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BRANDON THARP btharp@utexas.edu 1 210 383 3407 University of Texas School of Architecture

PORTFOLIO

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INDEX

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AUDUBON BRANCH LIBRARY

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DMZ PERCEPTION

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RUSK PSYCHIATRIC ASYLUM

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URBAN HOUSING DEVELOPMENT

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AUSTIN MUSIC ACADEMY

p.06

p.20

p.24

p.34

p.40

PROFESSIONAL p.52

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**UTSOA Design Excellence Award **Lyceum Fellowship Comp. Entry

A U D U B O N BRAN CH L IBR AR Y Fall 2016 New York, New York Critic: M. Haettasch New York City’s Audubon Terrace is located near the Washington Heights neighborhood between 155th and 156th streets in Northwest Manhattan. The terrace is surrounded by a collection of minority cultural buildings (a church and Hispanic heritage center among several others) constructed in the beaux arts style in the late 1920s. Unfortunately, this once pleasant space that was deeply invested in the local community has recently fallen into a state of abandonment and disrepair. When granted the opportunity to construct a library along the diminishing terrace, this major contextual issue quickly became the primary design consideration. The initial building strategy manifested itself in an unobstructed void that slices through the infill site. A response to the vacant terrace level (which is located 30 feet above 156th Street), this large void offers pedestrians on the street a clear view and clear path to the terrace, therefore opening it up to the public realm. The void creates both an upper and lower level to the library. The lower level steps up from the street to the terrace, easing both vertical circulation (to the terrace) along with volumetric organization of program. The largest and most important space of the lower level, the community room, is located at the very back of the site, another attempt to draw pedestrians towards the terrace. This general strategy, in regards to volumetric rhythm and spatial hierarchy, is echoed in the upper levels, which contain narrow volumes of bookshelves in the front of the building and larger communal reading rooms towards the rear. Rhythmical breaks within the upper volumes echo the circulation paths below and allow natural light to filter into the void. The void itself contains two exterior reading spaces, a green courtyard just below the terrace, another located on the terrace itself. Ultimately, these outdoor spaces take one final attempt at drawing pedestrians onto the terrace while providing patrons with an immensely rich spacial experience.

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As depicted in the upper sketch, 156th street consists of primarily early 20th century beaux arts style buildings. One of the original ideas was that the library’s facade would consist of some sort of grid that abstractly mimicked the language of the street. The sketches above show some initial attempts at subtraction within the building to create connections between street and terrace. The early wall assembly drawing to the right exhibits some attempts and general ideas concerning thermal barrier and structural 8

systems within the building. Certain elements, such as the exterior steel grid, were vacated as the project progressed. However, a few of the major concepts (the most important of which being the explicit street to terrace visual connection, remained quite explicit in the final project. Furthermore some of these original attempts at the unique approach of infilling the site with defined objects and integrating nature into the library at strategic points, can be seen within the final design.

01 Audubon Branch Library


WALL ASSE MBLY S T U DY

01 02 03 04 05 06

Exterior Steel Frame Steel Cable Cross-bracing Post-Tension Concrete Slab Open Web Steel Joist Dual Paned Frosted Glass Glass Window

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01

02

05

03 04

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VERTICAL TERRACE CONNECTION Mass

Cut

Align

Divide

LEVEL 1A

01 02 03 04 05 06 07

07

TERRACE LEVEL

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06

STREET LEVEL

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10

02

03

04

Circulation Desk Computer Lab Main Lobby Multipurpose Hall Terrace Reading Space Terrace Circulation Desk Book Stacks


LATERAL TERRACE CONNECTION Mass

Cut

Align

Divide

LEVEL 3

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08 09 10 11

09

10

Children’s Room Book Stacks Teen Room Main Reading Room

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LEVEL 2A

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09

LEVEL 1C

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Perspective 156th Street

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01 Audubon Branch Library


Perspective Terrace Reading Room

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VERTICAL MORPHOLOGY

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02

03

VERTICAL SECTION

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01 Audubon Branch Library

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09

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LATERAL SECTION

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01 Audubon Branch Library


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**Young Architects Comp. Entry

DM Z P ER CEP TION Winter 2017 Demilitarized Zone, Korea Team: B. Tharp, U. Song, C. Stacey

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A bathhouse on the Korean DMZ does not attempt to succumb to the ordinary and mundane, for the premise defies what is thought to be possible. With tensions high, a radical push towards unity is the only way to respect this barren landscape. This intervention is pushed to the depths of the earth, where a monumental form arises and takes cues from the circle, a gesture of peace. This bathhouse is not meant to blend with the setting, but rather be a bold intervention into a severely tense environment, an unrelenting approach to try to begin the formation of order. Two entrances from each country transcend an outer ring of water to ease down the landscape,

a process which connects the users to the depths of the earth to foster peace and unity. Tunnels are used during this procession in a manner of connecting users to an isolated, peaceful environment, challenging their typical connotation of war. Procession through the locker rooms lead citizens of both countries together to grand bathing spaces for all, where North and South Koreans, men and women, can co-habitate. Being wrapped in natural stone and separated only by the flow of water acts as spacial boundaries of each program. This bathhouse is not meant to follow its predecessors, rather it defies the need for boundaries, and pushes for a completely open bathing experience to ease tensions in these countries.

Perspective Bathhouse Approach

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section and diagrams by Brandon Tharp, graphic aid by Uijun Song 22


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R US K P S YC H IATRIC A S YLU M Spring 2016 Rusk, Texas Critic: D. Almy The small East Texas town of Rusk has long housed the campus to one of the state’s most valued psychiatric institutions. Due to lack of usable space at the aging facility and a steadily rising patient count, the hospital is in dire need of a massive, nearly 100,000 sq. ft. renovation. The additional program can be broken down into four primary categories, administration, admissions, health care and occupational therapy. Out of these four programs, occupational therapy was one of the largest and by far the most important in that it is truly the only program type directly related to patient psychological and mental healing. Naturally, the idea of creating a desirable and effective ‘therapy mall’ quickly took the forefront of the design. It was concluded that the best location of the therapy mall would be within the large central courtyard in the center of the Rusk campus. This centralized location offered multiple benefits including close proximity from all other buildings, easy containment of patients within an enclosed area and the hierarchical dominance of this healing program as the most important element of the hospital. Conversely, the courtyard is large enough to engage patients with an incredibly open and natural environment. After taking this approach to the therapy mall, the remainder of the project development became a series of reactive moves in attempt to make the nicest possible space while still managing to fit all of the program. Natural axi within the campus help to divide the therapy mall, creating facades and moments of interaction for patients. Volumes above the mall help to contain more program while connecting the courtyard with building 501 in front of it, allowing limited, controlled moments of interaction between patients and the general population. Finally, this volumetric strategy carries over to historic building 501 itself, which opens up to the city of Rusk and contains just single loaded first and second floors to allow maximum interaction and visual connection to the therapy mall.

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SITEPLAN

**Photo by Ui Jun Song** Many of the interior conditions inside of building 501 were in some stage of deterioration, however, the primary structural grid was still clearly intact as visible in one of the old wards on the third floor. Primary approach to this issue was through reapplication of simple materials (glass, gypsum board, new concrete were absolutely needed) throughout the building.

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**Photo by Ui Jun Song**During the 1930’s (most recent) renovation, a block containing mostly administrative and circulation spaces was added to the front and center of building 501. One design strategy was to hollow this space out, visually and spatially connecting the front of the campus (parking lot and park) to the primary axis this volume falls along (running straight through the campus and up to the chapel beyond).

03 Rusk Psychiatric Asylum

**Photo by Ui Jun Song** The exterior stone wall condition, especially at the ground connection (as depicted in the image) , is visibly deteriorating quite dramatically in some locations but still retains its structural integrity. Juxtaposing the existing stone wall with smooth, clean rhythmical concrete inserts gives an interesting new face to the facade while window panes and planters pop out to give further depth and contrast.


EXISTING

CONNECTION

AXIS CUT

RUSK CONNECTION

THERAPY MALL

FRONT CONNECTION

501 RESPONSE

PATIENT ENTRY

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LEVEL 3

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LEVEL 2

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18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27

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29 30 31

01

LEVEL 3

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14 15 16 17 18 19

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07 24 24 26

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28

02 03 04 05 06

07 08 09 10

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02 03 04 05 06

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ADMISSION

01 02 03 04 05

ADMINISTRATIVE

Lo b by (5 0 1 ) FLE X O f f i ce s St o r age M e di cal O f f i ce r o n D uty Secur ity St af f R o o m ADMINISTRATION

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He al t h Man age m e n t and Stor ag e He al t h Man age m e n t and Stor ag e H ealth M a nage m e n t an d St or ag e H ealth Mana g e me n t an d S t o rag e H ealth Manag eme n t an d S t o rage Su p e ri n t e n de n t an d Sup p or t Su p e ri n t e n de n t an d Sup p or t St af f Lo ck e rs St af f Bre ak R o o m Fa c i l i t y T rai n i n g Fa c i l i t y T rai n i n g Fa c i l i t y T rai n i n g Se c u ri t y Qu al i t y Man age m e n t Ut i l i z at i o n Man age m ent Te c hn i cal S u ppo rt FLE X O f f i ce s FLE X O f f i ce s Cl i n i cal D i re ct o r an d Sup p or t Di r ect o r of Psych o l o gy Safet y an d Wo rk e rs C omp ensation Safet y an d Wo rk e rs C omp ensation M e et i n g an d Mu l t i pu r p ose R oom M e et i n g an d Mu l t i pu r p ose R oom M e et i n g an d Mu l t i pu r p ose R oom Ch i ef N u rs e ’s O f f i ce Ch i ef F i n an ci al O f f i cer and Accountant Lo b by, We l co m e C e nter and Reception Job Center Job Center Pa t i e n t R i gh t s

THERAPY MALL

THERAPY MALL

01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27

Li b r ary an d R e adi n g R oom FLE X P ro gram an d Meeting R oom FLE X P ro gram an d Meeting R oom FLE X P ro gram an d Meeting R oom FLE X P ro gram an d Meeting R oom FLE X P ro gram an d Meeting R oom Cafe an d Su ppo rt K i tchen Co m pu t e r R o o m Po st O f f i ce an d Mai l Room Music Ar t s an d C raf t s Pe e r S u ppo rt Pa t i e n t Edu cat i o n Te a c h i n g K i t ch e n Tr u st Fu n d Cl ot h i n g C e n t e r Ca nt e e n Ca sh i e r an d Pat i e n t Pr op er ty B a r be r Ch ape l In d oo r C e n t ral R e creation St af f Lo ck e rs an d Br eak R oom Gy mn as i u m FLE X R o o m FLE X R o o m FLE X R o o m Au di t o ri u m

MEDICAL/ADMISSION

MEDICAL

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M e ch an i cal O P S an d Stor a g e M u l t i pu rpo s e Me et i n g R ooms E mp l oye e H e al t h an d Inf ection C ontr ol Offi ce s St af f B re ak R o o m De n t al M e di cal P rof e s s i o n al Of f ices M e di cal P rof e s s i o n al Of f ices M e di cal L ab an d EKG M e di cal Ex am R o o m s P h a rm acy

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FRONT ELEVATION

VERTICAL SECTION

LATERAL SECTION A

LATERAL SECTION B

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Perspective Building 501 Approach

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03 Rusk Psychiatric Asylum


Perspective Therapy Mall Green Roof

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URBAN H OUSING D EV ELOP MENT Spring 2015 Ciudad Miguel Aleman, Tamilipas Critic: A. Freedberg

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Ciudad Miguel Aleman is a relatively small Mexican border town in the state of Tamaulipas. Due to the recent discovery of oil in the nearby area, the city is anticipating an influx of primarily young men to work the oil fields. As a studio, we were tasked with creating a master plan containing four different target densities: 100, 80, 60 and 40 housing units per hectare. After creating the master plan, each individual was tasked with designing two or more unit typologies in their target density and creating a block of 20-30 units.

At 40 units per hectare, both the typologies and block as whole were designed to place inhabitants into a relaxed, open environment that promotes small scale, neighborly interaction. Unit clusters are centered around shaded but open courtyards that both physically and socially connect each house. Right: the site plan shows the five paths and six points of access to the block, allowing maximum access while creating an open environment.

Perspective Lateral Axis

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SITEPLAN

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04 Urban Housing Development


COURTYARD CONNECTION

SHADING DEVICE

AXIS

01 02 03 04 05

110m LEVEL 2 Shared Exterior Balcony Dining Room Kitchen Bathroom Bedroom

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110m LEVEL 1 Entry Vestibule Shared Laundry Study Living Room Closet Master Bedroom Master Bathroom

GREENSPACE

01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10

80m Exterior Courtyard Kitchen Dining Room Living Room Laundry Bathroom Bedroom Bedroom Closet Bathroom

01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11

100m Exterior Courtyard Dining Room Kitchen Bathroom Bedroom Closet Master Bathroom Master Bedroom Master Closet Study Living Room

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From the beginning of the design between neighbors. The shared, shaded The block’s is aareshaded cuts process, circulation played a primary major rolecorridor courtyards intended topath further that accentuate vertically through center, ease the of section access.shows Left: in the development of thethe housing block.allowing thesemaximum interactions. Below, The process outdoor corridors complex the sprawling, open feel of the units. Using the sketchthrough showsthe some initial ideas at making the central corridor are into intentionally designed to beAbove: spaciousprocess low density of the housing as a tool to a pleasant space. modeldesign shows initial attempt at and shaded, promoting social interaction create open spaces.

developing relationship between units and central corridor.

38 SECTION

Section A


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UTSOA Comprehensive Studio

A USTIN MU SIC ACAD EMY Fall 2017 Austin, Texas Team: B. Tharp, S. Iyengar Critic: M. Fajkus

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As “The Live Music Capital of the World”, Austin Texas serves as a home for some of the greatest musicians and most legendary festivals of all time. Paired with a quirky charm and vibrant youthful energy, a design for a new school of music must express the intangible beauty and uniqueness of the Austin music scene while also addressing the crucial significance of a central urban site just South of Republic Square Park. In conjunction with Sudarshan Iyengar, I devised strategy targeted at formally expressing the abstract qualities of music while addressing the crucial urban condition by creating key points of public interaction.

In its most abstract form, the structure of music can be defined by a note and the silence following that note. In translation, architecture can be summarized by a solid volume and the void that follows. Formally, our building consists brick volumes followed by u-glass reveals. This pattern repeats itself across the site, forming a strict grid. The grid is then strategically broken or expanded in spots of hierarchical importance and public interaction. Public interaction within the building happens in three primary areas: an elevated courtyard above a performance, the performance hall’s front of house (adjacent to Republic Square Park) and the school’s atrium.

Perspective Republic Square Park

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4TH STREET ELEVATION

GUADALUPE STREET ELEVATION

SCHOOL INTERIOR

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ARTS DISTRICT

PARK CONNECTION

TRANSIT CENTER

The lot is immediately surrounded by two major venues of similar program. The Austin Ballet to the Southwest and the Moody ACL Live Theatre to the Southeast.

The new music school will certainly have implications on Republic Square Park across the street. This new threshold was a primary design consideration.

The site is located near a core transit stop for the City of Austin buses and is also near Guadalupe and 2nd Street, two primary urban axi.

SITEPLAN

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MASSING

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VENUE

02

03

SCHOOL

04

VERTICAL SECTION A

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05 Austin Music Academy

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06


MUSIC

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08

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12

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LEVEL 1

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LEVEL 2

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06

07

04

03

03 10

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01

VERTICAL SECTION B

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LEVEL 3

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Entry Vestibule Atrium/Cafeteria Classroom Practice Room Kitchen Lunch Line Loading Dock Auditorium FOH Lobby Lecture Hall Recording Booth Mixing Room

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Outdoor Terrace Large Recording Booth Large Mixing Room Group Studio

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13

14

12 11

LATERAL SECTION

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Perspective Front of House

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Perspective Roof Terrace

05 Austin Music Academy


Perspective School Atrium

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FOH STRUCTURAL AXON

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05 Austin Music Academy


WALL SECTION Coping Wooden Header Rigid Board Insulation

DETAIL 1 Low Iron U-Chanel Glass Fiber Insulation Steel Column Interior Soundproof Glass

Aluminum Roof Panel Rigid Board Insulation Steel Beam

Brick Veneer Air Cavity

Steel Stud Waterproofing Membrane

Steel Shoe Steel Angle Concrete Slab Steel Decking Connection Tab Steel Beam Gypsum Board Panel

Steel Connection Bracket Steel Cable HVAC Duct Insulation

Steel Tube Steel Angle Aluminum Connection Bracket Waterproof Seal

Steel Connection Plate Rigid Board Insulation Waterproofing Membrane Aluminum Sofit

DETAIL 2 Steel Beam Rigid Insulation Aluminum Sofit Panel

Wooden Board Steel Rod Connection Aluminum Drainage Strip Drain Cap Waterproofing Concrete Slab Steel Angle Steel Beam Steel Beam PVC Pipe PVC Connection Joint

DETAIL 3

Coping Wood Veneer

Wooden Board Steel Box Planter Drain Cap

Plastic Cover Steel Connection Bracket LED Light Rod

Waterproofing Concrete Slab Steel Angle Steel Beam PVC Pipe Steel Connection Shoe Steel Angle Concrete Slab Drainage Steel Decking

PVC Connection Joint PVC Pipe

DETAIL 4 Steel T Steel Tube Steel Tube Steel Connection Bracket Felt Panel

DETAIL 5 Low Iron U-Channel Glass Fiber Insulation Aluminum Connection Bracket Concrete Slab Steel Decking Steel Beam Connection Tab

Steel Column Glass Railing Steel Shoe Bolted Connection Steel Angle Connection Steel Beam

Flashing Damproofing

Steel Cable

Rigid Board Insulation

Gypsum Ceiling Finish

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PROFESSIONAL 2017-2018 San Antonio, TX Architects Clayton and Little Architects Clayton and Little is a small firm in Austin and San Antonio, focusing primarily on high end residential and boutique commercial and hospitality work. As an intern in the San Antonio office, my primary role was to assist in schematic design and design development while producing physical and digital models. I had the opportunity to work on multiple projects, the three shown being the Kauai Residence, Winery Ag Barn in Paso Robles, California, and the residence in Austin, Texas (respectively). For the Kauai house I produced two quick study models and a more detailed section model (pictured) as well as multiple studies of the truss system over the roof of the guest house (also shown). For the barn and house, I produced two detailed models at the design development stage.

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KAUAI RESIDENCE

SECTION MODEL

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WINERY AG BARN

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AUSTIN RESIDENCE

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BRANDON THARP

A F F I L I AT I O N 2017-

AC E M EN TO R P RO G RAM AUSTIN M ENTOR, TEAM LEAD Served as a mentor and a team leader (2018) for the Architecture, Construction and Engineering Program for local high school students. Taught high-schoolers about different tasks of an architects, assisted in the design process of their group project.

btharp@utexas.edu 1 210 383 3407 2808 Whitis Ave. Austin, TX 78705

2014-

Served as the Spiritual chair (2016-2017) for the Catholicbased IFC fraternity at UT. Organized and planned rituals and community service events. Participated in service events such as TexasTHON and feeding the homeless. Participated in and assisted in preparation for various social events.

E D U C AT I O N 2014-

THE UN I VE R S I T Y O F T E XA S AT A U S T IN

2014-

5 year Bachelor of Architecture Program in the School of Architecture. Expected graduation date: May, 2019.

EXPERIENCE 2017-

Worked on a variety of projects ranging from high end residential to boutique restaurants and hotels. Assisted primarily in visualization during the schematic design and design development stages. Worked through both analog and digital methods, performed structural and schematic studies in Sketchup, built models with the aid of a 3-D printer.

2016

U TS O A S TU D EN T C O U N C IL S TUDIO REP. Served as a Studio Representative (2016), attended meetings, prepared and attended sponsored events. Played for IM champion volleyball team.

2017-

U TS O A M EN TO R P RO G RAM M ENTOR

CLAY TO N & L I T T L E SAN ANTONIO, AUSTIN I N T ERN

P H I K AP PA TH ETA VP - S P IRITUAL

Served as student mentor for a UTSOA freshman.

2018-

G U L F C O AS T D ES IG N L AB Currently enrolled in the design-build studio supervised by Coleman Coker. Designing and constructing a pavilion on Galveston Island for local children and families.

2015-

AIAS American Institute of Architecture students. Attended meetings, participated in sponsored firm tours.

KGA A R C HI T E C T U R E AUSTIN I N T ERN Worked on a wide range of projects including small scale commercial, education and religious. Assisted primarily in schematic design and also did some construction documentation. Worked primarily in Revit, Sketchup and AutoCad.

20152017

THE UNI VE R S I T Y O F T E XA S AT A U S TIN BUILDING SUPERVISOR, LIFEGUARD Worked at the Texas Lee and Joe Jamail Swim Center as a lifeguard and a building supervisor. Guarded and supervised some of the most competitive meets and best athletes in the world.

20142015

SE A W O R L D SAN ANTONIO L I FEGU AR D Worked as a lifeguard, performing multiple saves and assists at Sea World’s water park.

ACHIEVEMENT 2016

DESIGN EXCELLENCE AWARD UTSOA

2014

RANDOLPH CLUB SPOUSES SCHOLARSHIP

2014

ST. ANTHONY CLARET SCHOLARSHIP

2014

AIR FORCE FCU SCHOLARSHIP

COMPETITION 2016

LYCEUM FELLOWSHIP COMPETITION

2016

YOUNG ARCHITECTS COMPETITION

REFERENCE BR IAN KORTE CLAYTON & LITTLE brian@claytonandlittle.com

NATHAN GOODMAN KGA ARCHITECTURE ngoodman@kgaarchitecture.com

MARTIN HAE TTASCH UTSOA m.haettasch@utexas.edu

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SKILLS Revit

V-Ray

Photoshop

AutoCad

Sketchup

Illustrator

Rhinocerous

SU Podium

InDesign

Grasshopper

ARC GIS

Acrobat

3DS Max

Woodworking

Microsoft Office


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Brandon Tharp Architecture Portfolio  

UTSOA Undergraduate

Brandon Tharp Architecture Portfolio  

UTSOA Undergraduate

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