in 1962, then spent three (1963) from OSU. He worked in a mixed aniCommand at Fort Randolph, Texas. Among his years as the first lab animal veterinarian at the mal practice, then served in the Army Veterimany successes, Duffy developed a weeklong Civil Aeromedical Research Institute in Okla- nary Corps from 1966 to 1968. Soon after his course in humanitarian disaster response and homa City. Under his leadership, it became discharge, he established his own equine-only led training teams in The Gambia, Iraq, Afghan- AAALAC accredited. practice in 1968. istan, The Republic of Congo, and Macedonia. An active member of organized veterinary Holmes’ next appointment was split between He has led multiple infectious disease outbreak the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences medicine, Loafmann is a member of the Ameriresponses around the world, including dealing Center and the Oklahoma City Veterans can Veterinary Medical Association (1963), Miswith an outbreak of plague in northern Uganda Affairs Medical Center. Shortly after starting, souri Veterinary Medical Association (1965) and characterized Japanese encephalitis epide- he became a diplomate of the American Col- and the American Association of Equine Pracmiology in Vietnam. lege of Laboratory Animal Medicine (1966). titioners (1969). He has served in leadership

CONTINUES

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tion. The first veterinarian to serve as chief of the Experimental Animal Laboratory, he established the hospital’s Surgical Research Unit.

CONTINUES

roles and has published a book on equine hospital planning and construction. He has also taught equine science and health care at St. Louis Community College. CONTINUES


DUFFY CONTINUED

HOLMES CONTINUED

In 2015, the secretary of agriculture pre- facility supervisors. In addition, Holmes served sented the Dr. Daniel E. Salmon Award to Duffy as the lab animal consultant for the OU Medifor exemplary achievement in Federal Veter- cal Research Foundation and OU main campus. inary Medicine. Some of the major military Through the efforts of Dr. Gary White, a library/ awards and decorations he has earned include conference room in the OUHSC’s Biomedithe Bronze Star, Meritorious Service Medal, Air cal Science Building was dedicated to Holmes. Force Commendation Medal, National Defense From 1979 to 1986, Holmes served as the Service Medal and Global War on Terrorism director of Laboratory Animal Resources and Expeditionary Medal. professor of veterinary pathology at OSU’s CenMark is married to retired Air Force Maj. ter for Veterinary Health Sciences. He was also Angela Duffy. They have four children and share the attending veterinarian for OSU’s main campus. He authored a reference book, Clinical Laba passion for fitness and fly fishing. oratory Animal Medicine: An Introduction, which To see Lt. Col. Duffy’s video has been distributed internationally. on the Zika Virus, visit okla.st/2hnziCO

His final position (1986-93) before retirement was chief veterinary medical officer for the Department of Veterans Affairs in Washington, D.C. In 1991, the VA recognized Holmes’ commitment and dedication with the establishment of the Laboratory Animal Medicine Reference Library.

Throughout his career, Holmes has been active in organized veterinary medicine. He is a member of the American Veterinary Medical Association, the Oklahoma Veterinary Medical Association, American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine, American Association for Laboratory Animal Science and the Society of Experimental Biology and Medicine, to name a few. Holmes mentored many young veterinarians, especially through his work with the VA. He and colleagues created the Association of VA Veterinary Medical Officers to better coordinate activities and communications nationwide. He was a member of the Edmond YMCA’s board of management and the First United Methodist Church of Edmond’s board of trustees. He is a life member of the OSU Emeriti Association (president in 1998-1999), the OVMA and the OSU Alumni Association. He and Mary have been married 61 years. They have a son and a daughter.

LOAFMANN CONTINUED

Loafmann has mentored 93 pre-veterinary volunteers, 43 veterinary student externs and 37 graduate interns. As a class representative, he has spent countless hours during the last 53 years keeping his classmates connected and organizing class reunions.

He has been married to Fredda-Lois for 52 international reputation in biomedical research, veterinary science and medicine each year years. They have a son, Thomas G. Loafmann Jr., a daughter, Beth Renee Pawley, and four during the Fall Conference. Loafmann has served on missions to the grandchildren. He is dedicated to his family Navajo Indian Reservation (1977, 1978), Chey- and the Quest Evangelical Free Church, where enne Indian Reservation (1981), Bolivia (1984, he serves on the Elder Board. He is known for He was instrumental in establishing the 1985) and Mongolia (2002, 2006, 2013). He was his work ethic, his dedication to his clients and Class of 1963 Endowed Distinguished Lec- instrumental in conceiving and implementing to the well-being of their horses. He goes above tureship with his classmates. The endowment a continuing education program for Mongo- and beyond the call of duty and has truly had a provides opportunities for faculty, students lian veterinarians that has substantially raised positive impact on the profession of veterinary and practitioners to interact with eminent the level of veterinary medical expertise and medicine. scholars, speakers and leaders of national and practice there.

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PHOTO / COURTESY

HALL NAMED OKLAHOMA’S 2016 VETERINARIAN OF THE YEAR

D

“I initially took a job here at the Department r. Rod Hall didn’t set out to become the state veterinarian. He was happy in of Agriculture as a staff veterinarian,” Hall says. his mixed animal practice, where he “I was over the cattle programs and a Brucellosis enjoyed the large animal work most of all. So epidemiologist. I just worked for my boss, and how did the man who leads the entire agricul- she was great. She gave me a lot of leeway, and ture livestock industry in Oklahoma come to I pretty much did my job and was very happy be not only the state veterinarian but Oklaho- doing that. Then she took another job with the ma’s 2016 Veterinarian of the Year, so named by United States Department of Agriculture and the Oklahoma Veterinary Medical Association? left us without a state veterinarian.”

The answer is easy — hard work and a commitment to doing the best possible job for his clients. Those clients went from individuals when he was in private practice to producers and veterinarians across Oklahoma as state veterinarian.

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Dr. Michael Herrin, the assistant state veterinarian at the time, and Hall discussed the open position. “We both applied with the idea that probably one or the other of us would be chosen,” Hall says. “We just thought it would be better for one

of us to take it where we already knew the process and thought it would be a smoother transition. So ultimately that’s how I ended up here; it certainly wasn’t on my bucket list or anything.” Since taking the position in 2011, Hall has discovered much to enjoy about being state veterinarian. “I love that I get to talk to a lot of veterinarians,” he says. “We’ve worked really hard at trying to develop a good relationship with the practitioners, and I think we’ve made progress. And then I enjoy interacting with the different producer groups like Oklahoma Cattlemen’s Association, Oklahoma Pork Council. I enjoyed my clients when I was in practice, and I feel like


“ D O N ’ T B E A F R A I D TO G O TO A S M A L L TOW N A N D G O I N TO A M I X E D A N I M A L P R AC T I C E . I T ’ S H A R D WO R K . B U T I T H I N K YO U H AV E S U C H A N O P P O R T U N I T Y TO R E A L LY M A K E A P O S I T I V E I M PAC T O N P E O P L E ’ S L I V E S . W H E N A V E T E R I N A R I A N M OV E S I N TO A S M A L L TOW N , P E O P L E LO O K TO YO U A S S O M E O N E T H AT T H E Y R E S P E C T. W E R E A L LY N E E D M I X E D A N I M A L P R AC T I T I O N E R S .” —DR. ROD HALL

now I still have a similar job. I have clients, but my job now is basically to protect the livestock industry in Oklahoma.

And that line of thinking and keeping animal owners and veterinarians statewide informed has earned Hall the respect of his peers.

“Sometimes we have to quarantine herds and maybe even depopulate a herd of animals to get rid of a disease. It’s hard, but it’s also very interesting doing the epidemiology and trying to figure out where that disease came from and did it go somewhere? Do we have it contained? Whenever I talk to veterinarians, and especially younger veterinarians, I encourage them to call with problems or questions. We would rather help you work through something than have you do something wrong.”

“It’s just a tremendous honor to be given that award (Oklahoma Veterinarian of the Year) by the people who I consider to be my colleagues and friends,” he says. “I thank the OVMA for the award. I am proud of this profession. I’ve always thought that being a veterinarian was a really neat way to make a living.”

Hall earned his DVM degree in 1977. He married that summer, and the couple went to Alva, Okla., where he worked for Dr. Ben McKinley (OSU ’72) at Ridgeview Veterinary Hall calls communication key, and today’s Clinic for one year. Even though he loved Alva, technology makes it easier to disseminate the clinic and the people, he decided that wasn’t where he wanted to spend the rest of his life. information. “Our mission is to protect the herd and flock The couple moved to Tishomingo, Okla., where of Oklahoma, and we do that in so many dif- he ran a mixed animal practice for 29 years. For those thinking of working in a mixed ferent ways. Today, we have a staff with about 15 field people. We consider the practitioners animal practice, Hall has some words of our partners in working with producers and encouragement. educating the public on why it’s important to get your horses tested for EIA every year. Why it’s important to get a certificate of veterinary inspection when you’re traveling to another state. If they have questions or don’t agree with something that we say, well, let us know. We want to help them in any way that we can.”

“Don’t be afraid to go to a small town and go into a mixed animal practice. It’s hard work. You’re going to have to take after-hour calls. But I think you have such an opportunity to really make a positive impact on people’s lives. When a veterinarian moves into a small town, people look to you as someone that they respect. There are lots of great civic organizations that you will be invited to be a part of. We really need mixed animal practitioners.” Whether he’s taking a veterinarian’s call to discuss a potential disease problem or discussing cases that need testing performed or epidemiological investigations completed, Dr. Rod Hall is part of all Oklahomans’ lives as he and his team work to keep the food supply safe and animals and their owners healthy. To watch the video of Dr. Rod Hall talking about his career, visit okla.st/2hnOL5J

Other Honorees

At the Oklahoma Veterinary Medical Association’s 101st Annual Convention and Expo, the following OSU alumni were also honored:

Dr. Bob Shoup (’82), COMPANION ANIMAL PRACTITIONER OF THE YEAR Dr. Kimberly Huckaby (’06), YOUNG PRACTITIONER OF THE YEAR Dr. Dan Merkey (’68), DISTINGUISHED SERVICE AWARD

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From left: Edwin and Katherine Sain and Dr. Mike Wiley visit a patient in the equine barn.

Recognizing a Veterinarian and a Need SAINS ENDOW SCHOLARSHIP TO HONOR WILEY’S CARE AND HELP KEEP POSITIONS FILLED DERINDA BLAKENEY, APR / CVHS

It’s not often that clients would endow a scholarship in honor of their favorite veterinarian, but that’s exactly the case for Dr. Mike Wiley of the Equi-Center Veterinary Hospital in Norman, Okla. Clients Katherine and Edwin Sain of Oklahoma City have been bringing their horses to Wiley since 1986.

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GENESSEE PHOTO

“We inherited him from my father-in-law, who had race horses,” Katherine Sain says. “He brought his horses here so when we moved back to Oklahoma, we started bringing our horses here. I like his ability to get the job done when it needs to be done.” “Also, he cares,” Edwin Sain adds. “As far as taking care of the horses, he cares.” “It’s like he has a personal interest in them. They are not just somebody’s horses,” Katherine continues. The Sains met while attending Oklahoma State University. They lived across the United States before returning to Oklahoma when aging parents needed tending. The couple started raising and showing registered paint horses.

DERINDA BLAKENEY, APR / CVHS

Darcy Messerly of Enterprise, Utah, received the first Dr. Michael J. Wiley Endowed Scholarship.

“… THERE ARE FEWER AND FEWER LARGE ANIMAL VETS. … I H O P E P E O P L E F O L LOW U P O N W H AT W E ’ V E S TA R T E D.” — KATHERINE SAIN

They have been so impressed with Wiley that they recently endowed a scholarship in his honor.

He’s not the only one passionate about horses in this story.

“We had been thinking about it for a couple of years,” Katherine says. “After talking to him on several occasions, he said there are fewer and fewer large animal vets. There is a need. You have to have someone to take his place when he decides to retire. And we thought what better than the vet school, at the school we graduated from, to endow the scholarship in his name.”

“We like horses so that’s where our main thrust is,” Katherine says. “More people are getting in the horse business and more vets are getting out so we’re going to need more vets. And if you’re into agriculture or anything that supports the horse industry or vice versa, do something and give it back. There aren’t enough to go around, and we need more large animal vets.”

Wiley says learning of the scholarship set off an array of emotions.

OSU graduates between 85 and 90 veterinarians a year, with around a third going into large animal practices.

“It was a very nice honor. It’s nice to have your clients think that much of you,” he says.

“No gift is too small,” Katherine says. “I hope The Dr. Michael J. Wiley Endowed Scholarship in people follow up on what we’ve started. Pick a Large Animal Medicine will be awarded to a third- scholarship that is already started and put someor fourth-year veterinary student who has achieved thing to it. If you want to start your own, do that, high academic performance and is interested in large too. I’ve always said, ‘In lieu of flowers, send it to animal medicine. The first award was given in April the scholarship.’” DERINDA BLAKENEY, APR to Darcy Messerly of Enterprise, Utah. A member of the Class of 2016, Messerly has joined Dr. Rod Auffet To support future veterinarians, contact (OSU CVM ’95) at a rural, predominantly large anithe OSU Foundation’s Heidi Griswold, mal mixed veterinary practice in Wray, Colo. senior director of development for OSU’s Center for Veterinary Health “I grew up on a ranch in Oklahoma. OSU’s veteriSciences, at hgriswold@osugiving.com or 405-385-5656 nary college was a good place to go and I got an excellent education there, graduating in 1980,” Wiley says. To watch a short video with the Sains “You get to deal with a variety of people in a variety and Dr. Wiley, visit okla.st/1ONTbbX. of situations. No days are the same; they are always different. I think I’m fortunate in that my profession also turned out to be my passion.”

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IN MEMORIAM

Dr. Louie G. Stratton, founder of Stratton Award

L O U I E G . S T R AT TO N

Louie G. Stratton, DVM, Ph.D., Diplomate In 1980, Dr. Stratton was appointed as the of the American College of Theriogenologists, first director of the Boren Veterinary Medical died Aug. 1, 2016. He was 85. Teaching Hospital, opening the hospital. From 1984 to 1985, he added interim head of mediHe was born Oct. 25, 1930, in Cookson, Okla., cine and surgery to his titles of professor and and remained a lifelong resident. He earned his hospital director. From 1985 to 1988, he carried DVM degree from then-Oklahoma A&M Colthe responsibilities of professor, head of medlege in 1955 and went into private practice in icine and surgery, and hospital director. From Siloam Springs, Ark., from 1955 to 1968. Dr. 1988 until he retired in 1989, Dr. Stratton served Stratton was a member of the Arkansas Veteras professor and assistant dean of college outinary Practitioners Association and the Arkanreach for OSU’s College of Veterinary Medicine. sas Veterinary Medical Association, serving as

president in each organization.

WE HONOR THOSE WHO HAVE SERVED THE PROFESSION, OUR DISTINGUISHED COLLEAGUES AND FRIENDS.

Upon his retirement, the Stratton Staff From 1968 to 1971, Dr. Stratton was a National Award was established at OSU’s College of Institutes of Health postdoctoral trainee in the Veterinary Medicine. Dr. Stratton wanted this Department of Physiological Sciences at Okla- award to honor outstanding staff members for homa State University’s College of Veterinary their dedicated service and many key contriMedicine. In 1971, he became a research asso- butions. Nominations are accepted from any ciate and later a temporary assistant professor. employee of today’s Center for Veterinary In 1972, Dr. Stratton worked as an assistant Health Sciences and recipients are selected by professor in the Department of Animal Sci- an ad hoc committee appointed by the dean.

During his OSU tenure, Dr. Stratton served ences at the University of Arkansas. In July 1973, on numerous academic committees and menhe returned to his alma mater as an associate tored several veterinary and graduate students. professor in the Department of Medicine and He was an active member of several professional Surgery, becoming a professor in 1977. organizations including the American VeteriFrom 1978 to 1979, Dr. Stratton was also the nary Medical Association, the Oklahoma Vetacting coordinator of veterinary research. From erinary Medical Association (president), North 1979 to 1980, he served as professor and coorCentral Oklahoma Veterinary Medical Associadinator of animal disease research, and in 1980, tion (president) and the Society for Theriogenolhe was appointed as professor and director of ogy. In 1991, the Oklahoma Veterinary Medical research. The president appointed Dr. StratAssociation named Dr. Stratton the Oklahoma ton to serve as the first veterinary member on the Joint Committee for Food and Agriculture Veterinarian of the Year, and in 2008, OSU’s CenResearch of the U.S. Department of Agricul- ter for Veterinary Health Sciences awarded him ture. Ordered by Congress, this committee was a Distinguished Alumnus Award for his contricomposed of individuals from private industry, butions to OSU, his community and the profesuniversities and the USDA and charged to pro- sion of veterinary medicine. duce a report on the future role of the USDA.

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PHOTO / GREG KINDRED

Dr. Day is survived by his wife, Clara McCord Day; daughters, Cynthia Wilson and Sarah Day; son, John Diaz Day; six grandchildren; brother, James L. Day; and nieces and nephews. SOURCE: IDAHO STATESMAN

Dr. Larry W. Edwards Dr. M. Joseph Bojrab M. Joseph Bojrab, DVM, MS, Ph.D., died at his Las Vegas home on Sept. 13, 2016. He was 76.

Dr. Gordon Andrews Dr. Gordon Allan Andrews of Manhattan, Kan., died on Jan. 17, 2016, at Stormont Vail Medical Center in Topeka, Kan. He was 62. Born in Batavia, N.Y., he earned his bachelor’s degree from Cornell University (’75) and his DVM degree from OSU (’84). Following graduation, he worked in general and emergency veterinary medicine in New Jersey. In 1987, he entered Kansas State University, earning his doctorate in anatomical pathology in 1991 and completing his residency in veterinary pathology in 1992. He became a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Pathologists in 1993. He was a professor of diagnostic pathology at the KSU College of Veterinary Medicine for 22 years.

Born in Fort Wayne, Ind., he earned his DVM degree from Purdue University in 1964. He joined the Oklahoma State University veterinary clinical sciences faculty in 1966 as an instructor in the Department of Veterinary Surgery. He earned a master’s degree in physiology in 1968. In 1969, he received a National Science Foundation Faculty Fellowship and traveled to the University of Bristol, England, where he studied veterinary anatomy and earned his Ph.D. in 1971. Dr. Bojrab returned to OSU and was appointed associate professor and head of small animal surgery in 1973. He later taught at the University of Missouri College of Veterinary Medicine before opening a surgical consulting practice in Las Vegas in 1987. Dr. Bojrab was known for his surgery textbooks, lectures and hands-on laboratory courses featuring surgical pointers and techniques. It has been calculated that he delivered more than 800 seminars and presentations on veterinary surgery around the world. Dr. Bojrab was also heavily involved in continuing education, recruiting speakers for and managing the clinical track of the Central Veterinary Conference.

Dr. Andrews loved being outdoors and cultivating his flower and vegetable gardens. He enjoyed hiking, fishing and attending sporting events with his famMemorial gifts may be made to the Mary W. Blazer ily. He was a talented woodworker and well known Fund for Gastroesophageal Cancer Research (www. for his cooking. marysfund.org). Mary (Bojrab) Blazer and Dr. Bojrab He is survived by his wife, Mary Anne, and their two were first cousins who were very close. daughters, Katherine Andrews of Lawrence, Kan., and SOURCES: DVM360 AND KRAFT-SUSSMAN FUNERAL SERVICES Emily Andrews of Manhattan, Kan.; his parents, Gordon and Barbara Andrews of Del City, Okla.; as well as many other relatives and friends. Dr. John Day Memorial donations may be made to Public TeleviJohn C. Day, DVM, M.D., of Kerrville, Texas, died Oct. sion station KTWU Washburn University in Topeka or 28, 2016. He was 86. Habitat for Humanity in care of the Yorgensen-Meloan-Londeen Funeral Home, 1616 Poyntz Avenue, Born in Eden, Texas, he grew up in Black Fork, Ark. He attended the University of Arkansas in FayetteManhattan, KS 66502. ville and earned his DVM degree from OSU in 1955. SOURCE: YORGENSEN-MELOAN-LONDEEN FUNERAL HOME

Larry Wayne Edwards, DVM, of McKinney, Texas, died Oct. 14, 2016, after a four-year battle with cancer. He was 75. Born in Elk City, Okla., he graduated from Hereford High School and earned his DVM degree from OSU in 1965. After graduation, he and his wife, Carol Ann Newell, moved to Sherman, Texas, where he practiced veterinary medicine until he retired in 2014. Carol died after 43 years of marriage, and Dr. Edwards met and married Kristy Carmichael in 2008. Dr. Edwards loved spending time with his family. He and his first wife were founding members of Sherman Bible Church. He did mission work in several foreign countries including a recent trip to Cuba. He was a huge Dallas and OSU Cowboys fan and enjoyed hunting, fishing, tennis and golf. Besides his wife, Dr. Edwards is survived by his mother, Edith Edwards of Sherman; daughter, Clair (Todd) Petelski of Van Alstyne, Texas; stepchildren, Taylor (Lee) Carmichael Wynkoop of Fort Collins, Colo., and Meredith Carmichael and Brody Carmichael both of Austin, Texas; son-in-law, Mike Gray of Baltimore; and four grandchildren. Memorial gifts may be made to Sherman Bible Church, 2515 W. Lamberth Road, Sherman, TX 75092 or to East-West Ministries, 2001 W. Plano Parkway, Suite 3000, Plano, TX 75075. SOURCE: THE HERALD DEMOCRAT, SHERMAN, TEXAS

Dr. Herschell Giles Herschell Giles, DVM, Ph.D., of Birmingham, Ala., died Feb. 25, 2016, just shy of 77 years old. Originally from Caddo County, Okla., he earned his bachelor’s, DVM (’67), and doctorate in pathology from Oklahoma State University. In 1970, he moved to Auburn University to teach clinical pathology at the College of Veterinary Medicine. In 1976, Dr. Giles moved to Birmingham and worked at Southern Research Institute in cancer research. After retiring, Dr. Giles continued as a pathology consultant for Veterinary Lab Services for many years.

He changed his career to human medicine, studying at the University of Oklahoma School of Medicine, where he met his wife of more than 50 years. He specialized in obstetrics and gynecology at St. John’s Hospital in Tulsa. His main focus in retirement was to be the best and Dr. Day made a midcareer change to specialize in favorite Pepa — and he was, his family will tell you. pathology. He spent the remainder of his working life in Boise, Idaho, as chief of the laboratory at St. Luke’s Hospital and chief of the medical staff. Upon retiring, he returned to Kerrville.

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Dr. Giles is survived by his wife, Jo Ann; sons, Dr. Eric Wynn Jones Jeff, Brent (Karen), Clay (Renea), Ross (Kathy), Rip Eric Wynn “Ginger” Jones, Ph.D., MRCVS, FRCVS, of (Kim), Ryan (Beth); daughter Ginger (Brian); and 11 Starkville, Miss., died April 8, 2016, in Tupelo, Miss. grandchildren. He was 91. Memorial gifts may be made to the American CanBorn in St. Martins, Shropshire, England, he gradcer Society, 1100 Ireland Way, Suite 201, Birminguated from the Royal Veterinary College, University ham, AL 35205. of London, and earned a Ph.D. in surgery at Cornell SOURCE: THE BIRMINGHAM NEWS University. While at Cornell, he met and married Florence “Sam,” and they enjoyed 55 years together until her death in 2003. In the early 1950s, Dr. Jones joined the clinical faculty at OSU’s College of Veterinary Medicine and was named director of clinical research in 1964. Concurrently, he established the Veterinary Research Laboratory. He developed the first suitable and efficient anesthetic machine for large animals using endotracheoscopy and co-authored the original textbook on veterinary anesthesia and analgesia. Dr. Jones served as a consultant for the planning and Dr. Kester Hawthorne establishment of a new College of Veterinary MedKester Walton Hawthorne, DVM, of Baton Rouge, La., icine at Mississippi State University. He left OSU in died Oct. 4, 2016, following a long battle with can- 1977 to serve as its vice dean until his retirement. cer. He was 73. Dr. Jones was an accomplished veterinarian, anesBorn in Provencal, La., he graduated from University High School in Baton Rouge and attended Louisiana State University. He earned his DVM degree from OSU in 1967. Dr. Kester went on to serve the greater Baton Rouge area for more than 40 years as a veterinarian. He was known for his sharp wit and sense of humor and enjoyed spending time with his family, especially at the False River family camp.

PHOTO / TOM THOMPSON

Dr. Jerry Kendrick

DR. ERIC WYNN JONES

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Following his military service, Dr. Kendrick returned to Fairmont and founded Middletown Animal Clinic. Here, he cared for animals and mentored future veterinarians for 41 years. He was easy going and enjoyed golfing, skiing, and being a devoted West Virginia University sports and Pittsburgh Steelers fan. Dr. Kendrick was preceded in death by his parents and first wife. He is survived by his wife of 27 years, Susan Kendrick; two sons, David Zane Kendrick of Houston, Texas, and Jeffrey Scott Kendrick of Waxhaw, N.C.; four grandchildren; and many other relatives and friends. Memorial gifts may be made to Pet Helpers Inc., 726 East Park Ave., Fairmont, WV 26554; the Marion County Humane Society, P.O. Box 905, Fairmont, WV 26555; or the Humane Society of Harrison County, 2450 Saltwell Road, Shinnston, WV 26431. SOURCE: TIMES WEST VIRGINIAN

thesiologist, researcher, inventor, pharmacologist and professor with a passion for veterinary research. He was recognized through myriad honors, awards, appointments, memberships and publications, including being named a Charter Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons and a Founder Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Anesthesiologists. He was also the first veterinarian appointed to the American Society of Anesthesiologists.

Dr. Hawthorne is survived by his wife of 47 years, Bonnie Hardin Hawthorne; his sons, Rhett Hawthorne and Dr. Jones is survived by his beloved daughter, Sarah (John) Orebaugh; granddaughter, Claire Fyvolent; his Kyle Hawthorne; and two grandchildren. friend and companion of more than 10 years, Deen Memorial donations may be made to Mary Bird PerSelf; and many other family and friends. kins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, LA 70809 or St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, SOURCE: STARKVILLE DAILY NEWS 501 St. Jude Place, Memphis, TN 38105. SOURCE: GREENOAKS FUNERAL HOME AND MEMORIAL PARK

He served seven years in the U.S. Air Force achieving the rank of captain. During that time, he earned a Master’s degree in laboratory animal medicine from Texas A&M University and completed his board certification in that field.

Dr. Allan Kimmell Dr. Allan Thomas Kimmell, of Topeka, Kan., died Jan. 21, 2015. He was 89. Born in Cherokee, Okla., he volunteered to enlist in the U.S. Navy at 17 years old. He served in the Naval Armed Guard during World War II from 1943 to 1946. He was a member of the second veterinary class at then-Oklahoma A&M College, earning his DVM degree in 1952. He opened his own veterinary practice in Kiowa, Kan., serving Kansas and Oklahoma from 1952 to 1976. For the next two years, Dr. Kimmell was a federal meat inspector. In 1978, he became the Kansas State Veterinarian. In 1985, he was appointed to the Kansas Department of Animal Health as the livestock commissioner for five years.

Dr. Jerry Zane Kendrick, 76, of Fairmont, W.Va., died on Thursday, Jan. 28, 2016, at Ruby Memorial Hos- Dr. Kimmell was preceded in death by his wife of pital in Morgantown, W. Va. 52 years, Betty L. (Liggenstoffer) Kimmell. He is Dr. Kendrick graduated from Fairmont Senior High survived by his sons, Bill (Nik) Kimmell of Canyon, School in 1957. He excelled at basketball and foot- Texas; Richard (Pattie) Kimmell of Olathe, Kan.; and ball. He attended Fairmont State University and com- Jeff (Michelle) Kimmell of Kiowa; daughter Karen Ann pleted his undergraduate degree at West Virginia Kimmell of Fort Summer, N.M.; eight grandchildren University. Kendrick earned his DVM degree from and three great-grandchildren. Oklahoma State University in 1963.


Memorial gifts may be made to the Kiowa District Hospital, 1002 S. 4th St., Kiowa, KS 67070 and the Masonic Arab Shrine Legion of Honor, 1305 S. Kansas Ave., Topeka, KS 66612. SOURCE: DOVE CREMATION & FUNERAL SERVICE

PHOTO / CORNELL UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE

Dr. King is survived by his wife of nearly 70 years, Marie Ryan King; his sister, Ruth King, nieces and nephews. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be directed to the charity of one’s choice. The Dr. John M. King Phi Zeta Endowed Scholarship Fund at Oklahoma State University’s Center for Veterinary Health Sciences honors Dr. King while providing financial support to deserving veterinary students who present the finest research presentation on Phi Zeta Research Day. Donations may be made payable to the OSU Foundation with #28-95200 or John King in the memo and mailed to Sharon Worrell, Oklahoma State University, 308 McElroy Hall, Stillwater, OK 74078.

Dr. Gregor Morgan Gregor Morgan, BVSc, MVSc, DACT, of Mehan, Okla., died Aug. 14, 2016. He was 64. The New Zealand native grew up working the family dairy farm. In 1975, he earned a BVSc degree (equivalent to a DVM degree) and in 1978 a master’s degree in reproductive physiology, both from Massey University in New Zealand. He came to Stillwater in 1978 to teach, complete a three-year residency in theriogenology and earn a Ph.D. in reproductive physiology specializing in swine. In 1983, he became a Diplomate of the American College of Theriogenologists. Dr. Morgan began as an assistant professor at OSU’s Veterinary Medical Hospital in 1982. Before leaving in 2010, he taught for more than 30 years specializing in production medicine and theriogenology. For 22 years, he served as the food animal medicine section chief.

SOURCES: ITHACA JOURNAL AND THE C.L. DAVIS/ S.W. THOMPSON DVM FOUNDATION

Dr. John King Dr. John M. King, of Ithaca, N.Y., died April 14, 2016. He was 89.

Dr. Morgan was a pioneer in embryo work in horses and cattle. He is credited with having the first successful equine embryo transfer in Oklahoma and participated in producing the first in-vitro calf at OSU. He was instrumental in starting the laparoscopic artificial insemination service in deer and small ruminants in the early 1990s.

Born in Boston, he joined the U.S. Army in 1945. He earned his DVM degree from Oklahoma State University in 1955 on the GI Bill. Following graduation, he went to Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine, where he taught for 50 years. He spent all of his sabbaticals in foreign countries, teaching Dr. Judy Larson and doing applied research.

He was an active member of the Society of Theriogenology, American College of Theriogenologists, Former students and colleagues from around the Dr. Judith “Judy” Ann Larson, of Tulsa, died Feb. 6, American Association of Bovine Practitioners, American Association of Equine Practitioners and the Amerworld shared their thoughts on this “legend, pillar 2016, after a long battle with cancer. She was 73. of pathology and unrivaled master of observation.” She earned her DVM degree from Oklahoma State ican Embryo Transfer Association. During his tenure at OSU, Dr. Morgan was an author or co-author of A sampling: University in 1981. various book chapters and journals. He has trained “He had a love of pathology, of learning, of students, Dr. Larson founded Brookside Veterinary Clinic in Tulsa. numerous veterinary students, graduate students, of teaching and of challenging minds — young and residents and faculty. SOURCE: CLASSMATE old alike. His pathology catechism contains more Dr. Morgan is survived by his wife, Dr. Sandra Morthan 100 questions about veterinary pathology that gan (OSU ’80), sons, Seth and Sean and their families. aren’t in any textbook.” PHIL SHOCKLEY / UNIVERSITY MARKETING SERVICES

“King was known for his show-and-tell sessions where he would produce a career’s worth of portable treasures from a black box.” “His book, The Necropsy Book, is the best-selling volume ever written for veterinary pathologists. His Necropsy Show and Tell website contains more than 20,000 images, which are used around the world.” Dr. King was considered “tough on the outside with a heart of gold.” “All who trained with him owe a great deal to him. He gave us a superb grounding in pathology on which to build our careers.”

William Dean Munson, DVM, of Tulsa, died Sept. 17, 2015, just eight days before his 85th birthday. He was born in Helena, Mont., and joined the U.S. Air Force after graduating from high school. He proudly served his country during the Korean War. After his honorable discharge, he earned his DVM degree from OSU in 1960. Dr. Munson opened a clinic in Skiatook, Okla., and worked in private practice until 1975. He then worked for the state and federal governments until he retired in 1988.

“He had passion — he was not teaching from the books; he was teaching from the heart and developing in his students a scientific curiosity and a passion to not just learn but discover, question and comprehend.” “I will miss him, but he’s not gone. A part of him still lives inside me; he influenced my life and guided my career path. Guidance that he willingly shared with so many.”

Dr. William D. Munson

He had a passion for horses, was an avid sports fan, and enjoyed going to casinos. He is survived by his children, Debra Kay Munson, Diana Sue Slaton (Claude), Donna Lynn Bruce, William R. Taylor, Michael Dean Munson (Glenda), and Patricia Jo Munson; eight grandchildren; and one great-grandchild. DR. GREGOR MORGAN

SOURCE: PAYNE FUNERAL HOME & CREMATION SERVICE CONTINUES

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Dr. David Shell Dr. David Shell, of Houston, died May 6, 2016, after a three-year battle with cancer. He was 70. Born in Jackson Hole, Wyo., he earned his DVM degree from OSU in 1970. He began his career in small animal medicine in Tulsa and practiced at Memorial 610 Hospital for Animals in Houston for 33 years.

Dr. Van Beckum is survived by his wife, Margaret began her first assignment as an intern at the First Sattler Van Beckum; his children, Peter Van Beckum Year Graduate Veterinary Education Program in Fort (Cindy Stanley), Sarah Van Beckum (Matt Biscan), Belvoir, Va. Her clinical interests included ophthalMary (Steve) Goshorn, David Van Beckum (Carina mology with a long-term goal of pursuing exotic vetAlt), Paula Van Beckum (Jonathan Alms), Joe Van erinary medicine. Beckum (Dona Zanotti), one granddaughter and Her military awards include the Army Commendaeight grandsons. tion Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Memorial contributions may be made to Doctors With- Global War on Terrorism Service Medal and the Army out Borders (http://tinyurl.com/JVB-donate). Service Ribbon. SOURCE: ALL COUNTY FUNERAL HOME AND CREMATORY

GENESSEE PHOTO

Capt. Ward spent her free time traveling, hiking, horseback riding and chasing after her Doberman, Zenzi, or cuddling with her cat, Aurora. She is survived by her parents and younger brother, who still live near Tulsa. SOURCE: U.S. ARMY VETERINARY CORPS

Dr. Shell retired in 2009 to spend more time with his family and grandchildren and to enjoy his hobbies.

Dr. Donald R. Whitehead

He is survived by his wife, Carmen, three children and five grandchildren. Memorial gifts may be made to Reach Unlimited, 12777 Jones Road, Suite 103, Houston, TX 77070.

Donald Raymond Whitehead, DVM, age 66 of Magnolia, Ark., passed away Dec. 7, 2015. Born in Walkers Creek, Ark., he earned his DVM degree from OSU in 1974. Dr. Whitehead practiced veterinary medicine in Magnolia for 40 years. He was a member of the Arkansas Veterinary Medical Association, serving as past president. In 1998, the Arkansas VMA voted him Veterinarian of the Year. He was also a member of the American Veterinary Medical Association, serving as a national delegate to the AVMA for 20 years.

SOURCE: HOUSTON CHRONICLE

Dr. Greg Smith Dr. Argus Gregory “Greg” Smith died March 2, 2016, in Bethany, Okla. He was 62. Born in Fort Benning, Ga., he earned his DVM degree from OSU in 1984. He practiced for more than 32 years, earning a reputation of caring deeply for his clients and their pets.

He was an avid duck hunter. He was a charter member of the Holly Mound Land Company Duck Hunting Club and a board member of Delta Water Fowl.

Dr. Whitehead is survived by his wife, Kay; two sons, Robert Whitehead (Lynea) of St. Louis, Mo., and Josh Capt. Kristen M. Ward Hillery of Prescott, Ark.; two daughters, Melonie Himel He is survived by his wife, Gayla; daughter, Jessica; Army Capt. Kristen Marie Ward, DVM, 25, of Tulsa, (Shane) of Sulphur, La., and Susannah Broome of mother, Lucille; and many other relatives and friends. died Sept. 13, 2016. Born and raised in the sub- Magnolia; and four grandchildren. SOURCE: FOUR STATES NEWS SOURCE: BUCHANAN FUNERAL SERVICE urbs of Tulsa, she graduated summa cum laude from OSU in 2012 with a bachelor’s degree in animal science. She earned her DVM degree from OSU in 2016. Dr. Smith enjoyed OSU sports, the OKC Thunder and NASCAR.

During veterinary college, she was active in student life and leadership positions. She served as student representative to the Oklahoma Veterinary Medical Association, ambassador for the OSU Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, vice president for the Society for Veterinary Surgery and Anesthesiology, fundraising chair for the American Association of Feline Practitioners, and secretary for the Zoo, Exotics and Wildlife Club. James R. Van Beckum, DVM Dr. James R. Van Beckum, DVM, originally from Rubicon, Wis., died at his home in Sebastian, Fla., on June 16, 2016, two days before his 86th birthday. He earned his DVM degree from Oklahoma State University in 1961. He was a farmer, a veterinarian and a sailor. He will be greatly missed by all who knew and loved him.

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She was inducted into the Phi Zeta National Veterinary Honor Society during her junior year. She earned multiple scholarships for her academic standing throughout veterinary college. Capt. Ward joined the Army through the Health Professions Scholarship Program while attending veterinary college. She graduated from the Army Medical Department Basic Officer Leader course in July 2014 and completed the Veterinary Track in July 2016. She


VET’S PETS

Foals in the Field Dr. Grant Rezabek and his wife, Dr. Chris Schiller, raise registered quarter horses on their 22-acre farm east of Stillwater. Currently, they have 13 horses at home and additional animals in Overbook, Okla., being trained as cutting horses. As lifelong horse owners involved in rodeo, show and performance events, they began breeding some of their successful retired mares in 2006. Rezabek is an assistant clinical professor in the Department of Veterinary Pathobiology with his primary assignment as a veterinary pathologist at the Oklahoma Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory. His primary interests are equine and bovine pathology and the musculoskeletal system. Schiller is a board-certified veterinary pathologist who works for ANTECH Diagnostics. Her pathology training was at the National Zoo in Washington, D.C., and her primary interest is in avian and exotic animals. PHIL SHOCKLEY / UNIVERSITY MARKETING


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Vet Cetera Winter 2016  

Vet Cetera magazine is a publication of the Oklahoma State University Center for Veterinary Health Sciences. Its purpose is to connect the c...

Vet Cetera Winter 2016  

Vet Cetera magazine is a publication of the Oklahoma State University Center for Veterinary Health Sciences. Its purpose is to connect the c...