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The State of

Diversity at OSU

1


OSU

Celebrate Diversity

At OSU, we place great value on our differences. OSU cultivates an inclusively diverse community of students, faculty and staff and promotes the importance of broadening perspectives within Oklahoma and around the world. This supportive environment translates to student success. OSU grants more undergraduate degrees to Native Americans than any other university in the nation. With 14 OSU students named as Arthur Ashe Jr. Sports Scholars in 2010, OSU ranks sixth nationally and tops the Big 12 in Ashe Scholars. OSU doesn’t just talk about inclusivity. The OSU Division of Institutional Diversity is here to empower individuals to think and act in ways that will embrace and promote a more inclusive world.

DIVISION OF

Institutional Diversity 2


Table of Contents l Table of Contents

3

l Preface 4 l Diversity Statistics l Institutional Diversity

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• Office of the Associate Vice President • Office of Equal Opportunity

5

11 13

• Office of Multicultual Affairs 13

l College & Academic Commitments to Diversity 22

• College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources

22

• College of Education

23

• Oklahoma Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation(OK-LSAMP) 16

16

• Diversity Academic Support

• Retention Initiative for Student Excellence & Inclusion Leadership Program • TRiO Department

l Scholarships

17 18

19

l Living Learning Communities

19

l Curriculum and Anchoring Faculty 20 l Selected International Engagement 21

• College of Arts and Sciences

• College of Engineering, Architecture, and Technology • College of Human Sciences

24 25

• Spears School of Business • Center for Veterinary Health Sciences

26

27

• The Graduate College

29

• Edmon Low Library • The Honors College

27 29

l Division of Student Affairs

30

l Additional Commitments to Diversity

31

• Residential Life

• Enrollment Management and Marketing

31

31

• Administration and Finance

32

• Oklahoma Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (OK-EPSCoR) 33

l Next Steps

3

22

34


Preface Oklahoma State University (OSU) has significantly strengthened its commitment to promoting and advancing diversity throughout its system during the previous five year period between 2005-2010. The evidence of this commitment has been, and continues to be, demonstrated through the establishment of a Division within the University which focuses solely on developing diversity-related programs and initiatives, as well as strengthening existing activities that are aimed at improving the awareness and presence of diversity among the students, staff, faculty, and administration at OSU. During the past two years, the University has been especially proactive in enhancing d i v e r s i t y awareness, as well as being aggressive in its efforts to recruit a more diverse student population. In 2005 OSU established the Division of Institutional Diversity in an effort to strengthen its commitment to supporting and advancing the value of diversity. In addition to establishing the Division, OSU began implementing several “best practices” related to strengthening the existence of diversity on university campuses across the United States. First, and foremost, OSU’s President, V. Burns Hargis, has expressed a strong and sincere

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commitment to supporting and advancing diversity throughout the system. Dr. Robert Sternberg, appointed as OSU Provost in May of 2010, has also made clear his commitment to strengthening the University’s support for and advancement of the values of diversity and inclusion. Other “best practices” that were implemented include integrating diversity into the institutional culture, as well as the creation of an institutionalized and publicly transparent measurement of the University’s progress in this area. In 2005, OSU drafted and implemented a new Strategic Plan, which identified diversity as one of OSU’s core values and as a top institutional priority. Additionally, the University also developed a Diversity Ledger, which makes virtually all of its indicators of diversity publicly available on the University’s website. This 5-year diversity report spotlights OSU’s commitment to diversity.


Diversity Statistics OSU provides transparent information to the University community and its constituency through the use of three publically available ledgers; the academic ledger, the student profile, and the diversity ledger. The diversity ledger provides statistics from 2005-2010 on faculty (by rank), staff, undergraduate, and graduate students by race/ethnicity and gender. In addition, the student profile provides, among other information:

ENROLLMENT BYBYCOLLEGE, ETHNICITY, AND GENDER ENROLLMENT COLLEGE, ETHNICITY, AND GENDER FALLSEMESTER SEMESTER 20102010 FALL Classification Ag. Sci. & Nat. Res.    Undergraduates    Graduates Arts & Sciences    Undergraduates    Graduates Spears School of Bus.    Undergraduates    Graduates Education    Undergraduates    Graduates Engr, Arch, & Tech    Undergraduates    Graduates Human Envir. Sci.    Undergraduates    Graduates Univ. Acad. Serv.    Undergraduates Special Graduates    Graduates Graduate College    Graduates Total    Undergraduate    Graduate

African Native White American American Hispanic Asian International Total Grand Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Total 852 108

1974 424

62 168

2729 2088 403 582

4817 985

56 64

73 104

1522 263

2251 616

3773 879

1141 661

755 312

1896 973

524 2557 163 714

3081 877

19 5

6 2

108 9

131 7

19 4

18 1

9 2

2 3

5 82

6 78

2075 1612 266 368

167 10

103 8

305 16

217 21

66 12

53 10

44 8

41 7

72 91

1165 1771 172 452

87 5

110 14

146 14

174 27

41 3

72 10

27 5

51 9

1012 210

951 504

576 225

33 43

59 21

108 53

71 32

27 18

29 6

13 8

9 7

9 35

11 21

384 40

2033 232

29 2

77 6

47 5

187 12

21 3

66 9

18 2

53 15

25 111

141 440

1182 115

178 25

54 11

12 2

144 6

27 0

33 5

14 1

20 3

2 1

14 48

5 16

1447 188

238 45

1685 233

348

354

37

64

46

47

14

14

11

11

7

18

463

508

971

175

122

25

6

22

14

5

4

2

6

9

15

238

167

405

56

33

7

4

9

5

4

2

2

2

35

46

113

92

205

6,957 7,323 1,436 1,580

426 108

431 63

904 134

854 118

221 54

266 43

142 32

169 50

188 475

316 888

Note:  This table does not include 344 professional students.

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962 214

799 123

8,838 9,359 18,197 2,239 2,742 4,981


ENROLLMENT BYBY GENDER ENROLLMENT GENDER

FALL SEMESTERS 1990 THROUGH 2010 FALL SEMESTERS 1990 THROUGH 2010 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

8997

10594

8905

10571

8893

10584

8605

10396

8439

10122

8754

10371

8801

10400

8998

10352

9459

11007

9809

11278

10008

11244

10360

11512

10972

12020

11373

12198

11379

12247

11314

12147

11456

11851

11210

11795

11000

11768

10988

11857

11342

0

5000

12180

10000 Females

6

15000 Males

20000

25000


ENROLLMENT BYBY ETHNICITY ENROLLMENT ETHNICITY FALL SEMESTERS 2000 THROUGH 2010 2010 FALL SEMESTERS 2000 THROUGH

Fall White African American Native American Hispanic Asian International Semester Number % Number % Number % Number % Number % Number % Total 2000 16,507 77.70% 709 3.30% 1,555 7.30% 347 1.60% 366 1.70% 1,768 8.30% 21,252 2001 16,753 76.60% 720 3.30% 1,656 7.60% 400 1.80% 379 1.70% 1,964 9.00% 21,872 2002 17,475 76.00% 766 3.30% 1,784 7.80% 415 1.80% 375 1.60% 2,177 9.50% 22,992 2003 17,905 76.00% 778 3.30% 1,838 7.80% 444 1.90% 371 1.60% 2,235 9.50% 23,571 2004 17,943 75.90% 918 3.90% 1,896 8.00% 447 1.90% 389 1.60% 2,033 8.60% 23,626 2005 17,894 76.30% 917 3.90% 1,973 8.40% 523 2.20% 388 1.70% 1,766 7.50% 23,461 2006 17,769 76.20% 959 4.10% 1,990 8.50% 533 2.30% 411 1.80% 1,645 7.10% 23,307 2007 17,443 75.80% 923 4.00% 1,993 8.70% 525 2.30% 388 1.70% 1,733 7.50% 23,005 2008 17,172 75.40% 930 4.10% 1,964 8.60% 566 2.50% 386 1.70% 1,750 7.70% 22,768 2009 17,297 75.70% 929 4.10% 1,915 8.40% 555 2.40% 363 1.60% 1,786 7.80% 22,845 2010 17,599 74.80% 1,029 4.40% 2,032 8.60% 594 2.50% 399 1.70% 1,869 7.90% 23,522

Note: This table includes professional students and OSU-Tulsa students for all years listed. Student Profile books prior to Fall 2003 do not contain OSU-Tulsa students on this page.

UNDERGRADUATEDEGREES DEGREES GRANTED GRANTED BY AND GENDER UNDERGRADUATE BYCOLLEGE COLLEGE AND GENDER ACADEMICYEARS YEARS2000-2001 2000-2001 THROUGH ACADEMIC THROUGH2009-2010 2009-2010 College 2000-01 2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 Ag Sci & Nat Res       Female 175 146 159 177 193 176 181 225 200 209       Male 225 211 230 222 223 215 214 232 231 219    Total 400 357 389 399 416 391 395 457 431 428 Arts & Sciences       Female 436 484 480 529 541 572 640 590 573 558       Male 339 360 369 409 422 446 463 430 466 409    Total 775 844 849 938 963 1018 1103 1020 1039 967 Spears School of Bus       Female 350 373 398 421 441 431 393 432 424 399       Male 422 467 511 534 533 584 581 593 588 610    Total 772 840 909 955 974 1015 974 1025 1012 1009 Education       Female 197 172 192 208 234 245 261 281 259 266       Male 135 104 161 142 147 162 172 182 166 163    Total 332 276 353 350 381 407 433 463 425 429 Engr, Arch, & Tech       Female 62 79 75 87 86 79 76 64 64 84       Male 385 367 351 334 369 400 383 377 432 409    Total 447 446 426 421 455 479 459 441 496 493 Human Envir Sci       Female 217 208 254 286 315 324 304 348 368 403       Male 37 33 41 43 45 64 44 68 62 58    Total 254 241 295 329 360 388 348 416 430 461 Totals       Female 1437 1462 1558 1708 1810 1827 1855 1940 1888 1919       Male 1543 1542 1663 1684 1739 1871 1857 1882 1945 1868    Total 2980 3004 3221 3392 3549 3698 3712 3822 3833 3787

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Note: Degrees are reported in the college that grants the degree.


MASTERS DEGREESGRANTED GRANTED BY BY COLLEGE MASTERS DEGREES COLLEGEAND ANDGENDER GENDER ACADEMICYEARS YEARS2000-2001 2000-2001 THROUGH ACADEMIC THROUGH2009-2010 2009-2010

College 2000-01 2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 Ag Sci & Nat Res       Female 26 27 33 33 34 25 26 51 45 56       Male 45 42 32 41 45 18 21 26 38 47    Total 71 69 65 74 79 43 47 77 83 103 Arts & Sciences       Female 101 79 70 89 80 82 88 64 78 73       Male 89 56 92 67 74 94 63 84 76 73    Total 190 135 162 156 154 176 151 148 154 146 Spears School of Bus       Female 59 53 70 81 97 67 87 74 101 93       Male 89 84 121 169 175 136 142 166 162 184    Total 148 137 191 250 272 203 229 240 263 277 Education       Female 92 112 124 132 118 113 99 107 111 108       Male 56 54 51 43 37 31 37 48 46 44    Total 148 166 175 175 155 144 136 155 157 152 Engr, Arch, & Tech       Female 43 29 43 37 35 45 25 28 42 32       Male 133 123 164 195 242 155 103 105 167 163    Total 176 152 207 232 277 200 128 133 209 195 Human Envir Sci       Female 31 26 33 30 40 46 29 41 45 40       Male 4 6 10 5 7 12 8 8 7 8    Total 35 32 43 35 47 58 37 49 52 48 Graduate College*       Female 40 42 17 40 44 39 38 38 46 50       Male 69 49 14 33 45 41 34 32 28 36    Total 109 91 31 73 89 80 72 70 74 86 Totals       Female 392 368 390 442 448 417 392 403 468 452       Male 485 414 484 553 625 487 408 469 524 555    Total 877 782 874 995 1073 904 800 872 992 1007

*Interdisciplinary graduate programs that do not have a specific area of specialization are reported in the Graduate College. Note: Degrees are reported in the college that grants the degree.

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DOCTORATE & PROFESSIONAL DEGREES GRANTED BYDEGREES COLLEGE AND GENDER DOCTORATE & PROFESSIONAL GRANTED BY COLLEGE AND GENDER ACADEMIC YEARS 2000-2001 THROUGH 2009-2010 ACADEMIC YEARS 2000-2001 THROUGH 2009-2010 College 2000-01 2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 Ag Sci & Nat Res       Female 12 5 6 7 5 11 7 7 9 14       Male 31 21 20 24 21 22 21 20 14 21    Total 43 26 26 31 26 33 28 27 23 35 Arts & Sciences       Female 15 10 17 14 11 13 15 11 17 23       Male 23 23 31 17 15 20 29 22 21 26    Total 38 33 48 31 26 33 44 33 38 49 Spears School of Bus       Female 2 8 2 5 1 1 2 7 1 4       Male 9 12 3 13 14 7 6 2 8 8    Total 11 20 5 18 15 8 8 9 9 12 Education       Female 59 58 45 43 41 32 39 26 38 56       Male 49 26 29 38 28 25 16 17 22 19    Total 108 84 74 81 69 57 55 43 60 75 Engr, Arch, & Tech       Female 0 2 1 2 2 2 7 3 3 1       Male 15 14 13 18 17 22 24 12 18 17    Total 15 16 14 20 19 24 31 15 21 18 Human Envir Sci       Female 6 5 6 5 5 8 10 7 3 12       Male 1 1 1 6 2 6 5 2 1 5    Total 7 6 7 11 7 14 15 9 4 17 Graduate College*       Female 4 2 4 4 6 3 7 3 6 7       Male 6 4 7 12 12 8 8 8 12 4    Total 10 6 11 16 18 11 15 11 18 11 Cntr for Vet Hlth Sci**       Female 44 46 45 38 43 45 50 54 52 52       Male 33 25 24 35 26 23 17 24 26 22    Total 77 71 69 73 69 68 67 78 78 74 Totals       Female 142 136 126 118 114 115 137 118 129 169       Male 167 126 128 163 135 133 126 107 122 122    Total 309 262 254 281 249 248 263 225 251 291

*Interdisciplinary graduate programs that do not have a specific area of specialization are reported in the Graduate College. **Includes only professional degrees granted in the Center for Veterinary Health Sciences. Note: Degrees are reported in the college that grants the degree.

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GRANTED COLLEGE, DEPARTMENT, AND LEVEL DEGREES DEGREES GRANTED BY BY COLLEGE, DEPARTMENT, AND LEVEL NATIVEAMERICAN AMERICAN(NA), (NA),AFRICAN AFRICAN AMERICAN AND ASIAN (A) (A) BYBY NATIVE AMERICAN(AA), (AA),HISPANIC HISPANIC(H), (H), AND ASIAN 2006-2007 NA AA H A

2007-2008 NA AA H A

2008-2009 NA AA H A

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES AND NATURAL RESOURCES

Ag. Educ., Communications, & Leadership Agricultural Economics Animal Science Biochemistry & Molecular Biology Dean of Agriculture Entomology & Plant Pathology Horticulture & Landscape Architecture Natural Resource Ecology & Mgmt. Plant & Soil Sciences Total Ag. Sciences & Natural Resources Art Biochemistry & Molecular Biology Botany Chemistry Communication Sciences & Disorders Computer Science Dean of Arts & Sciences Economics & Legal Studies English Foreign Languages & Literature Geography Geology History Media and Strategic Communications Mathematics Microbiology & Molecular Genetics Music Philosophy Physics Political Science Psychology Sociology Statistics Theatre Zoology Total Arts & Sciences Accounting Dean of Business Administration Economics & Legal Studies Entrepreneurship Finance Management Marketing Management Science & Info. Systems Total Spears School of Business Applied Health & Educational Psychology Dean of Education Educational Studies Teaching & Curriculum Leadership Total Education

6 8 13 3 1 3 1 2 0 37

0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

1 1 3 1 0 0 3 0 0 9

0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 2

8 6 14 3 0 0 2 2 3 38

0 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 4

3 2 3 1 1 0 1 1 0 12

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

4 0 0 0 7 1 5 3 3 2 0 1 6 16 1 3 1 0 1 8 11 9 1 2 19 104

2 1 0 0 1 1 1 2 1 0 0 1 0 8 0 3 0 0 0 2 4 5 0 2 2 36

1 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 3 6 0 1 0 1 0 1 2 4 0 1 4 29

2 4 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 4 0 0 1 6 0 1 1 8 1 3 0 0 0 2 1 5 1 14 0 0 2 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 13 2 17 0 10 0 1 0 0 2 10 16 104

0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 2 1 0 0 1 4 0 1 0 0 0 3 6 7 0 0 3 32

2 0 0 2 0 0 4 0 0 2 0 1 0 8 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 2 25

1 1 2 4 0 0 0 1 0 9

13 9 15 5 2 0 2 4 0 50

1 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 5

0 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 4

0 0 0 2 1 0 2 0 0 5

12 7 10 5 2 0 5 7 0 48

0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 2

0 0 4 0 1 0 1 1 0 7

0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2

0 2 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 2 2 2 0 5 0 3 2 8 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 7 1 22 1 1 1 3 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 6 1 11 0 11 0 0 0 1 1 16 11 106

1 0 0 0 0 1 5 3 1 0 0 0 0 6 0 1 0 0 0 1 8 11 0 0 6 44

1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 3 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 1 0 0 3 20

0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 2 0 3 0 0 0 3 3 0 2 0 3 20

5 3 1 0 1 2 7 0 3 1 0 1 2 12 4 3 1 0 0 8 14 10 0 2 9 89

2 0 0 0 2 1 1 2 2 0 0 0 0 5 1 3 0 0 0 2 8 7 0 0 3 39

1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4 0 1 1 0 0 4 3 1 0 1 6 25

0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 4 0 1 1 0 0 1 2 2 0 1 2 20

WILLIAM S. SPEARS SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 10 2 18 0 11 19 30 11 101 5 2 3 17 27

3 3 9 0 2 11 10 4 42

4 5 1 0 7 1 6 2 26

3 3 0 0 2 2 5 1 16

12 3 18 0 13 13 26 2 87

3 3 3 0 1 16 7 4 37

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

5 0 1 6 12

4 0 2 1 7

0 0 2 1 3

13 0 3 28 44

8 4 1 10 23

3 7 5 0 7 6 5 2 35

6 1 2 0 6 8 7 2 32

10 6 6 0 10 34 17 4 87

3 3 4 0 8 13 10 1 42

1 3 4 0 2 6 4 1 21

8 0 1 0 4 8 1 3 25

15 4 6 0 10 36 20 4 95

5 2 2 0 5 16 15 1 46

4 2 1 0 7 3 6 0 23

7 0 1 0 3 2 2 1 16

0 1 0 7 8

0 0 2 0 2

13 3 6 26 48

5 1 2 8 16

0 1 2 7 10

1 0 1 1 3

18 6 1 17 42

4 0 2 4 10

4 3 0 4 11

4 0 1 3 8

1 0 2 1 0 1 2 2 3 12

0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 2

2 0 1 1 0 7 2 1 4 18

4 1 5 4 0 1 6 1 10 32

0 0 1 1 0 0 4 2 2 10

2 0 1 0 0 0 7 1 1 12

2 1 2 1 0 1 2 1 8 18

0 3 3 2 12 0 2 5 1 0 8 8 0 8 6 4 36 18 67 371 137

0 3 6 2 2 13 70

0 2 4 1 10 1 0 9 3 2 15 5 2 13 2 5 49 15 76 355 122

1 2 0 2 1 6 84

0 1 2 0 0 3 67

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING, ARCHITECTURE, AND TECHNOLOGY

Architecture Biosystems & Agricultural Engineering Chemical Engineering Civil & Environmental Engineering Dean of Engineering Electrical & Computer Engineering Engineering Technology Industrial Engineering & Management Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Total Engr, Arch, & Tech

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Dean of Human Environmental Sciences Design, Housing & Merchandising Hotel & Restaurant Administration Human Development & Family Science Nutritional Sciences Total Human Environmental Sci. Total Bachelor's Degrees Granted

5 1 1 1 1 1 13 1 5 29

0 2 0 1 0 1 3 2 0 9

0 0 0 2 0 0 3 1 1 7

1 1 2 2 0 2 1 1 2 12

0 1 1 0 1 2 11 0 11 27

0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 1 5

2 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 2 7

1 0 1 1 0 2 1 1 2 9

COLLEGE OF HUMAN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES 1 1 9 2 4 1 17 4 7 0 38 8 336 109

0 1 3 3 1 8 86

0 3 0 2 8 1 2 7 3 0 13 7 1 6 1 5 37 12 54 337 113

2009-2010 NA AA H A

0 1 1 4 1 7 94

4 1 0 6 0 4 18 0 11 44


Institutional Diversity Since 2005, the University has undertaken significant steps, and made what we believe is substantial progress across the University. One of these steps was the creation of the Division of Institutional Diversity, which now includes approximately 30 staff members. Currently, the Division includes the Office of the Associate Vice President, the Office of Equal Opportunity, a Diversity Academic Support and TRiO Department, the Oklahoma Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation Program (OK-LSAMP), and the Office of Multicultural Affairs (OMA). Each of the Offices are addressed below.

Office of the Associate Vice President Dr. Jason F. Kirksey, Associate Vice President for Institutional Diversity and Chief Diversity Officer holds a faculty appointment at the rank of Associate Professor of Political Science in the College of Arts and Sciences. Since 2007, he has also served as the Director of the OSU Center for Africana Studies. Dr. Kirksey serves as an integral part of the President’s Executive Team and the Provost’s Council, both of which serve as an advisory body to the respective administrators. Dr. Kirksey has undertaken numerous activities and initiatives, since being appointed as interim and now permanent Associate Vice President. He has substantially increased the visibility of Institutional Diversity as a University resource and has significantly strengthened the level of collaboration with internal and external constituencies on diversity issues. Dr. Kirksey has engaged in a number of efforts aimed at growing and strengthening the University’s relationship with its key higher 11

educational institutional constituents across the state. Dr. Kirksey and Provost Sternberg have met with the Provost of Langston University, the only Historically Black College or University in Oklahoma to discuss collaboration efforts between the two universities. In addition, he and Dr. Sternberg met with tribal college presidents from the Pawnee Nation College, College of the Muscogee Nation, and Comanche Nation College to discuss collaboration between the tribal colleges and OSU including the creation of memoranda of understanding. Dr. Kirksey most recently served as a member of the steering committee for the NCAA athletics accreditation self-study and also chaired


the subcommittee on Governance and Commitment to Rules Compliance. He serves on the Professional Education Committee as well as the College Student Development Advisory Committee, both in the College of Education. Dr. Kirksey is also a member of the Bailey Study Abroad Committee in the College of Arts & Sciences and regularly attends the University Budget Committee meetings. His broad membership, attendance, and active participation on these and other University committees serves as an additional “best practice” for ensuring that diversity becomes embedded within the overall culture of OSU. At the state level, Dr. Kirksey is actively involved in the Oklahoma Diversity Officers Practitioners Consortium a working group of Oklahoma higher education and industry diversity officers who meet monthly to discuss opportunities for collaboration and also to share ideas and best practices. In addition, Dr. Kirksey has developed relationships and provided financial support and program and event attendance for the Latino Community Development Agency in Oklahoma City; the Urban League of Greater Oklahoma City; the Oklahoma City Hispanic Chamber of Commerce; the American Indian Chamber of Commerce; the Greenwood Cultural Center in Tulsa; and Conexiones, a Latino community-based organization in Tulsa. In 2009, OSU was recognized as Partner of the Year by Conexiones primarily for its work with middle and high school Latino students in Tulsa. Dr. Kirksey also attends and participates in a variety of diversity-related forums, programs, and events. Over the past couple of years he has attended the Return on Inclusion summit in Tulsa; the Big 12 Chief Diversity Officers meetings at the University of Kansas (2009) and Texas A&M (2010); and is a member of the National Association of Diversity Officers in Higher Education (NADOHE). The Office of the Associate Vice President 12

has annually funded, supported, and attended, the following events at OSU: the statewide OSU Native American Student Association Fall Pow-Wow, Diwali Night, Harvest Moon Festival, African Night, a Diversity Alumni Homecoming Tailgate, and the Celebration of the Americas. The Office has also funded and supported a number of nationally-recognized speakers during the past several years, including Paula Giddings, Dr. John Corvino, and Dr. Neil de Grasse Tyson. The Office of the Associate Vice President has sponsored statewide events and projects, supporting a broader commitment to diversity and inclusion statewide, with the following organizations: Oklahoma Center for Community and Justice; John Hope Franklin Reconciliation Project; Oklahoma State NAACP; Kollaboration Tulsa; and the Oklahoma Legislative Black Caucus Biennial A. C. Hamlin Awards Banquet. In each of the past several years, The Oklahoman has published a diversity-based supplement that has been provided to 15,000-20,000 Oklahoma public school students. These supplements were developed by OSU students, faculty, and staff (including President Hargis). In March 2007 and March 2008 The Oklahoman produced educational supplements titled “Generations of Oklahoma Women Moving History Forward” and “Oklahoma Women: Footloose and Fancy-Free.” In February 2008 and February 2009 they produced educational supplements titled “Going to the Territory: The African-American Experience in Oklahoma” and “Things Ain’t What They Used To Be: The African-American Experience in Oklahoma.” In November 2009 The Oklahoman published the educational supplement titled “Angie Debo’s Oklahoma.” Each of these educational supplements was supported financially by the Office of the Associate Vice President. One of the annual highlights for Institutional Diversity is the Honors Convocation where faculty, staff, and students celebrate the academic successes of OSU students of color by recognizing scholarly achievements and awarding academic and leadership scholarships annually totaling approximately $30,000 from privately donated funds.


Office of Equal Opportunity The Office of Equal Opportunity has revisited its structure and purpose over the past few years. These changes culminated in the October 2009 hiring of Mackenzie Wilfong, J.D., CAAP as the Director of Equal Opportunity. Ms. Wilfong brings to this position a wealth of experience as a civil rights attorney from her previous employer, the U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, and is a Certified Affirmative Action Professional through the American Association of Affirmative Action. In the past two years, the Office of Equal Opportunity has taken active and measurable steps to solidify processes to achieve its three-fold purpose at OSU: first, to draft the federallymandated annual affirmative action plan in accordance with federal law; second, to educate the campus community to prevent all forms of harassment and discrimination known by the institution. Consequently Director Wilfong

Office of Multicultural Affairs The Office of Multicultural Affairs (OMA) is an office dedicated to promoting diversity and inclusiveness by serving the academic, social, and cultural needs of students at Oklahoma State University. The office consists of a director, an administrative assistant, and five coordinators who serve various underrepresented student populations: the Coordinator of African American Affairs, Coordinator of Asian American Affairs, Coordinator of Hispanic/Latino Affairs, Coordinator of Native American Affairs, and

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has developed in-house and offered over 30 workshops or sessions reaching 1,300 faculty, staff, and students during workshops and guest lectures on topics covering preventing employment discrimination, managing millennial momentum, what is affirmative action, respect for diversity, gender discrimination, sexual harassment, sexual harassment for the graduate teaching assistant (in-person and online), Title IX compliance, supervisory sexual harassment, and understanding the Americans with Disabilities Act requirements—and; third, to investigate allegations of harassment and discrimination on

campus and successfully resolve all such concerns as they arise. This investigation process has been fully revised to be in compliance with federal investigative practices.


Coordinator of Women’s and LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender) Affairs. These coordinators also serve as advisers to their respective student groups and serve as resources for presentations and information within the university community. This commitment to the larger University community is exemplified in committee service; collectively the coordinators and Director serve on over 20 University-wide committees. The Coordinator of African American Affairs is primarily responsible for programm i n g t a rg e t e d to the African American community as adviser to the African American Student Association. He works with the Black Faculty and Staff Association, the OSU Black Alumni Association, the Black Graduate Student Association, and the OSU Office of Undergraduate Admissions. He is a member of the Black Alumni Association and Black Graduate Student Association, Student Union Activities Board, and the Student Government Association Multicultural Affairs Committee. He works with these and other campus groups to put on about 15 programs each year with a cumulative attendance of approximately 750, which includes not only OSU students, staff, and faculty, but also members of the Langston University community. He also makes contact with the 781 African American undergraduate students and 154 graduate students to provide academic and social support throughout the year. The Coordinator of Asian American Affairs works with the Asian American Student Association, Vietnamese Student Association, 14

Asian Alumni Association, Asian American Faculty and Staff Association, and the Student

Government Association Multicultural Affairs Committee to put on 30 programs each year that draw 1100 students, faculty, staff, and members of the community. She also provides support to the 272 Asian American undergraduate students and 87 graduate students at OSU. The Coordinator of Hispanic/Latino Affairs works with the Latin American Student Association, Hispanic Student Association, Hispanic Faculty and Staff Association, Minority Women’s Association, and Sigma Lambda Gamma—OSU’s Hispanic sorority—to put on approximately 20 programs and service projects each year. These programs draw about 1500 total attendees including students, faculty, staff, and the general public each year. She is also the

faculty adviser for two residential floors housing 100 students combined.


87 Native American students, faculty, and staff.

The Coordinator of Native American Affairs works with the Native American Student Association, Ketchum House Native American Living and Learning community, OSU OIMC (Oklahoma Indian Missionary Conference) campus ministry, Native American Graduate Student Interest Group, Native American Faculty and Staff Association, and the four Oklahoma tribal colleges to put on 15 programs each year which serve over 800 University and community members.  She coordinates a monthly OSU Native American roundtable meeting to bring together the six Native American organizations on campus, academic programs that serve Native American students, two of the four Oklahoma tribal colleges, and the OSU branch campuses to assist in communication and coordination and address any campus issues affecting the Native American student population.  She makes contact to provide support to the 1758 American Indian or Alaskan Native undergraduate students and 252 graduate students at OSU.  She organizes a visitation weekend, which typically attracts approximately 80 Native American high school students to campus to learn about higher education and the resources available at OSU.  She also coordinates the NARELP (Native Americans Resiliency through Education and Leadership Program) mentorship program for 15

The Coordinator of Women’s and LGBT Affairs works with two student groups, the Sexual Orientation Diversity Association (SODA) and the National Organization for Women (NOW), as well as the Women’s Faculty Council, the Gender and Women’s Studies program, the local Parents and Families of Lesbians and Gays (PFLAG) chapter, Stillwater Domestic Violence Services, and other campus and community groups as necessary to encourage gender equality and to maintain and enhance a respectful and supportive campus environment for LGBT students, staff, and faculty. She is the primary organizer for 10 programs cumulatively drawing 600 people each year. In addition, she is the faculty adviser for a floor in the residence halls, which houses 50 students. The Director of OMA, Dr. Precious Elmore, is responsible for providing supervision, direction, budget administration, and policy development for the office. In addition, the Director and administrative assistant work with approxi-

mately 400 students each semester who come to OMA. They determine the student’s needs and either they or one of the coordinators assist the students. She is also the faculty adviser for the Williams Diversity Living Learning Community and supervises the academic and leadership development of the residents. The Director, with the assistance of the coordinators, facilitates the L.E.A.D. with S.T.Y.L.E. Summer Academy for 40 high school students from underrepresented populations to learn about higher education and develop leadership skills.


Oklahoma Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation Since 1994 Oklahoma State University has served as the Lead Institution for the Oklahoma Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (OK-LSAMP).   The OKLSAMP program has sought to increase the number of underrepresented minority  students pursuing and completing degrees in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM).   During the 16 years of support from the National Science Foundation and with the support of 11 alliance partner institutions, Oklahoma has successfully graduated over 8,500 minority students in the STEM disciplines.   In 2009-2010 the alliance institutions

graduated  more than 900 minority students in the STEM disciplines.  This represents a 33% increase over the previous year.  Oklahoma is also completing Phase IV of the Bridge to the Doctorate program.  Currently 24 Fellows are completing requirements for graduate degrees.  In 2009-2010 OSU OK-LSAMP Scholars were also recipients of a Goldwater Scholarship, 4 Udall Scholarships, and an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program Scholarship.  In addition 15 students participated in international research opportunities and 26 were admitted to graduate programs throughout the U.S.

Diversity Academic Support The Diversity Academic Support (DAS) department was established to focus on recruitment and retention of underrepresented students, as well as faculty and staff. The Director of Recruitment and Retention, Dr. Jovette Dew, serves as the 16

administrative head of this Department. DAS also houses two privately-funded recruitment and retention programs, the Retention Initiative for Student Excellence (RISE) program and the Inclusion Leadership Program (ILP).


Retention Initiative for Student Excellence & Inclusion Leadership Program

The RISE program, sponsored by ConocoPhillips, was created in fall 2006 to increase retention rates of first-generation and minority students.  Since the program’s creation it has served over 175 students.   The program has an average firstyear retention rate of 88%.  May 2010 marked the first semester of RISE graduates.  The four-year graduation rate is approximately 70%, which is significantly higher than the general university six-year graduation rate.  Annually each participant that successfully completes the RISE program receives a $1000 stipend.  Since the program’s inception, it has awarded over $120,000 to college student participants.  There are currently 69 students participating in the RISE program for the 2010-2011 academic year.  

The Inclusion Leadership Program (ILP), sponsored by the Williams Company, was also created in fall 2006 to foster leadership development in college sophomores at OSU and high school seniors in Tulsa and Oklahoma City.  ILP has served over 200 high school and college students. The retention rate for the college sophomores that return to the university for their junior year is 99%.  During the 2009-2010 year over 50% of the high school participants were admitted and enrolled at OSU for fall 2010.  The 17

high school participants in ILP that commit to attending OSU receive a $1000 stipend.  The college students who successfully complete the program also receive a $1000 stipend.  The Inclusion Leadership Program has awarded over $125,000 in scholarship dollars to both high school and college students.  Currently, the ILP program has 43 participants. This year the program will focus its efforts in the Tulsa area high schools with significant minority student enrollment.  In addition to these significant minority student recruitment and retention efforts, the Director regularly attends professional conferences geared toward underrepresented students who have recently earned a Ph.D. in an effort to maintain a vita bank that can be utilized to potentially identify candidates for openings at OSU. Over the past several years the Director has also worked with Colleges and Departments at OSU regarding the language of job advertisements, as well as other ideas for attracting diverse faculty. DAS also administers three significant outreach programs for underrepresented Oklahoma high school students--one in collaboration with the College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources, and two summer academies in collaboration with the College of Engineering, Architecture, and Technology. Since 2008, 133 minority students from across the state have participated in the Retired Educators for Youth Agricultural Program (REYAP) Institute, a four-day residential program organized to expose ninth through twelfth grade students to


tions during June of each year.

the varied career opportunities available in the field of agriculture. Participants perform field experiments and create research poster presenta-

The goals of the REYAP Agriculture Science and Technology Institute are to: • Increase diversity among the student population on the OSU campus; • Increase the number of students in agriculture or science-related fields at OSU; • Increase diversity among student / professor mentoring programs at OSU; and • Build capacity among universities and organizations.  The institute is a partnership with OSU Institutional Diversity, EPSCoR, and the Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources. Since its inception in 2007, Fired Up about Research Science and Engineering has engaged 76 tenth through twelfth grade students to explore and experience the excitement of the technol-

ogy and sciences that shape our world. During an intensive week-long residential program participants are challenged with laboratory and field-based scenarios centered on a common theme, “fire.”   Participants investigate careers, learn new skills, and prepare for the fascinating world of technology.  Specific activities include biosystems, robotics and the science and engineering of fire. The College of Engineering, Architecture, and Technology; the Associate Vice President for Institutional Diversity; and the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education jointly sponsor the program from which 12 students have enrolled at OSU following their academy experience. Since 2009, twenty 11th and 12th grade students have participated in Smart Cars. One of the fastest growing technologies is the use of hi-tech sensors. “Smart sensors” are being used in hundreds of application areas, like environmental monitoring, homeland security, medicine, aerospace, and automobiles. During this academy, students use smart sensor concepts to stimulate interest in science, math, and technology during a week-long residential academy. Specifically, the students develop a smart sensor system for steering an autonomous racecar.   The College of Engineering, Architecture, and Technology; the Associate Vice President for Institutional Diversity; and the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education jointly sponsor the program.

TRiO Department In September 2009, OSU established a single department within the Division of Institutional Diversity that houses the three existing TRiO programs (Upward Bound and two Educational Talent Search programs) at OSU which are funded by grants from the U.S. Department of Education. TRiO programs serve low-income, first-generation, and/or students with disabilities. The programs’ mission is to assist pre-college students to persist and graduate from high 18

school and go on to post-secondary education. In September 2010, OSU was awarded an additional TRiO grant, the Student Support Services program which will serve 140 OSU students who are low-income, first–generation, and/or students with disabilities. All of these programs are free to the participants, and help strengthen OSU’s commitment to first-generation and lowincome students.


Scholarships

Every year the Native American Faculty and Staff Association (NAFSA) provides ten $1,000.00 scholarships to outstanding students.

Since 2005, NAFSA has awarded $50,000 in scholarships. The Hispanic, Asian, and Black Faculty and Staff Associations also provide annual scholarships; collectively they have awarded over $36,500 since 2005. The Office of Scholarships and Financial Aid in conjunction with the OSU Foundation

provides five scholarships specifically for underrepresented students, regardless of their area of study. The individual Colleges provide 34 scholarships for underrepresented students in their respective Colleges. The Office of Scholarships and Financial Aid, partnering with the Division of Institutional Diversity, provides three Gates Millennium Scholarship workshops a year to aid students and parents in completing the essay portion of the application. The Gates Millennium Scholars, funded by a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, was established in 1999 to provide outstanding low-income African American, American Indian/Alaska Natives, Asian Pacific Islander American, and Hispanic American students with an opportunity to complete an undergraduate college education in any discipline. Since 2004-05, approximately 66 Gates Millennium Scholars have attended OSU.

Living Learning Communities OSU has 20 Living Learning Communities (LLC) housed within its residence halls. Of these, four are devoted to diversity. The Director of OMA and the Women’s and LGBT Coordinator are the advisers for the Williams Diversity Living Learning Community and supervise the academic and leadership development of 24 students including proctoring the weekly mandatory study hours. The Coordinator of Native American Affairs performs similar functions with Ketchum House, the LLC focused on Native American issues. Study Abroad and Maude’s Quad, for women in engineering, are additional LLCs available to 19

students and are advised by Student Affairs and the College of Engineering, Architecture, and Technology, respectively.


Curriculum and Anchoring Faculty 2009, Dr. Kirksey and a team of OSU faculty traveled to the University of Missouri for an intensive faculty institute, whose purpose was to help the faculty team develop a Difficult Dialogues faculty development program at OSU. Upon completion of the institute, the team has held five faculty-facilitated workshops regarding gender, sexual orientation, race, religion, and evolution to help faculty navigate these difficult discussions when they occur in the classroom.

OSU has made significant progress in adding diversity into its curriculum. In fall 2008, OSU added a three-hour required diversity dimension as a degree requirement for all OSU undergraduate degrees. This additional three-hour requirement was added to the previous three-hour international dimension, which had been required before 2005. Currently the colleges fulfill the two dimensions by offering over 107 diversity and 202 international dimension courses during the 2010-2011 academic year. In 2007, OSU established a Gender and Women’s Studies Program. Currently, a minor in Gender and Women’s Studies is offered through the College of Arts & Sciences. In addition to serving students through extensive academic course offerings, Gender and Women’s Studies works with leaders in OSU student groups such as SODA, NOW, Women’s Resource Center, and Minority Women’s Group. This dynamic program has brought numerous lectures and exhibits to campus, which has enriched the faculty, staff, and students at OSU. To help anchor current faculty, the Institute for Teaching and Learning Excellence presents numerous programs for faculty including the Difficult Dialogues series. In the summer of

20

OSU is also fortunate to have an Advance grant program, which engages in programming to increase the representation and advancement of women in academic science and engineering careers, thereby contributing to the development of a more diverse science and engineering workforce. In order to foster a sense of collegiality amongst faculty of color, Institutional Diversity annually holds a faculty reception in early fall. These receptions are well-attended by upper administration, including President Hargis. Faculty and staff also have active affinity groups on campus. Almost all provide generous annual student scholarships including the Black Faculty and Staff Association; the Native American Faculty and Staff Association; the Women’s Faculty Council; Employee Queers, Allies League EQuAL; the Hispanic Faculty and Staff Association; and the Asian American Faculty and Staff Association. These groups have countless activities for their members as evidenced in their linked websites.


Selected International Engagement OSU undertakes numerous efforts to provide outreach to our international students. These efforts are coordinated through the Office of

on Student Affairs for Chinese administrators representing four Chinese universities to help

International Students and Scholars, which provides numerous services from visa assistance to forums for cultural exchange. OSU has students from more than 100 countries. OSU’s School of International Studies’ (SIS) mission is “to provide a university-wide focus to synergize and expand international opportunities in instruction, research and extension for individuals and organizations seeking a greater understanding and involvement in world trade and international affairs.” SIS houses notable programs such as the Henry G. Bennett Distinguished Fellows Program, Study Abroad Center, OSU’s Peace Corps recruiting office, Fulbright information center, Phi Beta Delta, English Language Institute, Mexico liaison office, and other programs. In both 2009 and 2010, OSU Student Affairs organized and hosted an International Symposium 21

enhance their understanding of American Student Affairs’ concepts and practices to take back to their respective universities. This exchange was

reciprocated with Dr. Lee Bird, Vice President of Student Affairs, who in the fall of 2010 traveled to China to promote Student Affairs and OSU.  Dr. Bird was accompanied to China by Dr. Pam Ehlers from Career Services, Vivian Wang from International Student Services, and four OSU graduate students that worked with Dr. Bird’s International Symposium on Student Affairs the previous summer. During their travels, Dr. Bird and her colleagues blogged their trip.


College & Academic Commitments to Diversity College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources The College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources (CASNR) focuses on diversity in its AG 1011, Agriculture Orientation course, which is a required course for all incoming freshman CASNR majors. For three years, CASNR has invited industry professionals to speak to students about diversity in the workplace, and to actively engage in small group activities focused on diversity and various forms of discrimination during the orientation course. This past summer the Department of Horticulture, with the support of the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education, sponsored Camp T.U.R.F. (Tomorrow’s Undergraduates Realizing the Future), a two-week camp for 22 first-generation prospective students to learn about careers in horticulture and landscaping at OSU. On September 15, 2010, CASNR invited Dr. Temple Grandin, renowned scientist and advocate for individuals with disabilities, specifically individuals on the autism spectrum, to speak to OSU

students. In addition, the University announced the Temple Grandin Endowed Professorship in Animal Behavior. Annually, CASNR faculty actively engage 6th through 12th grade young women during the Women in Science program sponsored by OKEPSCoR. The free, one-day conference is designed to allow students in grades 6-12 to engage in hands-on science activities; learn first-hand about science and technology career opportunities from  Oklahoma’s top female scientists and engineers; and receive college preparation information from Oklahoma colleges, universities, and outreach representatives. The goal of the Women in Science conference is to show students that STEM careers are exciting, attainable, and rewarding.  The conference provides young people with real-world examples of science and engineering career opportunities and allows them to meet successful women scientists, doctors, and engineers from our state. CASNR faculty also co-sponsor Retired Educators for Youth Agricultural Program (REYAP) Institute, a free four-day residential program organized to expose ninth through twelfth grade minority students to the varied career opportunities available in the field of agriculture.

College of Arts and Sciences American Indians into Psychology was developed as part of the Indian Health Care Improvement Act of 1992 when OSU was authorized by the U.S. Senate to provide 22

programs that facilitate recruitment and training of American Indian students for careers in psychology. This summer enrichment program is a joint effort between the Clinical, Counseling, and School Psychology training programs through the College of Arts and Sciences and the College of Education at OSU. With the support


of the Graduate College, this program provides training opportunities that encourage American Indian students to pursue careers in psychology and provide mental health services to under-served American Indian communities. The College has also actively engaged in targeted faculty hiring over the past five years, by courting and engag-

ing future minority faculty candidates. This commitment includes inviting potential future targeted candidates for guest lecture series. Due to the College’s unique programming and strategic initiatives, the College is proud to have more Native American Ph.D. faculty in psychology than any other program in the U.S.

College of Education Dr. Sue Jacobs was appointed as the Ledbetter Lemon Endowed Diversity Professor in Counseling Psychology.   Among her areas of responsibility, Dr. Jacobs will engage in research and practice in counseling psychology with an emphasis on diversity. Dr. Julie Thomas, Morsani Endowed Chair in Science Education, serves as principal investigator for a half million dollars National Science Foundation grant that explores family and school influences on the science and mathematics interests and achievement of third through fifth grade students in rural, largely American Indian populations in Oklahoma.  Dr. Thomas (with partners in OSU’s College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology) also submitted a multi-million dollar grant proposal this fall to NSF to fund an initiative with Cherokee middle to high school students in eastern Oklahoma. Dr. Chris Ormsbee continues to lead the College’s Urban Initiative in Tulsa, Oklahoma. During fall 2010, the College of Education hosted 2010 Brock Laureate, Dr. Geoffrey Canada, creator of the Harlem Children’s Zone, at OSU -Tulsa.   Over 300 participants attended workshops and tours of community schools in the Tulsa area.  Dr. Canada’s public lecture drew ap23

proximately 1,000 participants.  In addition, the College recently signed a MOU with Tulsa Public Schools to formalize a partnership to prepare teachers for urban settings.   Dr. Ormsbee also serves as the College’s representative on Tulsa’s P-20 Council, a group of Tulsa leaders addressing issues of urban education. The College of Education continues to host the International Fair on the Stillwater campus with financial support from the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education.   Over 300 fourth-grade students attend each year to experience the culture of countries from around the world.  International student presenters and teacher education students lead hands-on activities for the elementary-aged students.


College of Engineering, Architecture, and Technology engineering and science.

The Multicultural Engineering Program’s (MEP) mission is to increase the participation of engineering students from multicultural backgrounds through a caring, informative, and supportive environment utilizing a comprehensive set of programming activities. MEP offers academic counseling, scholarships, tutoring, mentoring, industry tours, and contacts for internship opportunities.  The program continues to grow, now serving more than 375 minority students. MEP includes several individual active associations for students including: the American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES), the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE), and the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers (SHPE). The purpose of AISES is to help recruit and encourage Native American students in the science and engineering fields of study. AISES helps provide its members with various opportunities such as internship, scholarship, and networking opportunities that will be beneficial in furthering their professional career. NSBE is an organization that exists to increase the number of culturallyresponsible African American engineers who excel academically, succeed professionally, and positively impact the community. The Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers exists as an assistance program for Hispanic engineering and science students. The organization facilitates student growth, offering each the support needed for success. The Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers was created to increase the number of Hispanics entering the professional fields of 24

The ConocoPhillips Summer Bridge Program (CSBP) is a four-week residential program for engineering, architecture, and technology freshmen students in underrepresented ethnic groups (African American, Hispanic American, and Native American). The program’s objective is to provide an experience that will ease the transition of multicultural students to university life and facilitate academic achievement.

The Women in Engineering Program offers numerous resources including Maude’s Quad LLC, Collegiate Role Models for Educating Women (CREW) program, and WhEATies breakfast series. Since 2005, women in Engineering, Architecture, and Technology have the option of living in Maude’s Quad, a LLC named in honor of Maude Spear, the first woman to graduate in engineering from Oklahoma A&M University in 1915. CREW provides freshmen and sophomores the opportunity to meet upperdivision students who act as role models, offer encouragement, and share knowledge of classes, campus resources, and work experiences. The WhEATies monthly breakfast series, now in its third semester, continues to headline speakers who provide career guidance in an informal setting where students can also interact with peers and college faculty.


College of Human Sciences Program (REYAP), which focuses primarily on African American and first-generation college students.  Nutritional Sciences has also applied for a USDA Minority Undergraduate Fellowship which was unfunded but will be rewritten and resubmitted.  

The College of Human Sciences (CHS) has continued recruitment efforts to increase diversity in faculty, staff, and students.  Since 2005, two Latino and two Asian faculty members were hired (a tenured Associate Dean and Professor, a tenure-track Associate Professor, and two tenure-track Assistant Professors).   This represents four out of the five tenure-track positions which were filled this past year.   The Center for Student Success held recruitment activities on numerous high school campuses in Oklahoma, including schools with predominately minority populations and with various state student organizations to target prospective students of diverse backgrounds. Graduate coordinators throughout the college have made efforts to recruit McNair Scholars to attend OSU for graduate school.  Most recently, the School of Hotel and Restaurant Administration successfully recruited a McNair Scholar into their MS degree program and the Design, Housing and Merchandising Department was successful in recruiting a minority student into the Ph.D. program for fall 2010.   The Nutritional Sciences Department has continued to participate in OK–LSAMP research presentations sponsored by the Division of Institutional Diversity and the Graduate College. During the past two years the Department has participated in the Retired Educators for Youth in Agriculture 25

During the summer of 2010, the Department of Human Development and Family Sciences renovated facilities to provide two additional classrooms, which allowed a unique opportunity

to increase inclusiveness in the Child Development Laboratory.   This has been an exciting development for the department.   The unified program is open to children from 12 months through 5 years of age, and expands the services of the current center.  The new classrooms allow for a total of 66 children, increasing our capacity for inclusion of children living with developmental disabilities to 33.  The classrooms also serve as teaching laboratories for OSU early childhood education, as well as research facilities for a variety of programs across the campus.    In 2009, the College of Human Sciences created the Enhancing Human Lives Award, which was presented to Nancy Randolph Davis, the first African American student at OSU, in honor of her outstanding and significant life-long accomplishments. Mrs. Davis earned her Master’s degree in CHS. 


Spears School of Business For the past 20 years, the Spears School of Business (SSB) has offered a Women’s Business Leadership Conference in cooperation with the Oklahoma International Women’s Forum. In addition, the SSB recently launched the Women Entrepreneurs Inspire Conference, an annual forum attracting more than 650 women and celebrating women’s entrepreneurship.

program fully funds student participation in the National Women’s MBA Association, the National Hispanic MBA Association, and the National Black MBA Association.   This past

year the SSB sponsored a MBA case team for the National Black MBA Association conference. In addition the SSB actively advises and supports the African American Business Student Association to help them grow the organization. On behalf of the SSB, the OSU Foundation recently received a $25,000 gift from The Kerr Foundation, Inc. with a matching contribution to fund the 2010 Information Systems Technology Exploration (ISyTE) Academy. The ISyTE Academy is designed to encourage high school women and minorities to explore information systems careers. The SSB supports and funds its minority students’ attendance at numerous conferences and regularly sponsors African American

students to attend the BIG XII Conference on Black Student Government. The MBA 26

The SSB is an active University member of the PhD Project. The PhD Project focuses on recruiting minority faculty in business Ph.D. fields. SSB also attends the PhD Project annual career fair. The SSB has implemented three major entrepreneurship initiatives aimed at aiding underrepresented groups. Now in its second year, the SSB has created an exceptionally successful Disabled Veterans Entrepreneurship Program, which

serves disabled veterans across the nation with a three-stage, twelve-month entrepreneurship development initiative. The SSB also recently launched the Native American Entrepreneurs Academy, a portfolio of programs to encourage entrepreneurial behaviors within the Native American student body and larger community. The SSB is currently implementing a major effort to benchmark entrepreneurial activity at the tribal nation level.


Center for Veterinary Health Sciences

OSU’s Center for Veterinary Health Sciences has enrolled more Native American students in its Veterinary Medicine program than any other veterinary college in the United States for the fourth year running. As is the trend in veterinary medicine, the Center for Veterinary Health Sciences is experiencing a significant increase

in the number of female applicants and in enrollment. For the past four years, the classes have averaged between 70% and 75% female. The Center is also actively pursuing partnerships with colleagues at analogous institutions to encourage international collaborations, specifically with students from China.

Edmon Low Library On November 5, 2010, the OSU Library celebrated the acquisition of its three millionth volume with the purchase of a signed first edition, first printing of Oklahoman John Hope Franklin’s classic work From Slavery to Freedom: A History of African Americans. In selecting this book as the commemorative volume for this milestone event, the Library and the University paid tribute to the significance of the work itself, to Franklin’s contributions as a celebrated American historian, and to the distinct history of African Americans in Oklahoma. This event built on the acquisition of the Library’s ceremonial two-millionth volume Henry Schoolcraft’s Indian Tribes of the United States, which recognized the unique place of 27

Native American peoples and cultures in the development of Oklahoma. In June 2007, the OSU Library acquired an outstanding collection of materials documenting the role of African Americans in the United States armed forces from the time of the French and Indian War through the current conflicts in the Middle East. Designated “The Black American Military Experience Collection,” the 450 regimental histories, diaries, biographies, manuscripts and scholarly monographs that form this collection are one of the most complete collections on this topic. In spring 2008, a public opening of this collection featured a presentation by award-winning writer


Gail Buckley, author of American Patriots: The Story of Blacks in the Military from Revolution to Desert Storm. To further publicize the acquisition of this collection and its opening to the public, the Library, in partnership with the OSU Department of Political Science and students at OSU and Langston University, developed a 16-page supplement entitled “Going to the Territory: The African-American Experience in Oklahoma” for The Oklahoman’s Newspapers in Education program for 2008 Black History Month. The publication was so popular with the students and teachers enrolled in the program that it was updated and reissued in 2009 with the title, “Things Ain’t What They Used to Be.” The Library’s Oklahoma Oral History Research Program (OOHRP) has undertaken a number of oral history interview series documenting the participation and contributions of diverse groups of people to the development of Oklahoma State University, the state of Oklahoma, and to broad fields of interest. Some of these projects include interviews with trailblazing African American alumni and faculty, “Women of Willard,” women in the Oklahoma legislature, African Americans in Muskogee, and Native American artists. Some of these interviews have re28

sulted in feature stories in STATE M a g a z i n e . A d d i t i o n a l l y, OOHRP staff have provided oral history workshops and grant partnership support to the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma and to the John Hope Franklin Center for Reconciliation in Tulsa. The Library has added subscriptions to electronic resources documenting the participation of minority and underrepresented groups in the life of the United States. These subscriptions include Ethnic News Watch, an interdisciplinary, bilingual (English/Spanish) and comprehensive full text database of the newspapers, magazines and journals of the ethnic, minority and native press from 1960 through the present time and Mango Languages, an online language learning system teaching actual conversation skills in 22 languages for English speakers as well as English instruction (ESL) taught in 15 languages. These new additions complement an extensive list of existing databases and full-text electronic resources with a diverse focus. Furthermore, the Library has continued to make supplemental funds available for the purchase of additional materials in support of the teaching and research needs of our faculty, staff, and students related to African Americans and Native Americans.


The Graduate College Annually, the Graduate College holds the OSU Research Symposium and Research Scholars Conference, co-sponsored by the Division of Institutional Diversity. The conference encourages students in McNair and other scholar programs to participate. This conference is an excellent opportunity for scholar students to present their work to other undergraduate scholars from around the nation, OSU graduate students, and OSU faculty. Since 2005, the Graduate College has hosted over 800 students from over 17 states and 35 different universities.

In an effort to assess the satisfaction of graduate students at OSU, the Graduate College administers a Graduate Student Satisfaction Survey. The 2008 and 2010 surveys indicate that among

OSU graduate students, approximately twothirds of master’s students and three-fourths of doctoral students identified OSU as being supportive of students from diverse backgrounds. Over the past several years OSU has consistently ranked in the top ten nationally for the number of doctoral degrees awarded to Native American students. In collaboration with the Office of the Associate Vice President for Institutional Diversity, the Graduate College has embarked on an ambitious program to build upon the existing success to enhance the multicultural and culturally-sensitive environment and a truly holistic educational experience for students of all backgrounds and interests.

The Honors College The Honors College has an overall goal in its strategic plan to have 10% non-majority students actively participating in The Honors College. For the 2010 fall semester, 14.9% of active Honors College students are non-majority students compared with 12.9% in fall 2005.  The Honors College has also incorporated diversity into the available curriculum offered to its students. Since 2005, The Honors College has added two interdisciplinary upper-division honors seminars that satisfy the University’s three-hour Diversity requirement. The first course, Contemporary Cultures of the United States (HONR 3043), is an interdisciplinary study of racial and ethnic diversity in the United States in the context of social, political, and economic systems to promote knowledge of 29

racial and ethnic minority groups in the United States and appreciation of their contributions to the mosaic of contemporary American life. This course was developed by Dr. Kirksey and Dr. Tammy Mix, Associate Professor of Sociology. Dr. Kirksey and Mix team-teach this course every spring semester. The other course, Biology, Race, and Gender (HONR 3053), is a critical interdisciplinary investigation of relationships between biological theory (especially Darwinism) and social and ethical issues with special attention given to examining views of alleged biological aspects of perceived racial and gender differences and attempts to implement these views socially, legally, and medically in the United States and elsewhere.


Division of Student Affairs The Division of Student Affairs, led by Dr. Lee Bird, has played an integral role in engaging the campus in the area of diversity. The Division, through each of its departments and units, annually sponsors a variety of diversity-based initiatives, programs, and activities on the OSU campus, as well as in the Stillwater community. The campus experiences of all students at OSU are enhanced as a direct result of the Division’s demonstrated commitment to supporting and advancing the value of diversity. In addition to the development, coordination, and implementation of various University programs and activities throughout the year, the Division provides a substantial amount of financial support to all of the student organizations, including and especially those groups with a specific focus on diversity. Dr. Bird’s office makes a significant annual financial commitment to support the attendance of members of the campus’ National Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC) organizations at their respective national conferences and she also encourages the students to participate in a variety of general leadership events offered around the region and nation. Other student organizations such as the Asian American Student Association, the Hispanic Student Association, and the Native American Student Association are also provided with travel sponsorships, stipends, and other program funding support from the Division. In total the Division provides approximately $200,000 annually to support diversity-based student programs, activities, events, and travel. The Division annually sponsors a number of nationally and internationally recognized campus speakers during the year. These individuals often present a broader spectrum of ideas, perspectives, and considerations than those that are commonly espoused by OSU students, staff, and faculty. This type of exposure assist in the University’s efforts to produce graduates who are socially, culturally, and globally competent, and that recognize and value the unique contri30

butions of all members of society. Within the Division of Student Affairs the various departments and units help cultivate a campus environment that supports, encourages, and celebrates diversity and inclusion. The Department of Residential Life, for example, promotes social justice and inclusion in the residence halls through the Social Justice and Inclusion (SJI) Committee. The SJI Committee offers diversity-centered programs and activities such as The Tunnel of Oppression and cultural heritage month celebrations. Another area within the Division, the Career Services Office, established and maintains an annual monitoring report focused on students of color. This report helps identify opportunities to strengthen the interaction and engagement of minority students with the Career Services Office. The Division also actively engages in efforts to identify, recruit, and retain underrepresented employees and student workers. In adherence to the institutional imperative to promote and establish diversity throughout the University, the Division works collaboratively with the Division of Institutional Diversity, as well as other campus entities, to improve employee and student recruitment. Additionally, staff members within the Division of Student Affairs participate in annual diversity-related professional development workshops and programs. Overall the Division of Student Affairs significantly contributes to the University’s commitment to diversity. The Division makes a significant annual financial investment in strengthening the cultural competency of all OSU students. By offering such a wide variety of diversity-related opportunities to the entire University community, particularly to students, the Division of Student Affairs promotes an informed and engaged campus climate that is open, welcoming, respectful, and accommodating.


Additional Commitments to Diversity Residential Life Residential Life, an area of Student Affairs, has instituted a robust programming initiative called “Broadening Your Horizons” that consists of programs intended to introduce ideas of inclusion and social justice to the 6,000 students living in campus facilities. Such programs include Country Bingo where students play traditional bingo with facts from other countries; International Movie Night where students watch movies from other cultures; Blue Light Stroll Off where students from National Panhellenic Council fraternities

perform step shows; and Native American Storytelling from a faculty member. Since fall 2009, Residential Life has completed 408 “Broadening Your Horizons” programs, which consisted of approximately 12% of all residence hall programming. In addition, Residential Life has an active Family Resource Center which provides extensive youth and family programs, especially for international students. This includes actively engaging children of families living in residence halls in after school and nightly activities.

Enrollment Management and Marketing The Division of Enrollment Management and Marketing demonstrates its dedication to diversity through the manner in which it actively recruits students, hires staff, and visually depicts diversity in University marketing materials. There was a purposeful increase in diverse student enrollment in the last academic year. Enrollment Management, particularly the Office of Undergraduate Admissions and the Office of Scholarships and Financial Aid, partnered with Institutional Diversity to target schools in the Oklahoma City and Tulsa area rich with quality Oklahoma’s Promise students. There are roughly 13,000 Oklahoma’s Promise students statewide, of which OSU has enrolled more than any other college 31

or university in the state. The Office of Undergraduate Admissions is also dedicated to hiring professionals that represent the Division’s commitment to diversity and represents the larger diversity within Oklahoma: 85% of admissions counselors are women; two admissions counselors are African American; and one counselor is Latina who actively engages with the community fluently in Spanish. University Marketing is also keenly aware of diversity in


its visual depictions used in advertising. In addition, this broad commitment extends to STATE magazine, the primary marketing piece that highlights successful alumni and is distributed through the Alumni Association in hard copy three times a year. Marketing is diligent in highlighting diversity on the cover and in its articles, as can been seen in four recent covers. This commitment also carries over into the Posse magazine created for the Athletic Department. Most recently the Office of the Associate Vice President for Institutional Diversity, in conjunction with University Marketing, engaged in a targeted advertising campaign. Advertisements

highlighting OSU’s exceptional Native American graduation rates have been placed in numerous publications

including Tulsa People; Winds of Change; Diverse Magazine; and Oklahoma Choices guide to post-high school education.

Administration and Finance The Division of Administration and Finance has worked with the Oklahoma Minority Supplier Development Council (OMSDC) over the past several years to grow and strengthen the University’s commitment toward increasing supplier diversity. Acting on a directive from the Vice President for Administration and Finance, the Purchasing Department submits contracting bids to the OMSDC, which subsequently sends these bids out to approximately

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300 minority-owned businesses within the state. The Purchasing Department provides a quarterly purchasing report to OSU regarding its use of minority businesses. This effort has resulted in greater supplier diversity among OSU contractors during the past several years.


Oklahoma Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (OK-EPSCoR) OK-EPSCoR was established by the National Science Foundation in 1985 to strengthen Oklahoma’s exploration and growth in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. OKEPSCoR’s central goal is to increase the state’s research competitiveness through strategic support of research instruments and facilities, research collaborations, and integrated education and research programs. Two unique programs highlight their commitment to diversity: the Women in Science Conference and the Tribal College Outreach. The Women in Science Con-

about science and technology career opportunities from  Oklahoma’s top female scientists and engineers; and receive college preparation information from Oklahoma colleges, universities, and outreach representatives. OK-EPSCoR places special emphasis on the goal of broadening participation of American Indian students in STEM fields through culturally-attuned teaching methods and technology.  The most recent recipient of OK-EPSCoR Tribal Outreach funding is Oklahoma’s first tribal college, Comanche Nation College located in Lawton. Dr. Kirksey and the OK-EPSCoR Associate Director, Dr. James Wicksted, Professor in the

ference, a free annual conference, encourages young people to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields.  The conference is designed to allow

students in grades six through twelve to engage in hands-on science activities; learn first-hand 33

OSU Physics Department, have traveled to each of the state’s four tribal colleges and made presentations regarding collaborative opportunities for each of the colleges with OSU. OK-EPSCoR also co-sponsors two programs with the Division of Institutional Diversity that strengthen the university’s commitment to diversity. In addition to REYAP, OK-EPSCoR co-sponsors a minority and first-generation recruitment program called JumpStart. Since 2008, this program has enabled approximately fifteen prospective freshmen students each year to reside on the OSU campus and enroll in up to six hours of coursework during the four-week June summer session. Every student who has participated in the JumpStart program subsequently enrolled at OSU the following fall semester.


Next Steps OSU has become a more proactive, engaging, and focused institution in the areas of diversity and inclusiveness. Our commitment to supporting and advancing the values of diversity and inclusion is illustrated through enrollment growth trends, at the undergraduate and graduate levels, an increase in diverse faculty, increased diversity-based campus programming and

events, and individual college and unit initiatives as more fully described throughout this report. We were most recently identified by Diverse magazine as the number one ranked institution in the nation in the number of Native American students earning Bachelor’s degrees. OSU has significantly increased the amount of resources, programs, and opportunities available for our students, staff, and faculty to promote, understand, and value diversity. We are excited to continue advancing our University’s commitment to diversity and inclusion through new strategic initiatives and programming. A Native American Studies Center will soon be established which will provide more

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structured and robust academic and social activities for the University community and serve as an additional resource that strengthens the University’s commitment to diversity. In addition, the University is exploring opportunities to create a Women’s Center, an Inclusion Studies minor, and an Inclusion Ambassadors professional development certificate program for faculty and staff. We believe that we are laying a strong foundation for a better and brighter future at OSU, one that values diversity and inclusion at an institutional level, one which permeates through our students, faculty, and staff, one that we can continue to build upon, and one of which we can all be proud.


Native American students succeed at OSU grants more undergraduate degrees to Native Americans than any other university in the nation.* Why OSU? The reasons are too many to list, but OSU leads in mechani cal, aerospace and chemical engineering, the humanities, medicine and entrepreneurship — to name a few. Also, OSU is home to a thriving Native American campus community, with student organizations in engineering, science and the arts. Visit OSU in Stillwater, Okla., and you will see why we are one of The Princeton Review’s “100 Best Value Colleges for 2010.” www.okstate.edu

*2008-2009, Diverse Issues in Higher Education “Top 100 Degree Producers”

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DIVISION OF

Institutional Diversity 408 Whitehurst

Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078-1060 Phone: 405.744.9154 Fax: 405.744.5576

diversity.okstate.edu


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The State of Diversity at OSU