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BOZEMAN MAGAZINE

Inside This Issue:

March 2017 - Volume 10.10

Yellowstone Country Weddings Discovering the New West by the Glass Making Turns with Vasu Sojitra

GREATER YELLOWSTONE EVENTS CALENDAR


Table of Contents

Amelia Anne Gabel

Living Local

Screen and Stage

What’s Your Beef? The Golden Palaces - J Schuster 6

Verge Theatre - B Drozic 37

Editors Note: Bozeman Staycation - A Ripple 8

Recreation & Health

He Was A She: Manhattan’s Sammy Williams - R Phillips 10

Healthy Habits - P Cameron 24

Rob Quist Interview - K Thorsen 12

Making Turns with Vasu Sojitra - A Ripple 22

Yellowstone Country Wedding Season Preview - A Turner 26

Horoscope - N Judge 25

Food & Drinks

Montana Music

5 on Black - C Miller 16

The Werks 32

Vegetarians Guide to Eating Meat - J Gorham 18

ChickenJam West 34

Discovering the New West by the Glass - K Melee 20

Visual Arts

Business in Bozeman

Cover Shot: Amelia Anne Gabel 35

p.12

p.16

Real Estate CAP Rates - T Ford 14

p. 22 BozemanMagazine.com March 2017 5


What’s Your Beef?

The Golden Palaces Jerry Schuster

W

ell, it is here folks; we have our first look at the plans for spending $144 million (probably more) for two Bozeman high schools. Just to give you some perspective, I will take you to “old town” (which is Wolf Point in northeastern Montana), for a comparison with “new town” (which is Bozeman), over how such expenditures are handled. After all, we want our children to have a positive educational experience, but what environment is needed to accomplish this goal is the question. A few years ago, the School Board and community leaders in old town decided it was time to replace the one main gym floor at Wolf Point High School. They had struggled with the “we can get one more year out of the old one” mentality for years. There were huge bumps and cracks on the floor. When you tried to dribble a basketball on it, the surface shifted and you had no idea where the ball would end up. Sometimes, the ball would get lost and they had to start the game over. Just kidding, relax a little. Now, a project like this is a big item for a small town. I know what you are thinking—there is no comparison with replacing a gym floor to building and remodeling two schools. It is the approach to innovative financing, getting by with resources you have, scaling down and not burdening future taxpayers that is at issue here. Stay with me, you will soon see the light. We will stipulate that the size and scope of the projects are significantly different, so just get over it. If you don’t want to so stipulate, go read another article in this publication. So, old town high school needed a new gym floor. Very costly item for sure. Did the School Board and community leaders say we will get a big bond issue passed and have a world class floor? No. The people in the community were united to get this job done without burdening people for the next 80 years. There were donation drop-off containers at businesses around town and lots of donation challenges. A business or organization would make a sizable pledge and challenge other similar groups to beat or match it. Gym banners were sold to community sponsors. Oh, and those humble bake sales for cookies to be sold during the home games—that’s grassroots fundraising for sure. Also, many meetings and discussions about what was really needed were held. There were no “extras” added to the project, like remodeling the locker rooms, although it would be really nice if each player had their own shower and changing room. The cheerleaders could use a suite of rooms for practice and warm ups and the concession facilities needed more space, plus a computer-operated popcorn machine which would pop all those little kernels which end up in the bottom of the bag. No, none of that, just a good, sturdy, basic floor. So, finally, after 47 years of basketball on the floor that was first used in 1969, a new floor was planned, designed and installed after all the funds were

6 March 2017 BozemanMagazine.com

raised by hard work and community generosity. No big bond issue needed. The project included accommodations for disabled persons and a new scoreboard and sound system. Advertising is now allowed on the walls of the gym to carry on maintenance over the years. A lot of innovative thinking outside the box. Sagacity epitomized. A recent dedication of the new floor honored the late legendary basketball player Victor Bearskin, who was also inducted into the Montana Indian Athletic Hall of Fame. Of course, recognition and honor also went to the great coach Robert Lowry, who led the Wolves to many state basketball victories. Here is the main point, so wake up for a few minutes. Something significant can be accomplished without burdening the next four generations with excessive long-term debt. What is needed is community involvement, a realizable goal and hard work. Let’s move on to Bozeman. Remember, in a previous article, my proposal was to tear down the present “old” high school and build affordable housing units in that space. Then, build one gigantic new school for the community. Total cost would be under $100 million, and this town would have a nice affordable housing space. However, official support for this idea has been, should we say, tepid. It is time to move on to what the local experts and powers-that-be want, which is two “comprehensive” schools. Wait; I did have one person tell me they liked the affordable housing unit idea, but they had no kids in the school system and rented a house in Belgrade. Not fair to use that opinion. Apparently, Bozeman needs two golden palaces for the future high school students. Some examples? Bozeman wants “one big gym plus TWO auxiliary gyms…etc. for health classes and other uses.” Rather, we should consider restricting private vehicles at the facilities for able bodied students. Most students could be required to ride the buses, which would drop them off about two miles from the buildings. With that nice walk with full backpack, most of the health/fitness needs of the day are met. Consider, also, the long halls of the new behemoth. By the time the students make the classroom rounds in a day, they will exceed their 10,000 step Fit Bit requirement as mandated by OPI. Win/win; everybody very happy. Now, on to other spaces in the schools. Since over three students per year wish to take auto mechanics, wood working and metal works skills, each school will have to provide state of the art facilities for these subjects. Now, to be on the safe side, each school should have two auxiliary areas for these classes, since there may be as many as ten students participating by 2037. There is a regulation against crowding. Since only a select chosen few can actually use the main gym facilities, we will need special areas for fencing, advanced judo and meditation skills. Because skiing is so paramount here, both facilities should have their own practice ski


jump auxiliary gym, with year-round snow making capabilities. Don’t forget those mandatory Olympic-size swimming pools, as we have potential world-class swimmers in training here. Auditoriums? Yes, one big one each please. It would not be fair to continue to use the Willson Auditorium for “Hawks Night Live,” because one of the schools will no longer be the “Hawks.” This brings up an interesting topic on its own; I will give it some thought. Will the new team be the “Magpies” since they are so common around town? We might need a subcommittee to examine the environmental impact this permutation will have on the community. Now, we are told, the community financial burden will be a small sacrifice to pay for these world class facilities. Yes, just a mere $8.00 per month per $100,000 of assessed value. Nice! Easy!! When big increases in taxes are anticipated, the cost is always presented in terms of “per month” to the public. These are like car payments or phone plans, and are a lot easier to sell than the yearly total. Problem looming: there are no $100,000 houses in Bozeman that are habitable. A good modified broom closet size starts at about $300,000. If you need something for a family, think about $450,000. Not to worry say the experts, there are lots of folks moving in from California who are glad to pay a modest increase in taxes of $1,500 per year for the next 100 years. Bozeman will not allow “have and have not” high schools. If so, the lawsuits would continue for the duration of the 21st century, after which time there will be no need for brick and mortar buildings. All education will be handled by Big Brother via individual devices, implanted in the brain at birth. You see, in Bozeman, we need two “have” schools. There will be a requirement that all school functions and sports funding be equal. At the end of each school year, the school that has beaten the other in competitions will be penalized for the following year. All cross-town win/loss records must be equal each year. Welcome, all, to the golden halls of Bozeman Highs. What we end up with is anyone’s guess at this time, but it’s how the community goes about planning and discussing financial options that is important. Would you settle for “silver” palaces? b Jerry Schuster is a “semi-retired” attorney who moved from Wolf Point to Bozeman in 2013. I enjoy reading good books, writing for work and fun, and “things Bozeman

All generic disclaimers apply. Opinions expressed are not necessarily those of Bozeman Magazine staff or advertisers.

Submit YOUR Beef at: www.bozemanmagazine.com/pages/contribute OR www.bozemanmagazine.com/discussion

Keith Martinez ‘s

Fac e S hot s

-facebook.com/keetch.martinez


Editor’s Note

A BOZEMAN STAYCATION Angie Ripple

M

arch is Spring Break for kids of all ages! If you aren’t taking a big trip to a far off place and are looking for some fun stuff to do around town here is a quick list of staycation ideas for any Bozemanite:

1. Visit a Museum

Bozeman has one of the greatest museum’s in the Rocky Mountains, the Museum of the Rockies [600 W Kagy Blvd]. MOR’s newest exhibit CROCS: Ancient Predators in a Modern World brings you eye-to-eye with living reptiles! If you liked the Frogs and/or Gecko exhibits of the past you’ll love CROCS. The Gallatin History Museum [317 W Main St] is a fun way to spend a morning or afternoon learning about the history of Bozeman and the Gallatin Valley. From gallows, to jail cells (the Museum used to be Bozeman’s jail!), beer, wedding dresses and forts you’ll learn a lot here! Closed Sundays and Mondays. For the wee ones Children’s Museum of Bozeman [202 S Willson Ave] will keep the kids entertained for hours, and teach them something too. The bubble bar is a favorite for young and old, science, art and fun are all wrapped into one fun place at the CMB. Closed Sundays. The American Computer & Robotics Museum [2023 Stadium Drive] is the world’s oldest continually operating museum dedicated to the history of the information Age. Closed on Mondays.

Save a little dough and check out an Explore Bozeman pass with your library card at www.bozemanlibrary.org or visit the Information Desk at the Bozeman Public Library. Must be 18+ and have less than $10 in library fines.

2. Go For a Hike

We’ve got a Top 10 Hikes Around Bozeman list for you on our website, from 1.6 to many, many miles, we’ve got you covered. Just starting out with an easy meander, hit the Gallagator Trail easy to access and a cool way to check out Bozeman. Drinking Horse Trail & the M trail are a great way to get a good look at Bozeman from above and not too difficult a hike. South Cottonwood Creek Trail is great for hikers and mountain bikers. Hiking is always free and refreshing!

3. Check Out a Theatre Production

Bozeman has a diverse group of theatre companies offering a wide variety of productions throughout the year. Check out Verge Theatre, Kaleidoscope Youth Theatre, The Ellen Theatre, Black Box Theatre and Shakespeare in the Parks throughout the year for funny, entertaining, thrilling and expert theatre. The Emerson and Willson Theatre’s are also venues for local school and travelling productions. bozemanmagazine.com/events has the scoop for each venue.

4. Take a Soak

The Bozeman area is home to great Hot Springs! Take a drive to the Paradise Valley for a soak in Bozeman’s Choice developed hot springs - Chico Hot Springs. Chico is nestled at the foot of beautiful and quiet mountains. Their restaurant and bar will keep you comfortable, their outdoor pools are hot and cozy and if you’d like to stay the night they have great accommodations (make reservations early). Another quick road trip to Norris Hot Springs will allow a soak in the “Water of the Gods”. Their small outdoor pool is hot, hot, hot. Immerse yourself in nature at Norris, have a homegrown meal and regional drink to top it off. Bozeman Hot Springs in Four Corners is an obvious choice for locals, their large renovation in 2016 increased their pool space but not their admission rate. Catch some music from the outdoor stage several nights a week, enjoy the sauna, indoor pools and even get some reps in at the gym if you’d like.

5. Go Skiing or Skating

An obvious choice for local spring breakers is a trip to Bridger Bowl and/or Big Sky Resort. March is a great time to get some spring turns in, hopefully the snow will stick around for spring! Both Haynes Pavilion and Ressler Motors Ice Rink at the Ice Barn [901 N. Black Ave] will be open during spring break with many skating options. Try out the Adult Puck Lunch, All Ages Stick and Puck, Public Skating (No Sticks & Pucks), or take in a game at the Get Lucky Cup XI- Women’s Hockey Tournament. For a full schedule of events go to: http://www.bozemanhockey.org/ page/show/235310-rink-schedule Whatever you choose for Spring Break we hope it’s awesome, and be sure to check out our Events Calendar with all the up to date info for fun stuff anytime: http://bozemanmagazine.com/events/calendar Angie is a third generation Montanan, who balances wrangling her three children and adventures with her husband while living the dream. She was born March 9, which always falls just before Spring Break, a great excuse to get out on the slopes and celebrate life.


BOZEMAN MAGAZINE March 2017 - Volume 10.10 All material + more online at: www.bozemanmagazine.com

Distributed Monthly to over 200 locations. First copy is free. Additional copies $1each :-)

Publisher- Casen Creative Sales Manager, Editorial Director - Angie Ripple Production Manager, Montana Music Editor - Brian Ripple Contact Info: Web: bozemanmagazine.com Email: info@bozemanmagazine.com Office: 406-219-3455 • Cell: 406-579-5657 Cover Artist - Amelia Anne Gabel Photography - Zach Hoffman, Kacie Q Photography, Amelia Anne Dining & Drinks - Cassi Miller, Kathleen Melee, Jenna Gorham Living Local - Angie Ripple, Bennett Drozic, Ken Thorsen, Rachel Phillips What’s Your Beef? - Jerry Schuster Send your beef to info@bozemanmagazine.com

Fueled by Creative People Brian Ripple - Publisher Brian runs a sound & lighting company in Bozeman, skis the cold smoke, and enjoys going camping & taking his kids to the BMX track.

Angie Ripple - Publisher Editor for Bozeman Magazine Angie balances wrangling her three children and adventures with her husband while living the dream.

Nikki Judge - Horoscope Nikki is a spiritual counselor and life coach who is happily serving those who have chosen a solo spiritual path.

Jerry Schuster - Local Living A “semi-retired” attorney who moved from Wolf Point to Bozeman in 2013. Enjoys reading good books, writing for work and fun, and “things Bozeman”.

Cassi Miller - Dining Cassi is a writing instructor and veteran services tutor at MSU and also works for Montana Gift Corral. She loves spending time with her Husky named Flames.

Sarah Cairoli - Local Living Local writer, tutor, and mother who has been enjoying all Bozeman has to offer for the past decade.

Zach Hoffman - Photography Fascinated by the power of light to transform and educate, Zach strives to create, grow, and enrich the local photographic community.

Maddie McCann - Calendar Currently a sophomore at Montana State University, studying Business Marketing. Maddie likes to spend her free time outdoors either skiing or hiking.

Rachel Phillips - History Rachel Phillips is the Research Coordinator at the Gallatin History Museum in Bozeman.

Kris Drummond - Local Living Kris Drummond is a writer, photographer, and traveler living in Bozeman and enjoying spring skiing in January.

Campbell Gerrish - Health Owner at Stone Tiger Fitness. Personal Training, Group Fitness, and Coaching Intensives. (406) 599 - 6725, campbell.gerrish@ gmail.com

Dr. Phil Cameron - Health Phil Cameron is the owner of the Bozeman Wellness Center. He is a Chiropractic Physician and Professional Applied Kinesiologist.

Pat Hill - Music Pat is a freelance writer from Bozeman. He loves summer music festivals.

Julia Strehlau-Jacobs Local Living Julia has a strong interest in American History and Culture. She also enjoys doing carpentry and woodworking.

Cindy Shearer - Local Living Cindy Shearer is a volunteer at the Gallatin History Museum in Bozeman and also the Gallatin Historical Society Board President.

Ken Thorsen - Music / Rec An avid music lover and freelance photographer with three children. Ken or ‘Kenny T’ has been a KGLT disk jock for over twenty years.

Eric Kofer - Music Former Associated Students of Montana State University Campus Entertainment Director, and ChickenJam West Productions co-owner.

Tim Ford - Real Estate Tim Ford is a Realtor® with Bozeman Broker Group in Bozeman Montana.

Katie McGunagle - Local Living A Montana native, avid Shakespearean, and recent graduate of Boston University’s M.F.A. program in Creative Writing.

Seth Ward - Local Living Seth is a first-generation Montanan, navigating fatherhood, marriage, business and downtown life (on a budget) in the New West.

Recreation & Health - Phil Cameron, Angie Ripple Business in Bozeman - Tim Ford Montana Music - Brian Ripple, Chickenjam West Horoscope - Nikki Judge, Black Rose Spiritual Center Events Calendar - Maddie McCann, and YOU can add your events at: bozemanmagazine.com The Basics Bozeman Magazine features great local art on every cover and contributions from talented local writers each month. Every attempt has been made to provide our readers with accurate, dependable information about things which make the Bozeman area unique. Distributed to over 200 locations in the Gallatin Valley, and on MSU’s campus, well over 20,000 people enjoy Bozeman Magazine every month. You will too. Contributing Bozeman Magazine relies on the hard work of creative local people to keep our flow of information going. If you would like to become a contributor in writing, art, or photography please email us at info@bozemanmagazine.com to learn how. Every attempt is made to include accurate information, however, our writers and staff can NOT be held responsible for misprinted information. All Material ©2017, Casen Creative LLC - Bozeman, MT All writing, photos, and artwork remains property of the author, photographer, or artist. Opinions expressed are not necessarily those of Bozeman Magazine staff or advertisers. Send feedback, comments, suggestions, questions to: info@bozemanmagazine.com To Advertise or for more information please contact: info@bozemanmagazine.com or call 406 219-3455

Locally & Independently Published


Living Local

HE was a SHE

Manhattan’s Sammy Wil iams

Rachel Phillips

A

mong the graves at Meadowview Cemetery, just south of Manhattan, Montana, sits a rather curious tombstone. The inscription reads: “A female whose real name is unknown but who has been for many years known as Sammy Williams. Died Dec. 10, 1908. Age about 68 yrs.” Curious as this epitaph may be, the life behind the words is even more intriguing. The story begins not in Montana, but across the world in Hallingdal, Norway, perhaps in the 1830s, although no one is certain. Childhood friends Ingeborge Wekan and Sven Norem grew up together. As time passed, these school chums fell in love and were soon engaged to be married. It was at this time that Ingeborge’s parents decided to create a new life for themselves in America. The Wekans immigrated and settled in Allamakee County, Iowa, along with their daughter Ingeborge and her fiancé. Happy and anticipating her future life, Ingeborge began to sew her wedding clothes. Unfortunately, the happiness did not last. Sven’s mother, Mrs. Norem, broke off the engagement, claiming that Ingeborge and her family were not ranked high enough in society to become so closely connected with her son. Stricken with grief and a broken heart, Ingeborge Wekan disappeared. Billy Williams was a small, delicate-looking man (maybe 5 feet tall), with jet-black hair, a feminine voice, and a slight hunchback. He appeared in Eau Claire, Wisconsin during the late 1850s or early 1860s, and quickly made many friends. Billy frequently went out with the lumberjacks, where he never hesitated to dance with the girls and spend his money. While he loved to drink and have a good time with his buddies, he was always careful never to become intoxicated. Word quickly spread about Billy’s talent as a cook, and nearby logging camps hired him without delay. As evidenced by his nickname, “Billy Cook” was considered at the top of his profession in Eau Claire, and consequently made quite a bit of money. Over the course of thirty years, Billy was able to purchase several buildings and lots in the city, a rare feat for most people of his class. He was a smart man, and in addition to speaking Norwegian, English, and German fluently, Billy quickly picked up Indian languages during his time in the woods. But most of all, he was known for his generous nature. As reported later in Eau Claire’s Daily Telegram (reprinted in the Manhattan Record), “He was also of a very charitable turn of mind and there are those…who remember the kindly aids of a stranger who used to visit their homes and seeing indications of poverty, would leave five, ten and even fifteen dollars behind him without letting his identity be known.” Even after leaving Eau Claire sometime in the 1880s, Billy Williams sent gifts of money back to his friends who still resided there. The sick were never neglected when Billy was around – he made it a point to visit them and often stayed to nurse them through the night. Given his rather feminine appearance, rumors began to circulate about Billy Williams’ true gender. Matters worsened when a Norwegian family, one that was familiar with Ingeborge’s parents back in Iowa, moved to Eau Claire and noticed Billy’s resemblance to Mrs. Wekan. Word reached her family, and Ingeborge’s brother was sent to Eau Claire to persuade “Billy” to return home. Her brother, of course, failed in his task. Independent though she was, Ingeborge must have missed her family. It is rumored that during her stay in Eau Claire, she made one last trip back to Iowa to observe her parents and to catch a glimpse of her former fiancé and his wife. Of course Ingeborge was dressed as a tramp and took care that none recognized her. After the encounter with her brother, however, Inge10 March 2017 BozemanMagazine.com

borge decided it was time to leave Eau Claire. She sold her property and headed west to North Dakota, where she spent several years cooking for the Dalrymple farms. Sometime later, Manhattan area horse and cattle rancher Henry Heeb found he was in need of a cook. His current help was getting on in years and wished to return home to China. One day in the early 1890s, Heeb stopped by the local saloon and struck up a conversation with a little man who had just jumped off a


freight car. “Sammy” Williams (alias Ingeborge) was washing a few drinks down his travel-weary throat when he mentioned to Henry: “I cook good.” Williams was hired and spent the next 18 years in and around Manhattan, Montana, cooking for various ranch outfits, including the Heeb Ranch, the Meadowbrook Ranch, the Number I Ranch, and the Manhattan Company. Sammy got along as well with the Montana cow hands as he did with the Wisconsin lumberjacks. He chewed tobacco and slept in the bunkhouse with the hired hands. It must have been hard for Sammy to hide his true identity while rooming with the men. One source claims he was the first to get up in the morning and the last to climb up to bed at night, changing his clothes in the dark

while the others slept. Whatever lengths Ingeborge Wekan took to hide her sex are unknown, but her disguise must have been quite successful during her stay in Manhattan. There are no reports in the area of anyone thinking she was anything other than a man. By the end of 1908, Sammy Williams’ health had begun to decline. Friends advised him to see a doctor after he expressed that he did not feel well. Of course, Sammy always brushed off this suggestion. There are several different reports of what happened next. One says that Sammy was stricken with a sudden heart attack one Thursday evening as he worked in the kitchen, and died a short while later. Another suggests hungry cowboys found him dead in his bunk after he failed to prepare their breakfast one morning. Others claimed that at the time of his death, Sammy was recovering from a drinking binge. However it happened, Undertaker George R. Safely was quite taken aback when he began to prepare Sammy Williams’ body for burial. As one can imagine, the fact that a woman would masquerade as a man caused quite a stir in town, and an inquest was conducted to determine the just reason for the charade. A local jeweler by the name of C. J. O’Dell believed that it was possible he had seen Williams many years before in Eau Claire, Wisconsin. He sent a letter of inquiry to Eau Claire’s police chief and later was able to learn all that was known about Sammy Williams’ life, as well as her real name. Sammy Williams’ funeral was short and simple. The local Presbyterian minister, Rev. James Wallace MacGowan, spoke briefly, after which Billy/Sammy/ Ingeborge was buried in the local cemetery. Sammy’s many friends all chipped in to purchase a headstone for her, though they were uncertain of her real name. At the time of her death, Ingeborge Wekan owned 320 acres of land outside of Manhattan. According to the Daily Telegram, Sammy was scheduled to sign a deed to this land on the day she died. Consequently, many believed that Sammy was finally planning to return home to Iowa to spend her remaining days with her relatives, but was too late. Though not many of the details of Ingeborge Wekan’s life are known, what is certain is that, despite her hardships, she was a kind, caring person. She managed to make a vast number of friends in several states, who never forgot her kindness. As Eau Claire’s Daily Telegram stated: “And such is the sad life story of Ingeborge Wekan.” But, given the many friends she left behind, maybe her life did not end up to be such a sad story after all, just a different one. p Rachel Phillips is the Research Coordinator at the Gallatin History Museum in Bozeman. Visit the Gallatin History Museum at 317 W Main Street in Bozeman, www.gallatinhistorymuseum. org, or on Facebook.

BozemanMagazine.com March 2017 11


Living Local

Rob Quist

Throwing his Big, Well-Traveled Hat into the Political Ring

Ken Thorsen

O

n February 16, 2017 Ken Thorsen and Rob Quist sat down at Montana State University for an interview, the following is transcribed from their conversation. KT: We’re here today to talk to the people of Bozeman about, [you] possibly throwing your hat in the ring for the seat in Congress left by Ryan Zinke. I’ve got to ask you, first off, you’re a founding member of the Mission Mountain Wood Band?

I know that this is going to be a fight about public lands, which is probably one of the reasons I decided to get into this, even the concerns that are facing everyday Montanans. I’ve lived life on the ground here, and I know that Montanans have real concerns about several issues that are concerns for me and my family as well. So, I really felt like I could be a voice for this state. KT: We’ve got some questions from people.

RQ: Yes.

RQ: Absolutely, I’d love it.

KT: You’ve been in the music industry your whole life?

KT: You’re a musician. Do you write about politics? Is there politics in your music?

RQ: Yes. KT: Some would say that’s a sleazy industry. [Laughs] And now you’re going to throw your hat, no pun intended, your hat.. RQ: My big and well-traveled hat into this nasty political ring. [Laughs] KT: What got you interested in this? RQ: Well, you know, I, I guess in many ways, I really feel like I’ve been representing the State of Montana all my life. I love the Big Sky Country and I’ve really been a student of the history and, of course, the native tribes, the native cultures that live here, and, practically every song I’ve written is all about the Big Sky Country. So, I really care what happens, and I really feel like given the climate that I could be a voice for the entire state. I think I’ve really connected to every demographic in the state. I’ve traveled throughout every geographical region and I’ve really been in touch with pretty much every part of Montana, the big cities, the small towns, and also I love the wild as I’ve hiked all the trails and the rivers. So, this is important to me. 12 March 2017 BozemanMagazine.com

RQ: Well, you know, I think I’ve only written really one really political song. It was kind of cynical. I wrote that way back, I think it was 2007, it was called ‘It’s Going All To Hell’. That’s been the only one, but I guess in a lot of ways my songs are really political in the sense that you can tell in my music I’ve been standing up for public lands all my life. Also, I’ve fielded two shows which I’ve toured nationally and internationally with which talk about native cultures, presenting the history of Montana and the West from both rural American and Native American perspectives, with my good friend Jack Gladstone. KT: Oh, great. When you’re on the road performing as a musician, do you have fans, people that come up to you and ask you about political issues? RQ: Well, you know, I think that people would be surprised how political I am, but, of course, you know, you don’t want to alienate, a lot of your fan base, but I guess we always have what I call lively discussions, you know. To me, that’s really healthy. I think as long as you have a

good healthy discourse with respect, and that’s a Montana value, to be respectful in your discourse. So, I suppose people do ask me, and I’m sure that’s one of the reasons I’m probably in this because, this has gotten so political, I really felt like I had to be a part of it. KT: What are some concerns that you’re hearing from Montanans? RQ: I think the No. 1 concern I hear is about public lands. I was at the public lands rally in Helena, because that’s a big issue for me. There were over 1,000 people crammed into the rotunda and I loved it because there were people from all walks

of life, there were hunters and outfitters and people who love to hike and to kayak and to recreate in the outdoors. Plus, all these associations which I have close affiliations with, such as the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation and Northern Plains Resource Council and hunters and anglers. All those groups were there and they were all unified in their stand about not selling off our public lands. I think there was like 3.3 million acres that were going to be sold in Montana alone. And this happened all across the country, this human cry, and I’ve never seen a bill disappear so fast from the U.S. Congress. That was amazing. And that shows the power of what we could


go when we organize together. KT: The public lands, like you say, are the heart of Montana. RQ: Absolutely. And I’ve traveled the states, all the states in the course of my career, and many of the states have lost what we still have, so we have to really hold onto this. There’s that great American concept of keeping the things, of understanding that it’s not the present that you’re thinking about, it’s 7 generations that are coming that you have to keep in mind when you make decisions. KT: What are your political experiences? RQ: Well, I’ve been in the Montana Arts Council for 12 years, of course representing the performing artists to the Arts Council. Through that I became an educator as well because I realized I needed to do more, so I took my songwriting seminars into the schools which turned into anti-bullying songs and songs about nature. I’ve been a cultural representative for the Department of Commerce to Japan for 3 consecutive years for Japanese tourists with our sister city Kumamoto, so that was a big honor for me. I’ve also been a spokesman for the Montana Food Bank Network for 3 years, and of course I’ve served on boards like Big Country Guitar Foundation, the Share Your Voice Foundation, and the Arts Council. KT: An issue that is on the forefront of the media these days is the Affordable Care Act. There are roughly some 60,000 people from what I understand in Montana that are relying on the Affordable Care Act. There’s mass consensus that it needs to be fixed or replaced or repealed. Can it be fixed, or does it have to be repealed and replaced? What would you like to see as a solution? RQ: Well, I think it needs to be, you can’t repeal it because there are so many people relying on it now and, I think if we just scrap the whole thing and start over there’s, I heard somebody say that if we’re going to repeal this you have to choose 10

people that would die which would be okay for that to happen in order for us to repeal it. But, you know, I’ve had personal experiences with it too which we probably can’t get into now, but I’ve played for many benefits for people and we’ve all contributed to Gofundme sites. The fact that they want to scrap the whole thing, I think there’s been many a chance over the years to fix the Affordable Health Care Act but they’ve all been stonewalled and now I think the fact that they just want to scrap the whole thing and start over, we just can’t do that. KT: We can’t do that. You’re absolutely right. Jeannie Brown Galbreath, a question from a reader. RQ: Hi Jeannie. KT: Special programs such as Medicare and Food Stamps are expected to enter into block grants in the near future. In the past similar programs funded by block grants have been cut by the states in the ability to divert the block grant funds. What’s your stance on preventing block grants to these and other vital programs? RQ: I think that first of all it’s amazing how these social programs are on the block to be cut, it comes down to whether it’s service to self or service to others. I’ve always come down on the side of service to others. We have to, you know? When I was younger there was kind of a nice distribution of wealth between the classes and now it just seems like that whole graph has just flat-lined across, from the poor to the middle class and then when you get to the super, super wealthy it just shoots up so high it’s just off the page. I was given a meeting with the Teton County Democrats and I was talking about this very thing, about how the wealth is distributed amongst the super wealthy. This economist was talking about how people become super rich by not paying other people the value of their services. There was this crusty old rancher that stood up in the back and he said “Well, you know Rob, it’s a lot like B.S. You gotta pile it up and it just starts to stink, but if you spread it

around it grows everything.” So, it’s really about spreading the abundance to all people. It’s gotta work for everybody or it doesn’t work for anybody. It’s kinda close to me is being a 4th Generation Montana family of ranch style of farm up on the hi-line for years. KT: Climate change is a hot topic in the news today, and what effects have you seen firsthand in Montana maybe related to agriculture and maybe the environment, the recreational industry as well in Montana caused by global warming or climate change. What are your feelings on the Paris Climate Agreement? RQ: Well, first of all, I think one of the signs I see, and I’ve been hiking, like I said, the trails all my life. When I was a Boy Scout, when I was 13 years old, and we got to see some of these glaciers that are in Glacier Park, and, of course, when I hike there now, these glaciers are a third the size of what they were. I think they’re going to have to change the name of the park to Used To Be Glacier Park. Of course, we see the effects of climate change across, with the storms we’re getting and the crazy weather that’s happening and everything’s really out of whack, and I think it’s really an issue about pollution because every wild area in the world is really being threatened by pollution. I think we have to come up with green technologies that really would reduce our carbon footprint and at the same time we would be able to create jobs, that would really be leading technology for the State of Montana. We could get out in front of this and be a leader in this thing. We have all this potential for wind and solar and there’s companies really firing up right now in the Flathead Valley that are going to be technology leaders when it comes to this. KT: How would we accomplish something like that without jeopardizing jobs in the fossil fuel industry? RQ: Well, here’s the thing: I think a really good solution would be to put these wind generators and solar farms down in Colstrip because

they already have the infrastructure there, they’ve got the power lines that are already running out from there. Of course, I’ve been to these counties, they’re really scared about that, so, to me, what better place to put it than places like that? KT: Colstrip is being brought up in the news. RQ: That’s right. Not only to have those wind generators and solar farms there, but also to build the panels and also the wind generators there so there will be jobs there as well. I think that would be a good thing to implement. KT: This question comes from an anonymous reader. Will you take a question from an anonymous reader? RQ: Sure. KT: We don’t know who they are, from the Flathead Valley. With recent protests at Standing Rock Indian issues are at the forefront of the media, how would you define Indigenous Sovereignty and what role do you think the Federal Government should play? RQ: I’m really connected to Indian Country in so many ways. I’ve really adopted a lot of their core beliefs into my belief system. The concept of honoring Mother Earth and the concept of not questioning another person’s spiritual walk, and I think the one that’s most indicative right now is how they honor the person, not the person who collects the most wealth, but the one who gives the most away. I think where the Federal Government has made the mistake is not letting the Tribes be at the table when they first were putting this together. That was a mistake, and we have given these tribes sovereignty in these treaties. Treaties are contracts and we need to honor those contracts. KT: Planned Parenthood in Montana, it serves 10,000 to 15,000 people here in the state. There’s talk in defunding it. Would you have continued on p36 BozemanMagazine.com March 2017 13


Bozeman Real Estate

Understanding CAP Rates

Tim Ford REALTOR®

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he Bozeman Real Estate market has started off 2017 at a blistering pace. 76 single family homes sold in the first month. This is up over 28% from last January and almost double the number of sales in January of 2015. The rental market remains very hot and as such many investors are buying up houses, condos, and multi-family homes to use as income producing properties. I thought it wise to revisit a term often used when searching for income properties: Cap Rate. Short for capitalization rate, the Cap Rate is also known as the annual rate of return. The formula for determining the Cap Rate is as follows:

Net Operating Income divided by Purchase Price = Cap Rate The first step in determining the Cap Rate for a particular property is to establish its yearly Net Operating Income. To calculate Net Operating Income, or NOI, an investor must take the potential Gross Income a property may generate in a year and then deduct taxes, insurance, and any maintenance or management fees. What’s left is the NOI. Once the NOI is calculated, the investor should divide that number by the purchase price of the property. This final number is the Cap Rate. To illustrate determining a Cap Rate, let us look at this example. An investor purchases a residential property for $300,000 and rents the property for $1,885 a month. The taxes cost approximately $2300 per year, and insurance is another $800. The owner also plans on having a $1500 yearly budget for maintenance. All figures are approximate for this

example; actual taxes, insurance, and maintenance costs will vary. The property brings in $22,620 gross rents per year ($1,885 per month multiplied by 12 months), but after deducting taxes, insurance, and maintenance, the property nets $18,020 per year (this is the NOI). $18,020 divided by $300,000 is .06, or 6%. This is the investor’s Cap Rate or yearly rate of return on their investment. Investors can use the Cap Rate to compare multiple properties against one another, or even to compare a Real Estate investment against another vehicle, such as stocks or bonds. However, two factors it does not take into account are the tax benefits of owning Real Estate and the potential for appreciation, which can both add to the actual rate of return. The Cap Rate can also be run backwards to determine what income a property would need to generate in order to hit a desired return. I have included recent sales data for the first month of 2017. In addition to the 76 homes sold in January, another 135 homes are currently under contract or pending as of the date of writing. The included data reflects sales of homes in the greater Bozeman area, including Four Corners, Gallatin Gateway, Bridger Canyon, and Bozeman city limits. The data includes home sales reported through the local Southwest Montana MLS, and does not include private party sales, Condominiums, or Townhouses. q Tim Ford is a Realtor® with Bozeman Broker Group in Bozeman Montana. He can be contacted at 406209-1214.


BozemanMagazine.com March 2017 15


Food & Drinks

Cassi Miller, photos Zach Hoffman

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hen we think about food and Montana, there are some traditional staples that always come to mind: steak, buffalo burgers, and huckleberries just to name a few. It is cowboy, old west, chuck wagon fare. Montana food is hearty, rich, and filling. However, to only think of Montana food that way is to do ourselves a great disservice. Beyond the traditions and the first thoughts, there’s a budding foodie community composed of a variety of unique and worldly cuisine. There is also a desire to craft food that is healthy, fresh, and still fills you up and leaves you feeling completely satisfied.

Enter Five on Black. The brainchild of Tom Snyder, this Missoulabased restaurant is thriving and growing on the concept of fast, fresh food combined with the scintillating tastes of Brazil, and people are eating it up. The restaurant now has locations in Missoula, Denver, Boulder, and Bozeman, which joined the ranks of the vibrant downtown restaurant scene in 2015. Five on Black is based on the concepts of speed, customization, and deliciousness. You are in charge of your own Brazilian cuisine and adventure, choosing from a variety of bases, proteins, sides, sauces, and toppings to create a bowl of food that’s all your own. It’s a combination of things you know and love, like chicken, rice, and roasted veggies, and Brazilian-specif16 March 2017 BozemanMagazine.com

ic ingredients that offer new levels of flavor to those standard favorites. You can add in something new and delicious like feijoada, which is the national stew of Brazil made from a combination of beans, pork, and beef. Five on Black’s conceptualization of the stew also includes bacon. You can also finish your bowl with farofa, a toasted cassava flour that adds a smoky or salty flavor to your food, particularly enhancing the flavor of chosen meats. Their website boasts 70,560 different ways to order their food, taking you 193 years to try all the combinations. That level of variety is unique, fun, and offering something new and fresh to Montana. I had the opportunity to ask Five on Black owner Tom Snyder some questions about his culinary


particularities and the experiences of owning a restaurant like this in Montana. CM: What made you want to get into the restaurant business? TS: I was a finance major in college and after doing an internship within the field, my sophomore year I realized the traditional finance path was not for me. I started thinking of businesses and as a consumer was in love with the fast casual space; quick, inexpensive, and healthy food. I broke down the top 50 brands who serve that style of food and hold those values, and I tried to figure out what they were doing well and why they were succeeding. My thought was that they took a national cuisine and made it comfortable and familiar to the public. Although Brazilian steakhouses have been growing like crazy in the US, no one had made the jump to turn this incredible food into a fast casual concept. So, the idea was born. I started working on it my junior year and presented it as part of the statewide business plan competition during my last semester of college at the University of Montana. After winning the competition with the idea of Five on Black, it helped give me the resources and confidence to move forward. I opened up the first location in April 2013, two years after graduating. CM: What do you enjoy about being a part of the food scene in Montana and specifically Bozeman? TS: Montana and Bozeman have such an amazing entrepreneurial environment and the communities really support local businesses. Bozeman, although a small town, has a pretty remarkable food scene and for us it has been so much fun to add to the selection that people can have. We are able to really get to know the customers that come in the door and become a part of their week. We also started community nights in Bozeman where 50% of proceeds from the organization that week go back to them, It is part of the give and take in Bozeman that makes it such a special place! CM: What do you think makes Five on Black unique to Bozeman? What do you guys offer that other places don’t?

TS: In most small towns, there are a few different places that you can go for the same style of food. With us we are the only place that serves Brazilian food in Bozeman and we do it quickly, inexpensively, and with great taste. We are able to introduce people to a whole new set of flavors and give them something to try that they might have not otherwise had, like our Brazilian cheese buns and farofa. Bozeman is such an active community and our goal is to be a part of that lifestyle. The food we serve is something you can feel good about and have after a long run or before you head out to the mountains. People are on the move and want something that is filling and healthy but at a speed that fits their lifestyle. We aim to provide that to the community. CM: What do you want people to experience when they come to Five on Black? TS: We hope they’re looking for something new. Something fun. Something that feels familiar, but isn’t. Something that gives their gut what it needs and your tongue what it craves. What we believe in is real food. Healthy, fresh, and gluten free. What we serve is simple stuff put together in just the right way. What you get is made to order at a speed that fits your needs. We want people to enjoy the process of eating in an environment that is filled with friendly staff and people. CM: What would you say is your bestselling dish? TS: Our bestselling dish is a base of half crisp greens and half brown rice. Then add some rotisserie cooked chicken, coconut roasted sweet potatoes, and spicy coconut sauce. For toppings I would suggest having tomato onion vinaigrette, farofa, and chimmichurri. Last but not least you have to add a Brazilian cheese bun! CM: Any upcoming events or specials you want people to know about? TS: In the next couple of months, we are going to start doing downtown delivers via our Five on Black bicycle! All you have to do is call in your order to the restaurant and we will send our bike rider out to bring the tasty goodness of Five on Black to your office. q

My first experience with Bozeman’s Five on Black was during a Music on Main show this past summer. The sun was shining, music was loud, and people were laughing and smiling. A friend and I strolled into Five on Black where we were greeted happily and any questions we had were quickly answered. Within 10 minutes of walking in the door, we were enjoying bowls of spicy creations (I love spicy food) on the outdoor seating at Five on Black, listening to the band jam and watching the melting pot of people Music on Main always attracts. That’s the thing about Five on Black. It adds to the Bozeman experience we all love. It fits. We will always love, appreciate, and crave those traditional Montana dishes we hold so dearly in this state. We should continue to keep them in our rotation of favorite foods. However, it’s okay to step outside that box. It’s okay to try something new, something we’ve never had before. Five on Black offers us that experience. What’s more, particularly for us in Bozeman, they make the experience something simple to incorporate into our daily routines. If it’s a cold, snow, deep-freeze day in the dead of winter, a visit to Five on Black, and the creation of a hot, spicy bowl, will warm you for whatever winter challenges you may face that day. In the summertime, if you’ve just hiked your way through the Bridgers, enjoying the burn of a day well spent, capping it off with something fresh, healthy, and filling is the perfect way to end the day. Five on Black offers something fun and unique to Bozeman and, above all, it’s absolutely delicious. Oh, and Tom’s not kidding, you should always add a cheese bun to your order! z Cassi is a writing instructor and veteran services tutor at MSU and also works for Montana Gift Corral. She loves exploring everything Montana has to offer and spending time with her husky named Flames. She can be reached at: cassijo79@gmail.com

242 E. Main St. (406) 551-2692

FOOD STYLE:

Brazilian, fast, healthy, fresh, gluten-free, made to order

DRINKS:

fountain pop, water, specialty drinks

HOURS:

Monday-Saturday 11 AM-9 PM; Sunday: closed

PRICES:

$9-$13 for your bowl and a drink

VIBE:

friendly, casual, quick, modern


Food & Drinks

Do I really need to be eating organic, free-range, sugar-free, & plant-based??

18 March 2017 BozemanMagazine.com


Jenna Gorham

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ike many, I often ponder these questions. As a registered dietitian nutritionist, I know I don’t need to eat all organic in order to eat ‘healthy;’ they’re not synonyms and I tell my clients the same. But, ethically, would I feel better, like I was making a difference, if I did? After reading Marissa Landrigan’s thought-provoking book, The Vegetarian’s Guide to Eating Meat, I’m left with personal questions such as these. Her novel follows her through her 20s as she searches for ethical food and what that means to her. She begins her search believing that going vegetarian is the way to eat ethically. Like many ethical vegetarians, she realizes, “being a vegetarian means you have to eat a lot of vegetables,” and unfortunately she’d “never really been a fan.” She spent her early years as a vegetarian microwaving fake chicken patties and surviving on tater tots, cheese sandwiches, ramen, and Kraft macaroni and cheese. The truth is, Marissa is not alone. As a Montana meat-lover, consuming the Standard American Diet, I’m sure you can relate to her friend’s thinking, “if a meal doesn’t have meat, even if it fills me up, I still feel as though something is missing.” As a flexitarian myself, I prefer not to put restrictions on foods I can and can’t eat or label foods as good or bad. More and more research is linking a plant-based diet to preventing and even reversing chronic disease. I see more and more clients wanting to go vegetarian or even vegan for various reasons, yet they don’t know where to start. They don’t want to end up like Marissa relying on the frozen foods section. I help them go about it in a healthy way to prevent malnutrition, find a healthy relationship with food, and find what eating ‘healthy’ means to them. “Food, as far as (Marissa) was concerned, came from the grocery store.” Here in Bozeman, we’re lucky to live in a place that values local food and supporting local farmers; a place that has a year-round farmers’ market; and a place that educates our kids on where our food comes from with the Farm to School program. However, when Marissa moves to Bozeman after college, she finds herself struggling as a vegetarian in such a meat-loving state. When she goes on a date to the Land of Magic, she finds zero vegetarian options and a server that laughs in her face. Over the years as she continues her search, she educates herself by visiting slaughterhouses and going elk hunting here in Montana, eventually learning to eat meat again. Marissa’s search expands from vegetarianism, to eating organic and local and no high-fructose corn syrup. She faces the dilemma that although she is eating organic or meat-free she may still be supporting large corporations. She explores these food industry buzzwords and finds what works for her and her beliefs. The media is full of buzzwords that we begin to equate with meaning healthy or better for us, often tricking us into a purchase. Below are a few definitions to help you navigate your next trip to T&C or the Co-Op.

Organic:

A product labeled organic must contain 95% organic ingredients. If something is labeled “Made with Organic Ingredients,” it must contain at least 70% organic ingredients. For meat and poultry , the animals must be: -Fed 100% organic feed (except for trace vitamins and minerals) -Managed without antibiotics, growth hormones, or genetic engineering -Allowed year-round access to the outdoors -Raised on certified organic land

Natural:

Contains no artificial ingredients, including color additives, and is only minimally processed (the processing does not alter the final product).

Free-Range:

The supplier must be able to demonstrate that the animal has had access to the outside. The amount of time spent outside and the size of the outdoor area are unspecified.

Local:

There is no official definition for the term ‘local’. The meaning varies person to person, and often by what foods can be grown or produced in various locations or climates. The top three reasons people choose to eat local products are for freshness, supporting the local economy, and knowing where their food comes from.

No Hormones:

According to the FDA “Hormones are not allowed in raising hogs or poultry. Therefore, the claim ‘no hormones added’ cannot be used on the labels of pork or poultry.” This term can be used on beef if adequate documentation can be provided to support the claim.

Grass-Fed:

Last year, the USDA dropped its official definition of ‘grass-fed’ because experts claimed the ambiguous term is misleading because all cows naturally eat grass. There is currently no definition for this term. It is often used as a marketing ploy. Landrigan’s novel is a worthy read and one that left me thinking. What does healthy eating and ethical food mean to you? f Reach out, I’d love to chat more! Find me at www.jennagorhamrd.com for the answers to your questions or contact me at jennagorhamrd@gmail.com or 406-2197547.


Food & Drinks Liquid Courage:

Discovering the New West by the Glass Kathleen Melee

Too much of anything is bad, but too much whiskey is never enough. – Mark Twain

Moonshine with jalapeno’s and pineapple, or the SnowCrest Vodka with meyer lemon and sugar (a doppleganger for Limoncello). The small-batch bourbon, aged in American white oak and enhanced with Bordeaux cherries, will kiss your lips on its way down the pie hole, and bring you back to Ennis for bliss not fishin’.

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n the Old West, cow punchers were advised: “Always drink your whiskey with your gun hand to show your good intentions.” 5th generation ranchers tell stories of the copper-boiler-turnedstill in granddad’s errantly marked “outhouse,” raisin’ Cain, and dodging the Chicagoans during Prohibition. Barn smarts and Montana farm ingredients drive the local, small-batch vinting, distilling, and brewing. Today, Gallatin County encourages us to follow the Code of the New West by appreciating the splendor of Montana’s natural beauty, being good stewards of the land, and showing friendliness to visitors and neighbors alike. Laws allow for the making and selling of small-batch alcohol without a liquor license as long as the establishment closes by 8pm and follows serving guidelines. Bozeman offers plenty of hospitality and goodwill one glass of wine, distilled spirits, or craft beer at a time. Grab your copper mug , crystal stem, or beer stein and vanquish Winter at some of our region’s best tasting rooms.

Feast, East Side (Bozeman)

Microbreweryville has a secret crush on grapes. Caressa Bailey Sack of Big Sky Wine and Spirits is the educator of aspiring sommeliers in Gallatin Valley, and she let us know, “People are interested in

Willie’s Distillery, Ennis

Nicole at the tasting bar offers a wellspring of knowledge and mixology not on the menu, “SnowCrest Vodka, cherry Bordeaux juice, lemon San Pellegrino, and a little club soda to cut the calories, no fizz . . . I call it the Wet Willie.” A celestial experience the color of stained glass. Sorry boss, my morning coffee is already graced with Willie’s Sweet Cream Liqueur, but I still need the day off to taste all that Western Montana has to convert a teetotaler. For brides-to-be, a good wedding drink is the Huckleberry Drop (SnowCrest with huckleberry juice and fresh lemon, purple with a sugarrim glass.) Bygone brides and well-worn grooms can make up with The Flight – 5 tasters of the 9 spirits on offer for $5.00. A Kentucky companion, and his wee terrier Kiwi, stood in the reader’s shoes for a dry run: Blackberry liquore (50 proof, a 20 March 2017 BozemanMagazine.com

little on the sweeter side); Mixed Berry Moonshine (80 proof, sublime); Big Horn Bourbon Whiskey (80 proof, the gentleman’s drinking whiskey); Honey Moonshine (70 proof, heaven), and Montana Wild Choke Cherry liquore (50 proof, a Montana original) -- just because we’d seen frozen choke cherries in the snow on the way -- believe me the spirit of the wild fruit is more gorgeous than the original. The Mixed Berry Moonshine is the unlikely result of a big-rig accident that included a driver, asleepat-the-wheel, who delivered an accidental crop of blackberries through the front door. Willie, the exArmy ranger from North Carolina, and his amazing wife, Robin, from the family ranch near Toston, MT, are distillers extraordinaire. Nicole let us try some of the barkeep’s experimental infusions. When you get to Willie’s, ask about the Montana


Dry Hills Distillery, Four Corners

wine because the growing regions are so different. Expression of terroire can give you huge variety in flavors and aromas. This gives us so much to talk about.” March is a time when brides are planning summer and fall events. Caressa said that wedding guests fly to Bozeman from all over the world and share excitement about the local creations of wine producers (hearty varietals that withstand the MT freeze), distilleries, and craft breweries. Expression of vines can be found at Plonk and Corx, both offer wine tasting in downtown Bozeman. The Raw Bar at Feast Bistro lays out exquisite pairings, such as Bison Carpaccio, Stuffed Clams, or Salt Roasted Oysters with La Solitude Côtes du Rhône or Chateau des Deux Rocs Languedoc Cabrières, both from hilly regions and each a distinct canvas upon which to paint your seafood dreams. Maybe it was the contact high of the double dozen oysters from the raw bar, or the close proximity of a Scottish Stone Mason, but the Deux Rocs felt more balanced between a perfume nose and savory afterglow (no sulphite or grapeseed residue, just divine providence). The bar master can whip a mottled mojito with habanero and Prosecco into competition for any local distillery. Celebrate winter months with an “r,” especially March, the enchanting frutti di mare will soothe your soul while the vino is decanting. Conversation at the Feast bar is also a welcome respite from affairs with technology. My inner Italian requested the Da Milano Marghe Langhe Nebbiolo before coffee and dessert. The sommeliers at Feast, trained by Caressa’s school, are on to something you can discover and make your own.

To the left of Dark Horse Customs lives a world of good, botanical-infused distillations based on Erica and Jeff Droge’s efforts to bring potato farming into the 21st Century: “as the younger generation, everything we do here is to help diversify and sustain the 5th generation family farm.” Their first write up was in 2010, when the usual Tuesday night Droge brothers’ drinking tourney found them tossing around ideas of what to do with surplus Montana-grown potatoes. This team did their research in Bourbon Country, at the Moonshine University of Louisville, Kentucky, where Jimmy Russell from Wild Turkey, along with other top names in the industry, helped them find their answer. Add Erica’s love of raspberries from her mother’s garden, which flavor the 80-proof Hollowtop Wild Raspberry Vodka at Dry Hills, and you will experience a great flight. Jeff’s oldest brother farms in the Hollowtop mountains, near Harrison, at the base of the Tobacco Roots, where water from the snowpack is the lifeline of their potato crops. You can experience the smoother, creamier profile than regular grain-based Vodka, and it’s 100% gluten free. Try the Montana Abbey Gin, with citrus, juniper, elder flower, rose hips, spearmint, cardamom, coriander, and ginger root amongst the fourteen different botanicals. For a perfect Martini -- sweet and sour and strong -- request the St. Germaine’s sweet elder flower liquor paired with the Montana Abbey gin and lime or lemon juice. A Scotts gal at heart, I needed a dram, and the Bin 7 Whiskey, named for the first bin wherefrom the Droges pulled out their hard red wheat for distilling, is 90 proof. Bin 7 starts in American Oak and finishes in French Oak barrels from Northern California’s wine industry, giving the whiskey a dark cherry-bourbon nose, great neat or in a classic Manhattan stirred over rocks. Add two parts Bin 7 whiskey to one part Sweet Vermouth and bitters, and you’ve got a DHD Manhattan Martini that will kick the seat of any New Yorker. Dry Hills has plenty of space to host your Bridal or Baby Shower, or bachelor/-ette party, and will treat you like family: “We love to promote Montana. Everything we make here, we raise. That’s what we are, just a bunch of farm kids.”

or cherry-infused Vodka, made with a few extra steps than Moonshine (cognac-like continental smoothness with a decidedly local impact). The pre-prohibition-style Old Tom Gin and the 80-proof Vodka, straight are game changers. Betty Jean, mom, always ordered an Old Fashioned at the OClub (officer’s, natch), I tried WildRye’s Apple Pie, Bourbon, Cinnamon, and Bitters recipe – a swing dance by the glass. With a humidor room of cigars, outstanding pizza next door, and adjacent Kombucha and Craft Beer breweries, daily happy hour at WildRye from 3-5pm is not to be missed.

Bozeman Spirits Distillery, Main Street

Jim R Harris III give us a magnet tasting room on Main Street. The 1889 Whiskey, aged one year in American White Oak on a bourbon recipe (barley/ rye/corn blend) has a slight oak character with eighth notes of vanilla and caramel. Loy Maierhouser and Jesse Broussard of Fermentana, LLC, both clear spirits afficiandos, and business partners promoting all things fermented at the upcoming Craft Beer Week, May 6-13, 2017, took flight with me at BSD. Jesse observed the 1889, “a really pleasant, nice sipping whiskey with no abrasiveness.” The Ruby River Gin is a stand out. Ask for a Stinger. Kids drinks and locally made bar snacks are on the menu. The BSD is a great place to meet up with friends to listen to live music, and taste the finer things of life. Brides love the Spice Girl (Cold Spring Vodka, mottled red apple, and grated ginger, with ginger beer). Let’s hang out at Bozeman Spirits Distillery, or at White Dog Brewery next door! q Kathleen Melee writes about music, wine, distilled spirits, and craft beer, amongst other things . . .

WildRye Distillery, Cannery District (Bozeman)

Thai Mule, please; that’ll be basil infused spiced Rum (rum made from Montana grown sugar beets, a prose-pirate’s bounty), coconut and ginger. The flight here was crazy-good (I made the red-hairedCarhart’s-man next to me drink the shots after each sip I took, so I saved room for the cocktails). Matt Moeller and Phil Sullivan have a contemporary vibe going on around traditional spirits. If the corn-based, non-GMO Moonshine doesn’t grab you, try the Silver rum (light, silken, and powerful), BozemanMagazine.com March 2017 21


Recreation & Health

Making Turns with

Vasu Sojitra Adaptive Sports Director for Eagle Mount Bozeman Angie Ripple with Vasu Sojitra

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ometimes editorial comes from the most interesting places, this time it was the checkout line at Costco. While items were conveying and the business account for Bozeman Magazine was showing on the back of our Costco card the cashier said something to the effect of “Bozeman Magazine, I love Bozeman Magazine. You should do a feature story about Eagle Mount’s Adaptive Sports Director Vasu!” We listened, and got a hold of Vasu Sojitra as soon as possible. He was eager to oblige our inquiry to feature Eagle Mount. Vasu moved to Bozeman in 2014 from Burlington, VT. He had never seen Montana before, but really wanted to venture out west after falling in love with skiing and adaptive sports. It all started when Vasu was 10 years old. Well technically, it all started when he was born and at just 9 months old he had his leg amputated due to septicemia, a bacterial infection in the blood. More specifically, Vasu’s skiing obsession started when he was just a decade into this rockin’ roller coaster we call life. For his first 8 years Vasu used a prosthetic leg with minor use of forearm crutches and a bit of (hip) hopping around. This all changed when he had his last and final fall while on the faux leg. Injured and traumatized in the middle of his 3rd grade classroom, he decided to switch to 100% crutching 100% of the time. This titanium decision opened up new doors and opportunities for Vasu. He become more active and agile — participating in more sports and actually doing pretty well at them; with skiing

being the primary focus. As the years came and went, Vasu started to sculpt his life around the sport; develop new friendships, making his high school ski team, dedicating every weekend in the winter to make the journey to the mountains, and later deciding to do his undergraduate studying at the University of Vermont to be closer to the mountains. While studying at UVM Vasu started researching how to get himself into the backcountry with crutches. After a few failed attempts and a lot of post holing during those rare East-coast powder days, he and his friends were able to develop what he now calls “a snowshoe attachment”

for his outriggers (forearm crutches with little skis on the bottom). This opened up new opportunities — opportunities that people in similar situations didn’t quite have on a daily basis. The lifestyle had now been given a small voice; one that aimed to encourage others to transcend limitations, not just through emotional perseverance but also through perseverance in innovation. At this nexus Vasu finally understood the age old and possibly overused, but eternally applicable phrase, ‘where there’s a will, there’s a way.’ Vasu was never alone in his pursuits, his parents, brother and friends continuously provided him with the opportunities to express himself freely and pursue his passions. With a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering under his belt, Plan A was to get an engineering job. That’s what graduates do, right? Get a job for what they went to school for? Somehow, that plan changed. He decided to intern instead with Vermont Adaptive Ski and Sports (VASS) at Sugarbush Mt. Ellen. VASS is a therapeutic recreation organization that helps people with disabilities recreate. This was one experience he would never forget, and a new passion started to emerge as he started to realize the power of sports and staying active. “I had never acknowledged it, but that life changing decision I had made at the age of 10 had shaped my future to the emotionally stable state it is at now.” says Sojitra. He goes on to say “Sadly, that’s not the case for a large population of people with disabilities. A great deal of disabilities come with an endless

lists of barriers that become encapsulating to create a crushingly unhealthy state of mind, which in turn go to create more barriers. Unless you’re able to persevere and work through them, it’s easy to get caught in this loop of negative feedback. Sports, as I realized while at VASS, created confidence and independence within me, especially during emotional valleys of my life. Through this confidence and independence, I acquired the potential to grow and was able to steadily overcome these “endless” barriers that I had put on myself.” With solid ground under him, it only took one winter to realize what his body and mind were capable of and to develop a voice for that muscular structure we call sport, and be able to advocate for individuals less fortunate than himself. Vasu used his personal connections and ability to help co-produce a film, Out on a Limb. This film was meant to spread the message of what a disability actually is in society today and how to dissolve that preconceived notion. If you haven’t seen it already, check it out! This all happened during the same winter he was working at VASS. Vasu dedicated a few weekends here and there to film in New England and Quebec with T-Bar Films. “It was eyeopening to see the interworking of film making and how to incorporate storytelling and art into sport and athleticism.” he says. Once the film was finished and his time at VASS was coming to a close, Vasu headed out to Bozeman, MT with a few close friends to start the next chapter in his life.


“I roamed around at odd jobs that first summer, while connecting with Eagle Mount Bozeman, a similar type of organization to VASS, but also incorporating camps for people with cancer and veterans. I applied and was offered a job opening to be the Program Assistant, and soon after Program Director for our Adaptive Ski Program. With all that and much more, I was thrown right into the fire.” Out on a Limb quickly began creating sparks among the outdoor community. “We reached for the stars when it came to pitching it to festivals. We sent it into as many outdoor film festivals as possible and to our surprise got into all the major ones including Banff Mountain Film Festival (I can still feel the flutters in my heart) and Telluride Mountain film (more flutters) being the two major ones. This was inconceivable

to me and Tyler (Co-founder of T-Bar Films). We were in awe for the time being.” Vasu and Tyler both pushed to promote themselves as professional entities, and it worked. They reached out to several ski companies to see if an ambassadorship was a possibility. DPS Skis were the first to vote yes in Vasu’s favor. And they have become one of the strongest partnerships to date. With DPS Skis backing him up he continued to reach out, landing several more partners: Dynafit, Deuter, Ortovox, Julbo Eyewear, Kate’s Real Food, Darn Tough Socks, and Skida. “ It has been quite an incredible

journey, having finally created a platform to amplify that small voice that sparked in me all those years ago. Yes. I can safely say, life has been full throttle since then. Let us see if we can’t push the limit just a bit more, yeah?” As the Adaptive Sports Director for Eagle Mount Bozeman Vasu heads up the Bridger Ski Program in the winter for over 200 skier with disabilities and 300 volunteers that help out with those lessons. He also overlooks the Cross-country Program, which has it’s own coordinator. In the summers he is in charge of the Adventure Day Camps Programs for over 100 campers with disabilities. The day camps include anything from rafting, kayaking, fishing, hiking, and cycling. In the fall Vasu overlooks Eagle Mount’s iceskating program, involving our local Bozeman schools. “We try to do it all with our campers.” Vasu says of Eagle Mount camps. “This included a weekly climbing program at our local climbing gym to get our campers on the wall.” Each one of these programs are growing every year and Eagle Mount is working to reach out as much as possible to get more and more people involved, either as a participant or as a volunteer to help out. “There are so many rewarding parts to this job, but the biggest is definitely seeing how impactful something as simple as skiing is to our participants as well as our volunteers. It has helped so many build confidence and even be able to incorporate themselves into society in a more beneficial way for both themselves and others.” I had to ask Vasu his favorite run at Bridger and here is his response: “I <3 HULLY GULLY!!! Well actually, I do like me a good Ridge Lap. My go to is Cuckoo’s, Lewis and Clark, and if I’m feeling really ambitious Northwest Passage/Direct. Anything steep and tight is my JAM!!” And, what he wants you to know about you and/or the Adaptive Sports Program is simple: “Let’s make some turns!” If you would like to know more about Eagle Mount visit them online at: http://eaglemount.org s

Angie is a third generation Montanan, who balances wrangling her three children and adventures with her husband while living the dream. Her favorite run at Bridger (this season) is Three Bears.


Recreation & Health

Lets Turn Your Habits Into Indulgences For Better Health! Dr. Phil Cameron DC

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here are many people who say humans are flawed individuals by nature. I say that humans seek opportunity for pleasure and often ignore the consequences attached to their indulgences until it is to late. Of course everyone likes to feel good, to eat tasty things, and to experience euphoria because our brains are wired to do so. The limbic system, a developmentally old part of our nervous system, is designed to make us aware of pain and pleasure. I refer to it as the lizard brain. Reptiles only know how to respond to a stimulus, they don’t have higher thoughts about what the stimulus means. If the stimulus feels good, they are happy and content; if the stimulus causes pain, they run away. We have the same wiring in our brain, but we also have a conscious mind to understand the consequences of our actions. Mark Twain says “A man without vices doesn’t have much reason to get up the morning.” That quote speaks often to our bad habits, which we let control our lives instead of changing our behavior to live a more optimal, healthier life. There is a very simple law of physics that holds a great universal truth. Every action has an equal and opposite reaction. The same is true for what happens in our physiology. We either do things that will enhance our physiology or detract from it, by our actions, our diets, and our habits. The physiology of the human body is very paradoxical. We need to feed, nourish, and build our body, while at the same time detoxifying and eliminating waste from everyday stresses that weaken our body. Survival of the fittest is the name of the game. If we have too many indulgences we make our body weak, which can ultimately lead to a disease. There is a fine line between an indulgence and a habit. An indulgence is a calculated extravagance that we do occasionally because we enjoy

it. A habit is an action that is done on a repetitive basis. Humans are creatures of habit as we like routines, and to go on autopilot to conserve brain energy. Remember good habits are hard to make and easy to break and bad habits are easy to make and hard to break. Surviving your indulgences takes good habits that only come with practice. The trick to long-term success of good habits is discipline. The best definition of discipline I ever heard was “doing what you don’t want to do now, so you can do what you want to do later.” If you want to lose 10 lbs., you have to start by putting the donut down now and start exercising even though you don’t want to. So let’s be realistic; we are not going to be perfect all the time. We need to allow ourselves some wiggle room to have an occasional indulgence and not fall apart or create a recurring problem. The first step is to know what your indulgence is, and they come in many different tastes, activities, and time wasters. If your indulgence is ice cream, just be mindful that you have a weak spot in your limbic system for it. Using your conscious mind, make a choice to not deny yourself from ever eating ice cream again, but to stop eating ice cream every night before bed. Think of special occasions where you truly want to indulge in an ice cream cone. Go have really good ice cream at your favorite ice cream parlor instead of eating cheap ice cream full of preservatives and bad ingredients in your Lazy Boy chair every night while watching television. Then after you have the ice cream, take some lactase enzymes to help digest the lactose in the ice cream that is irritating to your intestine. It’s best to have the ice cream after a meal so you have less stomach space and your body is already in digestion mode and can work more efficiently on your ice cream

indulgence. You have now changed a habit into an indulgence that you can survive with a little planning and preparation and still not feel like you are denying yourself what you want. Turning every bad habit into an indulgence will drastically reduce the stress on your body. But that’s not to say that every indulgence won’t come with a price either. The reality is you will have to pay the piper at some point; the idea is to pay as little as possible. If you stay up late to watch a movie, you know you will be tired the next day when you have to get up and go to work. Create a recovery plan to maximize your time and efficiency so you don’t have to make decisions when you are tired and weak. Plan to make a meal in the crock-pot so it’s cooking while you are gone at work. Then when you come home there is already a healthy, delicious meal waiting for you. It’s little tricks like that which help you to survive your indulgence and get back on track very quickly. Remember failure to plan is planning to fail! Make sure to survive your indulgence by thinking ahead and planning for your recovery from your indulgence whether it is from food, activities, or alcohol. Rule number 1, don’t over do it. Then, when you do it, don’t go so crazy that it makes you sick. Support your body in ways to help with digestion and detoxification, like being more hydrated, and eating healthier food around your indulgence. Keep your body moving so you don’t become stagnant and fester in your own toxicity. Even if its just going for a walk, your body will be grateful for the movement to get the toxins out. Keep your body habit free and make yourself conscious about your indulgences by thinking through what your body needs to recover, which will ultimately help you live a healthier, more natural, and more optimal life. c

Dr. Phil Cameron DC is the owner of the Bozeman Wellness Center. He is a Chiropractic Physician and Professional Applied Kinesiologist. He treats every patient based on his or her individual healthcare needs and strives to help each patient Live Healthy, Live Naturally, and Live Optimally. Visit www.bozemanwellnesscenter.com for more information.

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Sun Sign Horoscopes March 2017 Aries: You are sure to be full of lots of energy this month. With no less than five planets spending some time in your sign, there are sure to be plenty of happenings to keep you busy. Venus is sure to continue the love energy, raising your sweet sex appeal.

Libra: Love comes early in the month under the Uranus opposition to Jupiter on the 2nd. Passion is on the schedule beginning on the 9th with Mars storming into Taurus. You will be feeling that sensual heat and passion indulge and enjoy but guard your heart.

Taurus: Mars enters your sign on the 9th, lighting up your first house of appearance. This could have you feeling a pick prickly, so exercise patience to win the day – even if it means counting to 100! With Venus in retrograde, now is the time to make returns!

Scorpio: You could be feeling a tug to reach out to someone from the past for a romantic connection now under the influence of Venus’s retrograde movement starting on the 4th. Make sure you are not remembering just the good in a golden glow.

Gemini: Venus goes retrograde on the 4th giving you a chance to fix mistakes either financial or romantic before the end of the month. Use the opportunity wisely – it is a limited time offer. The 20th will give you the energy and strength you need to move on.

Sagittarius: Kick up your heels and have a great time! Venus is spending the month in your sign giving you the opportunity to have a little fun and relax. Since this lovely planet is retrograde, you are given an opportunity to renew an old love you lost.

Cancer: Impatience may run high with five planets passing through Aries this month. This puts a lot of activity in your house of authority figures and higher ups. Avoiding misunderstandings may be difficult, but not impossible if you exercise patience yourself.

Capricorn: Beautiful Venus rules love and money. Turning retrograde on the 4th she is going to give you a perfect opportunity to review your finances. Are you living within your means? Is your job supporting you? An old love may return and reignite.

Leo: You will need to keep a close eye on your checkbook balance as Venus turns retrograde on the 4th and the negative can hit you again with a potential kick in the financial teeth on the 12th. Expect to hear from a long distance loved ones on the 5th.

Aquarius: It is time to buckle down and finish those home projects. Soon you will want to have some fun in the sun. A tough decision is needed on the 12th regarding finances or joint resources. A new love interest with an interesting accent appears.

Virgo: Jupiter is in your second house of money and finances and this can bring some excessive shopping or spending. Be careful with overspending, you still need to be financially conservative. Ready to make it exclusive, say so on the 7th or 9th.

Pisces: The planets are on your side all month, but you get an extra boost of positive energy from the 4th through the 9th. That’s the time to begin new projects and state your case to those in authority. Love is in the air on the 2nd when an admirer declares.


26 March 2017 BozemanMagazine.com Kacie Q Photography, Title art: Ivy Courtney Creative


Wedding Season Preview

From online planning to the big day, 2017 is shaping up to be a beautifully trendy year for Montana brides!

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ith 2017 off and running, brides are looking for fresh inspiration and guidance for their wedding. Montana Party Rentals owner Jill Remon weighed in on trends that will help point brides toward their dream event this year. June thru September is peak wedding season, however, off-season weddings are a fun and fresh alternative for brides. “Our clients often struggle to book particular vendors. By choosing a date during off-season, you will be working with vendors that are focused on you,” said Redmon. Many vendors offer discounted rates in the off-season months such as May. BONUS: Having an off-season wedding means having the entire summer to enjoy together as newlyweds! Picture a winter wedding complete with magical backdrops, cozy spaces, and snuggling under fuzzy blankets in the snow. Beyond nailing down a date, this year promises trendy details that brides won’t want to miss including greenery, metallic, and dedicated lounge spaces. Greenery is the Pantone color of the year, which at first looks like a seasonal color, but MPR feels like it’s perfect to mix into any wedding style. “I’m happy green is getting some attention. I’ve always considered green a neutral color,” says Redmon. “It truly goes with so many colors. This season we are offering a new line of gorgeous velvet linens with so many beautiful shades of green – grass, fern, emerald. These shades would be a fantastic base for either a rustic or more elegant affair.” Metallic shades are also easy to blend into any wedding style. Rose gold or brushed flatware, copper votives or hammered Moscow mules in a gunmetal finish are all quick ways to add pops of metallic to any table top. Redmon believes that while metallic may be a popular trend in 2017, it’s proving to have some staying power simply because it’s an easy way to add a celebratory touch to any event. Lounge areas are also looking to stick around this year – a trend guaranteed to please everyone on the guest list. “The feedback on lounge areas is positive and is enjoyed by all generations,” says Redmon. “Often older guests will stay a bit longer since they have an option to move from dinner into more comfortable seating.” One of our biggest questions was how a bride can tackle all these trends while still maintaining a unique sense of style. Redmon says it’s all about including timeless pieces with fresh new products. Don’t be afraid to include the quirky pieces that reflect the couple’s personality while also mixing in some 2017 trends. I’m a huge fan of mixing new with the old, including vintage rental pieces in a design adds style and interest, even if it’s in small touches.” says Redmon.  Another trend that will continue to grow this year is the ability for brides to be able to plan these events anywhere, any time. That means having vendors and planners just a click away. Whether it’s via an app or an email, event planners are a bride’s greatest resource. It’s easy to get overwhelmed with the details, which is why the professionals are there to help each step of the way. The MPR wishlist feature allows our brides to view our vast inventory and submit a wishlist at their convenience. From there we provide a quote and discuss logistics.” x


Friends vs. Professionals An interview with wedding professionals Frequently, brides reach out to friends and family to take care of some of the important elements of their wedding day. Whether it is for budget reasons or because they want to honor their friend or family member, these individuals become a “vendor” at the wedding.

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e approached a few of the wedding professionals whose services frequently get replaced by a well-meaning person close to the engaged couple. We asked them to give their thoughts and helpful advice on proceeding with a nonprofessional for some key elements of a wedding.

Amelia Anne Gabel

Let’s address cost. How can you help brides stick to a budget, but keep the professional quality that you offer? Julio Freitas (JF): We usually find that couples have a very hard time pinpointing their floral budget. It seems as if they are afraid of “offending” the floral designer they are wanting to hire by throwing a number out there that may be too low. We try to work with all budgets and often make suggestions on where to cut, be it a flower, number of centerpieces or size of arrangements. Abby Turner (AT): One of our primary roles is to help the couple stick to a budget. We help them not only determine a number, but how they use the money. One of those strategies is to help them hire professionals that are within their budget, but 28 March 2017 BozemanMagazine.com

will also provide a quality product. We take this role seriously to make sure everyone is happy. We serve the couple and the wedding professionals in this aspect. AJ Rohrer (AR): I love chatting with clients on how to use their budget to emphasize the things that matter to them. Do not be afraid to allocate money in your budget to

places that reflect what’s important for you. Great music helps propel a good party to epic levels and a great DJ is often much more affordable and helpful than most people imagine. Your DJ is very similar to the rudder of a ship, they are the voice that can turn the direction of your party and keep it running true.


expect the unexpected and choosing the appropriate action for the best outcome.

Amelia Anne Gabel

How do you strive to make the couple’s day the best wedding day they can experience? JF: It’s all in the details! We try to work out as many kinks as possible long before the wedding day, and we drill into so many details couples rarely think of! We always ask for a couple of on-site contacts, be it a wedding planner or an involved relative. And we always deliver the bouquet, it’s our favorite part!

What is one professional tool/experience that you bring to the table that a “friend vendor” can’t?

been the foundation behind a client’s decision of hiring a professional to bring their floral vision to life.

JF: Our style is rooted in color theory, and many principles and elements of floral design, such as texture and movement. We work very closely with our vendors, who understand our style, to bring the best product we can find while minimizing shipping costs, which can be such a huge expense. We have found that, over the years, those two things have

AR: Many people think that the key to being a great DJ is music knowledge. I would argue that it is the ability to communicate effectively. The experience of your DJ plays directly into how well they communicate. The biggest difference between a DJ who has done 200 gigs and one who has done 20 is how well they can control a crowd. What do you do when no one is listening to you?

Beth Renick Officiant Big Sky Wedding Ceremonies

Julio Freitas Florist The Flower Hat

What if there is an emergency of some kind? What if no one is dancing? You’ll want to be in experienced hands when the unexpected happens.

AR: We do about 200 weddings as a company every year and it could be so easy to just treat one event the same as another. We combat this by streamlining our basic services while still allowing for full customization. We encourage our clients to be as involved as they want to be in the process the day. Whatever end of the spectrum you are on, we match your DJ to the personality, overall feel, and the skills required for your wedding.

Beth Renick (BR): When a couple asks a friend or relative to officiate their wedding ceremony they may assume all will be executed perfectly, because it is a person whom they love and trust. However, this connection may not replace the experience of a seasoned professional. The value of a professional is the ability to

BR: I believe that it is the joy of officiating which reflects a motivation to customize each couples interests and create a ceremony that is personal and perhaps just a bit unique. I have an understanding that the event is not about me, I have no agenda

AJ Rohrer DJ Joe’s Mobile DJ Service

Abby Turner Wedding Designer & Planner Reed & Lee | Events

continued on p 31

BozemanMagazine.com March 2017 29


Wedding Season Preview

Top 10 Wedding Drinks

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ondering what to serve you guests? According to Taylor Shull, who manages off-site beverage catering for The Bay Bar & Grille, here are the Top 10 choices of Montana couples:

1. Huckleberry Flavored Vodka Lemonade

This summery cocktail is made by combining 1 part huckleberry vodka with 1 1/2 parts of lemonade, served over ice. Huckleberry vodka gives the drink a distinct berry flavor while the lemonade provides both sweetness and tartness. Bozeman Spirits Distillery offers a naturally flavored Huckleberry Vodka, and The Rocking R Bar is the only bar in Montana to feature its own private label Huckleberry Vodka.

6. Crowd Pleasing Red Blends Red blends are a big trend in domestic wines that all level of drinkers are embracing, and so will your guests.

14North’s Tai Mule

2. Salmon Fly

Salmon Fly Honey Rye beer from Madison River Brewing Company is a unique malted barley brew complimented by the subtle spiciness of rye and local Montana honey. These ingredients blend together to create a lighter bodied drinking experience for all kinds of beer drinkers.

3. Bozone Amber

7. Hopzone, Bent Nail or other local IPA

India Pale Ale [IPA] is a big hit in our area, hoppier than regular pale ale IPA’s go down smooth with a slight edge.

A local favorite, Bozone Amber is made with Montana grown and malted Pale barley, as well as Crystal and Vienna malts plus Magnum, Columbus, Santiam, and a late kettle addition of Cascade hops for a pleasant aroma. Cheers!

8. Pinot Noir

4. Honey Lemon Whiskey Punch

Brewed by Harvest Moon Brewing Company in Belt, MT Beltian White is a Witbier style beer (white beer in Flemish). It’s an ale for every season with a hint of fruit with a subdued malty flavor and a slightly citrus finish.

Basically this drink is a sparkly Arnold Palmer—except honey-spiked and with whiskey instead of tea. Mix up a pitcher with 1/4 cup honey simple syrup to 4 cups lemonade, 3 cups whiskey, 4 cups club soda serve with lemon slices and ice.

5. Crisp Sauv. Blanc

Sauvignon Blanc is a lean, crisp, white wine that’s a great alternative to Chardonnay. It’s extremely flexible with food, making it a great wedding choice.

Another wine easily paired with a wide variety of foods, Pinot Noir is a luscious red wine that is juicy, delicious and enjoyed by many.

9. Beltian White

10. Moscow Mule

Half the lure to this drink is the copper cups used to serve them in! Three ingredients get the job done; 1/2 oz. lime juice, 2 oz. vodka and 4-6 oz. ginger beer served over ice with a stirring rod, Voilà. See more about local Wine & Spirits in our article Liquid Courage: Discovering the New West by the Glass page 20. s


Wedding Season Preview Friends vs Professionals - p28 other than to craft a small piece of a great day. Through ten years of experience, I have performed a variety of ceremonies at unique locations. It is through each couple’s unique love story that I am able to create a memorable experience. Is there a tool brides can use to help their “friend vendor” complete their wedding day task? JF: Many wedding sites will offer a day-of checklist, and those can be extremely helpful. When a “friend vendor” is helping with flowers, they should be aware of a timeline of when flowers need to be set out. If there are any on-site pieces to be made, an arch, for example, that should also be accounted for in the timeline; set up time is extremely important. If the wedding is during the summer, also take in consideration the weather, so the flowers look perfect for their big show. AR: If you’ve already tagged a friend to be your vendor of choice, get together a simple day-of schedule. Give them an idea of what order you want things to occur in, specific times are not as important. Get them a list of songs you want played and songs you definitely do not want to hear. Finally, when the big day comes, do not be afraid to communicate if something is not going the way you planned. Communicating with your friend will help minimize any obstacles that may arise. AT: There are a lot of planning tools on the internet for couples to use when putting together their day. At the very least, give your “friend vendor” a day-of timeline. Give them the contact information to all other vendors, and have the discussion with the vendors and your friend as to task lists. Who is going to take care of each of the portions of the wedding day? As long as everyone knows that it’s covered, there won’t be a question in the moment. Finally, discuss clean-up! If you have tagged a friend to be your day-of coordinator or help, make sure they have a plan for cleaning up.

What should couples look for in a “friend vendor” who can provide realistic wedding services? JF: The bottom line here is: does the person you want to hire actually do what you want them to do professionally? I have been to so many weddings where the friend hired for a certain position, didn’t work in the wedding industry. There’s nothing wrong with that, but the end result rarely is what the couple expected. Working on a wedding requires a set of skills that’s very specific to that setting. Having a close friend or relative help with the wedding can be a very rewarding, meaningful act, and if your styles mesh, don’t hesitate. But if their work is not what you’re looking for, don’t be afraid to turn down the offer. You’ll want to look back on your wedding and be glad you hired the people that you did. AR: Be sure that they have good quality equipment and know how to use it properly. Make sure they know the overall feel you want. Whether this person is just doing announcements and playlists; getting people on the dance floor all night; or something in between - communicate what you want for your wedding. Be sure your friend knows where to turn if something unexpected comes up. Finally, make sure they are someone who is reliable and can perform under pressure. BR: As far as officiants go, a few points to consider are: does the “friend vendor” officiant feel comfortable speaking in front of people, enough to handle the unanticipated? Does the friend know how to write a personalized ceremony that reflects the couple’s love? Can they make it personalized without uncomfortable bits of information? Can the friend direct the bridal parties, family and guests? And finally, do they know the nuances of a basic wedding ceremony? Your day will be great with a perfect mix of friends and professionals on your team. w


Montana Music

March 24 with C.F.T.C. Chickenjam West

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n their forthcoming LP Magic, jamband favorites The Werks transcend their roots while never losing their identity. Poignant songwriting and engaging melody come together on a record that showcases their maturation as a multidimensional group of uniquely creative musicians. The virtuosic rhythm junkies of The Werks have released four highly acclaimed studio albums over the past ten years - Synapse (2009), The Werks (2012), Mr. Smalls Sessions EP (2014), and Inside a Dream (2015) - performed well over one thousand shows (including launching their own multi-day music festival The Werk Out), and released countless live recordings including last year’s Live at The Werk Out live album. In that time they’ve earned a devoted fan base across the world and reputation as one of the most energetic, compelling, and downright entertaining live acts in the business. They’ve developed a hard won confidence, and a willingness to fearlessly chart new sonic territory on Magic. “This is our first truly multi-genre album” says Chris Houser. “Each track has its own unique vibe and sound. We didn’t write these songs to please people,

we wrote them because this is what we hear when we turn off the outside and let the creativity flow.” The songs on Magic started as sketches the band members crafted independently. Coming together in their sonic dojo The Werkspace, those seeds of groove were nurtured by the group, growing into fully wrought songs through holistic arrangement and organic improvisation. “Our writing is collaborative,” explains Dan Shaw, “but starting with demos written individually gives each band member a chance to leave their fingerprint on a tune.” The songwriting finished, the band decamped to Sonic Lounge in Grove 32 March 2017 BozemanMagazine.com

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City, Ohio. There lead engineer and producer Joe Viers (Blues Traveler, Twenty One Pilots) settled down to work with the studio’s legendary Amek/Neve 9098i mixing console. One of only thirteen in the world, Sonic Lounge’s was originally installed in Olympic Studios in London, England, where it served to document the unique creative mojo of Eric Clapton, Pink Floyd, and more. Joining Viers were assistant engineers and producers Aaron Oakley and B.J. Davis, and the unstoppable horns of Columbus’ own Hoodoo Soul Band - Chris Young (trumpet), Kevin O’Neil (tenor), and Phil Clark (Baritone) – while Kenny Holmes, tour manager and right hand man, was the gaff tape that held it all together. Finally Columbus native and current Los Angeles, CA resident Brian Lucey (Train, Dr. Dog) mastered the record. From those sessions emerged a rare jewel of a record; Magic is muse put to tape, a direct download of the creative spark. “This is a recording of the music that’s in our souls” explains Rob Chafin. “In a way, the past decade has been leading to this moment. We play and write together so seamlessly now, we’re able to channel the inspiration in our hearts out into our instruments, and come at this from a pure place.” Together, these visionaries have crafted a record where melodies take flight, dancing and twisting around the sonorous main of the tune itself. By fusing their spirited improvisation to a core of immediately engaging songwriting, The Werks have truly performed a feat of modern musical Magic. Chickenjam West presents: The Werks with Cure For The Common is taking place at The Eagles Lodge Ballroom, on Friday, March 24. The doors open at 8pm with music beginning at 9pm. As always this is a 21+, general admission show. Advance tickets are $13 at Cactus Records and Gifts and cactusrecords. net, and will be $15 at the door. d

BozemanMagazine.com March 2017 33


Montana Music

Jon Wayne and The Pain - The Filler, March 9

JWP

For nearly a decade, electronic reggae-dub innovators Jon Wayne and The Pain have been crafting a unique sound, one that features a mesmerizing blend of modern age electronic beats fused with upbeat traditional roots reggae and a fresh layer of grooving funk to keep the soul moving in all the right ways. The Twin Cities-based ensemble burst onto the festival scene in 2007 following their debut self-titled album, and has since built a highly devoted following through multi-dimensional jamming, extensive touring and thoughtful, relevant songwriting. Their transcendent live performances and fluid chemistry has propelled them to the forefront of a new generation of reggae music, and with an ever-changing musical landscape, it is evident that this Midwestern quartet is becoming a force to be reckoned with.

Horseshoes & Hand Grenades & Rabbit Wilde - Eagle’s Ballroom, March 25

HHG

Hailing from the river town of Stevens Point, Wisconsin, HHG plays something like progressive high-energy old-time folk music. With strong roots in old-time and bluegrass, the band has formed it’s own unique style born from the diverse musical backgrounds and interests of the five friends who make up the band. All born and raised in the great state of Wisconsin, Horseshoes & Hand Grenades began playing music and their earliest shows in the spring of 2009. Since then, the band has shared the stage with Merle Haggard, the Infamous Stringdusters, Trampled by Turtles, Yonder Mountain String Band, Railroad Earth, the Del McCoury Band, and many more. Being mostly inspired by rivers, valleys, good friends, and good drink, this five piece is as sturdy as any midwest riverbed and will make your toes tap from sundown to sunrise.

Digital Beat Down & M.O.T.H. - The Filler, March 31 Digital Beat Down is a live electronica duo that fuses synthetic textures and organic instrumentation to create their infectious brand of “live electronic funk house.” Combining live and electronic percussion, multiple synthesizers, guitars and a loop pedal as the brain of the operation, the duo’s resulting sound is funky, warm, deep, bass forward and fresh. The distinctive feature of Digital Beat Down is their ability to draw on the ethos of the DJ culture while still providing the intangible live band experience. Digital Beat Down is crossing the sounds of four-on-the-floor with the esoteric and psychedelic sounds of rock and roll. It’s like Jimi Hendrix stumbled in to London’s underground house scene and decided that he never wanted to leave…

MOTH


Visual Arts

COVER

SHOT

Amelia Anne Gabel

A

melia’s passion for photography started at the age of fifteen, when she was lucky enough to take her first trip to Kenya. Her dad was a professional hot air balloon pilot who lived and worked there. The experience changed her life. She was captivated by the beauty of Kenya and its people. After her travels, her love for photography grew stronger. She became interested in learning about new cultures and started seeing people in a different light. Photography gave her the ability to document the beauty that she was seeing in people.  She adores photographing people and being invited into people’s lives to document moments that are special to them. She is passionate about capturing natural moments and beauty.  Her work has been published internationally and is often featured in local publications. Most recently, she was voted Best Portrait & Wedding Photographer by the readers of Bozeman Magazine as well as Bozeman’s Best Wedding Photographer by Borrowed & Blue.

She is known for her creativity, patience, attention to detail and the ability to make the people she photographs comfortable in front of the camera. Visit Amelia at her Bozeman studio, 111 East Oak, Suite 2A, or online at www.ameliaannephotography.com/ d

BozemanMagazine.com March 2017 35


Rob Quist - p 12 a proposed plan to help Montana women who receive their reproductive help from the state? RQ: You know, you don’t have to be a woman to understand how important reproductive rights are. I understand how angry they are about this, it’s really when you can legislate what a person can do with their body, I mean, where is that going to end? So, I think, as far as Planned Parenthood, all these things are being cut because of this one issue? That’s just a microcosm of what this whole thing is, it covers cervical cancer screening and all these other things, so we cannot cut this funding for Planned Parenthood. KT: Kelly Corwin of Bozeman, the question from her is -RQ: Him. It’s a him. KT: Okay, there’s a lot of talk in the air about privatizing education for profit using public funds for school vouchers and private charter schools. Shrinking budgets from the Education Dept. could be harmful to single, rural communities in Montana particularly. How do you propose to protect public schools in Montana and now that we have an advocate in the position of Secretary of Education administration, how do you – RQ: Well, I’m a product of a rural school. I went to a little country school called the Winkler Superior School in North Glacier County. How long did it take the United States to get public education as a model, and it’s worked. The fact that they want to use this voucher system so that schools that have more money will be able to get a better education whereas maybe rural schools won’t, that’s just wrong. That’s not the American way. One of the things I did when I was in the Montana Arts Council, I realized that arts funding were cut for rural schools halfway through the year and so I advocated long and hard to, to get funding for that. That’s really why I developed this whole thing of being an arts educator to take my songwriting seminars in the schools. I really will defend public education and arts education are one of my top priorities.

36 March 2017 BozemanMagazine.com

KT: We sit here at the Native American Building here on the campus of MSU, college graduates come to mind right off the forefront and we have college graduates leaving with the highest debt in history. Is there a fix for the outrageous debt that these college grads are leaving with? RQ: You know, let’s just call it like it is. These are predatory loans. When I went to college, we had the federal insured student loan and we would get out of college with 1% loans and you could always roll this over into another loan if you needed to, but now that’s not the case. Both my kids are strapped with major college debt. I’ve even actually taken on my son’s debt myself. You make payments on these and they just get higher and higher with the interest rates and it seems like you can pay on it forever but they don’t go down. They only go up. And I know a lot of students are facing that. So, let’s just call it like it is: these are predatory loans and the fact that we’re allowing people to make profit on the backs of our students, I think the average student comes out of college with probably, I’ve heard people say as much as $37,000 as an average. If you take that paying $300 a month, I mean, how long would it take you to pay that off, especially with the interest rates. So, that’s just predatory. KT: Next question: If you have the opportunity to serve on a Federal House Committee, which one would it be, and why? RQ: Well, I think I probably would want to serve on the Veteran’s Affairs Committee. It’s really important to me. This is spiritual because I lost some friends in Vietnam, I lost some close friends. Even now my friends in the healthcare industry tell me that there are veterans that are going to be coming back, that we’re going to be inundated, we’re just seeing the tip of the iceberg. I have a perfect example, there’s a young gentlemen who, he’s [been] in Afghanistan, he’s a renter of ours and he also plows our driveway. He’s a broken individual. He was over there for 5 years and he would walk down the street, he went over thinking he was going to be spreading freedom

and people would spit on him as he walked down the street. He watched the same school be bombed and rebuilt 5 times. We have this whole climate of regime change, but all it’s really doing is just spreading untold destruction around the world and it’s really bringing a backlash of terror against our own people and then we have all these veterans that are returning home. So, I think that’s really going to be one. Here’s a program I’m instituting with one of my good friends, Dave McGriffith, we’ve kind of been calling it Band of Brothers, where we go into some communities and we get musical instruments for some of these veterans because they come home, they don’t know how to relate to people, but they’ve got that Band of Brothers, you know, psychology. So, we teach them to put a band together, they can meet once a week, play music together, of course, music is such a healing thing. It’s the frequencies that come through, you learn how to communicate, you learn how to express it yourself. Of course, that’s the toughest thing these vets are facing is how to express these feelings they have. So, this is a program that’s really near and dear to my heart. KT: That’s fantastic. I guess the last question I have for you, and it kind of goes to the mainstream news again and it pertains to Alternative Facts, fake news. It’s everywhere. Do you think what we’re doing right now is fake news, is my first question to you, and do you have any ideas to protect people, the public, against fake news and fake journalism? RQ: Well, I think really, people have to be really discerning of news that they listen to. My mother who was probably one of the most incredibly wise people that I’ve ever known, she gave me a phrase way back when I was younger and since I’m in this political game I’ve been using a lot more, and that phrase is: Consider the source. You know, when you’re hearing some kind of news thing you need to discern what is their skin in the game, you know, who owns them and what is their agenda in all this? I think it reveals a lot about where we’re getting our news from. And the other phrase I’ve

been using a lot lately is that old Watergate [phrase]: Follow the money. So, those two things really reveal a lot about where we’re getting it. A lot of news that we get, it’s not really news, it’s to create outrage. I call it Outrage Du Jour. “Did you see what such and such!! Let’s get outraged!” You know, we’ve got to tone down the outrage. But I know that there are people that are really trying hard to get into what the actual news is and to be fair minded and to report what’s actually happening. Unfortunately, a lot of people aren’t taking the time to make that a priority. KT: I’m trying to take that time as a priority as a volunteer, as a representative of music and contributing arts, a contributor for Bozeman Magazine that I think may help give some velocity to what’s being said if we can actually talk to representatives, state representatives, people in power and get direct answers on microphone so that it’s documented and know where they stand and what they feel and if they’re listening to the constituents. Would that be something that you would be open to as a representative? RQ: Absolutely. You know, and that’s the thing, you hit the nail right on the head. That’s [why] this office feels right to me because I really feel in many ways I’ve been representing the State of Montana all my life and I have no other [sites] on any other office. This is the only office that appeals to me because it is being a representative of the people. So, the way that I want to run this is that I feel that I would be the servant and the people of Montana would be the boss. You’ve seen those charts where it has the CEO on top and then there’s the staff and everybody, well I’m flipping that. The people of Montana are going to be the top of the chart and then there’s going to be my staff and I’ll be at the bottom, so I’ll be the servant here. KT: Rob, thanks so much for taking time out of your long, busy schedule to sit down and talk to me. RQ: My honor. My honor. KT: Thank you.

q


The Screen & The Stage

Verge Theatre Montanaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Own:

Bennett Drozic

Family Stage: The Emperor's New Clothes

Kathryn Schultz Miller's dynamic and fun stage adaptation of the classic story is packed with action, laughs, and magic tricks! Under the Direction of consummate funny man Todd Hoberecht, lots of hilarity is in store when Peter, the mischievous tailor, comes up with his sure-fire get rich quick scheme--to embarrass the vain Emperor and make off with a basket of gold! Peter uses all his wit and magic to convince the court he can make magic clothes! Only those who are very smart can see the clothes, he tells them, so everyone pretends they can see the clothes until... Someone in the audience shouts out the truth! The Emperor's New Clothes runs at 2pm on Saturdays from March 25-April 29. It's only $7 for an hour of family fun. Reservations online at vergetheater. com or in person at Cactus Records. Verge Theater is located at 2304 N. 7th Ave, across from Murdoch's, on the extremely happy North Side of Bozeman.

Monday Night Improv On The Verge

Recover from your weekend with Improv Comedy! Join us as we offer up a Monday Night sacrifice of the most daring, death defying type of live theater there is: Improv! We call it Improv on the Verge! Improv Monday Nights feature The Bozeman Improverts who will beguile you with their laser-like wits, sharp tongues, and obnoxiously large heads. These masterful, main stage players improvise sketches built around audience suggestions, play improv games similar to those you see on Who's Line Is It Anyway, and perform long form improv that is basically making up short plays on the spot. You have to experience this to believe it!! It's a mere $7 to get in and laugh like hell at our team of S.W.A.T. trained Improv Players. (S.W.A.T. = SouthWest Alternative Theater). Our upcoming shows are on March 20, April 10 and 24. All Monday Night Improv shows begins at 7pm. Reservations can be made online at vergetheater. com or in person at Cactus Records in Downtown Bozeman. Verge Theater is located at 2304 N. 7th Ave, across from Murdoch's, on the extremely hysterical North Side of Bozeman.

Family Stage: Silly Moose Improv Comedy

Join Silly The Moose and his gang of funsters every week for an Improvisation show for kids and parents alike. The kids are encouraged to get crazy, shout suggestions and become a part of the hilarity on stage. Just like Improv on the Verge but with a G rating!! Silly Moose Improv runs at 2pm on Saturdays from Feb. 11-Mar. 4. It's only $7 for an hour of laughs. Reservations online at vergetheater.com or in person at Cactus Records. Verge Theater is located at 2304 N. 7th Ave, across from Murdoch's, on the extremely silly North Side of Bozeman.

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BozemanMagazine.com March 2017 37


GREATER YELLOWSTONE COMMUNITY

EVENTS CALENDAR Wednesday, Mar. 1 1 Million Cups 7:30-8:30am ^ Red Tractor

Pizza, 1007 W Main St, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ All Ages ^ (406) 359-1999 ^ www.redtractorpizza.com The first Wednesday of each month, the 1MC program offers two local entrepreneurs an opportunity to present their startups to a diverse audience.

Profit Mastery: Understanding Business Financial, Break Even, and Profit 8:30am-

4:30pm ^ Montana Manufacturing Extension Center, 2310 University Way, Bldg. 2, Bozeman ^ $150 for Prospera Members, $175 for non-members ^ Understand why and how to benchmark your company performance. Establish the difference between “making a profit” and “having cash” volume and costs.

Montana Women’s Business Center Trainings 8:30am-4:30pm ^ Montana

Manufacturing Extension Center, 2310 University Way, Bldg. 2, Bozeman ^ $175 non members ^ Profit Mastery: Business Finance for Small Businesses

Sensational Babies 10-11am ^ Museum

of the Rockies, 600 West Kagy Boulevard, Bozeman ^ Free for members, $5 ^ Birth - 36 months ^ (406) 994-2251 ^ www.museumoftherockies.org Read, talk, sing and play with your baby through sensory awareness activities and explorations designed specifically for newborns, one- and two-year-olds.

Little Ones Storytime 10:15-11am ^ Bozeman Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 2-4 ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org Short storytime for ages 2-4.

Little Ones Storytime 11:15am-noon ^

Bozeman Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 2-4 ^ 406-5707752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org Short storytime for ages 2-4.

Sack Lunch Seminar- “Turf Wars and Professionalism” noon-1pm ^ MSU SUB

(Strand Union Building), 280 Strand Union, Bozeman ^ (406) 994-4636 ^ www. montana.edu/sub/ The Battle for Expertise and Legitimacy in the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

Minecraft Meetup 3:45-5pm ^ Boze-

man Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www. bozemanlibrary.org Play Minecraft with other kids - bring your own device, or use one of ours!

Wii Wednesday 4-5:30pm ^ Bozeman Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org Kids of all ages are invited.

R.E.A.D. to a Dog 4-5pm ^ Bozeman Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org Intermountain Therapy Dogs are available to be read to by kids.

Bozeman Learn to Skate 5:10-6:20pm ^

Haynes Pavilion, ^ $240- 12 WEEK SESSION $150- 6 WEEK SESSION ^ www.bozemanskating.com Learn to Skate! All skills levels welcome. Classes include basic skills, hockey skills, and adult skills. Go to www.bozemanskating.com for more information or call 640-0475.

Free Tax Help 5:30-7pm ^ Jake Jabs Col-

lege of Business and Entrepreneurship, ^ FREE ^ (406) 994-4421 Accounting students from MSU’s Jake Jabs College of Business and Entrepreneurship are offering free help preparing tax returns for MSU students and individuals who made less than $58,000 last year.

Music & Mussels 5:30-8pm ^ Bridger Brewing, 1609 S 11th Ave, Bozeman ^ (406) 587-2124 ^ www.bridgerbrewing. com Live music and mussels! Gallatin History Museum Lecture Series

6-7pm ^ Museum of the Rockies, 600 West Kagy Boulevard, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ (406) 994-2251 ^ www.museumoftherockies.org Lecture series at the MOR.

2nd Annual Tales from the Backcountry: Celebrating Our Public Lands 6-9:30pm

^ The Emerson Center for the Arts & Culture, 111 South Grand Ave, Bozeman ^ $10 ^ All Ages ^ (406) 587-9797 ^ www. theemerson.org Join the Montana Chapter of Backcountry Hunters & Anglers for a live storytelling pint night sharing tales of hunting and angling on our public lands.

Fitness with Friends: Self-Paced Cardio

6-7pm ^ Belgrade Community Library, 106 N Broadway, Belgrade ^ FREE ^ Adults ^ (406) 388-4346 ^ www.belgradelibrary. org Self-paced cardio program with former aerobic instructor, Gale Bacon. Free and open to the public.

Mathias 6-8pm ^ Outlaw Brewing, 2876 N 27th, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ All Ages, 21+ to drink ^ (406) 577-2403 ^ outlaw-brewing. com Live, local music

Avalanche Awareness 6-7:30pm ^ REI,

2220 Tschache Lane, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ (406) 587-1938 ^ www.rei.com 24 spots available. In partnership with the GNFAC.

38 March 2017 BozemanMagazine.com

The Fundamentals of Successful Investing 6:15-8:15pm ^ Montana State University, Bozeman ^ $79.00 or register with another person for $129.00 ^ (406) 994-0211 ^ www.montana.edu At the completion of this course, you will have an understanding of the basic process for constructing a portfolio and the various methods used to select specific investments to put your plan into practice.

Pickin’ in the Parks 6:30-9:30pm ^ The

Story Mansion, 811 S. Willson, Bozeman ^ Free ^ all ^ 406-582-2910 ^ www. friendsofthestory.org Pickers, singers, listeners, dancers, on-lookers of all abilities are welcome.

MSU Women’s Basketball v. Idaho State

7pm ^ Brick Breeden Fieldhouse, 1 Bobcat Circle, Bozeman ^ (406) 994-7117 ^ www. brickbreeden.com Go Cats!

Bozeman’s Original Pub Trivia 7-9:30pm ^

Profit Mastery: Understanding Business Financial, Break Even, and Profit 8:30am-

4:30pm ^ Montana Manufacturing Extension Center, 2310 University Way, Bldg. 2, Bozeman ^ $150 for Prospera Members, $175 for non-members ^ Understand why and how to benchmark your company performance. Establish the difference between “making a profit” and “having cash” volume and costs.

Montana Women’s Business Center Trainings 8:30am-4:30pm ^ Montana

Manufacturing Extension Center, 2310 University Way, Bldg. 2, Bozeman ^ $175 non members ^ Profit Mastery: Business Finance for Small Businesses

Baby Bistro 11am-1pm ^ Bozeman Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org A free breastfeeding support group.

Pub 317, 321 E Main St Ste 317, Bozeman ^ 21+ ^ (406) 582-8898 ^ www.pub317. com Bring your friends and test your smarts during our Wednesday night trivia. Topics include sports, history, politics, geography, science, animals, and many more.

Babies & Books 11:15am-noon ^ Belgrade

Trivia Night 7-9pm ^ Pine Creek Lodge,

Toast Masters noon-1:10pm ^ Owenhouse

2496 E. River Road, Livingston ^ $5 per team ^ (406) 222-3628 ^ www.pinecreeklodgemontana.com 50 cent wings, $2 Miller High Lifes or Pabst Blue Ribbons, cash and other prizes. Teams of 1-8 members.

“Lost Human: Slavery In Our Own Backyard” 7-9pm ^ MSU SUB (Strand Union

Building), 280 Strand Union, Bozeman ^ (406) 994-4636 ^ www.montana.edu/sub/ Discussion panel seeking to start a conversation about human trafficking in Montana.

Trivia Night 8pm ^ Rockin’ R Bar, 211 E.

Main St, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ (406) 587-9355 ^ www.rockingrbar.com Trivia followed by a live DJ 10pm- close.

Trivia 8pm ^ The Molly Brown, 703 W.

Babcock, Bozeman ^ (406) 552-7362 Bar tabs for the top 3 teams.

Karaoke Night 9pm ^ Bacchus Pub, 105

W Main St, Bozeman ^ (406) 522-0079 ^ www.bacchuspubbozeman.com Whether you’ve “Got Friends in Low Places” or you’re “Just a Small Town Girl, Livin’ In a Lonely World” our karaoke caters to all. Talented to tone deft.

Open Mic 10:30pm ^ The Haufbrau, 22

S 8th Ave, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 21+ ^ (406) 587-4931 ^ www.facebook.com Bozeman’s only bar with live music 7 nights a week. Open Mics are Sunday, Monday and Wednesday.

Thursday, Mar. 2 Dan Egan Steeps Camps Big Sky Resort, 50 Big Sky Resort Road, Big Sky ^ (800) 5484486 ^ www.bigskyresort.com Ski Clinic.

Community Library, ^ FREE ^ (406)3884346 ^ belgradelibrary.org Bring your little one, ages birth to 36 months. Songs, rhymes, and finger plays. Each story time is followed by active play time and socialization.

ACE Hardware (Downstairs), ^ FREE ^ All Ages ^ The mission of a Toastmaster Club is to provide a mutually supportive and positive learning environment in which every member has the opportunity to develop communication and lead.

“Let’s Help Our Children Become Readers” noon-1pm ^ Willson School, 404 East Main, Bozeman ^ Talk by Cindy Christen, Bozeman Public Library

DIY (Do It Yourself) Club 4:30-5:30pm ^

Bozeman Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ ages 10-16 ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org This club is an extension of the diy.org website and app, where you can create projects, share then with other DIYers, and earn patches.

The Vibe Quartet 6pm ^ 406 Brewing,

111 S. Oak St., Bozeman ^ no cover ^ www.406brewingcompany.com Live local music!

Getting to Know your GoPro 6-7:30pm ^

REI, 2220 Tschache Lane, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ (406) 587-1938 ^ www.rei.com GoPro Basics

Art on the Rocks Series- Margaritas & Macrame 6:30-8:30pm ^ Rockin’ R Bar,

211 E. Main St, Bozeman ^ $35 members/ $40 non-member ^ 21+ ^ (406) 587-9355 ^ www.rockingrbar.com f you are creative but need direction and don’t want the commitment of a multi-week course, this is the class for you! Cost includes supplies and 2 signature cocktails.

Bluegrass Thursdays w/The Bridger Creek Boys 7-9pm ^ Red Tractor Pizza, 1007 W Main St, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ All Ages ^ (406) 359-1999 ^ www.redtractorpizza.

All listings are subject to change. Check ahead for full details.


BRI NG I N G IN T E R E S T IN G A RT & CU LT U RE T O PEO P L E H U N G R Y F OR S O ME T H IN G N E W ... com The Bridger Creek Boys draw inspiration from traditional artists such as Dock Boggs and Bill Monroe, as well as more contemporary artists like the Grateful Dead, Steve Earle, and The Band.

Speaker Series: A History of Floating the Yellowstone 7-9pm ^ Pine Creek Lodge,

2496 E. River Road, Livingston ^ (406) 2223628 ^ www.pinecreeklodgemontana.com Speaker series featuring Robert Wiltshire, founder of the Invasive Species Action Network.

Meet Me in St. Louis 7-9pm ^ Petra

Academy, ^ $10 general admission; $20 reserved seating ^ All Ages ^ 406-582-8165 ^ www.petraacademy.com Petra Academy is proud to present four performances of Meet Me in St. Louis.

Buffalo Ruckus 8pm ^ Live From the

Divide, 627 East Peach Street, Bozeman ^ $27.50 (at Cactus Records) ^ livefromthedivide.com Live music.

The Fresh Boys & Dusty Green Bones Band 8pm ^ The Filling Station, 2005 N. Rouse Ave, Bozeman ^ $7 ^ 21+ ^ (406) 587-0585 Formed in the winter of 2013, Dusty Green Bones Band is a five piece electric newgrass group based out of California’s Bay Area.

Kalyn Beasley 8pm ^ The Murray Bar, 201

W Park St, Livingston ^ (406) 222-6433 ^ www.themurraybar.com Wyoming songwriter.

Live Music 9-11pm ^ Bacchus Pub, 105

W Main St, Bozeman ^ (406) 522-0079 ^ www.bacchuspubbozeman.com Come enjoy live music at the Bacchus Pub.

Friday, Mar. 3

Read-Sing-Play! Preschool Storytime

11:15am ^ Bozeman Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ Preschool ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org Join other preschooler & their parents for reading, singing and learning.

Walk for the Health Of It noon-1pm ^

Peets Hill (base area), ^ FREE ^ All Ages ^ gvlt.org Getting outside for a walk can be one of the easiest ways to stay healthy. Join us for our weekly trail walking group. This is a fun, casual way to get moving during the work day.

Pokemon Club 4:30-5:30pm ^ Bozeman

Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www. bozemanlibrary.org Love Pokemon? Meet other Pokemon fans Fridays at 4:30 in the library for all kinds of Pokemon fun.

Claudia Williams 5:30-8:30pm ^ Kountry

Korner Cafe, 81820 Gallatin Road, Bozeman ^ all ages ^ (406) 586-2281 Claudia from Montana Rose, live music while you dine.

Andrew Gromiller & The Organically Grown 6-8pm ^ Wild Joe’s Coffee House,

18 W Main St, Bozeman ^ $5 ^ (406) 5861212 ^ wildjoescoffee.com Live music.

Dan Egan Steeps Camps Big Sky Resort, 50 Big Sky Resort Road, Big Sky ^ (800) 5484486 ^ www.bigskyresort.com Ski Clinic.

Reggie Watts Warren Miller Performing

Arts Center, 45465 Gallatin Road, Gallatin Gateway ^ 406-995-6345 ^ www.warrenmillerpac.org Live music.

Read-Sing-Play! Preschool Storytime

10:15am ^ Bozeman Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ Preschool ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org Join other preschooler & their parents for reading, singing and learning.

Western Electric 9pm ^ The Murray Bar,

201 W Park St, Livingston ^ (406) 222-6433 ^ www.themurraybar.com Classic country

Dan Egan Steeps Camps Big Sky Resort, 50 Big Sky Resort Road, Big Sky ^ (800) 5484486 ^ www.bigskyresort.com Ski Clinic.

Snowshoe Suffle Madison Base Area, ^ Bring out the dogs and help raise money for the Heart of the Valley animal shelter.

The Max 9pm ^ Sacajawea Hotel, 5 N

Pinhead Classic Bridger Bowl, 15795 Bridger Canyon Road, Bozeman ^ 800-2239609 ^ bridgerbowl.com Telemark ski festival and dual slalom race.

Saturday, Mar. 4

Bozeman Winter Farmers’ Market 9am-

Main St, Three Forks ^ A wide variety of choice danceable covers.

Quenby & the West of Wayland Ban

Chico Hot Springs, 20 Miles South of Livingston, Pray ^ (406) 333-4933 ^ www. chicohotsprings.com Live music.

Montana Manouche Uncorked Wine &

Cheese Bar, 212 W. Park St, Livingston ^ 406-222-5418 ^ thegourmetcellar.com/ wine-bar/ Gypsy jazz.

noon ^ Emerson Ballroom, 111 S. Grand, Bozeman ^ (406) 587-9797 ^ www.theemerson.org Find hot breakfast, ethically sourced coffee and tea, fresh greens & vegetables, local grassfed meats, wild-caught fish, fresh eggs, cow & goat cheese, fresh pasta, honey, jams & preserves, Montana grown grains & oils, baked goods (gluten free too!), soaps & salves, wool, yarn, live music, and much more.

7pm ^ Brick Breeden Fieldhouse, 1 Bobcat Circle, Bozeman ^ (406) 994-7117 ^ www. brickbreeden.com Go Cats!

Gift Of Gab with Landon Wordswell 7pm-

Bozeman Icedogs vs. Billings Bulls 7:30pm

Norris ^ (406) 685-3303 ^ www.norrishotsprings.com Singer/songwriter

East Main Street, Bozeman ^ no cover ^ 21+ ^ (406) 587-9996 Live local music

Norris ^ (406) 685-3303 ^ www.norrishotsprings.com Original Folk/ Rock

MSU Women’s Basketball v. Weber State

Virginia Warner Uncorked Wine & Cheese

Kalyn Beasley Norris Hot Springs, Rr 84,

The Mighty Flick 9pm ^ Eagles Lodge, 316

Joe Schwem Norris Hot Springs, Rr 84,

8pm ^ Hope Lutheran Church, 2152 Graf St., Bozeman ^ $12 adult/ $5 children ^ Family ^ Family friendly play.

2am ^ Cat’s Paw, 721 N 7th Ave, Bozeman ^ $10 ^ 21+ ^ (406) 586-3542 ^ www. facebook.com Gift of Gab (Of Blackalicious) with Landon Wordswell live at The Cat’s Paw. Tickets only at the door. Doors at 7pm.

Bar, 212 W. Park St, Livingston ^ 406-2225418 ^ thegourmetcellar.com/wine-bar/ Blues music.

Bozeman, 225 E Main St, Bozeman ^ no cover ^ 21+ ^ (406) 586-8400 ^ www.gallatinpost14.com Live local music

Transylmania Youth Dinner Theater 6-

Chico Hot Springs, 20 Miles South of Livingston, Pray ^ (406) 333-4933 ^ www. chicohotsprings.com Live music.

Quenby & the West of Wayland Ban

Comstock Lode 9pm ^ American Legion

^ Haynes Pavilion | Gallatin County Fairgrounds, 901 North Black, Bozeman ^ All Ages ^ (406) 582-3270 ^ www.gallatin. mt.gov Local hockey!

Brothers Comatose 8pm ^ The Filling Sta-

tion, 2005 N. Rouse Ave, Bozeman ^ $12 at Cactus Records/ $15 at the door ^ 21+ ^ (406) 587-0585 Americana/ Folk/ Bluegrass from San Francisco

Martin Sexton 8pm ^ The Ellen Theatre,

17 W. Main St., Bozeman ^ (406) 585-5885 ^ www.theellentheatre.com Live music.

“Marjorie Prime” 8pm ^ Verge Theater,

2304 N. 7th Ave, Bozeman ^ $14 ^ (406) 587-0737 ^ vergetheater.com The thoughtprovoking drama, a 2015 finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, confronts issues of aging and identity in a not-too-distant and unsettling future.

All listings are subject to change. Check ahead for full details.

BozemanMagazine.com March 2017 39


GREATER YELLOWSTONE COMMUNITY

EVENTS CALENDAR Scout Day 2017 9am-2pm ^ Museum of

the Rockies, 600 West Kagy Boulevard, Bozeman ^ (406) 994-2251 ^ www. museumoftherockies.org A day at the MOR just for Scouts!

HealthCare Connections-Mobile Health Screenings 9am-1pm ^ Three Forks, ^

Take Control of Photos for Mac 10-11am

^ F-11 Photo, 2612 West Main, Bozeman ^ $24.99 ^ 18+ ^ (888) 548-0203 ^ f11photo. com Get organized and learn how to use Apple’s Photos App on your Mac, iPhone and iPad. Please pre-register.

Saturday Stories 11:15am-noon ^ Boze-

FREE ^ all ages 18+ ^ 406-414-2100 HealthCare Connections offers free health screenings and select immunizations for those who need it, particularly the un-insured and under-insured.

man Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www. bozemanlibrary.org Join us with the whole family for this all-ages storytime.

Free Tax Help 9:30-11am ^ Jake Jabs Col-

Serving Our Veterans One Step at a Time

lege of Business and Entrepreneurship, ^ FREE ^ (406) 994-4421 Accounting students from MSU’s Jake Jabs College of Business and Entrepreneurship are offering free help preparing tax returns for MSU students and individuals who made less than $58,000 last year.

Books & Babies 10-11am ^ Bozeman

Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ 0-2 ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www. bozemanlibrary.org A fun, relaxed storytime for caretakers and babies ages 0-2.

Montana International Children’s Film Festival 10am-3pm ^ Bozeman Public

Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ All ages ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www. bozemanlibrary.org Children of all ages are invited to enjoy 4 hours of film viewing at the Bozeman Public Library on Saturday, March 4th in the large conference room. Children must be accompanied.

1-4pm ^ MSU Shroyer Gym, 1 Bobcat Circle, Bozeman ^ $5 suggested ^ Phi Upsilon Omicron of Montana State University presents a walk for Veterans.

Silly Moose Improv Comedy 2pm ^ Verge Theater, 2304 N. 7th Ave, Bozeman ^ $7 ^ All Ages ^ (406) 587-0737 ^ vergetheater. com Family friendly improv show.

Dream Big with Science on Screen 2-4pm

^ The Ellen Theatre, ^ FREE ^ All Ages ^ 406-581-2188 ^ www.bozemanfilmsociety. org Through the eyes of four engineers, Dream Big (originally produced for IMAX Theaters) takes viewers on a journey of discovery to underwater robots and smart, sustainable cities.

12th Annual Cody Dieruf Benefit Live and Silent Auction 5pm ^ The Commons at

Auditorium, 404 W. Main St., Bozeman ^ Adults $27+, Students $22 ^ Join the Bozeman Symphony & Symphonic Choir for an evening to remember. A struggle with Fate, a plea for peace, and an epic orchestral masterpiece await.

Pert’ Near Sandstone 8pm ^ The Filling

Station, 2005 N. Rouse Ave, Bozeman ^ $12 at Cactus Records/ $15 at the door ^ 21+ ^ (406) 587-0585 American Stringband/ Old-Time/ Bluegrass

“Marjorie Prime” 8pm ^ Verge Theater,

2304 N. 7th Ave, Bozeman ^ $14 ^ (406) 587-0737 ^ vergetheater.com The thoughtprovoking drama, a 2015 finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, confronts issues of aging and identity in a not-too-distant and unsettling future.

Comstock Lode 9pm ^ American Legion

Bozeman, 225 E Main St, Bozeman ^ no cover ^ 21+ ^ (406) 586-8400 ^ www.gallatinpost14.com Live local music

The Mighty Flick 9pm ^ Eagles Lodge, 316 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ no cover ^ 21+ ^ (406) 587-9996 Live local music

Swingley Latin-Funk-Jazz 9pm ^ The

Murray Bar, 201 W Park St, Livingston ^ (406) 222-6433 ^ www.themurraybar.com Live music.

Baxter and Love, 1794 Baxter Lane, Bozeman ^ (406) 451-0067 ^ www.thecommonsbozeman.com Fundraiser for The Cody Dieruf Benefit Foundation for Cystic Fibrosis. Raffles, door prizes, music, and food.

Sugar Daddies 9pm ^ Sacajawea Hotel, 5

Dream Big with Science on Screen 5pm

Aaron Williams Norris Hot Springs, Rr

^ The Ellen Theatre, ^ FREE ^ All Ages ^ 406-581-2188 ^ www.bozemanfilmsociety. org Through the eyes of four engineers, Dream Big (originally produced for IMAX Theaters) takes viewers on a journey of discovery to underwater robots and smart, sustainable cities.

N Main St, Three Forks ^ Live music.

Sunday, Mar. 5 84, Norris ^ (406) 685-3303 ^ www.norrishotsprings.com Rock/ Reggae/ Folk

Remote Control Car Racing noon-6pm ^

Bob Britton 5:30-8:30pm ^ Kountry Korner Cafe, 81820 Gallatin Road, Bozeman ^ all ages ^ (406) 586-2281 Bob plays piano while you dine.

Lazy Suzy 6-8pm ^ MAP Brewing Co, 510

Bozeman Learn to Skate 12:30-2:10pm ^

Saturday Dance Social 7-10pm ^ The MAC - Montana Movement Arts Center, 1871 S. 22nd Street Ste. A-2, Bozeman ^ $5 ^ All Ages ^ (406) 551-6077 ^ themacmontana. com Kick off the month with a family-friendly dance lesson and social dancing. 7:00 pm lesson ,open dancing at 7:30 (partner and line dancing) to upbeat country, swing, ballroom mix.

SwingCats Saturday Night Swing Dance

7-11pm ^ Romney Gym, 3rd Floor Dance Studio, ^ FREE lesson and dance with original American swing dances like Lindy Hop, East Coast Swing, Balboa, Charleston, and more!

Haynes Pavilion, ^ $240- 12 WEEK SESSION $150- 6 WEEK SESSION ^ www.bozemanskating.com Learn to Skate! All skills levels welcome. Classes include basic skills, hockey skills, and adult skills. Go to www.bozemanskating.com for more information or call 640-0475.

Family Movie- Monsters, Inc. 2pm ^ The

Ellen Theatre, 17 W. Main St., Bozeman ^ FREE ^ Family ^ (406) 585-5885 ^ www. theellentheatre.com No tickets needed.

Songs of Destiny 2:30pm ^ Willson

Live Music 5:30-8:30pm ^ Kountry Korner

Cafe, 81820 Gallatin Road, Bozeman ^ all ages ^ (406) 586-2281 Local musicians play live music while you dine each Sunday.

Todd Green 6-8pm ^ MAP Brewing Co, 510 Manley Rd, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ All Ages ^ (406) 587-4070 ^ www.mapbrewing.com Live music.

Bingo Night 6-8pm ^ Pine Creek Lodge,

2496 E. River Road, Livingston ^ $5/card ^ (406) 222-3628 ^ www.pinecreeklodgemontana.com Cash and other prizes.

Bridger Mountain Big Band 7-9:30pm ^

Eagles Lodge, 316 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ no cover ^ (406) 587-9996 Live music each Sunday.

Of Love and Nature, Winter Choral Concert 7:30pm ^ Hope Lutheran Church, 2152 Graf St., Bozeman ^ The MSU Chorale, Montanans, and the Manhattan Christian Concert Choir will join forces to present a winter choral concert.

Open Mic 10:30pm ^ The Haufbrau, 22

S 8th Ave, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 21+ ^ (406) 587-4931 ^ www.facebook.com Bozeman’s only bar with live music 7 nights a week. Open Mics are Sunday, Monday and Wednesday.

Monday, Mar. 6 LEGO Club 3:45-5pm ^ Bozeman Public

Bozeman American Legion, ^ $10 Racing; $10 Rental Car ^ All Ages ^ 406-579-2707 ^ www.facebook.com Mini-z Racing ever Sunday at the American Legion upstairs. Setup and practice will be from 12pm - 1:30pm. Racing will start at 2pm. The club will have 4 rental cars (first come).

Manley Rd, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ All Ages ^ (406) 587-4070 ^ www.mapbrewing.com Live music.

40 March 2017 BozemanMagazine.com

Songs of Destiny 7:30pm ^ Willson

Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org For kids who love to build; LEGOs provided!

Teen Writers 4-5pm ^ Bozeman Public

Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ Teens ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www. bozemanlibrary.org This teen-led group meets every Monday in the Teen Study Room.

Pints with Purpose 5-8pm ^ Bridger Brewing, 1609 S 11th Ave, Bozeman ^ All ages ^ (406) 587-2124 ^ www.bridgerbrewing. com Every Monday night Bridger Brewing donates $1 from every pint sold to a non-profit or charity. Check our website (bridgerbrewing.com) for details.

Bart Budwig, Ovando and Jeffrey Martin 5pm ^ The Murray Bar, 201 W Park St, Livingston ^ (406) 222-6433 ^ www.themurraybar.com Songwriters.

Free Tax Help 5:30-7pm ^ Jake Jabs Col-

lege of Business and Entrepreneurship, ^ FREE ^ (406) 994-4421 Accounting students from MSU’s Jake Jabs College of Business and Entrepreneurship are offering free help preparing tax returns for MSU students and individuals who made less than $58,000 last year.

Auditorium, 404 W. Main St., Bozeman ^ Adults $27+, Students $22 ^ Join the Bozeman Symphony & Symphonic Choir for an evening to remember. A struggle with Fate, a plea for peace, and an epic orchestral masterpiece await.

All listings are subject to change. Check ahead for full details.


Bozeman Writers’ Group 6-8pm ^ Boze-

man Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www. bozemanlibrary.org The group welcomes all levels of writers, and encourages the free exchange of ideas among writers in the Board Room on the second floor.

Fitness with Friends: Self-Paced Cardio

6-7pm ^ Belgrade Community Library, 106 N Broadway, Belgrade ^ FREE ^ Adults ^ (406) 388-4346 ^ www.belgradelibrary. org Self-paced cardio program with former aerobic instructor, Gale Bacon. Free and open to the public.

Ballroom & Swing Dance Classes 6-9pm ^

The MAC - Montana Movement Arts Center, 1871 S. 22nd Street Ste. A-2, Bozeman ^ $10/$8 students ^ All Ages ^ (406) 5516077 ^ themacmontana.com Beginning and continuing partner dance classes including Waltz, Swing, Cha Cha, Foxtrot and more. One hour class, take the series or drop in for a single session.

Spanish Class with Kristin ND Wolf 7:30-

8:30pm ^ Lockhorn Cider House, 21 South Wallace Avenue, Bozeman ^ $130/punchcard (includes 8 classes and one glass of cider/class) ^ 21+ ^ (406) 404-1168 ^ lockhornhardcider.com Sip cider and hone your Spanish speaking skills. All levels welcome.

Trivia 8-10pm ^ Bacchus Pub, 105 W Main St, Bozeman ^ 21+ ^ (406) 522-0079 ^ www.bacchuspubbozeman.com Come in and join us every Monday night and use whatever brainpower you have left from the weekend to battle with Bozeman’s best and brightest for Bacchus VIP money.

Open Mic 10:30pm ^ The Haufbrau, 22

S 8th Ave, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 21+ ^ (406) 587-4931 ^ www.facebook.com Bozeman’s only bar with live music 7 nights a week. Open Mics are Sunday, Monday and Wednesday.

Tuesday, Mar. 7 Books & Babies 10-11am ^ Bozeman

Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 0-2 ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www. bozemanlibrary.org A fun, relaxed story time for caretakers and babies 0-2.

Tours for Tots 10-11am ^ Museum of the

Rockies, 600 West Kagy Boulevard, Bozeman ^ Included with admission ^ 3-5 ^ (406) 994-2251 ^ www.museumoftherockies.org Museum learning for 3-5 year olds.

Kids’ Chess Club 3:30-5pm ^ Bozeman

Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ K-12 ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org If you are in grades K-12 you are invited to Chess Club.

Summer Camp & Activity Roundup 2017 4-7pm ^ Gallatin Valley Mall, 2825 West Main St., Bozeman ^ (406) 586-4565 ^ gallatinvalleymall.com A free family event! Performances, kids activities and more!

SW MT Crohn’s & Colitis Community Support/Education Group 5:30-7pm ^

Bozeman Health Deaconess Hospital PINE ROOM, ^ Free ^ all ages ^ 406-209-0277 The group offers support and education for those suffering with inflammatory bowel disease and their friends and family.

Rich Mayo 6-8pm ^ Kountry Korner Cafe,

81820 Gallatin Road, Bozeman ^ all ages ^ (406) 586-2281 Rich plays music while you dine.

Hazel Hue 6-8pm ^ MAP Brewing Co, 510 Manley Rd, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ All Ages ^ (406) 587-4070 ^ www.mapbrewing.com Live music.

Cribbage Night 6:30-9pm ^ Eagles Lodge,

316 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ $8 ^ 21+ ^ (406) 587-9996 Open cribbage tournaments every Tuesday evening. Sign up at 6:25, start at 6:30! Come play five games with us! $8 buy-in, 100% payout, high hand bonus, and lots of good times!

Chord Rustlers Rehearsals 7pm ^ Boze-

man Catholic Community Center, 210 S. Grand Ave, Bozeman ^ If you’re a fellow who loves to sing join us in singing four-part harmony on Tuesday evenings at 7:00 pm.

The Best Way to Predict the Future is to Design it 7-8pm ^ Bozeman Public Library,

626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ All Ages ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org Permaculture for sustainable living and beyond: Free permaculture presentation in the small conference room at the library. If you want to learn more about permaculture and how you can live a more sustainable life, join us!

Rockin’ R Bingo 7pm ^ Rockin’ R Bar, 211 E. Main St, Bozeman ^ (406) 587-9355 ^ www.rockingrbar.com Bingo night at the Rockin’ R!

Free Dream Interpretation 7:30pm ^

Willson School, 404 East Main, Bozeman ^ Talk by Bridget Wilkinson, Bozeman Area Community Foundation Executive Director

Lockhorn Cider House, 21 South Wallace Avenue, Bozeman ^ (406) 404-1168 ^ lockhornhardcider.com A small group of dream interpretation students are offering free dream interpretations in order to apply what they’ve been studying.

Books & Babies 1-2pm ^ Bozeman Public

Elton John 8pm ^ Brick Breeden Field-

Creating a Culture of Giving noon-1pm ^

Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 0-2 ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www. bozemanlibrary.org A fun, relaxed story time for caretakers and babies 0-2.

house, 1 Bobcat Circle, Bozeman ^ $49.50$149.50 ^ All Ages ^ (406) 994-7117 ^ www.brickbreeden.com One of the most successful artists on the road today, Elton and his band perform a concert you will never forget.

All listings are subject to change. Check ahead for full details.

Live Music 8-10pm ^ Bacchus Pub, 105

W Main St, Bozeman ^ (406) 522-0079 ^ www.bacchuspubbozeman.com Come enjoy live music at the Bacchus Pub.

2017 Take the LEAD Series 8-10pm ^ Bozeman Chamber of Commerce, 2000 Commerce Way, Bozeman ^ $99/$198 ^ (406) 586-5421 ^ www.bozemanchamber.com Leadership Flexibility: One Size Does Not Fit All

Karaoke 9pm ^ Bar IX, 311 E Main St,

Bozeman ^ (406) 551-2185 ^ www.bar-ix. com Make your voice heard at Bozeman’s Choice for karaoke every Tuesday from 9-close.

Wednesday, Mar. 8 Sensational Babies 10-11am ^ Museum

of the Rockies, 600 West Kagy Boulevard, Bozeman ^ Free for members, $5 ^ Birth - 36 months ^ (406) 994-2251 ^ www.museumoftherockies.org Read, talk, sing and play with your baby through sensory awareness activities and explorations designed specifically for newborns, one- and two-year-olds.

Little Ones Storytime 10:15-11am ^ Bozeman Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 2-4 ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org Short storytime for ages 2-4.

Little Ones Storytime 11:15am-noon ^

Bozeman Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 2-4 ^ 406-5707752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org Short storytime for ages 2-4.

Woman-Owned Business Tour: bisl + Indulgence noon-1pm ^ bisl food, ^ FREE ^

Women ^ Women-Owned Business Tour featuring bisl Food & Indulgence Salon

Minecraft Meetup 3:45-5pm ^ Boze-

man Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www. bozemanlibrary.org Play Minecraft with other kids - bring your own device, or use one of ours!

Wii Wednesday 4-5:30pm ^ Bozeman Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org Kids of all ages are invited.

R.E.A.D. to a Dog 4-5pm ^ Bozeman Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org Intermountain Therapy Dogs are available to be read to by kids.

Bozeman Learn to Skate 5:10-6:20pm ^

Haynes Pavilion, ^ $240- 12 WEEK SESSION $150- 6 WEEK SESSION ^ www.bozemanskating.com Learn to Skate! All skills levels welcome. Classes include basic skills, hockey skills, and adult skills. Go to www.bozemanskating.com for more information or call 640-0475.

Free Tax Help 5:30-7pm ^ Jake Jabs Col-

lege of Business and Entrepreneurship, ^ FREE ^ (406) 994-4421 Accounting students from MSU’s Jake Jabs College of Business and Entrepreneurship are offering free help preparing tax returns for MSU students and individuals who made less than $58,000 last year.

Music & Mussels 5:30-8pm ^ Bridger

Brewing, 1609 S 11th Ave, Bozeman ^ (406) 587-2124 ^ www.bridgerbrewing. com Live music and mussels!

Fitness with Friends: Self-Paced Cardio6-

7pm ^ Belgrade Community Library, 106 N Broadway, Belgrade ^ FREE ^ Adults ^ (406) 388-4346 ^ www.belgradelibrary. org Self-paced cardio program with former aerobic instructor, Gale Bacon. Free and open to the public.

Dan Henry 6-8pm ^ Outlaw Brewing, 2876

N 27th, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ All Ages, 21+ to drink ^ (406) 577-2403 ^ outlaw-brewing. com Live, Local Music

Ski and Snowboard Tuning Basics

6-7:30pm ^ REI, 2220 Tschache Lane, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ (406) 587-1938 ^ www.rei. com Introductory class to learn how to care for your gear.

The Fundamentals of Successful Investing 6:15-8:15pm ^ Montana State University, Bozeman ^ $79.00 or register with another person for $129.00 ^ (406) 994-0211 ^ www.montana.edu At the completion of this course, you will have an understanding of the basic process for constructing a portfolio and the various methods used to select specific investments to put your plan into practice.

Pickin’ in the Parks 6:30-9:30pm ^ The

Story Mansion, 811 S. Willson, Bozeman ^ Free ^ all ^ 406-582-2910 ^ www. friendsofthestory.org Pickers, singers, listeners, dancers, on-lookers of all abilities are welcome.

Bozeman’s Original Pub Trivia 7-9:30pm ^

Pub 317, 321 E Main St Ste 317, Bozeman ^ 21+ ^ (406) 582-8898 ^ www.pub317. com Bring your friends and test your smarts during our Wednesday night trivia. Topics include sports, history, politics, geography, science, animals, and many more.

Meet the Author- Kevin Canty 7pm ^

Country Bookshelf, 28 W. Main Street, Bozeman ^ (406)587-0166 ^ www. countrybookshelf.com Meet the author of The Underworld.

Free Gardening Presentation 7-8pm ^

Lockhorn Cider House, 21 South Wallace Avenue, Bozeman ^ (406) 404-1168 ^ lockhornhardcider.com Get Your Garden Started: The 7 questions you should ask (and answer) before getting your hands dirty in the garden.

Trivia Night 8pm ^ Rockin’ R Bar, 211 E.

Main St, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ (406) 587-9355 ^ www.rockingrbar.com Trivia followed by a live DJ 10pm- close.

BozemanMagazine.com March 2017 41


GREATER YELLOWSTONE COMMUNITY

EVENTS CALENDAR Trivia 8pm ^ The Molly Brown, 703 W.

Babcock, Bozeman ^ (406) 552-7362 Bar tabs for the top 3 teams.

Karaoke Night 9pm ^ Bacchus Pub, 105

W Main St, Bozeman ^ (406) 522-0079 ^ www.bacchuspubbozeman.com Whether you’ve “Got Friends in Low Places” or you’re “Just a Small Town Girl, Livin’ In a Lonely World” our karaoke caters to all. Talented to tone deft.

Open Mic 10:30pm ^ The Haufbrau, 22

S 8th Ave, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 21+ ^ (406) 587-4931 ^ www.facebook.com Bozeman’s only bar with live music 7 nights a week. Open Mics are Sunday, Monday and Wednesday.

Thursday, Mar. 9 Tours for Tots 10-11am ^ Museum of the

Rockies, 600 West Kagy Boulevard, Bozeman ^ Included with admission ^ 3-5 ^ (406) 994-2251 ^ www.museumoftherockies.org Museum learning for 3-5 year olds.

Baby Bistro 11am-1pm ^ Bozeman Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org A free breastfeeding support group.

Babies & Books 11:15am-noon ^ Belgrade Community Library, ^ FREE ^ (406)3884346 ^ belgradelibrary.org Bring your little one, ages birth to 36 months. Songs, rhymes, and finger plays. Each story time is followed by active play time and socialization.

Toast Masters noon-1:10pm ^ Owenhouse ACE Hardware (Downstairs), ^ FREE ^ All Ages ^ The mission of a Toastmaster Club is to provide a mutually supportive and positive learning environment in which every member has the opportunity to develop communication and lead.

DIY (Do It Yourself) Club 4:30-5:30pm ^

Bozeman Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ ages 10-16 ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org This club is an extension of the diy.org website and app, where you can create projects, share then with other DIYers, and earn patches.

The Vibe Quartet 6pm ^ 406 Brewing, 111 S. Oak St., Bozeman ^ no cover ^ www.406brewingcompany.com

Extreme History Project Lecture Series

Mystery Readers’ Book Club 6:30pm ^

Belgrade Community Library, ^ FREE ^ 18+ ^ (406)388-4346 ^ belgradelibrary.org Book discussion, opinion-sharing, refreshments, and lots of fun!

Bluegrass Thursdays w/The Bridger Creek Boys 7-9pm ^ Red Tractor Pizza, 1007 W

11:15am ^ Bozeman Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ Preschool ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org Join other preschooler & their parents for reading, singing and learning.

Walk for the Health Of It noon-1pm ^

Main St, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ All Ages ^ (406) 359-1999 ^ www.redtractorpizza. com The Bridger Creek Boys draw inspiration from traditional artists such as Dock Boggs and Bill Monroe, as well as more contemporary artists like the Grateful Dead, Steve Earle, and The Band.

Peets Hill (base area), ^ FREE ^ All Ages ^ gvlt.org Getting outside for a walk can be one of the easiest ways to stay healthy. Join us for our weekly trail walking group. This is a fun, casual way to get moving during the work day.

An Evening with Groucho 7:30pm ^ The

Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www. bozemanlibrary.org Love Pokemon? Meet other Pokemon fans Fridays at 4:30 in the library for all kinds of Pokemon fun.

Ellen Theatre, 17 W. Main St., Bozeman ^ $19.50-$24.50 ^ (406) 585-5885 ^ www. theellentheatre.com Mr. Ferrante has been portraying Groucho Marx for decades, winning his first of many awards for the role in 1987. However, the greatest testament to Ferrante’s work in An Evening with Groucho is the sheer volume of critics’ praise.

Jon Wayne & The Pain 8pm ^ The Filling

Station, 2005 N. Rouse Ave, Bozeman ^ $12 advance, $15 at the door ^ 21+ ^ (406) 587-0585 Electronic reggae-dub innovators, Jon Wayne and The Pain have been mesmerizing fans for nearly a decade, with their signature JWP cosmicblend of electronic beats.

Erin & The Project 8pm ^ The Murray Bar,

201 W Park St, Livingston ^ (406) 222-6433 ^ www.themurraybar.com Indie Soul-Ternative

Live Music 9-11pm ^ Bacchus Pub, 105

W Main St, Bozeman ^ (406) 522-0079 ^ www.bacchuspubbozeman.com Come enjoy live music at the Bacchus Pub.

Friday, Mar. 10 Ten Years Gone Chico Hot Springs, 20

Miles South of Livingston, Pray ^ (406) 333-4933 ^ www.chicohotsprings.com Live music.

MSU Fridays MSU SUB (Strand Union

Building), 280 Strand Union, Bozeman ^ (406) 994-4636 ^ www.montana.edu/sub/ Open to prospective students.

Bob Britten Uncorked Wine & Cheese Bar, 212 W. Park St, Livingston ^ 406-222-5418 ^ thegourmetcellar.com/wine-bar/ Jazz/ Eclectic piano

6-7pm ^ Museum of the Rockies, 600 West Kagy Boulevard, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ (406) 994-2251 ^ www.museumoftherockies.org Lecture series at the MOR.

Tim Kirwan Norris Hot Springs, Rr 84,

The Landscapes and Ancient Cultures of the Desert Southwest 6-7:30pm ^ REI,

Read-Sing-Play! Preschool Storytime

2220 Tschache Lane, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ (406) 587-1938 ^ www.rei.com Presentation about the redrock country.

Read-Sing-Play! Preschool Storytime

Norris ^ (406) 685-3303 ^ www.norrishotsprings.com Folk/ Country/ Americana

10:15am ^ Bozeman Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ Preschool ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org Join other preschooler & their parents for reading, singing and learning.

Pokemon Club 4:30-5:30pm ^ Bozeman

Free Friday Night 5-8pm ^ Children’s

Museum of Bozeman, 202 S. Willson Ave., Bozeman ^ Free ^ (406) 522-9087 ^ www. cmbozeman.org EVERY second Friday of EVERY month

Gillette Promotions Gun Show 5-8pm ^

Gallatin County Fairgrounds, 901 N. Black, Bozeman ^ $5 adult/ $1 children ^ (406) 582-3270 ^ www.gallatin.mt.gov Gun show open to public. Friday-Sunday

Claudia Williams 5:30-8:30pm ^ Kountry

Korner Cafe, 81820 Gallatin Road, Bozeman ^ all ages ^ (406) 586-2281 Claudia from Montana Rose, live music while you dine.

Adlib’s Micwarz 7pm ^ Zebra Cocktail

Lounge, 321 E Main St, Bozeman ^ $9 (at Cactus Records) ^ 21+ ^ (406) 585-8851 ^ www.zebracocktaillounge.com Live music.

Open Door Theatre presents “Helium”

7:30pm ^ Kaleidoscope Youth Theatre, 1602 W. Beall St., Bozeman ^ (406) 5873642 ^ www.kytbozeman.com A retired high school chemistry teacher and her family cope with an 80-year-old mind that is no longer bound by space and time.

^ The Filling Station, 2005 N. Rouse Ave, Bozeman ^ $8 (at Cactus Records) $10 (at door ) ^ 21+ ^ (406) 587-0585 Live music.

Heather Lingle Band 9pm ^ The Murray

Bar, 201 W Park St, Livingston ^ (406) 222-6433 ^ www.themurraybar.com Butte Americana Country

Sunrise Karaoke 9pm ^ Sacajawea Hotel, 5 N Main St, Three Forks ^ Karaoke night!

Saturday, Mar. 11 Ten Years Gone Chico Hot Springs, 20

Miles South of Livingston, Pray ^ (406) 333-4933 ^ www.chicohotsprings.com Live music.

Neil Filo Beddow Norris Hot Springs, Rr 84, Norris ^ (406) 685-3303 ^ www.norrishotsprings.com Original Folk/ Rock

Headwater’s IFSA Junior Freeride Big Sky Resort, 50 Big Sky Resort Road, Big Sky ^ (800) 548-4486 ^ www.bigskyresort.com Junior regional freeski and freeride competition.

Slushy Slalom Bridger Bowl, 15795

Bridger Canyon Road, Bozeman ^ $30 entry fee ^ 800-223-9609 ^ bridgerbowl. com Snowboard banked GS race.

Gillette Promotions Gun Show 9am-6pm

^ Gallatin County Fairgrounds, 901 N. Black, Bozeman ^ $5 adult/ $1 children ^ (406) 582-3270 ^ www.gallatin.mt.gov Gun show open to public. Friday-Sunday

Dismantling Hate- Skills & Strategies You Can Use 9am-3pm ^ C’mon Inn, 6139 East

Valley Center Road, Bozeman ^ (406) 5873555 ^ www.cmoninn.com This workshop will enable you to develop skills and strategies to dismantle hatred towards disadvantaged and marginalized peoples.

Free Tax Help 9:30-11am ^ Jake Jabs Col-

Miller Performing Arts Center, 45465 Gallatin Road, Gallatin Gateway ^ $39-$14 ^ 406-995-6345 ^ www.warrenmillerpac. org Live music.

lege of Business and Entrepreneurship, ^ FREE ^ (406) 994-4421 Accounting students from MSU’s Jake Jabs College of Business and Entrepreneurship are offering free help preparing tax returns for MSU students and individuals who made less than $58,000 last year.

“Marjorie Prime” 8pm ^ Verge Theater,

Books & Babies 10-11am ^ Bozeman

Hiromi: The Trio Project 7:30pm ^ Warren

2304 N. 7th Ave, Bozeman ^ $14 ^ (406) 587-0737 ^ vergetheater.com The thoughtprovoking drama, a 2015 finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, confronts issues of aging and identity in a not-too-distant and unsettling future.

Alter Ego 9pm ^ American Legion Boze-

man, 225 E Main St, Bozeman ^ no cover ^ 21+ ^ (406) 586-8400 ^ www.gallatinpost14.com Live local music

Renegades 9pm ^ Eagles Lodge, 316 East

Main Street, Bozeman ^ no cover ^ 21+ ^ (406) 587-9996 Live local music

42 March 2017 BozemanMagazine.com

The Sextones with Cole & The Thorns 9pm

Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ 0-2 ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www. bozemanlibrary.org A fun, relaxed storytime for caretakers and babies ages 0-2.

Run to the Pub 10am ^ Downtown Boze-

man, Bozeman ^ St. Patrick’s Day 10K and Half Marathon.

Saturday Stories 11:15am-noon ^ Boze-

man Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www. bozemanlibrary.org Join us with the whole family for this all-ages storytime.

All listings are subject to change. Check ahead for full details.


BRI NG I N G IN T E R E S T IN G A RT & CU LT U RE T O PEO P L E H U N G R Y F OR S O ME T H IN G N E W ... Bob Britton 5:30-8:30pm ^ Kountry Korner Cafe, 81820 Gallatin Road, Bozeman ^ all ages ^ (406) 586-2281 Bob plays piano while you dine.

Open Door Theatre presents “Helium”

7:30pm ^ Kaleidoscope Youth Theatre, 1602 W. Beall St., Bozeman ^ (406) 5873642 ^ www.kytbozeman.com A retired high school chemistry teacher and her family cope with an 80-year-old mind that is no longer bound by space and time.

Rocky Mountain Pearls 7:30pm ^ Gallatin

Riverhouse Grill, 45130 Gallatin Rd, Big Sky ^ (406) 995-7427 ^ gallatinriverhousegrill.com A locals favorite. Country western boot scootin music.

Elephant Revival 8pm ^ Eagles Lodge

Ballroom, 316 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ $20 advance, $24 at the door ^ 21+ ^ This Nederland, Colo., quintet are, quite a sound to be experienced – especially when they fall into the pocket of a groove containing elements of gypsy, Celtic, Americana and Folk

“Marjorie Prime” 8pm ^ Verge Theater,

2304 N. 7th Ave, Bozeman ^ $14 ^ (406) 587-0737 ^ vergetheater.com The thoughtprovoking drama, a 2015 finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, confronts issues of aging and identity in a not-too-distant and unsettling future.

(406) 582-3270 ^ www.gallatin.mt.gov Gun show open to public. Friday-Sunday

Galloping Dog Agility & Flyball Club- Fun Match noon-3pm ^ Gallatin County Fairgrounds, 901 N. Black, Bozeman ^ FREE for spectators ^ (406) 582-3270 ^ www. gallatin.mt.gov Come and watch!

Remote Control Car Racing noon-6pm ^

Bozeman American Legion, ^ $10 Racing; $10 Rental Car ^ All Ages ^ 406-579-2707 ^ www.facebook.com Mini-z Racing ever Sunday at the American Legion upstairs. Setup and practice will be from 12pm - 1:30pm. Racing will start at 2pm. The club will have 4 rental cars (first come).

Galloping Dog Agility & Flyball Clinic-Fun Match noon-3pm ^ Gallatin County Fairgrounds, 901 N. Black, Bozeman ^ (406) 582-3270 ^ www.gallatin.mt.gov Come and enjoy this fun match for free!

Bozeman Learn to Skate 12:30-2:10pm ^

Haynes Pavilion, ^ $240- 12 WEEK SESSION $150- 6 WEEK SESSION ^ www.bozemanskating.com Learn to Skate! All skills levels welcome. Classes include basic skills, hockey skills, and adult skills. Go to www.bozemanskating.com for more information or call 640-0475.

Live & Let Livingston Vegan Potluck

Teen Writers 4-5pm ^ Bozeman Public

Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ Teens ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www. bozemanlibrary.org This teen-led group meets every Monday in the Teen Study Room.

Pints with Purpose 5-8pm ^ Bridger Brewing, 1609 S 11th Ave, Bozeman ^ All ages ^ (406) 587-2124 ^ www.bridgerbrewing. com Every Monday night Bridger Brewing donates $1 from every pint sold to a non-profit or charity. Check our website (bridgerbrewing.com) for details.

Ty Alex 5pm ^ The Murray Bar, 201 W Park St, Livingston ^ (406) 222-6433 ^ www. themurraybar.com Indie Rock

Free Tax Help 5:30-7pm ^ Jake Jabs Col-

lege of Business and Entrepreneurship, ^ FREE ^ (406) 994-4421 Accounting students from MSU’s Jake Jabs College of Business and Entrepreneurship are offering free help preparing tax returns for MSU students and individuals who made less than $58,000 last year.

Bozeman Writers’ Group 6-8pm ^ Boze-

man Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www. bozemanlibrary.org The group welcomes all levels of writers, and encourages the free exchange of ideas among writers in the Board Room on the second floor.

4:30-7pm ^ Park County Senior Center, ^ FREE ^ All Ages ^ (406) 333-2276 ^ www. parkcountyseniorcenter.com Live and Let Livingston shares delicious food and recipes at 4:30pm on the second Sunday of every month. Everyone is welcome! “You don’t have to be vegan, but the food does!”

Fitness with Friends: Self-Paced Cardio

The Cooks 6-8pm ^ MAP Brewing Co, 510 Manley Rd, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ All Ages ^ (406) 587-4070 ^ www.mapbrewing.com Live music.

Country Bookshelf, 28 W. Main Street, Bozeman ^ (406)587-0166 ^ www.countrybookshelf.com Book club talking about “Bone Gap” by Laura Ruby.

Bridger Mountain Big Band 7-9:30pm ^

Zach Landin 6-8pm ^ Outlaw Brewing,

WWW.TWANG 9pm ^ Sacajawea Hotel, 5 N

Eagles Lodge, 316 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ no cover ^ (406) 587-9996 Live music each Sunday.

2876 N 27th, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ All Ages, 21+ t0 drink ^ (406) 577-2403 ^ outlawbrewing.com Live Local Music

Sunday, Mar. 12

Le Vent Du Nord 7:30pm ^ The Ellen The-

Ballroom & Swing Dance Classes 6-9pm ^

Alter Ego 9pm ^ American Legion Boze-

man, 225 E Main St, Bozeman ^ no cover ^ 21+ ^ (406) 586-8400 ^ www.gallatinpost14.com Live local music

Renegades 9pm ^ Eagles Lodge, 316 East

Main Street, Bozeman ^ no cover ^ 21+ ^ (406) 587-9996 Live local music

Skavocado 9pm ^ The Murray Bar, 201

W Park St, Livingston ^ (406) 222-6433 ^ www.themurraybar.com Ska/Reggae/Funk/ Rock

Main St, Three Forks ^ Live music.

Ovando, Jeffrey Martin, Bart Budwig

Norris Hot Springs, Rr 84, Norris ^ (406) 685-3303 ^ www.norrishotsprings.com Songwriters

Headwater’s IFSA Junior Freeride Big Sky Resort, 50 Big Sky Resort Road, Big Sky ^ (800) 548-4486 ^ www.bigskyresort.com Junior regional freeski and freeride competition.

Slushy Slalom Bridger Bowl, 15795

Bridger Canyon Road, Bozeman ^ $30 entry fee ^ 800-223-9609 ^ bridgerbowl. com Skier banked GS race.

Gillette Promotions Gun Show 9am-3pm

atre, 17 W. Main St., Bozeman ^ $19.75 ^ (406) 585-5885 ^ www.theellentheatre. com Live music.

Open Mic 10:30pm ^ The Haufbrau, 22

S 8th Ave, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 21+ ^ (406) 587-4931 ^ www.facebook.com Bozeman’s only bar with live music 7 nights a week. Open Mics are Sunday, Monday and Wednesday.

Monday, Mar. 13 LEGO Club 3:45-5pm ^ Bozeman Public

Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org For kids who love to build; LEGOs provided!

^ Gallatin County Fairgrounds, 901 N. Black, Bozeman ^ $5 adult/ $1 children ^

All listings are subject to change. Check ahead for full details.

6-7pm ^ Belgrade Community Library, 106 N Broadway, Belgrade ^ FREE ^ Adults ^ (406) 388-4346 ^ www.belgradelibrary. org Self-paced cardio program with former aerobic instructor, Gale Bacon. Free and open to the public.

Trivia 8-10pm ^ Bacchus Pub, 105 W Main St, Bozeman ^ 21+ ^ (406) 522-0079 ^ www.bacchuspubbozeman.com Come in and join us every Monday night and use whatever brainpower you have left from the weekend to battle with Bozeman’s best and brightest for Bacchus VIP money.

Open Mic 10:30pm ^ The Haufbrau, 22 S 8th Ave, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 21+ ^ (406) 587-4931 ^ www.facebook.com Bozeman’s only bar with live music 7 nights a week. Open Mics are Sunday, Monday and Wednesday.

Tuesday, Mar. 14 Books & Babies 10-11am ^ Bozeman

Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 0-2 ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www. bozemanlibrary.org A fun, relaxed story time for caretakers and babies 0-2.

Books & Babies 1-2pm ^ Bozeman Public

Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 0-2 ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www. bozemanlibrary.org A fun, relaxed story time for caretakers and babies 0-2.

Kids’ Chess Club 3:30-5pm ^ Bozeman

Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ K-12 ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org If you are in grades K-12 you are invited to Chess Club.

Rich Mayo 6-8pm ^ Kountry Korner Cafe,

81820 Gallatin Road, Bozeman ^ all ages ^ (406) 586-2281 Rich plays music while you dine.

Forever Young Adult Book Club 6pm ^

The MAC - Montana Movement Arts Center, 1871 S. 22nd Street Ste. A-2, Bozeman ^ $10/$8 students ^ All Ages ^ (406) 5516077 ^ themacmontana.com Beginning and continuing partner dance classes including Waltz, Swing, Cha Cha, Foxtrot and more. One hour class, take the series or drop in for a single session.

Monday Night Blues Jam 7pm ^ The Fill-

ing Station, 2005 N. Rouse Ave, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ (406) 587-0585 Live music.

Spanish Class with Kristin ND Wolf 7:30-

8:30pm ^ Lockhorn Cider House, 21 South Wallace Avenue, Bozeman ^ $130/punchcard (includes 8 classes and one glass of cider/class) ^ 21+ ^ (406) 404-1168 ^ lockhornhardcider.com Sip cider and hone your Spanish speaking skills. All levels welcome.

FREE add the icon to your homescreen

BozemanMagazine.com March 2017 43


GREATER YELLOWSTONE COMMUNITY

EVENTS CALENDAR Denny Earnest 6-8pm ^ MAP Brewing

Co, 510 Manley Rd, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ All Ages ^ (406) 587-4070 ^ www.mapbrewing.com Live music.

Cribbage Night 6:30-9pm ^ Eagles Lodge,

316 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ $8 ^ 21+ ^ (406) 587-9996 Open cribbage tournaments every Tuesday evening. Sign up at 6:25, start at 6:30! Come play five games with us! $8 buy-in, 100% payout, high hand bonus, and lots of good times!

Chord Rustlers Rehearsals 7pm ^ Boze-

man Catholic Community Center, 210 S. Grand Ave, Bozeman ^ If you’re a fellow who loves to sing join us in singing four-part harmony on Tuesday evenings at 7:00 pm.

Rockin’ R Bingo 7pm ^ Rockin’ R Bar, 211 E. Main St, Bozeman ^ (406) 587-9355 ^ www.rockingrbar.com Bingo night at the Rockin’ R!

Free Dream Interpretation 7:30pm ^

Lockhorn Cider House, 21 South Wallace Avenue, Bozeman ^ (406) 404-1168 ^ lockhornhardcider.com A small group of dream interpretation students are offering free dream interpretations in order to apply what they’ve been studying.

Live Music 8-10pm ^ Bacchus Pub, 105

W Main St, Bozeman ^ (406) 522-0079 ^ www.bacchuspubbozeman.com Come enjoy live music at the Bacchus Pub.

Steve Poltz 8pm ^ Live From the Divide,

627 East Peach Street, Bozeman ^ $25 + service fees ^ livefromthedivide.com SingerSongwriter, Folk, Alternative

Karaoke 9pm ^ Bar IX, 311 E Main St,

Bozeman ^ (406) 551-2185 ^ www.bar-ix. com Make your voice heard at Bozeman’s Choice for karaoke every Tuesday from 9-close.

Wednesday, Mar. 15 Sensational Babies 10-11am ^ Museum

of the Rockies, 600 West Kagy Boulevard, Bozeman ^ Free for members, $5 ^ Birth - 36 months ^ (406) 994-2251 ^ www.museumoftherockies.org Read, talk, sing and play with your baby through sensory awareness activities and explorations designed specifically for newborns, one- and two-year-olds.

Little Ones Storytime 10:15-11am ^ Boze-

from MSU’s Jake Jabs College of Business and Entrepreneurship are offering free help preparing tax returns for MSU students and individuals who made less than $58,000 last year.

Music & Mussels 5:30-8pm ^ Bridger

Thursday, Mar. 16

Fitness with Friends: Self-Paced Cardio

ing Extension Center, 2310 University Way, Bldg. 2, Bozeman ^ $100 for members ^ QuickBooks Basics Installed Version

6-7pm ^ Belgrade Community Library, 106 N Broadway, Belgrade ^ FREE ^ Adults ^ (406) 388-4346 ^ www.belgradelibrary. org Self-paced cardio program with former aerobic instructor, Gale Bacon. Free and open to the public.

Little Ones Storytime 11:15am-noon ^

Lang Termes 6-8pm ^ Outlaw Brewing,

Minecraft Meetup 3:45-5pm ^ Boze-

man Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www. bozemanlibrary.org Play Minecraft with other kids - bring your own device, or use one of ours!

Wii Wednesday 4-5:30pm ^ Bozeman Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org Kids of all ages are invited.

R.E.A.D. to a Dog 4-5pm ^ Bozeman Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org Intermountain Therapy Dogs are available to be read to by kids.

Bozeman Learn to Skate 5:10-6:20pm ^

Haynes Pavilion, ^ $240- 12 WEEK SESSION $150- 6 WEEK SESSION ^ www.bozemanskating.com Learn to Skate! All skills levels welcome. Classes include basic skills, hockey skills, and adult skills. Go to www.bozemanskating.com for more information or call 640-0475.

Free Tax Help 5:30-7pm ^ Jake Jabs Col-

lege of Business and Entrepreneurship, ^ FREE ^ (406) 994-4421 Accounting students

2876 N 27th, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ All Ages, 21+ to drink ^ (406) 577-2403 ^ outlawbrewing.com Live, local music

Pickin’ in the Parks 6:30-9:30pm ^ The

Story Mansion, 811 S. Willson, Bozeman ^ Free ^ all ^ 406-582-2910 ^ www. friendsofthestory.org Pickers, singers, listeners, dancers, on-lookers of all abilities are welcome.

Bozeman’s Original Pub Trivia 7-9:30pm ^

Pub 317, 321 E Main St Ste 317, Bozeman ^ 21+ ^ (406) 582-8898 ^ www.pub317. com Bring your friends and test your smarts during our Wednesday night trivia. Topics include sports, history, politics, geography, science, animals, and many more.

Larry Hirshberg 7pm ^ The Murray Bar,

201 W Park St, Livingston ^ (406) 222-6433 ^ www.themurraybar.com Words & Music.

An Evening with Craig Johnson 7pm ^

Bozeman Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www. bozemanlibrary.org New York Times bestselling author, Craig Johnson, author of the Walt Longmire mystery novels in Bozeman for a lively discussion and book signing, upstairs on the second floor of the Library.

20th Century Women 7pm ^ The Ellen

Theatre, 17 W. Main St., Bozeman ^ $8.75 GA ^ Rated R Movie ^ (406) 585-5885 ^ www.theellentheatre.com Movie night at The Ellen!

Trivia Night 8pm ^ Rockin’ R Bar, 211 E.

Main St, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ (406) 587-9355 ^ www.rockingrbar.com Trivia followed by a live DJ 10pm- close.

Trivia 8pm ^ The Molly Brown, 703 W.

Babcock, Bozeman ^ (406) 552-7362 Bar tabs for the top 3 teams.

Karaoke Night 9pm ^ Bacchus Pub, 105

W Main St, Bozeman ^ (406) 522-0079 ^ www.bacchuspubbozeman.com Whether you’ve “Got Friends in Low Places” or you’re “Just a Small Town Girl, Livin’ In a Lonely World” our karaoke caters to all. Talented to tone deft.

44 March 2017 BozemanMagazine.com

S 8th Ave, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 21+ ^ (406) 587-4931 ^ www.facebook.com Bozeman’s only bar with live music 7 nights a week. Open Mics are Sunday, Monday and Wednesday.

Brewing, 1609 S 11th Ave, Bozeman ^ (406) 587-2124 ^ www.bridgerbrewing. com Live music and mussels!

man Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 2-4 ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org Short storytime for ages 2-4.

Bozeman Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 2-4 ^ 406-5707752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org Short storytime for ages 2-4.

Open Mic 10:30pm ^ The Haufbrau, 22

Montana Women’s Business Center Trainings 9am-3:30pm ^ Montana Manufactur-

Baby Bistro 11am-1pm ^ Bozeman Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org A free breastfeeding support group.

Babies & Books 11:15am-noon ^ Belgrade Community Library, ^ FREE ^ (406)3884346 ^ belgradelibrary.org Bring your little one, ages birth to 36 months. Songs, rhymes, and finger plays. Each story time is followed by active play time and socialization.

Toast Masters noon-1:10pm ^ Owenhouse ACE Hardware (Downstairs), ^ FREE ^ All Ages ^ The mission of a Toastmaster Club is to provide a mutually supportive and positive learning environment in which every member has the opportunity to develop communication and lead.

Wonderlust Nordic Crime Fiction Serie

noon ^ Country Bookshelf, 28 W. Main Street, Bozeman ^ (406)587-0166 ^ www. countrybookshelf.com Book: “Jar City” by Arnaldur Indridason

DIY (Do It Yourself) Club 4:30-5:30pm ^

Bozeman Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ ages 10-16 ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org This club is an extension of the diy.org website and app, where you can create projects, share then with other DIYers, and earn patches.

The Vibe Quartet 6pm ^ 406 Brewing,

111 S. Oak St., Bozeman ^ no cover ^ www.406brewingcompany.com Live local music!

Art on the Rocks Series- Guinness & Gouache 6:30-8:30pm ^ The Emerson

Center for the Arts & Culture, 111 South Grand Ave, Bozeman ^ $35 members/ $40 non-member ^ (406) 587-9797 ^ www. theemerson.org If you are creative but need direction and don’t want the commitment of a multi-week course, this is the class for you! Cost includes supplies and 2 signature cocktails.

Bluegrass Thursdays w/The Bridger Creek Boys 7-9pm ^ Red Tractor Pizza, 1007 W Main St, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ All Ages ^ (406) 359-1999 ^ www.redtractorpizza. com The Bridger Creek Boys draw inspiration from traditional artists such as Dock Boggs and Bill Monroe, as well as more contemporary artists like the Grateful Dead, Steve Earle, and The Band.

All listings are subject to change. Check ahead for full details.


BRI NG I N G IN T E R E S T IN G A RT & CU LT U RE T O PEO P L E H U N G R Y F OR S O ME T H IN G N E W ... Tom Marino 7pm ^ Gallatin Riverhouse

Grill, 45130 Gallatin Rd, Big Sky ^ (406) 995-7427 ^ gallatinriverhousegrill.com From Cash to Keen and a little hippie in between! Live music.

Erin & The Project 8pm ^ The Murray Bar,

201 W Park St, Livingston ^ (406) 222-6433 ^ www.themurraybar.com Indie Soul-Ternative

Live Music 9-11pm ^ Bacchus Pub, 105

W Main St, Bozeman ^ (406) 522-0079 ^ www.bacchuspubbozeman.com Come enjoy live music at the Bacchus Pub.

Friday, Mar. 17 Bebe Le Boeuf Duo Uncorked Wine &

Cheese Bar, 212 W. Park St, Livingston ^ 406-222-5418 ^ thegourmetcellar.com/ wine-bar/ Cajun/Celtic/Swing

Lane Norberg Norris Hot Springs, Rr 84, Norris ^ (406) 685-3303 ^ www.norrishotsprings.com Singer/songwriter

Read-Sing-Play! Preschool Storytime

10:15am ^ Bozeman Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ Preschool ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org Join other preschooler & their parents for reading, singing and learning.

Read-Sing-Play! Preschool Storytime

11:15am ^ Bozeman Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ Preschool ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org Join other preschooler & their parents for reading, singing and learning.

Walk for the Health Of It noon-1pm ^

Peets Hill (base area), ^ FREE ^ All Ages ^ gvlt.org Getting outside for a walk can be one of the easiest ways to stay healthy. Join us for our weekly trail walking group. This is a fun, casual way to get moving during the work day.

Pokemon Club 4:30-5:30pm ^ Bozeman

Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www. bozemanlibrary.org Love Pokemon? Meet other Pokemon fans Fridays at 4:30 in the library for all kinds of Pokemon fun.

Claudia Williams 5:30-8:30pm ^ Kountry

Korner Cafe, 81820 Gallatin Road, Bozeman ^ all ages ^ (406) 586-2281 Claudia from Montana Rose, live music while you dine.

Bozambique 6-8pm ^ MAP Brewing Co,

510 Manley Rd, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ All Ages ^ (406) 587-4070 ^ www.mapbrewing.com Live music.

Nikki Lane 7pm ^ The Filling Station, 2005

N. Rouse Ave, Bozeman ^ $15 advance, $18 at the door ^ 21+ ^ (406) 587-0585 The Stagecoach Spotlight tour featuring Nikki Lane with Robert Ellis & Jonathan Tyler. VIP Packages available. More info: chickenjamwest.com

Family Movie- Darby O’Gill and the Little People 7pm ^ The Ellen Theatre, 17 W.

Books & Babies 10-11am ^ Bozeman

Spring Equinox Dual GS 11am ^ Bridger

Main St., Bozeman ^ FREE ^ Family ^ (406) 585-5885 ^ www.theellentheatre.com Celebrate Saint Patty’s Day with an Irish family favorite.

Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ 0-2 ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www. bozemanlibrary.org A fun, relaxed storytime for caretakers and babies ages 0-2.

Open Door Theatre presents “Helium”

Saturday Stories 11:15am-noon ^ Boze-

Remote Control Car Racing noon-6pm ^

7:30pm ^ Kaleidoscope Youth Theatre, 1602 W. Beall St., Bozeman ^ (406) 5873642 ^ www.kytbozeman.com A retired high school chemistry teacher and her family cope with an 80-year-old mind that is no longer bound by space and time.

Buzz Cason and Robert Cline Jr. 8pm

^ Live From the Divide, 627 East Peach Street, Bozeman ^ $25 + service fees ^ livefromthedivide.com Singer/Songwriter

Cool McCool & the Spies 9pm ^ American

Legion Bozeman, 225 E Main St, Bozeman ^ no cover ^ 21+ ^ (406) 586-8400 ^ www. gallatinpost14.com Live local music

Gary Small & The Coyote Brothers 9pm ^

The Murray Bar, 201 W Park St, Livingston ^ (406) 222-6433 ^ www.themurraybar. com Boogie music

Catskills 9pm ^ Sacajawea Hotel, 5 N Main St, Three Forks ^ Live music.

Saturday, Mar. 18 Cole Thorne Norris Hot Springs, Rr 84, Norris ^ (406) 685-3303 ^ www.norrishotsprings.com Reggae Soul

Shedhorn Ski Mo Big Sky Resort, 50 Big

Sky Resort Road, Big Sky ^ (800) 548-4486 ^ www.bigskyresort.com Ski mountaineering race.

Bozeman Brew Off Bridger Brewing, 1609 S 11th Ave, Bozeman ^ (406) 587-2124 ^ www.bridgerbrewing.com Register online to have a chance to have your recipe brewed on a commercial scale at Bridger Brewing! Competition March 18-19. Public awards ceremony held on the 19th after judging is complete.

Bozeman Winter Farmers’ Market 9am-

noon ^ Emerson Ballroom, 111 S. Grand, Bozeman ^ (406) 587-9797 ^ www.theemerson.org Find hot breakfast, ethically sourced coffee and tea, fresh greens & vegetables, local grassfed meats, wild-caught fish, fresh eggs, cow & goat cheese, fresh pasta, honey, jams & preserves, Montana grown grains & oils, baked goods (gluten free too!), soaps & salves, wool, yarn, live music, and much more.

Free Tax Help 9:30-11am ^ Jake Jabs Col-

lege of Business and Entrepreneurship, ^ FREE ^ (406) 994-4421 Accounting students from MSU’s Jake Jabs College of Business and Entrepreneurship are offering free help preparing tax returns for MSU students and individuals who made less than $58,000 last year.

All listings are subject to change. Check ahead for full details.

man Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www. bozemanlibrary.org Join us with the whole family for this all-ages storytime.

Bob Britton 5:30-8:30pm ^ Kountry Korner Cafe, 81820 Gallatin Road, Bozeman ^ all ages ^ (406) 586-2281 Bob plays piano while you dine.

SwingCats Saturday Night Swing Dance

7-11pm ^ Romney Gym, 3rd Floor Dance Studio, ^ FREE lesson and dance with original American swing dances like Lindy Hop, East Coast Swing, Balboa, Charleston, and more!

Open Door Theatre presents “Helium”

Bowl, 15795 Bridger Canyon Road, Bozeman ^ $15 entry fee ^ 800-223-9609 ^ bridgerbowl.com GS race series for all ages and levels.

Bozeman American Legion, ^ $10 Racing; $10 Rental Car ^ All Ages ^ 406-579-2707 ^ www.facebook.com Mini-z Racing ever Sunday at the American Legion upstairs. Setup and practice will be from 12pm - 1:30pm. Racing will start at 2pm. The club will have 4 rental cars (first come).

Bozeman Learn to Skate 12:30-2:10pm ^

Haynes Pavilion, ^ $240- 12 WEEK SESSION $150- 6 WEEK SESSION ^ www.bozemanskating.com Learn to Skate! All skills levels welcome. Classes include basic skills, hockey skills, and adult skills. Go to www.bozemanskating.com for more information or call 640-0475.

Narrative with a Cause: Stories as Persuasive Art 1-3:30pm ^ Writer’s Residence, ^

7:30pm ^ Kaleidoscope Youth Theatre, 1602 W. Beall St., Bozeman ^ (406) 5873642 ^ www.kytbozeman.com A retired high school chemistry teacher and her family cope with an 80-year-old mind that is no longer bound by space and time.

$36 ^ 18+ ^ 406.581.9405 ^ www.MontanaCoauthor.com Local coauthor Anika Hanisch will provide tips on the most effective persuasive form that humans have used for millennia: the personal narrative.

James Sewell Ballet 7:30pm ^ Warren

Voices of Choice: A Benefit to Support the Susan Wicklund Fund 3-6pm ^ The

Miller Performing Arts Center, 45465 Gallatin Road, Gallatin Gateway ^ $20-$49 ^ 406-995-6345 ^ www.warrenmillerpac. org Big Sky’s favorite Ballet Company returns for their 8th performance on the WMPAC Stage with exhilarating new choreography.

The Second Chance Prom: 3rd Time’s a Charm 8pm ^ Eagles Lodge Ballroom, 316 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ $20 (at Cactus Records) ^ 21+ ^ Benefiting the Bozeman Area Community Foundation.

Cool McCool & the Spies 9pm ^ American

Legion Bozeman, 225 E Main St, Bozeman ^ no cover ^ 21+ ^ (406) 586-8400 ^ www. gallatinpost14.com Live local music

Gary Small & The Coyote Brothers 9pm ^

The Murray Bar, 201 W Park St, Livingston ^ (406) 222-6433 ^ www.themurraybar. com Boogie music

Tucker Down 9pm ^ Sacajawea Hotel, 5 N Main St, Three Forks ^ Live music.

Sunday, Mar. 19 Mathias Norris Hot Springs, Rr 84, Norris

^ (406) 685-3303 ^ www.norrishotsprings. com Acoustic Rock

Bozeman Brew Off Bridger Brewing, 1609 S 11th Ave, Bozeman ^ (406) 587-2124 ^ www.bridgerbrewing.com Register online to have a chance to have your recipe brewed on a commercial scale at Bridger Brewing! Competition March 18-19. Public awards ceremony held on the 19th after judging is complete.

Baxter Hotel, 105 W. Main St, Bozeman ^ $40 ^ (406) 582-1000 ^ www.thebaxterhotel.com/‎ Enjoy an afternoon of conversation with a community of women who continue to fight for reproductive choice.

Live Music 5:30-8:30pm ^ Kountry Korner

Cafe, 81820 Gallatin Road, Bozeman ^ all ages ^ (406) 586-2281 Local musicians play live music while you dine each Sunday.

Edis Kitrell 6-8pm ^ MAP Brewing Co, 510 Manley Rd, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ All Ages ^ (406) 587-4070 ^ www.mapbrewing.com Live music.

Bridger Mountain Big Band 7-9:30pm ^ Eagles Lodge, 316 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ no cover ^ (406) 587-9996 Live music each Sunday. Open Mic 10:30pm ^ The Haufbrau, 22

S 8th Ave, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 21+ ^ (406) 587-4931 ^ www.facebook.com Bozeman’s only bar with live music 7 nights a week. Open Mics are Sunday, Monday and Wednesday.

Monday, Mar. 20 LEGO Club 3:45-5pm ^ Bozeman Public

Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org For kids who love to build; LEGOs provided!

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GREATER YELLOWSTONE COMMUNITY

EVENTS CALENDAR Teen Writers 4-5pm ^ Bozeman Public

Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ Teens ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www. bozemanlibrary.org This teen-led group meets every Monday in the Teen Study Room.

Pints with Purpose 5-8pm ^ Bridger Brewing, 1609 S 11th Ave, Bozeman ^ All ages ^ (406) 587-2124 ^ www.bridgerbrewing. com Every Monday night Bridger Brewing donates $1 from every pint sold to a non-profit or charity. Check our website (bridgerbrewing.com) for details.

Shelly Besler & Tony Polecastro 5pm ^ The Murray Bar, 201 W Park St, Livingston ^ (406) 222-6433 ^ www.themurraybar.com Americana

Free Tax Help 5:30-7pm ^ Jake Jabs Col-

lege of Business and Entrepreneurship, ^ FREE ^ (406) 994-4421 Accounting students from MSU’s Jake Jabs College of Business and Entrepreneurship are offering free help preparing tax returns for MSU students and individuals who made less than $58,000 last year.

Trivia 8-10pm ^ Bacchus Pub, 105 W Main St, Bozeman ^ 21+ ^ (406) 522-0079 ^ www.bacchuspubbozeman.com Come in and join us every Monday night and use whatever brainpower you have left from the weekend to battle with Bozeman’s best and brightest for Bacchus VIP money.

Dead Man Winter 9pm ^ The Filling Sta-

tion, 2005 N. Rouse Ave, Bozeman ^ $14 (in Cactus Records) ^ (406) 587-0585 Live music.

Open Mic 10:30pm ^ The Haufbrau, 22

S 8th Ave, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 21+ ^ (406) 587-4931 ^ www.facebook.com Bozeman’s only bar with live music 7 nights a week. Open Mics are Sunday, Monday and Wednesday.

Tuesday, Mar. 21 Montana Women’s Business Center Trainings 9am-noon ^ Park County Extension

On the Shoulders of Giants Film Screening 6-8pm ^ The Emerson Center for the

Arts & Culture, 111 South Grand Ave, Bozeman ^ (406) 587-9797 ^ www.theemerson.org Stunning and emotional 21 minute film about the value of conservation to Montana’s landscape, economy, and way of life.

Cribbage Night 6:30-9pm ^ Eagles Lodge,

Wii Wednesday 4-5:30pm ^ Bozeman Pub-

man Catholic Community Center, 210 S. Grand Ave, Bozeman ^ If you’re a fellow who loves to sing join us in singing four-part harmony on Tuesday evenings at 7:00 pm.

Rockin’ R Bingo 7pm ^ Rockin’ R Bar, 211

Fitness with Friends: Self-Paced Cardio

Rockies, 600 West Kagy Boulevard, Bozeman ^ Included with admission ^ 3-5 ^ (406) 994-2251 ^ www.museumoftherockies.org Museum learning for 3-5 year olds.

Ballroom & Swing Dance Classes 6-9pm ^

The MAC - Montana Movement Arts Center, 1871 S. 22nd Street Ste. A-2, Bozeman ^ $10/$8 students ^ All Ages ^ (406) 5516077 ^ themacmontana.com Beginning and continuing partner dance classes including Waltz, Swing, Cha Cha, Foxtrot and more. One hour class, take the series or drop in for a single session.

Dead Man Winter (feat. Dave Simonett of Trampled By Turtles) 7pm ^ The Filling

Station, 2005 N. Rouse Ave, Bozeman ^ $14 at Cactus Records/ $17 at the door ^ 21+ ^ (406) 587-0585 Dave Simonett sings, plays guitar and writes songs for the acoustic band Trampled by Turtles. Dead Man Winter is his electric rock & roll band.

Spanish Class with Kristin ND Wolf 7:30-

8:30pm ^ Lockhorn Cider House, 21 South Wallace Avenue, Bozeman ^ $130/punchcard (includes 8 classes and one glass of cider/class) ^ 21+ ^ (406) 404-1168 ^ lockhornhardcider.com Sip cider and hone your Spanish speaking skills. All levels welcome.

Improv On The Verge 8pm ^ Verge

Theater, 2304 N. 7th Ave, Bozeman ^ $7 ^ (406) 587-0737 ^ vergetheater.com Come enjoy Cheap Thrills for your Laugh Hole!

46 March 2017 BozemanMagazine.com

Books & Babies 1-2pm ^ Bozeman Public

Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 0-2 ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www. bozemanlibrary.org A fun, relaxed story time for caretakers and babies 0-2.

Afternoon Swimming Lessons 2:30pm ^

Bozeman Swim Center, ^ Swimming lessons.

Kids’ Chess Club 3:30-5pm ^ Bozeman

Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ K-12 ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org If you are in grades K-12 you are invited to Chess Club.

Photography 101: Basic Digital Photography 5:30-7:30pm ^ F-11 Photo, 2612 West Main, Bozeman ^ $49.99 ^ 18+ ^ (888) 548-0203 ^ f11photo.com Explore the what, when and why of digital camera settings and get comfortable with the geek-speak of digital photography. Pre-registration required.

Rich Mayo 6-8pm ^ Kountry Korner Cafe,

81820 Gallatin Road, Bozeman ^ all ages ^ (406) 586-2281 Rich plays music while you dine.

Lucas Biespiel 6-8pm ^ MAP Brewing Co, 510 Manley Rd, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ All Ages ^ (406) 587-4070 ^ www.mapbrewing.com Live music.

man Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www. bozemanlibrary.org Play Minecraft with other kids - bring your own device, or use one of ours!

lic Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org Kids of all ages are invited.

R.E.A.D. to a Dog 4-5pm ^ Bozeman Public

Broken Ground Workshop 7-8pm ^

Books & Babies 10-11am ^ Bozeman

6-7pm ^ Belgrade Community Library, 106 N Broadway, Belgrade ^ FREE ^ Adults ^ (406) 388-4346 ^ www.belgradelibrary. org Self-paced cardio program with former aerobic instructor, Gale Bacon. Free and open to the public.

Bozeman Swim Center, ^ Swimming lessons.

Chord Rustlers Rehearsals 7pm ^ Boze-

man Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www. bozemanlibrary.org The group welcomes all levels of writers, and encourages the free exchange of ideas among writers in the Board Room on the second floor.

Tours for Tots 10-11am ^ Museum of the

Afternoon Swimming Lessons 2:30pm ^ Minecraft Meetup 3:45-5pm ^ Boze-

Center, ^ $25 ^ Fwd. Business Series Training: SEO + Google Analytics for Small Business

Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 0-2 ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www. bozemanlibrary.org A fun, relaxed story time for caretakers and babies 0-2.

Bozeman Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 2-4 ^ 406-5707752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org Short storytime for ages 2-4.

316 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ $8 ^ 21+ ^ (406) 587-9996 Open cribbage tournaments every Tuesday evening. Sign up at 6:25, start at 6:30! Come play five games with us! $8 buy-in, 100% payout, high hand bonus, and lots of good times!

Lockhorn Cider House, 21 South Wallace Avenue, Bozeman ^ (406) 404-1168 ^ lockhornhardcider.com Organic Gardening Made Easy – Part 1: 5 Tips to Get Your Garden Started

Bozeman Writers’ Group 6-8pm ^ Boze-

Little Ones Storytime 11:15am-noon ^

E. Main St, Bozeman ^ (406) 587-9355 ^ www.rockingrbar.com Bingo night at the Rockin’ R!

Journey with Special Guest Asia 7:30pm ^ Brick Breeden Fieldhouse, 1 Bobcat Circle, Bozeman ^ $59.50-$95 ^ (406) 994-7117 ^ www.brickbreeden.com Live music.

Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org Intermountain Therapy Dogs are available to be read to by kids.

Bozeman Learn to Skate 5:10-6:20pm ^

Haynes Pavilion, ^ $240- 12 WEEK SESSION $150- 6 WEEK SESSION ^ www.bozemanskating.com Learn to Skate! All skills levels welcome. Classes include basic skills, hockey skills, and adult skills. Go to www.bozemanskating.com for more information or call 640-0475.

Free Tax Help 5:30-7pm ^ Jake Jabs Col-

Live Music 8-10pm ^ Bacchus Pub, 105

W Main St, Bozeman ^ (406) 522-0079 ^ www.bacchuspubbozeman.com Come enjoy live music at the Bacchus Pub.

lege of Business and Entrepreneurship, ^ FREE ^ (406) 994-4421 Accounting students from MSU’s Jake Jabs College of Business and Entrepreneurship are offering free help preparing tax returns for MSU students and individuals who made less than $58,000 last year.

Dirtwire (feat. members of Beats Antique) 8pm ^ The Filling Station, 2005 N.

Photography 102: Intermediate Digital Photo and Drills & Skills 5:30-7:30pm ^

Rouse Ave, Bozeman ^ $10 advanced/ $12 at show ^ 21+ ^ (406) 587-0585 Live music.

Karaoke 9pm ^ Bar IX, 311 E Main St,

Bozeman ^ (406) 551-2185 ^ www.bar-ix. com Make your voice heard at Bozeman’s Choice for karaoke every Tuesday from 9-close.

F-11 Photo, 2612 West Main, Bozeman ^ $99.99 ^ 18+ ^ (888) 548-0203 ^ f11photo. com Strengthen your confidence and competence in digital imaging. Learn, then practice, specific skills. Pre-registration required.

Music & Mussels 5:30-8pm ^ Bridger

Wednesday, Mar. 22

Brewing, 1609 S 11th Ave, Bozeman ^ (406) 587-2124 ^ www.bridgerbrewing. com Live music and mussels!

Sensational Babies 10-11am ^ Museum

Fitness with Friends: Self-Paced Cardio

of the Rockies, 600 West Kagy Boulevard, Bozeman ^ Free for members, $5 ^ Birth - 36 months ^ (406) 994-2251 ^ www.museumoftherockies.org Read, talk, sing and play with your baby through sensory awareness activities and explorations designed specifically for newborns, one- and two-year-olds.

Little Ones Storytime 10:15-11am ^ Bozeman Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 2-4 ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org Short storytime for ages 2-4.

6-7pm ^ Belgrade Community Library, 106 N Broadway, Belgrade ^ FREE ^ Adults ^ (406) 388-4346 ^ www.belgradelibrary. org Self-paced cardio program with former aerobic instructor, Gale Bacon. Free and open to the public.

Peter King 6-8pm ^ Outlaw Brewing, 2876

N 27th, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ All Ages, 21+ to drink ^ (406) 577-2403 ^ outlaw-brewing. com Live, Local Music

Pickin’ in the Parks 6:30-9:30pm ^ The

Story Mansion, 811 S. Willson, Bozeman ^ Free ^ all ^ 406-582-2910 ^ www. friendsofthestory.org Pickers, singers, listeners, dancers, on-lookers of all abilities are welcome.

All listings are subject to change. Check ahead for full details.


BRI NG I N G IN T E R E S T IN G A RT & CU LT U RE T O PEO P L E H U N G R Y F OR S O ME T H IN G N E W ... Creek & River Writers Night with Mike Devine 7pm ^ Pine Creek Lodge, 2496 E.

River Road, Livingston ^ FREE ^ (406) 2223628 ^ www.pinecreeklodgemontana.com Mike Devine is a poet, musician and the author of the novel, Henry.

Bozeman’s Original Pub Trivia 7-9:30pm ^

Pub 317, 321 E Main St Ste 317, Bozeman ^ 21+ ^ (406) 582-8898 ^ www.pub317. com Bring your friends and test your smarts during our Wednesday night trivia. Topics include sports, history, politics, geography, science, animals, and many more.

Science Inquiry Series 7-8pm ^ Museum

of the Rockies, 600 West Kagy Boulevard, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ (406) 994-2251 ^ www. museumoftherockies.org Explore cutting edge science topics, their latest developments, and their relevance to Society--through speaker presentations followed by conversations between speaker and audience.

Juan Soria 7pm ^ The Murray Bar, 201

W Park St, Livingston ^ (406) 222-6433 ^ www.themurraybar.com Argentinian Songwriter

Eric Church 8pm ^ Brick Breeden Field-

house, 1 Bobcat Circle, Bozeman ^ $67/89 ^ (406) 994-7117 ^ www.brickbreeden. com American country music singer and songwriter.

Trivia Night 8pm ^ Rockin’ R Bar, 211 E.

Main St, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ (406) 587-9355 ^ www.rockingrbar.com Trivia followed by a live DJ 10pm- close.

Trivia 8pm ^ The Molly Brown, 703 W.

Babcock, Bozeman ^ (406) 552-7362 Bar tabs for the top 3 teams.

Grant Farm 8pm ^ The Filling Station,

2005 N. Rouse Ave, Bozeman ^ $10 (in Cactus Records) ^ 21+ ^ (406) 587-0585 Live music.

Eric Church 8pm ^ Brick Breeden Field-

house, 1 Bobcat Circle, Bozeman ^ $67-$89 ^ (406) 994-7117 ^ www.brickbreeden. com Live music.

Karaoke Night 9pm ^ Bacchus Pub, 105

W Main St, Bozeman ^ (406) 522-0079 ^ www.bacchuspubbozeman.com Whether you’ve “Got Friends in Low Places” or you’re “Just a Small Town Girl, Livin’ In a Lonely World” our karaoke caters to all. Talented to tone deft.

Thursday, Mar. 23 Tours for Tots 10-11am ^ Museum of the

Rockies, 600 West Kagy Boulevard, Bozeman ^ Included with admission ^ 3-5 ^ (406) 994-2251 ^ www.museumoftherockies.org Museum learning for 3-5 year olds.

Baby Bistro 11am-1pm ^ Bozeman Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org A free breastfeeding support group.

Babies & Books 11:15am-noon ^ Belgrade Community Library, ^ FREE ^ (406)3884346 ^ belgradelibrary.org Bring your little one, ages birth to 36 months. Songs, rhymes, and finger plays. Each story time is followed by active play time and socialization.

Toast Masters noon-1:10pm ^ Owenhouse ACE Hardware (Downstairs), ^ FREE ^ All Ages ^ The mission of a Toastmaster Club is to provide a mutually supportive and positive learning environment in which every member has the opportunity to develop communication and lead.

Grief and Loss – Helping Kids Cope noon-

1pm ^ Willson School, 404 East Main, Bozeman ^ Talk by Shawna Rader Kelly, EdS, NCSP, School Psychologist for Bozeman Public Schools

Afternoon Swimming Lessons 2:30pm ^

Bozeman Swim Center, ^ Swimming lessons.

DIY (Do It Yourself) Club 4:30-5:30pm ^

Bozeman Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ ages 10-16 ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org This club is an extension of the diy.org website and app, where you can create projects, share then with other DIYers, and earn patches.

Photography 102: Intermediate Digital Photo and Drills & Skills 5:30-7:30pm ^

F-11 Photo, 2612 West Main, Bozeman ^ $99.99 ^ 18+ ^ (888) 548-0203 ^ f11photo. com Strengthen your confidence and competence in digital imaging. Learn, then practice, specific skills. Pre-registration required.

The Vibe Quartet 6pm ^ 406 Brewing,

111 S. Oak St., Bozeman ^ no cover ^ www.406brewingcompany.com Live local music!

Auction for the Arts 6pm ^ Moonlight

Basin Lodge, 66 Mountain Loop Rd, Big Sky ^ $75 GA/ $125 VIP ^ Fundraiser for the Art Council of Big Sky.

Backcountry Woman Series: Women’s Backpacking Basics 6-7:30pm ^ REI, 2220

Tschache Lane, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ (406) 587-1938 ^ www.rei.com Backpacking basics for women. 27 spots available.

4th Thursday Book Club 6:30pm ^ Bel-

grade Community Library, ^ FREE ^ 18+ ^ (406)388-4346 ^ belgradelibrary.org Book discussion, opinion-sharing, refreshments, and lots of fun!

Bluegrass Thursdays w/The Bridger Creek Boys 7-9pm ^ Red Tractor Pizza, 1007 W Main St, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ All Ages ^ (406) 359-1999 ^ www.redtractorpizza. com The Bridger Creek Boys draw inspiration from traditional artists such as Dock Boggs and Bill Monroe, as well as more contemporary artists like the Grateful Dead, Steve Earle, and The Band.

DVD Talk on “Love & Heartbreak: Recovery from Lost Love and Mourning” 7-9pm ^ Bozeman Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org Montana Friends of Jung presents a DVD talk on “Love & Heartbreak: Recovery from Lost Love and Mourning.”

TAUK 8pm ^ The Filling Station, 2005 N.

Rouse Ave, Bozeman ^ $12 (at Cactus Records) ^ 21+ ^ (406) 587-0585 Live music.

Erin & The Project 8pm ^ The Murray Bar,

201 W Park St, Livingston ^ (406) 222-6433 ^ www.themurraybar.com Indie Soul-Ternative

Live Music 9-11pm ^ Bacchus Pub, 105

W Main St, Bozeman ^ (406) 522-0079 ^ www.bacchuspubbozeman.com Come enjoy live music at the Bacchus Pub.

Friday, Mar. 24 MSU Fridays MSU SUB (Strand Union

Building), 280 Strand Union, Bozeman ^ (406) 994-4636 ^ www.montana.edu/sub/ Open to prospective students.

Quenby Unplugged Uncorked Wine &

Juan Soria Norris Hot Springs, Rr 84, Norris ^ (406) 685-3303 ^ www.norrishotsprings. com Rock/Folk/Blues

Smokin’ Aces Tour Big Sky Resort, 50 Big

Sky Resort Road, Big Sky ^ (800) 548-4486 ^ www.bigskyresort.com Ski and snowboard slopestyle competition.

MSU Bobcat Ski Day Bridger Bowl, 15795 Bridger Canyon Road, Bozeman ^ 800223-9609 ^ bridgerbowl.com Discounts for carpools of 3 or more people! Fundraiser for MSU Bobcat Alpine Ski Team!

Read-Sing-Play! Preschool Storytime

10:15am ^ Bozeman Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ Preschool ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org Join other preschooler & their parents for reading, singing and learning.

Read-Sing-Play! Preschool Storytime

11:15am ^ Bozeman Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ Preschool ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org Join other preschooler & their parents for reading, singing and learning.

Walk for the Health Of It noon-1pm ^

Peets Hill (base area), ^ FREE ^ All Ages ^ gvlt.org Getting outside for a walk can be one of the easiest ways to stay healthy. Join us for our weekly trail walking group. This is a fun, casual way to get moving during the work day.

Afternoon Swimming Lessons 2:30pm ^

Bozeman Swim Center, ^ Swimming lessons.

Pokemon Club 4:30-5:30pm ^ Bozeman

Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www. bozemanlibrary.org Love Pokemon? Meet other Pokemon fans Fridays at 4:30 in the library for all kinds of Pokemon fun.

Claudia Williams 5:30-8:30pm ^ Kountry

Korner Cafe, 81820 Gallatin Road, Bozeman ^ all ages ^ (406) 586-2281 Claudia from Montana Rose, live music while you dine.

9th Annual Adult Spelling Bee 6pm ^ Riverside Country Club, 2500 Springhill Road, Bozeman ^ (406) 587-5105 ^ riversidecountry-club.com Fundraiser for Bozeman Schools Foundation

Cheese Bar, 212 W. Park St, Livingston ^ 406-222-5418 ^ thegourmetcellar.com/ wine-bar/ Texas roots. Live music.

Grant Farm 9pm ^ The Filling Station,

2005 N. Rouse Ave, Bozeman ^ $10 (in Cactus Records) ^ 21+ ^ (406) 587-0585 Live music.

Open Mic 10:30pm ^ The Haufbrau, 22

S 8th Ave, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 21+ ^ (406) 587-4931 ^ www.facebook.com Bozeman’s only bar with live music 7 nights a week. Open Mics are Sunday, Monday and Wednesday.

All listings are subject to change. Check ahead for full details.

BozemanMagazine.com March 2017 47


GREATER YELLOWSTONE COMMUNITY

EVENTS CALENDAR Trivia Night: Blade Runner (1982) 7pm ^

The Ellen Theatre, 17 W. Main St., Bozeman ^ $5 ^ (406) 585-5885 ^ www.theellentheatre.com Worksheets available at 6pm. Winners will be posted in the lobby after the film.

Open Door Theatre presents “Helium” 7:30pm ^ Kaleidoscope Youth Theatre, 1602 W. Beall St., ^ (406) 587-3642 ^ www. kytbozeman.com A retired high school chemistry teacher and her family cope with an 80-year-old mind that is no longer bound by space and time.

The Werks with Cure For The Common

8pm-1am ^ Eagles Lodge Ballroom, 316 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ $13 advance, $15 at the door ^ 21+ ^ Beloved Ohio jam rockers The Werks have responded to tragedy and transition by solidifying the strongest lineup in their decade of existence.

Strangeways 9pm ^ American Legion

Bozeman, 225 E Main St, Bozeman ^ no cover ^ 21+ ^ (406) 586-8400 ^ www.gallatinpost14.com Live local music

Punch Drunk Monkey Funk 9pm ^ The

Murray Bar, 201 W Park St, Livingston ^ (406) 222-6433 ^ www.themurraybar.com Funk, Jam

Sunrise Karaoke 9pm ^ Sacajawea Hotel, 5 N Main St, Three Forks ^ Karaoke night!

Saturday, Mar. 25 Tom Georges Norris Hot Springs, Rr 84, Norris ^ (406) 685-3303 ^ www.norrishotsprings.com Americana

Smokin’ Aces Tour Big Sky Resort, 50 Big

Sky Resort Road, Big Sky ^ (800) 548-4486 ^ www.bigskyresort.com Ski and snowboard slopestyle competition.

Carving out Hunger Food Drive Bridger

Bowl, 15795 Bridger Canyon Road, Bozeman ^ 800-223-9609 ^ bridgerbowl.com For every 15 cans of 15lbs of non perishable food donors receive $25 lift ticket.

Free Tax Help 9:30-11am ^ Jake Jabs Col-

lege of Business and Entrepreneurship, ^ FREE ^ (406) 994-4421 Accounting students from MSU’s Jake Jabs College of Business and Entrepreneurship are offering free help preparing tax returns for MSU students and individuals who made less than $58,000 last year.

Books & Babies 10-11am ^ Bozeman Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ 0-2 ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www. bozemanlibrary.org A fun, relaxed storytime for caretakers and babies ages 0-2. Crocs Family Day 10am-noon ^ Museum

of the Rockies, 600 West Kagy Boulevard, Bozeman ^ Included with admission ^ (406) 994-2251 ^ www.museumoftherockies.org Join us in celebrating Montana’s newest reptilian inhabitants! Though fun actives and interactive stations, MOR is bringing the Mesozoic Era back to life. Learn about crocodiles and alligators by meeting these predators up close and personal. See live demonstrations, participate in family activities, read storybooks, make crafts and more as we explore these ancient predators that now live in our modern world.

Photographing Landscape & Critters

10:30am-1pm ^ F-11 Photo, 2612 West Main, Bozeman ^ $74.99 ^ 18+ ^ (888) 548-0203 ^ f11photo.com Tour the tools & techniques you need to use in the field to get better images. Discuss animal behavior, technical & artistic aspects in composition & more. Please pre-register.

LEGO Club 11am ^ Belgrade Community

Library, ^ FREE ^ Students grades K-6 ^ (406)388-4346 ^ belgradelibrary.org Children will be given an hour to create based on a monthly theme or free build.

Get Ready to Backpack at Bozeman REI

11am-7pm ^ REI, 2220 Tschache Lane, Bozeman ^ (406) 587-1938 ^ www.rei. com Become one with your pack! No registration required.

Saturday Stories 11:15am-noon ^ Boze-

man Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www. bozemanlibrary.org Join us with the whole family for this all-ages storytime.

Organic Gardening Made Easy 1-4pm ^

Broken Ground, 1505 Bridger Drive, Bozeman ^ $45 ^ All Ages ^ (406) 600-7881 ^ www.brokengroundpermaculture.com A workshop for the beginner gardener, a class giving you the basics to get your garden started. Learn about seed starting, soil requirements, & the best veggies for a cold climate.

The Emperor’s New Clothes 2pm ^ Verge

Street, Bozeman ^ $13 (at Cactus Records) ^ 21+ ^ (406) 587-9996 Live music.

Strangeways 9pm ^ American Legion

Bozeman, 225 E Main St, Bozeman ^ no cover ^ 21+ ^ (406) 586-8400 ^ www.gallatinpost14.com Live local music

One Leaf Clover 9pm ^ The Murray Bar,

201 W Park St, Livingston ^ (406) 222-6433 ^ www.themurraybar.com Mountain Boogie Music

Theater, 2304 N. 7th Ave, Bozeman ^ (406) 587-0737 ^ vergetheater.com Kathryn Schultz Miller’s dynamic and fun stage adaptation of the classic story is packed with action, laughs, and magic tricks!

Exit 288 9pm ^ Sacajawea Hotel, 5 N Main

Afternoon Swimming Lessons 2:30pm ^

Lang Termes Norris Hot Springs, Rr 84,

Bozeman Swim Center, ^ Swimming lessons.

42nd Annual Chord Rustlers Show 3pm ^

Emerson’s Crawford Theatre, 111 S. Grand Ave., Bozeman ^ $15 ^ all ages ^ (406) 587-9797 ^ www.theemerson.org The Chord Rustlers are joined by quartet Newfangled Four, 2013 International Collegiate quartet champions, and a performance by Rhapsody and Real Men Sing.

Bob Britton 5:30-8:30pm ^ Kountry Korner Cafe, 81820 Gallatin Road, Bozeman ^ all ages ^ (406) 586-2281 Bob plays piano while you dine.

Gloves Off Gala 5:30-11pm ^ The Com-

mons at Baxter and Love, 1794 Baxter Lane, Bozeman ^ $100/person $1000/table ^ (406) 451-0067 ^ www.thecommonsbozeman.com Gallatin Ice Foundation fundraiser.

Skavacado 6-8pm ^ MAP Brewing Co, 510 Manley Rd, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ All Ages ^ (406) 587-4070 ^ www.mapbrewing.com Live music.

James Hill 7pm ^ The Ellen Theatre, 17 W. Main St., Bozeman ^ $15 ^ (406) 585-5885 ^ www.theellentheatre.com Live music.

Open Door Theatre presents “Helium”

7:30pm ^ Kaleidoscope Youth Theatre, 1602 W. Beall St., Bozeman ^ (406) 5873642 ^ www.kytbozeman.com A retired high school chemistry teacher and her family cope with an 80-year-old mind that is no longer bound by space and time.

Contra Dance 7:30pm ^ Bozeman Senior Center, Tamarack and Tracy, Bozeman ^ $10 ^ Hosted by The Bozeman Folklore Society

Ishmael 7:30pm ^ Warren Miller Performing Arts Center, 45465 Gallatin Road, Gallatin Gateway ^ $14-$39 ^ 406-9956345 ^ www.warrenmillerpac.org Live performance.

48 March 2017 BozemanMagazine.com

Horseshoes & Hand Grenades with Rabbit Wilde 8pm ^ Eagles Lodge, 316 East Main

St, Three Forks ^ Live music.

Sunday, Mar. 26 Norris ^ (406) 685-3303 ^ www.norrishotsprings.com Acoustic Eclectic

Smokin’ Aces Tour Big Sky Resort, 50 Big

Sky Resort Road, Big Sky ^ (800) 548-4486 ^ www.bigskyresort.com Ski and snowboard slopestyle competition.

Remote Control Car Racing noon-6pm ^

Bozeman American Legion, ^ $10 Racing; $10 Rental Car ^ All Ages ^ 406-579-2707 ^ www.facebook.com Mini-z Racing ever Sunday at the American Legion upstairs. Setup and practice will be from 12pm - 1:30pm. Racing will start at 2pm. The club will have 4 rental cars (first come).

Bozeman Learn to Skate 12:30-2:10pm ^

Haynes Pavilion, ^ $240- 12 WEEK SESSION $150- 6 WEEK SESSION ^ www.bozemanskating.com Learn to Skate! All skills levels welcome. Classes include basic skills, hockey skills, and adult skills. Go to www.bozemanskating.com for more information or call 640-0475.

Narrative with a Cause: Stories as Persuasive Art 1-3:30pm ^ Writer’s Residence, ^ $36 ^ 18+ ^ 406.581.9405 ^ www.MontanaCoauthor.com Local coauthor Anika Hanisch will provide tips on the most effective persuasive form that humans have used for millennia: the personal narrative.

Afternoon Swimming Lessons 2:30pm ^

Bozeman Swim Center, ^ Swimming lessons.

Live Music 5:30-8:30pm ^ Kountry Korner

Cafe, 81820 Gallatin Road, Bozeman ^ all ages ^ (406) 586-2281 Local musicians play live music while you dine each Sunday.

Petty John’s Underground 6-8pm ^ MAP

Brewing Co, 510 Manley Rd, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ All Ages ^ (406) 587-4070 ^ www. mapbrewing.com Live music.

All listings are subject to change. Check ahead for full details.


BRIN GI NG I N T E R E S T I N G ART & CU LTU RE TO PEOP L E HU N G R Y F OR S OMETH IN G N EW ... Kevin Grastorg 6-8pm ^ Outlaw Brewing, 2876 N 27th, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ All Ages, 21+ to drink ^ (406) 577-2403 ^ outlawbrewing.com Live Local Music

Bridger Mountain Big Band 7-9:30pm ^

Eagles Lodge, 316 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ no cover ^ (406) 587-9996 Live music each Sunday.

The Ghost of Paul Revere 7-11:30pm ^

The Filling Station, 2005 N. Rouse Ave, Bozeman ^ $8 advance, $10 at the door ^ 21+ ^ (406) 587-0585 Born on the banks of the Saco River, brothers in all but name, the Ghost of Paul Revere is Maine’s holler-folk band. A powerful, energetic, non-traditional American folk band.

Open Mic 10:30pm ^ The Haufbrau, 22

S 8th Ave, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 21+ ^ (406) 587-4931 ^ www.facebook.com Bozeman’s only bar with live music 7 nights a week. Open Mics are Sunday, Monday and Wednesday.

Monday, Mar. 27

Bozeman Writers’ Group 6-8pm ^ Boze-

man Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www. bozemanlibrary.org The group welcomes all levels of writers, and encourages the free exchange of ideas among writers in the Board Room on the second floor.

Fitness with Friends: Self-Paced Cardio

6-7pm ^ Belgrade Community Library, 106 N Broadway, Belgrade ^ FREE ^ Adults ^ (406) 388-4346 ^ www.belgradelibrary. org Self-paced cardio program with former aerobic instructor, Gale Bacon. Free and open to the public.

Ballroom & Swing Dance Classes 6-9pm ^

The MAC - Montana Movement Arts Center, 1871 S. 22nd Street Ste. A-2, Bozeman ^ $10/$8 students ^ All Ages ^ (406) 5516077 ^ themacmontana.com Beginning and continuing partner dance classes including Waltz, Swing, Cha Cha, Foxtrot and more. One hour class, take the series or drop in for a single session.

Spanish Class with Kristin ND Wolf 7:30-

Brewing Co, 510 Manley Rd, Bozeman ^ (406) 587-4070 ^ www.mapbrewing.com Pint Night at MAP Brewing.

8:30pm ^ Lockhorn Cider House, 21 South Wallace Avenue, Bozeman ^ $130/punchcard (includes 8 classes and one glass of cider/class) ^ 21+ ^ (406) 404-1168 ^ lockhornhardcider.com Sip cider and hone your Spanish speaking skills. All levels welcome.

Afternoon Swimming Lessons 2:30pm ^

Trivia 8-10pm ^ Bacchus Pub, 105 W Main

Defenders of Wildlife Pint Night MAP

Bozeman Swim Center, ^ Swimming lessons.

LEGO Club 3:45-5pm ^ Bozeman Public

Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org For kids who love to build; LEGOs provided!

Teen Writers 4-5pm ^ Bozeman Public

Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ Teens ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www. bozemanlibrary.org This teen-led group meets every Monday in the Teen Study Room.

Pints with Purpose 5-8pm ^ Bridger Brewing, 1609 S 11th Ave, Bozeman ^ All ages ^ (406) 587-2124 ^ www.bridgerbrewing. com Every Monday night Bridger Brewing donates $1 from every pint sold to a non-profit or charity. Check our website (bridgerbrewing.com) for details.

Love Is A Dog From Nebraska 5pm ^ The

Murray Bar, 201 W Park St, Livingston ^ (406) 222-6433 ^ www.themurraybar.com Songwriter

Free Tax Help 5:30-7pm ^ Jake Jabs Col-

lege of Business and Entrepreneurship, ^ FREE ^ (406) 994-4421 Accounting students from MSU’s Jake Jabs College of Business and Entrepreneurship are offering free help preparing tax returns for MSU students and individuals who made less than $58,000 last year.

St, Bozeman ^ 21+ ^ (406) 522-0079 ^ www.bacchuspubbozeman.com Come in and join us every Monday night and use whatever brainpower you have left from the weekend to battle with Bozeman’s best and brightest for Bacchus VIP money.

Christ Shiflett of Foo Fighters 8pm ^

Eagles Lodge Ballroom, 316 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ $13 ^ 21+ ^ Live music.

Open Mic 10:30pm ^ The Haufbrau, 22

S 8th Ave, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 21+ ^ (406) 587-4931 ^ www.facebook.com Bozeman’s only bar with live music 7 nights a week. Open Mics are Sunday, Monday and Wednesday.

Tuesday, Mar. 28 Books & Babies 10-11am ^ Bozeman

Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 0-2 ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www. bozemanlibrary.org A fun, relaxed story time for caretakers and babies 0-2.

Social Media - Help, My Child Knows A LOT More Than Me! noon-1pm ^ Willson School, 404 East Main, Bozeman ^ Talk by Detective Scott McCormick and Mary Ann Benz, Student Assistant Coordinator

Books & Babies 1-2pm ^ Bozeman Public

Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 0-2 ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www. bozemanlibrary.org A fun, relaxed story time for caretakers and babies 0-2.

All listings are subject to change. Check ahead for full details.

Afternoon Swimming Lessons 2:30pm ^

Bozeman Swim Center, ^ Swimming lessons.

Kids’ Chess Club 3:30-5pm ^ Bozeman

Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ K-12 ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org If you are in grades K-12 you are invited to Chess Club.

Montana Women’s Business Center Trainings 5:30-8:30pm ^ Big Sky Chamber, ^ $25 (must be a Big Sky resident) ^ QuickBooks Online Big Sky

Rich Mayo 6-8pm ^ Kountry Korner Cafe,

81820 Gallatin Road, Bozeman ^ all ages ^ (406) 586-2281 Rich plays music while you dine.

Café Scientifique 6pm ^ Baxter Hotel, 105

W Main St, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ Open to public ^ (406) 582-1000 ^ www.thebaxterhotel.com Michelle Flenniken will present “What’s Killing the Bees? The Impacts of Pathogens and other Factors on Honey Bee Health

Brews & the Big Sky: Montana Made, Montana Brewed 6pm ^ Museum of the

Rockies, 600 West Kagy Boulevard, Bozeman ^ $8 (includes beer tasting) ^ 21+ ^ (406) 994-2251 ^ www.museumoftherockies.org Enjoy an adult night at the MOR with drinks, dinner and local history.

Tommy Georges 6-8pm ^ MAP Brewing

Co, 510 Manley Rd, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ All Ages ^ (406) 587-4070 ^ www.mapbrewing.com Live music.

Cribbage Night 6:30-9pm ^ Eagles Lodge,

316 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ $8 ^ 21+ ^ (406) 587-9996 Open cribbage tournaments every Tuesday evening. Sign up at 6:25, start at 6:30! Come play five games with us! $8 buy-in, 100% payout, high hand bonus, and lots of good times!

Chord Rustlers Rehearsals 7pm ^ Boze-

man Catholic Community Center, 210 S. Grand Ave, Bozeman ^ If you’re a fellow who loves to sing join us in singing four-part harmony on Tuesday evenings at 7:00 pm.

Bingo Night 7pm ^ Sacajawea Hotel, 5 N Main St, Three Forks ^ Games begin at 7pm with plenty of time to order food. Cash prizes.

Book Club 7pm ^ Country Bookshelf, 28

W. Main Street, Bozeman ^ (406)587-0166 ^ www.countrybookshelf.com “H is for Hawk” by Helen MacDonald

Broken Ground Workshop 7-8pm ^

Lockhorn Cider House, 21 South Wallace Avenue, Bozeman ^ (406) 404-1168 ^ lockhornhardcider.com Organic Gardening Made Easy – Part 1: 5 Tips to Get Your Garden Started

Rockin’ R Bingo 7pm ^ Rockin’ R Bar, 211 E. Main St, Bozeman ^ (406) 587-9355 ^ www.rockingrbar.com Bingo night at the Rockin’ R!

Live Music 8-10pm ^ Bacchus Pub, 105

W Main St, Bozeman ^ (406) 522-0079 ^ www.bacchuspubbozeman.com Come enjoy live music at the Bacchus Pub.

Karaoke 9pm ^ Bar IX, 311 E Main St,

Bozeman ^ (406) 551-2185 ^ www.bar-ix. com Make your voice heard at Bozeman’s Choice for karaoke every Tuesday from 9-close.

Wednesday, Mar. 29 Sensational Babies 10-11am ^ Museum

of the Rockies, 600 West Kagy Boulevard, Bozeman ^ Free for members, $5 ^ Birth - 36 months ^ (406) 994-2251 ^ www.museumoftherockies.org Read, talk, sing and play with your baby through sensory awareness activities and explorations designed specifically for newborns, one- and two-year-olds.

Little Ones Storytime 10:15-11am ^ Bozeman Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 2-4 ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org Short storytime for ages 2-4. Little Ones Storytime 11:15am-noon ^

Bozeman Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 2-4 ^ 406-5707752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org Short storytime for ages 2-4.

Sack Lunch Seminar: Intersections of Indigenous Feminism and Women’s Reproductive Rights noon-1pm ^ MSU

SUB (Strand Union Building), 280 Strand Union, Bozeman ^ (406) 994-4636 ^ www. montana.edu/sub/ Join graduate student Abbie Bandstra for a presentation and discussion.

Afternoon Swimming Lessons 2:30pm ^

Bozeman Swim Center, ^ Swimming lessons.

Minecraft Meetup 3:45-5pm ^ Boze-

man Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www. bozemanlibrary.org Play Minecraft with other kids - bring your own device, or use one of ours!

Wii Wednesday 4-5:30pm ^ Bozeman Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org Kids of all ages are invited.

R.E.A.D. to a Dog 4-5pm ^ Bozeman Public

Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org Intermountain Therapy Dogs are available to be read to by kids.

A Season of Predators 7-9pm ^ Emer-

son’s Crawford Theatre, 111 S. Grand Ave., Bozeman ^ (406) 587-9797 ^ www. theemerson.org Join Defenders of Wildlife for a special screening of A Season of Predators by Jason Kauffman Alpenglow Press Productions.

BozemanMagazine.com March 2017 49


GREATER YELLOWSTONE COMMUNITY

EVENTS CALENDAR Bozeman Learn to Skate 5:10-6:20pm ^

Haynes Pavilion, ^ $240- 12 WEEK SESSION $150- 6 WEEK SESSION ^ www.bozemanskating.com Learn to Skate! All skills levels welcome. Classes include basic skills, hockey skills, and adult skills. Go to www.bozemanskating.com for more information or call 640-0475.

Free Tax Help 5:30-7pm ^ Jake Jabs Col-

Trivia Night 8pm ^ Rockin’ R Bar, 211 E.

Main St, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ (406) 587-9355 ^ www.rockingrbar.com Trivia followed by a live DJ 10pm- close.

Trivia 8pm ^ The Molly Brown, 703 W.

Babcock, Bozeman ^ (406) 552-7362 Bar tabs for the top 3 teams.

lege of Business and Entrepreneurship, ^ FREE ^ (406) 994-4421 Accounting students from MSU’s Jake Jabs College of Business and Entrepreneurship are offering free help preparing tax returns for MSU students and individuals who made less than $58,000 last year.

Karaoke Night 9pm ^ Bacchus Pub, 105

Montana Women’s Business Center Trainings 5:30-8:30pm ^ Big Sky Chamber,

Open Mic 10:30pm ^ The Haufbrau, 22

^ $25 (must be a Big Sky resident) ^ QuickBooks Online Big Sky

Music & Mussels 5:30-8pm ^ Bridger

W Main St, Bozeman ^ (406) 522-0079 ^ www.bacchuspubbozeman.com Whether you’ve “Got Friends in Low Places” or you’re “Just a Small Town Girl, Livin’ In a Lonely World” our karaoke caters to all. Talented to tone deft.

S 8th Ave, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 21+ ^ (406) 587-4931 ^ www.facebook.com Bozeman’s only bar with live music 7 nights a week. Open Mics are Sunday, Monday and Wednesday.

Brewing, 1609 S 11th Ave, Bozeman ^ (406) 587-2124 ^ www.bridgerbrewing. com Live music and mussels!

Thursday, Mar. 30

BPW Awards Ceremony 5:30-9pm ^ The

Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org A free breastfeeding support group.

Emerson Center for the Arts & Culture, 111 South Grand Ave, Bozeman ^ (406) 587-9797 ^ www.theemerson.org Networking and Awards Ceremony

Baby Bistro 11am-1pm ^ Bozeman Public

Babies & Books 11:15am-noon ^ Belgrade

^ REI, 2220 Tschache Lane, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ (406) 587-1938 ^ www.rei.com Get your bike ready for the nice weather!

Community Library, ^ FREE ^ (406)3884346 ^ belgradelibrary.org Bring your little one, ages birth to 36 months. Songs, rhymes, and finger plays. Each story time is followed by active play time and socialization.

Pickin’ in the Parks 6:30-9:30pm ^ The

Toast Masters noon-1:10pm ^ Owenhouse

Spring Bike Maintenance Basics 6-7:30pm

Story Mansion, 811 S. Willson, Bozeman ^ Free ^ all ^ 406-582-2910 ^ www. friendsofthestory.org Pickers, singers, listeners, dancers, on-lookers of all abilities are welcome.

ACE Hardware (Downstairs), ^ FREE ^ All Ages ^ The mission of a Toastmaster Club is to provide a mutually supportive and positive learning environment in which every member has the opportunity to develop communication and lead.

Elise R. Donohue Lecture on The American West in Memory of Walter S. Rosenberry

Afternoon Swimming Lessons 2:30pm ^

6:30-7:30pm ^ Museum of the Rockies, 600 West Kagy Boulevard, Bozeman ^ Free to the public ^ (406) 994-2251 ^ www. museumoftherockies.org Bringing the Ocean to Eye Level: Notes from the Arctic - Presented by Stephanie Gandulla

Planning and Investing For Your Retirement 6:30-8:30pm ^ Montana State

University, Bozeman ^ $79.00 ^ (406) 994-0211 ^ www.montana.edu You will learn: - Ed’s Top Ten Investment and Retirement Planning Priorities - Why many are unaware that today may be the most challenging investment environment in history, and options for responding to that.

Bozeman’s Original Pub Trivia 7-9:30pm ^

Pub 317, 321 E Main St Ste 317, Bozeman ^ 21+ ^ (406) 582-8898 ^ www.pub317. com Bring your friends and test your smarts during our Wednesday night trivia. Topics include sports, history, politics, geography, science, animals, and many more.

50 March 2017 BozemanMagazine.com

Bozeman Swim Center, ^ Swimming lessons.

DIY (Do It Yourself) Club 4:30-5:30pm ^

Bozeman Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ ages 10-16 ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org This club is an extension of the diy.org website and app, where you can create projects, share then with other DIYers, and earn patches.

The Vibe Quartet 6pm ^ 406 Brewing, 111 S. Oak St., Bozeman ^ no cover ^ www.406brewingcompany.com

IBU’s 6-8pm ^ MAP Brewing Co, 510

Manley Rd, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ All Ages ^ (406) 587-4070 ^ www.mapbrewing.com Live music.

Bluegrass Thursdays w/The Bridger Creek Boys 7-9pm ^ Red Tractor Pizza, 1007 W Main St, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ All Ages ^ (406) 359-1999 ^ www.redtractorpizza. com The Bridger Creek Boys draw inspiration from traditional artists such as Dock Boggs and Bill Monroe, as well as more contemporary artists like the Grateful Dead, Steve Earle, and The Band.

Random Acts of Improv 8pm ^ Verge

Random Acts of Improv 8pm ^ Verge

Kalyn Beasley 8pm ^ The Murray Bar, 201

S.L.A.M. Presents Chris Cunningham & Friends 8pm ^ Live From the Divide, 627

Theater, 2304 N. 7th Ave, Bozeman ^ $7 ^ (406) 587-0737 ^ vergetheater.com The amazing Bozeman Improverts are on the Verge Main Stage to tackle long form improv, the tight rope walk of the theater world!

W Park St, Livingston ^ (406) 222-6433 ^ www.themurraybar.com Wyoming Songwriter

Live Music 9-11pm ^ Bacchus Pub, 105

W Main St, Bozeman ^ (406) 522-0079 ^ www.bacchuspubbozeman.com Come enjoy live music at the Bacchus Pub.

Theater, 2304 N. 7th Ave, Bozeman ^ $7 ^ (406) 587-0737 ^ vergetheater.com The amazing Bozeman Improverts are on the Verge Main Stage to tackle long form improv, the tight rope walk of the theater world!

East Peach Street, Bozeman ^ $30 + service fees ^ livefromthedivide.com Please join us and support a great cause plus some fantastic music!

Exit 288 9pm ^ American Legion Boze-

Friday, Mar. 31

man, 225 E Main St, Bozeman ^ no cover ^ 21+ ^ (406) 586-8400 ^ www.gallatinpost14.com Live local music

Shelly Besler & Tony Polecastro Uncorked

Gallatin Grass Project 9pm ^ The Murray

Wine & Cheese Bar, 212 W. Park St, Livingston ^ 406-222-5418 ^ thegourmetcellar.com/wine-bar/ Americana.

Dan Dubuque Norris Hot Springs, Rr 84, Norris ^ (406) 685-3303 ^ www.norrishotsprings.com One Man Soul Band

Read-Sing-Play! Preschool Storytime

10:15am ^ Bozeman Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ Preschool ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org Join other preschooler & their parents for reading, singing and learning.

Read-Sing-Play! Preschool Storytime

11:15am ^ Bozeman Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ Preschool ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org Join other preschooler & their parents for reading, singing and learning.

Bar, 201 W Park St, Livingston ^ (406) 2226433 ^ www.themurraybar.com Bluegrass

Bluebelly Junction 9pm ^ Sacajawea Hotel, 5 N Main St, Three Forks ^ Live music.

Saturday, Apr. 1 Fools Gold Gallatin Riverhouse Grill, 45130 Gallatin Rd, Big Sky ^ (406) 995-7427 ^ gallatinriverhousegrill.com This awesome country western band you won’t want to miss.

Heather Lingle Norris Hot Springs, Rr 84, Norris ^ (406) 685-3303 ^ www.norrishotsprings.com Americana Songwriter

Bozeman Winter Farmers’ Market 9am-

Peets Hill (base area), ^ FREE ^ All Ages ^ gvlt.org Getting outside for a walk can be one of the easiest ways to stay healthy. Join us for our weekly trail walking group. This is a fun, casual way to get moving during the work day.

noon ^ Emerson Ballroom, 111 S. Grand, Bozeman ^ (406) 587-9797 ^ www.theemerson.org Find hot breakfast, ethically sourced coffee and tea, fresh greens & vegetables, local grassfed meats, wild-caught fish, fresh eggs, cow & goat cheese, fresh pasta, honey, jams & preserves, Montana grown grains & oils, baked goods (gluten free too!), soaps & salves, wool, yarn, live music, and much more.

Pokemon Club 4:30-5:30pm ^ Bozeman

Free Tax Help 9:30-11am ^ Jake Jabs Col-

Walk for the Health Of It noon-1pm ^

Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www. bozemanlibrary.org Love Pokemon? Meet other Pokemon fans Fridays at 4:30 in the library for all kinds of Pokemon fun.

Claudia Williams 5:30-8:30pm ^ Kountry

Korner Cafe, 81820 Gallatin Road, Bozeman ^ all ages ^ (406) 586-2281 Claudia from Montana Rose, live music while you dine.

IBU’s 6-8pm ^ MAP Brewing Co, 510

Manley Rd, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ All Ages ^ (406) 587-4070 ^ www.mapbrewing.com Live music.

Everything Fitz: The Fitzgerald Family Band 7:30pm ^ The Ellen Theatre, 17 W.

lege of Business and Entrepreneurship, ^ FREE ^ (406) 994-4421 Accounting students from MSU’s Jake Jabs College of Business and Entrepreneurship are offering free help preparing tax returns for MSU students and individuals who made less than $58,000 last year.

Books & Babies 10-11am ^ Bozeman

Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ 0-2 ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www. bozemanlibrary.org A fun, relaxed storytime for caretakers and babies ages 0-2.

13th Annual Bridal Walk 11am-3pm ^

Downtown Bozeman, Bozeman ^ Plan your Montana Wedding in the heart of Downtown Bozeman!

Main St., Bozeman ^ $17.50 ^ (406) 5855885 ^ www.theellentheatre.com Live music.

All listings are subject to change. Check ahead for full details.


BRI NG I N G IN T E R E S T IN G A RT & CU LT U RE T O PEO P L E H U N G R Y F OR S O ME T H IN G N E W ... Saturday Stories 11:15am-noon ^ Boze-

man Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www. bozemanlibrary.org Join us with the whole family for this all-ages storytime.

The Emperor’s New Clothes 2pm ^ Verge

Theater, 2304 N. 7th Ave, Bozeman ^ (406) 587-0737 ^ vergetheater.com Kathryn Schultz Miller’s dynamic and fun stage adaptation of the classic story is packed with action, laughs, and magic tricks!

Matt Ridgeway 6pm ^ Uncorked Wine

& Cheese Bar, 212 W. Park St, Livingston ^ 406-222-5418 ^ thegourmetcellar.com/ wine-bar/ Classic and Latin Jazz.

Saturday Dance Social 7-10pm ^ The MAC - Montana Movement Arts Center, 1871 S. 22nd Street Ste. A-2, Bozeman ^ $5 ^ All Ages ^ (406) 551-6077 ^ themacmontana. com Kick off the month with a family-friendly dance lesson and social dancing. 7:00 pm lesson ,open dancing at 7:30 (partner and line dancing) to upbeat country, swing, ballroom mix.

SwingCats Saturday Night Swing Dance

7-11pm ^ Romney Gym, 3rd Floor Dance Studio, ^ FREE lesson and dance with original American swing dances like Lindy Hop, East Coast Swing, Balboa, Charleston, and more!

Random Acts of Improv 8pm ^ Verge

Theater, 2304 N. 7th Ave, Bozeman ^ $7 ^ (406) 587-0737 ^ vergetheater.com The amazing Bozeman Improverts are on the Verge Main Stage to tackle long form improv, the tight rope walk of the theater world!

Carlos Nunez 8pm ^ The Ellen Theatre,

17 W. Main St., Bozeman ^ $19.75 ^ (406) 585-5885 ^ www.theellentheatre.com Live music.

Exit 288 9pm ^ American Legion Boze-

man, 225 E Main St, Bozeman ^ no cover ^ all ages ^ (406) 586-8400 ^ www.gallatinpost14.com Live local music

Ticket Sauce 9pm ^ The Murray Bar, 201

W Park St, Livingston ^ (406) 222-6433 ^ www.themurraybar.com Blues Rock

Sunday, Apr. 2 Tom Catmull Norris Hot Springs, Rr 84,

Norris ^ (406) 685-3303 ^ www.norrishotsprings.com Original and Stolen Americana

Remote Control Car Racing noon-6pm ^

Bozeman American Legion, ^ $10 Racing; $10 Rental Car ^ All Ages ^ 406-579-2707 ^ www.facebook.com Mini-z Racing ever Sunday at the American Legion upstairs. Setup and practice will be from 12pm - 1:30pm. Racing will start at 2pm. The club will have 4 rental cars (first come).

Bozeman Learn to Skate 12:30-2:10pm ^

Haynes Pavilion, ^ $240- 12 WEEK SESSION $150- 6 WEEK SESSION ^ www.bozemanskating.com Learn to Skate! All skills levels welcome. Classes include basic skills, hockey skills, and adult skills. Go to www.bozemanskating.com for more information or call 640-0475.

Narrative with a Cause: Stories as Persuasive Art 1-3:30pm ^ Writer’s Residence, ^ $36 ^ 18+ ^ 406.581.9405 ^ www.MontanaCoauthor.com Local coauthor Anika Hanisch will provide tips on the most effective persuasive form that humans have used for millennia: the personal narrative.

Dirk Alan 6-8pm ^ MAP Brewing Co, 510

Manley Rd, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ All Ages ^ (406) 587-4070 ^ www.mapbrewing.com Live music.

Bridger Mountain Big Band 7-9:30pm ^

Eagles Lodge, 316 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ no cover ^ (406) 587-9996 Live music each Sunday.

Ballroom & Swing Dance Classes 6-9pm ^

The MAC - Montana Movement Arts Center, 1871 S. 22nd Street Ste. A-2, Bozeman ^ $10/$8 students ^ All Ages ^ (406) 5516077 ^ themacmontana.com Beginning and continuing partner dance classes including Waltz, Swing, Cha Cha, Foxtrot and more. One hour class, take the series or drop in for a single session.

Spanish Class with Kristin ND Wolf 7:30-

8:30pm ^ Lockhorn Cider House, 21 South Wallace Avenue, Bozeman ^ $130/punchcard (includes 8 classes and one glass of cider/class) ^ 21+ ^ (406) 404-1168 ^ lockhornhardcider.com Sip cider and hone your Spanish speaking skills. All levels welcome.

Trivia 8-10pm ^ Bacchus Pub, 105 W Main St, Bozeman ^ 21+ ^ (406) 522-0079 ^ www.bacchuspubbozeman.com Come in and join us every Monday night and use whatever brainpower you have left from the weekend to battle with Bozeman’s best and brightest for Bacchus VIP money.

Open Mic 10:30pm ^ The Haufbrau, 22

Open Mic 10:30pm ^ The Haufbrau, 22

S 8th Ave, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 21+ ^ (406) 587-4931 ^ www.facebook.com Bozeman’s only bar with live music 7 nights a week. Open Mics are Sunday, Monday and Wednesday.

S 8th Ave, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 21+ ^ (406) 587-4931 ^ www.facebook.com Bozeman’s only bar with live music 7 nights a week. Open Mics are Sunday, Monday and Wednesday.

Monday, Apr. 3

Tuesday, Apr. 4

LEGO Club 3:45-5pm ^ Bozeman Public

2017 Take the LEAD Series 8-10am ^

Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org For kids who love to build; LEGOs provided!

Teen Writers 4-5pm ^ Bozeman Public

Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ Teens ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www. bozemanlibrary.org This teen-led group meets every Monday in the Teen Study Room.

Pints with Purpose 5-8pm ^ Bridger Brewing, 1609 S 11th Ave, Bozeman ^ All ages ^ (406) 587-2124 ^ www.bridgerbrewing. com Every Monday night Bridger Brewing donates $1 from every pint sold to a non-profit or charity. Check our website (bridgerbrewing.com) for details.

Free Tax Help 5:30-7pm ^ Jake Jabs Col-

lege of Business and Entrepreneurship, ^ FREE ^ (406) 994-4421 Accounting students from MSU’s Jake Jabs College of Business and Entrepreneurship are offering free help preparing tax returns for MSU students and individuals who made less than $58,000 last year.

Bozeman Writers’ Group 6-8pm ^ Boze-

man Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www. bozemanlibrary.org The group welcomes all levels of writers, and encourages the free exchange of ideas among writers in the Board Room on the second floor.

All listings are subject to change. Check ahead for full details.

Bozeman Chamber of Commerce, 2000 Commerce Way, Bozeman ^ $99/$198 ^ (406) 586-5421 ^ www.bozemanchamber. com Leading through Change: Getting from Here to There

Books & Babies 10-11am ^ Bozeman

Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 0-2 ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www. bozemanlibrary.org A fun, relaxed story time for caretakers and babies 0-2.

Tours for Tots 10-11am ^ Museum of the

Rockies, 600 West Kagy Boulevard, Bozeman ^ Included with admission ^ 3-5 ^ (406) 994-2251 ^ www.museumoftherockies.org Museum learning for 3-5 year olds.

Stress, Grief and Trauma noon-1pm ^

Willson School, 404 East Main, Bozeman ^ Talk by Laura St. John, SAFE-TI (School & Family Engagement Trauma Informed)

Books & Babies 1-2pm ^ Bozeman Public

Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 0-2 ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www. bozemanlibrary.org A fun, relaxed story time for caretakers and babies 0-2.

Kids’ Chess Club 3:30-5pm ^ Bozeman

Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ K-12 ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org If you are in grades K-12 you are invited to Chess Club.

SW MT Crohn’s & Colitis Community Support/Education Group 5:30-7pm ^

Bozeman Health Deaconess Hospital PINE ROOM, ^ Free ^ all ages ^ 406-209-0277 The group offers support and education for those suffering with inflammatory bowel disease and their friends and family.

Tommy Georges 6-8pm ^ MAP Brewing Co, 510 Manley Rd, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ All Ages ^ (406) 587-4070 ^ www.mapbrewing.com Live music. Cribbage Night 6:30-9pm ^ Eagles Lodge,

316 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ $8 ^ 21+ ^ (406) 587-9996 Open cribbage tournaments every Tuesday evening. Sign up at 6:25, start at 6:30! Come play five games with us! $8 buy-in, 100% payout, high hand bonus, and lots of good times!

Chord Rustlers Rehearsals 7pm ^ Boze-

man Catholic Community Center, 210 S. Grand Ave, Bozeman ^ If you’re a fellow who loves to sing join us in singing four-part harmony on Tuesday evenings at 7:00 pm.

Live Music 8-10pm ^ Bacchus Pub, 105

W Main St, Bozeman ^ (406) 522-0079 ^ www.bacchuspubbozeman.com Come enjoy live music at the Bacchus Pub.

Karaoke 9pm ^ Bar IX, 311 E Main St,

Bozeman ^ (406) 551-2185 ^ www.bar-ix. com Make your voice heard at Bozeman’s Choice for karaoke every Tuesday from 9-close.

Wednesday, Apr. 5 1 Million Cups 7:30-8:30am ^ Red Tractor

Pizza, 1007 W Main St, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ All Ages ^ (406) 359-1999 ^ www.redtractorpizza.com The first Wednesday of each month, the 1MC program offers two local entrepreneurs an opportunity to present their startups to a diverse audience.

Sensational Babies 10-11am ^ Museum of the Rockies, 600 West Kagy Boulevard, Bozeman ^ Free for members, $5 ^ Birth - 36 months ^ (406) 994-2251 ^ www.museumoftherockies.org Read, talk, sing and play with your baby through sensory awareness activities and explorations designed specifically for newborns, one- and two-year-olds. Little Ones Storytime 10:15-11am ^ Bozeman Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 2-4 ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org Short storytime for ages 2-4. Little Ones Storytime 11:15am-noon ^

Bozeman Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 2-4 ^ 406-5707752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org Short storytime for ages 2-4.

BozemanMagazine.com March 2017 51


GREATER YELLOWSTONE COMMUNITY

EVENTS CALENDAR Minecraft Meetup 3:45-5pm ^ Boze-

Pickin’ in the Parks 6:30-9:30pm ^ The

Wii Wednesday 4-5:30pm ^ Bozeman Pub-

Planning and Investing For Your Retirement 6:30-8:30pm ^ Montana State

man Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www. bozemanlibrary.org Play Minecraft with other kids - bring your own device, or use one of ours!

lic Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org Kids of all ages are invited.

R.E.A.D. to a Dog 4-5pm ^ Bozeman Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org Intermountain Therapy Dogs are available to be read to by kids.

Bozeman Learn to Skate 5:10-6:20pm ^

Haynes Pavilion, ^ $240- 12 WEEK SESSION $150- 6 WEEK SESSION ^ www.bozemanskating.com Learn to Skate! All skills levels welcome. Classes include basic skills, hockey skills, and adult skills. Go to www.bozemanskating.com for more information or call 640-0475.

Mathias 6-8pm ^ Outlaw Brewing, 2876 N 27th, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ All Ages, 21+ to drink ^ (406) 577-2403 ^ outlaw-brewing. com Live Local Music

Story Mansion, 811 S. Willson, Bozeman ^ Free ^ all ^ 406-582-2910 ^ www. friendsofthestory.org Pickers, singers, listeners, dancers, on-lookers of all abilities are welcome.

Marco Benevento 8pm ^ The Filling Sta-

tion, 2005 N. Rouse Ave, Bozeman ^ $12 Advance $15 door ^ 21+ ^ (406) 587-0585 Benevento’s studio albums and live performances set forth a vision that connects the dots in the space between LCD Soundsystem and Leon Russell pulsating with dance rock energy.

Grill, 45130 Gallatin Rd, Big Sky ^ (406) 995-7427 ^ gallatinriverhousegrill.com From Cash to Keen and a little hippie in between! Live music.

Live Music 9-11pm ^ Bacchus Pub, 105

W Main St, Bozeman ^ (406) 522-0079 ^ www.bacchuspubbozeman.com Come enjoy live music at the Bacchus Pub.

University, Bozeman ^ $79.00 ^ (406) 994-0211 ^ www.montana.edu You will learn: - Ed’s Top Ten Investment and Retirement Planning Priorities - Why many are unaware that today may be the most challenging investment environment in history, and options for responding to that.

Karaoke Night 9pm ^ Bacchus Pub, 105

Bozeman’s Original Pub Trivia 7-9:30pm ^

Open Mic 10:30pm ^ The Haufbrau, 22

10:15am ^ Bozeman Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ Preschool ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org Join other preschooler & their parents for reading, singing and learning.

Thursday, Apr. 6

Read-Sing-Play! Preschool Storytime

Pub 317, 321 E Main St Ste 317, Bozeman ^ 21+ ^ (406) 582-8898 ^ www.pub317. com Bring your friends and test your smarts during our Wednesday night trivia. Topics include sports, history, politics, geography, science, animals, and many more.

Trivia Night 8pm ^ Rockin’ R Bar, 211 E.

Main St, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ (406) 587-9355 ^ www.rockingrbar.com Trivia followed by a live DJ 10pm- close.

Trivia 8pm ^ The Molly Brown, 703 W.

Babcock, Bozeman ^ (406) 552-7362 Bar tabs for the top 3 teams.

W Main St, Bozeman ^ (406) 522-0079 ^ www.bacchuspubbozeman.com Whether you’ve “Got Friends in Low Places” or you’re “Just a Small Town Girl, Livin’ In a Lonely World” our karaoke caters to all. Talented to tone deft.

S 8th Ave, Bozeman ^ Free ^ 21+ ^ (406) 587-4931 ^ www.facebook.com Bozeman’s only bar with live music 7 nights a week. Open Mics are Sunday, Monday and Wednesday.

Tours for Tots 10-11am ^ Museum of the

Rockies, 600 West Kagy Boulevard, Bozeman ^ Included with admission ^ 3-5 ^ (406) 994-2251 ^ www.museumoftherockies.org Museum learning for 3-5 year olds.

Baby Bistro 11am-1pm ^ Bozeman Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org A free breastfeeding support group.

Babies & Books 11:15am-noon ^ Belgrade Community Library, ^ FREE ^ (406)3884346 ^ belgradelibrary.org Bring your little one, ages birth to 36 months. Songs, rhymes, and finger plays. Each story time is followed by active play time and socialization.

Toast Masters noon-1:10pm ^ Owenhouse ACE Hardware (Downstairs), ^ FREE ^ All Ages ^ The mission of a Toastmaster Club is to provide a mutually supportive and positive learning environment in which every member has the opportunity to develop communication and lead.

DIY (Do It Yourself) Club 4:30-5:30pm ^

Bozeman Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ ages 10-16 ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org This club is an extension of the diy.org website and app, where you can create projects, share then with other DIYers, and earn patches.

The Vibe Quartet 6pm ^ 406 Brewing,

111 S. Oak St., Bozeman ^ no cover ^ www.406brewingcompany.com Live local music!

Bluegrass Thursdays w/The Bridger Creek Boys 7-9pm ^ Red Tractor Pizza, 1007 W Main St, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ All Ages ^ (406) 359-1999 ^ www.redtractorpizza. com The Bridger Creek Boys draw inspiration from traditional artists such as Dock Boggs and Bill Monroe, as well as more contemporary artists like the Grateful Dead, Steve Earle, and The Band.

52 March 2017 BozemanMagazine.com

Tom Marino 7pm ^ Gallatin Riverhouse

Friday, Apr. 7 Read-Sing-Play! Preschool Storytime

11:15am ^ Bozeman Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ Preschool ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www.bozemanlibrary.org Join other preschooler & their parents for reading, singing and learning.

Pokemon Club 4:30-5:30pm ^ Bozeman

Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www. bozemanlibrary.org Love Pokemon? Meet other Pokemon fans Fridays at 4:30 in the library for all kinds of Pokemon fun.

Claudia Williams 5:30-8:30pm ^ Kountry

Korner Cafe, 81820 Gallatin Road, Bozeman ^ all ages ^ (406) 586-2281 Claudia from Montana Rose, live music while you dine.

The Shawshank Redemption 7:30pm ^

The Ellen Theatre, 17 W. Main St., Bozeman ^ $5 ^ (406) 585-5885 ^ www.theellentheatre.com Movie night at The Ellen!

Cosmic Noise 9pm ^ American Legion

Bozeman, 225 E Main St, Bozeman ^ no cover ^ 21+ ^ (406) 586-8400 ^ www.gallatinpost14.com Live local music

Sol Seed 9pm ^ The Filling Station, 2005

N. Rouse Ave, Bozeman ^ $8 advance, $10 door ^ 21+ ^ (406) 587-0585 Sol Seed brings a distinct sound combining elements of Rock, Hip Hop, Soul, World Music and Psychedelic Jam all over a solid Reggae foundation to form a positive musical fusion.

Saturday, Apr. 8 Books & Babies 10-11am ^ Bozeman

Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ 0-2 ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www. bozemanlibrary.org A fun, relaxed storytime for caretakers and babies ages 0-2.

Saturday Stories 11:15am-noon ^ Boze-

man Public Library, 626 East Main Street, Bozeman ^ FREE ^ 406-570-7752 ^ www. bozemanlibrary.org Join us with the whole family for this all-ages storytime.

All listings are subject to change. Check ahead for full details.


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