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THE

BRADGATE MAG A Z I N E

FURNLEY HOUSE APPLAUD

COMMUNITY CHAMPIONS

good NEIGHBOURs in thurcaston & cropston

Blanche Sargeaunt Foundation Supporting the cost of homecare

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GREETINGS Happy New Year Everyone! ...and here’s definitely hoping for a better 2021, than 2020 turned out to be. 2020 has been such a tough 12 months for so many of course, but also for your good old Bradgate Magazine too….as our advertisers, and indeed many charities and community groups had to pull back, cut cloths or cease operations altogether, our publication definitely felt the chill of Covid-19. As a result we had to shelve our May/Jun and Jul/Aug editions, without a tipping point of advertisers (who were understandably cautious about their futures) to underpin us and without local groups’ being able to get together and hold events our usual plethora of editorial was also much diminished, but we’ve started to see an upturn. Some great businesses have either carried on (hardly regardlessly) or started to get back into the swing of things as such we’re delighted to continue to showcase their wares within these pages. If supporting local is your thing, please make sure our trusty local businesses, charities and trades men and women, are given your attention when considering where your valuable time and money is spent this year. ...and finally, my thanks must also go to The Bradgate team - Sue Harris, Executive Sales; Sue is always busy, both taking care of her existing accounts and canvassing for new prospects, a warm smile with always a moment to chat, Sue has continued to work hard for the magazine, despite these trying times; and to Nena Killick too - Nena leads on design and putting the magazine together and finely balances editorial space for community- and human interest stories, with those that pay the bills, our adverts! Its always been important to Nena (and formerly her father, Ed, our previous editor) that the community had a voice and we’re proud that this tradition is so strongly retained. Our troop here at The Bradgate Magazine might be tiny in number, but we are mighty in endeavour! So, well done team and here’s to a better, brighter 2021! Regards

March / April 2021 edition copy deadline: 05 February 2021

Jo

To advertise contact the editor for prices, details and deadlines editor@thebradgatemagazine.co.uk

editor

07708 915779 | www.thebradgatemagazine.co.uk

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News, reviews, competitions, events and must-see things to do and hear - add to that the fantastic range of services and products available from our advertisers and you have a publication that puts you, our reader, “at the heart of your community” - just as we have always proudly done, since 2013.

PS

Printed by

“ T hrow off the bowlines. Sail away from t h e s a f e h a r b o u r. C a t c h t h e t r a d e w inds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Di s c o v e r. ” - M a r k Twa i n

Our Disclaimer: Reasonable effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of all content, The Bradgate Magazine takes no responsibility for the accuracy of statements or content and can accept no liability for errors, omissions or any inconvenience arising therefrom. No part of this publication may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. All text, images and design in this publication and on the website are subject to copyright. Any unauthorised duplication is strictly prohibited. Artwork and articles are accepted in good faith and on the condition that permission has been granted for use on our website. Copyright © The Bradgate Magazine Ltd.

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“MS is so unpredictable - you just don’t know what will happen to you” 22 year old sales rep reveals impact of multiple sclerosis in charity appeal As evidence reveals one in five people diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) in the UK is now under the age of 30, a 22 year old from Castle Donington, Leicestershire is shedding light on the need for new treatments as part of a £100 million charity appeal. Ellie Marsh was diagnosed with relapsing MS just over two years ago. Today the medical sales rep lives with symptoms including extreme fatigue, cognitive fog and memory problems, and also experiences difficulty walking. “When I was diagnosed I was in pieces,” offered Ellie. “I was a complete state. The first thing I did was call my Mum and I remember just wailing down the phone at her. Since then if I let it really get to me I could feel very depressed, but I try to role with the punches and stay as positive as I can.” According to the MS Society, MS is the most common progressive neurological condition in young people today. There are 130,000 people living with MS in the UK and, in the last year alone, more than 1,250 people under 30 have been diagnosed. Ellie is one of 30 under 30s appearing in a new photo series from the MS Society and award winning photographer Spencer Murphy as part of the charity’s ‘Stop MS Appeal’. Subjects range from 16-30 years of age, and include a nurse, an expectant mum, and a trainee vicar amongst others. MS is highly unpredictable and, when diagnosed, no one knows how their condition will develop, or how disabled they may become. Approx. 85% of people with MS are diagnosed with the relapsing form, where symptoms come in sudden attacks then fade. Two in three will go on to develop secondary progressive MS, where there is no remission and you become increasingly disabled. 10-15% of people have primary progressive MS, where symptoms gradually get worse from the outset. Ellie continues: “When I think about the future it’s scary, because MS is so unpredictable – you just don’t know what will happen to you. I worry that I could be physically very disabled in a few years, and that I might not be able to look after my kids if I have them, and one of my biggest fears is going blind, because I love drawing, art and illustration. If I couldn’t walk the dog any more, that would really impact me, and it’s then that you realise there’s so much you take for granted. “If there was a treatment that could stop that progression, it would change everything. I’d never have to worry about having kids, or the type of house I’d need to live in, or losing my job because I can’t drive any more. It would take a massive weight off my shoulders. If I’m honest, I’d probably have much more planned for my life, because I’d know MS wasn’t going to affect it all at some point.” Tens of thousands of people with progressive forms of MS still have no treatment to help them as their condition advances but the ‘Stop MS Appeal’ aims to raise £100 million to help find, develop and test new treatments. Dr Emma Gray, Assistant Director of Research at the MS Society, said: “Today, most people will first experience MS symptoms in their 20s and 30s, when they’re working on their career, or perhaps thinking about starting a family. The condition is unpredictable and different for everyone, and that can make it hard to plan for the future. “There are now over a dozen licensed treatments for people with the relapsing form of MS, and some emerging for early active progressive MS – but there is nothing to stop you becoming more disabled as your condition advances. Thankfully, we have never been closer to stopping MS, and with the discoveries being made right now, we believe treatments that slow or stop disability progression are a very real prospect.” Thanks to the amazing support received to date the Society has already secured over £54 million of its target but with your help more can be achieved. For more details visit www.mssociety.org.uk/STOP-MS. Text FUTURE8 to 70800 to donate £5 and support the ‘Stop MS Appeal’. Messages cost £5 plus your standard network rate. 100% of your text donation will be received by the MS Society. To opt-out of future text messages from us, please text NOSMS MSS to 88008. For full terms and conditions visit: www.mssociety.org.uk/privacy.

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Central American hurricane survivors receive £30,000 from Freemasons

Hundreds of families in Nicaragua and Honduras who have had

transmission of Covid-19 in crowded temporary shelters. A £30,000

their lives devastated by two major hurricanes, will be receiving

grant from the Freemasons is enough to provide 553 families in

emergency supplies, thanks to a grant of £30,000 from the

Nicaragua with water and sanitation kits containing water, soap,

Freemasons to Plan International UK.

sanitiser, toothbrushes, toothpaste and insect repellent, and 331

Hurricane Eta made landfall on Nicaragua’s northern coast as a Category Four hurricane in early November, bringing catastrophic

families in Honduras with shelter kits, containing mats, blankets, torches and mosquito nets.

rains and winds of 140mph, blowing off roofs and knocking down

The Freemasons from Leicestershire & Rutland have contributed

trees. Hurricane Iota, the strongest Atlantic hurricane of the year,

to the grant that comes via the Masonic Charitable Foundation,

then caused widespread devastation in Nicaragua, Honduras,

which is funded by Freemasons, their families and friends, from

Guatemala and El Salvador just two weeks later. Iota, also a

across England and Wales.

Category Four hurricane, made landfall on Monday, November 16, just two weeks after Hurricane Eta had left 4.2 million people in Nicaragua, Honduras and Guatemala in urgent need of humanitarian assistance. The storm hit almost exactly the same stretch of coast that had already been devastated by Hurricane Eta. In Honduras alone, over half a million families have been affected

Rose Caldwell, Chief Executive of Plan International UK, said: “We’re very grateful for this generous grant which will allow Plan International to reach families and young children in those parts of the region hardest hit by the hurricanes. It’s critical that we act now to provide this support to those most at risk.”

and thousands have seen their homes damaged or destroyed by

Peter Kinder of the Leicestershire & Rutland Freemasons said:

the winds, rain and subsequent floods. Schools and health centres

“I’m very pleased we’ve been able to help Plan International with

have seen the brunt of the storms and roads and power lines

their relief effort in Central America. This is a desperate situation

have been destroyed, which creates even greater challenges for

and Plan International and the other organisations helping on the

response teams and communities.

ground need all the help and support we can offer.”

Children and families are in need of emergency supplies to help

Photo shows flooded communities in Honduras, the aftermath of

them in this critical period, especially given the additional risks of

Hurricane Iota, the strongest Atlantic hurricane of 2020.

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Leicestershire Community Champions Awards

A Great Success

The first Leicestershire Community Champions Awards was a great success with the Midland Langar Seva Society taking the flagship Charity of the Year award. The event, set up by the Furnley House Foundation in partnership with Voluntary Action LeicesterShire (VAL), intended to celebrate the amazing people and organisations who have gone above and beyond to help their local communities through the Covid19 pandemic. The Furnley House Foundation - born out of Leicester financial planners’ Furnley House’s ambition to create opportunities and improve the lives of the local community - usually hold a number of events to help bring the community together and have previously raised in excess of £40,000 a year for charities and not-for-profits. For the awards, the Foundation asked people to nominate their local heroes over ten categories, to help shine a light on registered charities, community organisations and local businesses, alongside deserving individuals too. The Midland Langar Seva Society - who help those facing homelessness and poverty - were awarded the title of Charity of the Year, winning a £5,000 grant as well as a share of the proceeds from the next Furnley House Foundation Summer Ball. Hosted by local celebrity Ian Stringer, the virtual awards evening was attended by more than 160 people online. Over £650 was raised on the night, plus an additional £250 from some generous Furnley House clients, with the proceeds being split equally between the five Charity of the Year finalists - the aforementioned Midland Langar Seva Society, together with Charity Link, Help the Homeless, Steps Conductive Education Centre and the Zinthiya Trust. Stefan Fura, co-founder of Furnley House and Trustee of the Furnley House Foundation said: “It was great to see the community of Leicestershire pulling together during this difficult year. We are delighted that we’re able to raise awareness and support for so many local causes as well as celebrating the fantastic individuals and organisations who have really made a difference. Congratulations to all the deserving finalists and winners and a bit thank you to all our judges and sponsors for their generous support of the Awards and the Furnley House Foundation.” For more information, including all category winners, please visit www.furnleyhouse.co.uk/the-furnley-house-foundation.

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Good Neighbours:

Here Before, Dur ing and After Covid-19 This year will be the fifth year since a group of volunteers set up the Thurcaston and Cropston Good Neighbours Scheme. Who would have thought that within five years they would have: • driven neighbours thousands of miles to more than 150 appointments

• been shopping for neighbours on over 150 occasions • completed 20 gardening tasks (plus a similar number for DIY) • made 120 trips to pharmacies to collect prescriptions • freely given hundreds of hours in aid of being a ‘buddy’ to housebound residents

No fewer than 192 of these tasks have been completed since the start of the Covid-19 crisis, when the number of the groups’ regular ‘clients’ doubled, albeit fortunately, so too did the number of their volunteers, however, as some of these folk have now been able to return to work or to university, volunteer numbers have subsided a little. For some who have been unable to do much more than ‘phone buddying’ because they themselves are in the ‘high risk’ groups, they, in particular, are looking forward to being able to resume normal duties as and when the pandemic and lockdown restrictions ease, they volunteer because they want to help their neighbours and enjoy being appreciated by the people they help. If this appeals, or if you’re in Thurcaston or Cropston and need help please email goodneighboursLE7@gmail.com or call 0743 526 5397. In the meantime, Good Neighbours would like to wish all residents of Thurcaston and Cropston (and beyond) a very happy, healthy 2021!

CHARNWOOD MUSEUM AWARDED RECOVERY GRANTS Charnwood Museum has been awarded two recovery grants to develop its education programme and to help improve its communication with visitors. The museum, situated in Queen’s Park, Loughborough and run in partnership with Leicestershire County Council, is one of five heritage and museum sites in the county that will benefit from more than £70,000 of funding as part of the government’s £1.57bn Culture Recovery Fund. The fund was created to help the heritage sector face the challenges of the Covid-19 pandemic and will be used to further develop education programmes and to find new and sustainable ways of telling the rich stories of the county’s history. The award-winning education programme delivers tailored learning at Charnwood Museum as well as Bosworth Battlefield Heritage Centre, the 1620s House & Garden at Donington le Heath, Harborough Museum and Melton Carnegie Museum. Charnwood Museum was also awarded £10,000 to develop a website as part of the Museum Development East Midlands’ Covid-19 Recovery Grants scheme. The museum identified that not having a standalone website, that enabled the team to engage with audiences unable to visit the building when closed during lockdown, was a barrier and resulted in the grant being awarded. Councillor Jenny Bokor, lead member for arts and culture at Charnwood Borough Council, said: “I couldn’t be more pleased for Charnwood Museum and all the heritage and museum sites that are going to benefit from the grant. Arts and culture play a significant role in so many people’s lives, and our museum provides excellent educational workshops to children across the borough and continues to promote Charnwood’s rich history to people of all ages.” Charnwood Museum is currently closed in line with the Government’s national lockdown restrictions, but customers can take part in online activities at www.charnwood.gov.uk/museum_online. For more information on Charnwood Museum, visit www.charnwood.gov.uk/museum. Photo: Cassandra Costelow, museum manager (left), Sylvia Wright, head of leisure and culture at Charnwood Borough Council (centre) and Councillor Jenny Bokor (right).

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Residents protest against development in Charnwood Forest

Earlier this year around 250 Nanpantan residents took part in an orderly, socially-distanced protest against the proposed building of 30 houses on open space in the Charnwood Forest. Its border - with the ancient Burleigh Wood - means the space attracts a wealth of local wildlife, flora and fauna, making it almost certainly the richest in biodiversity in the Loughborough settlement area; the open space is also the only location in Loughborough where Cambrian rock similar to the outcrops at Outwoods and Bradgate Park can be found. A survey carried out by the Nanpantan Ward Residents’ Group found that the open space is highly prized by residents - it has been used as such for 50 years for walking, dog walking, exercise, picnics, children’s play and in winter the large hill is used for sledging. Visitors can enjoy beautiful views over Loughborough and the Wolds. Charnwood Borough Councillor Margaret Smidowicz, who attended the protest, commented: “This year, we have all been made acutely aware of the importance of open space for the wellbeing of residents, there are many studies, including a recent Public Health England report, that link open spaces with wellbeing. Surely, we need to be listening to our residents at this time.” Nanpantan Ward Residents’ Group Chairman, Steve Cuff, said: The Council’s 2020 Corporate Strategy says it will care for our open spaces so they can be enjoyed by everyone. As far as the residents of Nanpantan are concerned this is a simple choice for the Council - do they care for our wellbeing, or not?” The Residents’ Group have subsequently run an e-petition which received over 700 signatures and to date over 100 pages (almost 10%) of consultation responses have been from Nanpantan residents concerned over this matter. To date Charnwood Borough Council still have not responded to the Group in writing, with regards to how they will protect a space of extreme importance, particularly during such unprecedented times. To find out more about the campaign, please visit www.nanpantan.com.

THE LAST ORDERS PROJECT Sales of alcohol from local stores and supermarkets jumped in 2020 with more people than ever choosing to drink at home. Age UK Leicestershire & Rutland’s Last Orders Project is working alongside Turning Point to provide free support for anyone over the age of 50 in relation to alcohol or substance misuse. The project is available across Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland. Non-judgemental information and advice is given as well as linking individuals, their carers and families to other support services. If you would like a confidential chat with the team about yourself or a loved one, please contact Jackie on 07734 960 241 or email hollie.hughes@ageukleics.org.uk.

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A Midlands-based App is providing a unique bridge between businesses and consumers Leicestershire based entrepreneur, John Whitbread, launched the Spotted App in early 2020 to allow businesses to connect with consumers without having to rely on social media alone or the interference of predictive algorithms. The app has been designed to overcome the frustrations which can arise when searching for a product or service online, frustrations caused by the fact that behind the scenes technology is often trying to second-guess exactly what users are looking for. “Traditional search platforms have algorithms working behind the scenes to decide which selected options you’ll see rather than delivering everything which matches your request” offered John. “Their predictions, and the criteria by which the results are sorted on your behalf, can often mean that the options you get aren’t actually the best for you. Of course, you will also be presented with the businesses which have paid the most to get themselves in front of you, which again, doesn’t always best suit what the consumer is looking for.” John’s biggest passion is to ensure that the new Spotted App offers equal opportunities to both the businesses and consumers who use it. So, as well as making the connections impartial and transparent, John made the decision to keep the cost to advertise on the app as minimal as possible at just 99p per month - and entirely free for consumers to use. More so, John is so passionate about the platform that he decided to scrap the advertising fee entirely for the first two months, making the cost less than £10 for an entire first year. The concept is simple - businesses upload their details and consumers type in what they are looking for to find local suppliers who best meet their needs. At a time when business agility is key, one of the main features of the Spotted App is its flexibility. Businesses can turn off notifications if they are busy and then immediately turn them back on again when they are ready to accept leads. This simplicity is all part of John Whitbread’s vision. “My experience with the Spotted Facebook group allowed me to focus on what was most important - fairness, affordability and bringing back a sense of community. The open nature of the app gets us back to what search was in the good old days – a genuine matching of people’s needs with the local businesses who can help them.” Just months since its launch and the app has already proven to be a hit with hundreds of businesses and consumers. To find out more about the Spotted App visit www.spottedapp.com.

Contact NHS 111 For Urgent Medical Care Patients in Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland are being encouraged to contact NHS 111 for urgent medical care needs to help patients get the care and treatment they need at the right place based on their clinical needs. It will also help manage the flow of patients to protect their safety and the safety of NHS staff during the Covid-19 pandemic and winter. Patients contacting NHS 111 will be clinically assessed so that they can be referred to either an emergency department, an NHS Urgent Treatment Centre, a Minor Injuries Unit, pharmacy or their GP, or advised to self-care where appropriate. If people attend the emergency department at Leicester Royal Infirmary with a non-emergency condition and have not already contacted NHS 111, they could be asked to contact NHS 111 whilst on-site and could be referred to another service. The new move looks to help prevent overcrowding and enable social distancing in waiting areas at the emergency department of the Leicester Royal Infirmary and other urgent care settings. To access NHS 111 by telephone dial 111 or go online at www.111.nhs.uk for further information.

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LEICESTER ASSOCIATION

2020 was the 125th anniversary of the founding of the National Trust - it legally began on 12th January 1895, the date it was formally constituted under the Companies Act - and whilst many events were planned to celebrate the anniversary most have had to be cancelled due to Covid-19. So we need to remember the beginnings of the Trust before the moment passes. Looking back it actually took years for the Trust to get established and build up its portfolio of properties. At the initial Council meeting in February 1895 it acquired its first property, the gift of four acres of cliff top land at Dinas Oleu in Wales. The Trust’s second property, and first building, was Alfriston Clergy House in East Sussex. This was a small Oak framed medieval hall built around 1350 which was practically derelict. The local vicar was, however, aware of its historical significance and the Trust were convinced to buy it for £10.00 in April 1896. Extensive renovations were eventually completed and a tenant took residence in 1898. In 1899 the Trust acquired 2 acres of Wicken Fen in Cambridgeshire, an area of fenland and an unofficial nature reserve. Over the years the holding has increased to almost 2,000 acres and it is now the largest area of undrained fenland in the UK. Also in 1899, Duffield Castle, near Derby, was purchased. It was the site of a Norman Castle built about 1190 but only the outline of the foundations remained. This was the first archaeological site owned by the Trust. Long Crendon Court House, near Aylesbury, purchased in 1900, was the next building acquired by the Trust and only the fifth property in the first five years of its existence. It is a two storey timber framed building and a superb example of a 14th century courthouse, albeit it also had a number of other uses over the years too. From 1900 onwards properties were acquired most years. However the first large Country House purchased, Barrington Court, was not acquired until 1907. This property was again received in ruins and was not renovated until the 1920’s, with the work being paid for by the tenant, Colonel Lyle, of Tate and Lyle.

The National Trust Leicester Association has currently suspended all group activities. Please check the Association website at www.leicesternt.btck.co.uk for updates, including the latest details on Stoneywell Cottage.

Alan Tyler | Publicity Officer NT Leicester Association

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NEW FASHION AND BEAUTY BRANDS John Lewis announces the launch of more than 30 new fashion, beauty and accessory brands to its lineup for the new season. The selected brands have been chosen because they respond directly to the new needs of the nation as customers are opting for more casual wardrobe choices. The collection includes the launch of a new athleisure category featuring iconic brands Athleta, Adidas by Stella McCartney, Isle Jacobsen, Hornbaek and Calvin Klein Performance.

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Thurcaston & Cropston Local History Society For our final online meeting of the year, a brief AGM was followed by one of our members, Jane Smith, telling us the story of the Grey family of Bradgate Park from 1720 onwards. By this date the family had gained the title of Earl of Stamford and had abandoned court politics for life as landed gentry. In that year the 2nd Earl died and the title passed to a cousin who lived at Enville Hall in Staffordshire, he chose to remain there so Bradgate ceased to be the main family seat, as such the house fell into decay. Skipping ahead, the 4th Earl’s marriage brought into the family an estate at Dunham Massey in Cheshire and the further title of Earl of Warrington. In this period the Greys became wealthy, courtesy of coal mines, canals and the mill town of Ashton-under-Lyne, and with these additional finances they created fashionable landscapes and gardens at Enville, which included follies, cascades and even a Chinese-style boating lake! Bradgate Park was not forgotten however and both the 4th and 5th Earls developed it - as a shooting estate - creating the walled spinneys from which game birds could be driven into the path of waiting guns, alas. It was the 5th Earl who also built Old John. When flat racing became popular in the late 18th century, the Grey family turned to breeding racehorses and they laid out courses at Enville and Bradgate to mimic the one at Epsom. They converted Old John into a building for viewing the course around it and you can still see the remains of the rubbing-down stables nearby. With the aim of entering races with “unknown” horses - trained in private on the Grey estates, which they could then bet on to win at long odds - they achieved only moderate success in this venture. The 7th Earl, who came into title aged just 18, was a colourful character. Despite being one of the most eligible men in England, he made two scandalous marriages: first to Bessie Billage, the daughter of his bedmaker at Cambridge, then to Kitty Cocks, a circus bare-back horse rider! He spent enormous sums to enlarge Enville Hall and develop the gardens there, adding spectacular fountains and a 160 foot long glass conservatory, with pinnacles and onion domes. The gardens received thousands of visitors each week in summer and there were special festivals held, which showcased multi-coloured illuminations and fireworks. At his Bradgate estate, the 7th Earl built a lavish new 46-bedroom house set in 80 acres of grounds near Field Head. Though not accepted in all circles of society, the Earl and Countess were honoured by a three-day visit from the Prince and Princess of Wales, to the new Bradgate House in 1882. The Earl died the following year but the Countess lived for a further 22 years. On her death the family properties were divided up. Enville Hall was given to a niece of the Countess, whose descendants still live there whilst the Bradgate estate was sold off in a series of auctions across the 1920s. Charles Bennion (founder of the British United Shoe Machinery Company) purchased the estate and later gave it, in trust, to be managed “in perpetuity as an open space or public park for the purposes of recreation” by the people of Leicestershire. Our beautiful Bradgate Park is still enjoyed by many today, and long may that continue.

www.thurcastoncropstonhistory.org.uk

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Combating isolation

FOR people with learning disabilities The VALUES Project, run by Voluntary Action LeicesterShire (VAL), offers activities for people with learning disabilities to help them to make friends, learn new skills and have fun. After being forced to close to new clients due to the pandemic, the service is now one of just a few of its type accepting new referrals in Leicestershire. For over 20 years VAL’s VALUES Project has offered people with learning disabilities an opportunity to get out of the house, make friends and get involved in a range of group activities, from ten pin bowling to music or maths and English lessons. VALUES has been a core part of daily life for many of its clients and helps them to avoid loneliness and isolation. Clients can pay for VALUES with their social care personal budgets, which means they get to choose which sessions they want to do. In March, the service had to make the difficult decision to close to both new and existing clients during the lockdown. However, the resourceful VALUES staff soon thereafter moved to delivering some of their sessions virtually, helping existing clients to feel less isolated and facilitating opportunities for them to see their friends and take part in online activities. Now VALUES has reopened, with Covid-safe measures in place throughout their base, on Newarke Street in Leicester, to ensure the safety and health of all of their clients. Mikaela Paterson, VALUES Team Manager, said: “We are really happy to be open and holding fun and exciting group sessions again. We know from engaging and talking to our clients during the lockdown period that lots of them have missed being a part of VALUES, doing their favourite activities and seeing their friends. It’s been especially hard for some who don’t fully understand why they can’t just come in and do all of the things they used to and usually do with us. “VALUES is currently one of the few services in Leicester that’s open and offering group services. We’ve worked really hard and made lots of changes to how we run sessions, put in lots of Covid-safe processes and changed the types of sessions we run to make sure everybody is safe and happy.” The VALUES learning disability support service is taking referrals for new clients. If you want to refer somebody to the service, or if you want to find out more about what VALUES does, you can visit the VAL website or contact Mikaela from VALUES directly: Email: Mikaela.p@valonline.org.uk Telephone: 0116 257 5044

Online wildlife talks in the comfort of your own home The Leicestershire and Rutland Wildlife Trust has put together an exciting and informative programme of wildlife and nature-themed talks which are accessible online in the comfort of your own home. This replaces the monthly local group meetings and is a great way to find out more about nature as well as to stay in touch with your local Wildlife Trust group. The talks are held via Zoom and details of the talks and how to book them can be found at: www.lrwt.org.uk/online-talks The talks are free, but if you would like to donate to the Trust please go to: www.lrwt.org.uk/donate

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The

Power Of Print Still Holds True

Thanks to the good folk at DOR-2-DOR we’re pleased to bring our readers (and advertisers!) an insightful item on why hard copy printing - which of course includes our magazine - still retains a potent place in today’s digital age. For many years now we have been told that digital marketing will be the future and print will have to take second or even third place as a marketing tool. However, there are signs that consumers are beginning to experience digital fatigue. You only have to check your inbox to see how many marketing or spam e-mails you receive. With this mind consider the below as to why we think the power of print still rules. 1. Print Breaks Through Digital Noise - Research revealed in 2017 that business users sent or received 121 emails each day, originating from 269 billion emails sent out around the world daily! Whichever way you look at it this is a lot of digital noise, and print as a tangible product, can help cut through this noise. 2. Print Elicits Strong Emotions - It has been known for some years that, contrary to some people’s opinion, people do not ignore materials that hit their doormat, but tend to keep them, on average, for 38 days. With less physical mail hitting the mailbox than the number of emails that hit your inbox, physical materials make a stronger emotional connection than their digital counterparts. 3. Print Supports Digital Efforts - Although people may be suffering from digital overload, this does not mean this avenue can be ignored, far from it, however print advertising can compliment the digital world by ensuring ‘calls to action’ feature on advertisements, for example to drive people to websites or social media channels. 4. Print Strengthens Branding - Printed materials are an excellent way of strengthening your company’s brand and keeping your ‘Top of Mind Awareness’ (TOMA) high. A regular printed presence will keep your proposition in customers’ minds for longer and can be a better way of doing this than sending out thousands of emails. 5. Print is Engaging - A well-planned marketing campaign aimed at a specific target audience will engage a prospect far more than a generic email will. If your message is relevant to readers, they will not pass you by. 6. Print Establishes Trust - Although we live in a digitally-driven world, that doesn’t necessarily mean that people always believe what they read and see in the digital realm. In fact research shows that many people perceive a message printed on paper to be more trustworthy than a digital one on a screen. 7. Print Evokes Response - Printed advertising encourages consumers to remember ads better than digital ones, and crucially this makes it easier for them to remember the product, service or message being advertised; critical in helping encourage brand awareness and loyalty and ultimately, in generating business leads and sales.

If you’d like to advertise with The Bradgate Magazine contact the editor@thebradgatemagazine.co.uk | 07708 915779. DOR-2-DOR are leaflet distribution marketing solution experts who operate through a network of over 70 local franchised offices. For more information visit: www.dor2dor.co.uk | facebook.com/dor2dor | 0800 009 6959 | sales@dor2dor.com. Photo by Suzy Hazelwood. Pexels.

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IN THE GARDEN with Joanne Kennedy How often do we use the garden in winter? Well, the honest answer is probably not enough, and at the moment it’s actually more important than ever to get outside. So, instead of “putting the garden to bed” for the winter, treat the outdoors as an alternative ‘chill-out’ space. All you need is the correct equipment to help keep everyone cosy and warm, and making your garden inviting and interesting will encourage you to use it more often. Concentrate on making just one area more intimate. Create a cosy area, heating it with a patio heater, chiminea or a fire-pit. The last two not only create great focal points, but you even get to toast marshmallows!!! So wrap a blanket around you and huddle up or go stargazing in your own back garden - it’s truly amazing what you can see on a clear crisp night. Consider installing a pergola over the same area to increase the cosiness or install lighting or use candles to add ambience, both will create strong, atmospheric shadows. Heart-warming food such as stews - served in mugs! - can be added to the equation and creamy hot chocolate is fabulous, as is glühwein. Invest in an outdoor pizza oven children will love making their own, and all with the added bonus of being outside in the fresh air. If budgets permit, consider a gazebo, a summerhouse or an outdoor room and benefit from being both indoors and outdoors at the same time. Any of these can be made warm and inviting with the right furnishings. Create winter interest and entertainment by attracting wildlife and birds to your garden.

Sit outside, close to a feeder, and simply enjoy watching the birds going backwards and forwards. As word gets around in “bird land”, you’ll soon encourage varieties you’ve perhaps never seen before into your garden. Finally, add winter flowering plants close to where you sit, that way you can appreciate their beautiful scent. Plants such as Sarcoccoca (winter box), Daphne, Winter Honeysuckle (lonicera Fragrantissima or lonicera x Purpuseii `Winter Beauty’) and Viburnum Bodnantense are choice. Consider purchasing containers pre-planted with bulbs and annuals to give instant colour in your cosy area. Enjoy your garden all year round! If you want more advice or help with the design of your garden or planting, feel free to contact me on 07739 153 516 or 01530 832 670. You can also contact me through my website: www.gardenblueprints.net | Facebook @GardenBlueprints | Twitter @GardenBluPrints

THINGS TO DO IN THE GARDEN IN JANUARY AND FEBRUARY: • Continue to clear leaves from borders • Ensure tender plants are wrapped or covered in fleece • Request seed catalogues to help decide what annual flowers and vegetables you would like to grow • Clean out greenhouses and sheds with disinfectant - this rids them of pests and diseases • Clean your tools with disinfectant • Sharpen tools such as secateurs, shears and lawn edging shears • Prune apple and pear trees • Prune blackcurrant, gooseberry and redcurrant bushes • Plant bare-rooted hedges and trees. BRADGATE

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DIRECTORY CLOTHING & JEWELLERY

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HOME CONTINUED

Cathy Stephens Jewellery........................... 36

Ancient & Modern Restoration................ 35

Wreake Valley Flooring............................... 32

In Stitches........................................................ 35

Broughtons Lighting & Ironmongery......17 Carpet Cuts..........................................................

MOTORING

FOOD & DRINK

Clock Doctor.................................................. 35

Cropston Garage.......................................... 35

Afternoon Tea Parties.................................. 35

CV Lane...........................................................28

J.B Stone Garage Services............................ 3

Roberts Butchers............................................. 3

DeVol....................................................... 12 + 13

The Star Inn, Thrussington.......................... 28

Dream Doors.................................................... 3 Graham Botterill Soft Furnishings............ 35

GARDEN Garden Blueprints......................................... 35 LB Grounds Maintenance............................. 5 LB Landscaping..............................................17 PMB Landscaping..........................................10 PMB Maintenance........................................ 26

Blanche Sargeaunt Foundation.................. 2

MM Leggett Vet Surgery............................ 35

Hassall & Son Ltd............................................ 3 Holme Tree Kitchens.................................... 32 John Lewis & Partners................................. 25 Light House.....................................................10 Loft Storage Solutions................................. 26 Nick’s Pest Control....................................... 35 Quorn Stone....................................................21

HEALTHCARE & WELL-BEING

PETS

Splashout..........................................................31

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES Empire Finance...............................................10 Johnston Astills...............................................15 Lee Cooper Funeral Directors................... 28 Sunrise Care Advisers.................................... 5 Swann Financial Consultancy............ 22+23

Woodcock Farm Shop................................... 5

Candor Care....................................................18 Care UK - Lonsdale Mews Care Home..... 6 Charnwood Hearing Centre.......................17 Quality Life UK................................................15

To advertise please contact the editor for prices, details and deadlines: 07708 915779 editor@thebradgatemagazine.co.uk or visit:

www.thebradgatemagazine.co.uk

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Profile for The Bradgate Magazine - Leicestershire

The Bradgate Magazine - January 2021  

THE local community magazine across Charnwood & surrounding areas of Leicestershire.

The Bradgate Magazine - January 2021  

THE local community magazine across Charnwood & surrounding areas of Leicestershire.

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