Page 1

WATER SMART PLANTING GUIDE

for the Bozeman Area

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Water in Bozeman: The Big Picture Perched at the headwaters of the Missouri River Basin, Bozeman enjoys extremely high-quality water, almost straight from the source. Although our water is high quality, quantity is limited. With only 16 inches of average precipitation annually, Bozeman’s considered semi-arid and drought-prone.

Bozeman relies on snowpack for its water supply. 80% of our city’s water comes from snowmelt in the Hyalite Range which feeds Sourdough Creek and Hyalite Reservoir. The other 20% comes from a developed spring at the headwaters of Lyman Creek.

But, with shifting climate patterns, our water supplies are likely to become less reliable. In the future, more moisture is expected to arrive as rain instead of snow. On top of that, warmer temperatures will lead to earlier peak flows and drier summers.

Plus, Bozeman is booming, growing at a rate far above the national average. More people will need more water, and eventually, these supplies won’t be enough.

In fact, Bozeman could be facing a water shortage in the next 20 years. The City of Bozeman has identified water conservation as the single largest source of water for Bozeman’s future.

Water conservation creates additional supplies by reducing water used in and around homes and businesses.

It’s the cheapest, most expedient and environmentally friendly way to thrive through drought, and to ensure a reliable water supply for the future.

Nearly 50% of household water goes into our yards. You can help save water right in your own lawn, landscape, and garden. We’ll walk you through everything you need to know about soil, watering, and planting – even how to cash in on rebates – so you can keep more green in your yard and in your pocket. For more information, visit www.bozemanwater.com.

2 | Water Smart Planting Guide for the Bozeman Area | www.bozemanwater.com

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Lawn & Landscape

The Dirt on Soil Gardeners worth their salt know that lawns and landscapes depend on good dirt. Knowing your soil type means knowing how to improve it—and that’s the secret to efficient watering and gorgeous landscapes.

DISCOVER YOUR DIRT To find your soil type, place approximately one tablespoon of soil in the palm of your hand. Add water one drop at a time and knead the soil to break down all the larger pieces. You can identify your soil when the consistency feels like putty. Refer to the soil types listed to the left to determine your soil type. For more information, refer to the Outdoor Resources information at www.bozemanwater.com. IMPROVE YOUR DIRT Good dirt has particles of varying sizes and shapes and organic materials which retain water, provide nutrients, and allow water to get to plant roots.

KNOW YOUR DIRT There are three common soil types: clay loam, sand loam and silt loam. · Clay loam is sticky and easy to shape. It often requires sand and organic matter to improve its quality. Clay is the gluey “peanut butter” of soils, but it can dry to a hard, almost impermeable surface.

Once you know your soil type, make it even better: 1) Begin with deep spading, plowing or rototilling to a depth of about six inches to break up compacted soil.

· Sand loam is visibly granular with no stickiness. It’s gritty, like sugar. Most sand loam will break up easily even when wet.

2) While tilling, add organic matter such as compost or shredded leaves to beef up nutrition.

· Silt loam is the happy medium between clay and sand loam. Its granules are smaller than sand but not as small as clay. It is smooth like clay but breaks apart like sand.

3) Add soil amendments, as needed, for your type of soil. For more information about soil amendments, refer to Outdoor Resources at www.bozemanwater.com.

Guess what Bozeman is built on? Mostly, clay loam. This heavy, fine soil prevents water from soaking in easily. If you water this type of soil too fast, the water pools and runs off into the street and storm drains, picking up all kinds of contaminants. This dirty water can end up in our streams.

SECRET INGREDIENT: COMPOST Compost is decomposed organic materials, and plants love it. You can purchase it or make it yourself from leaves, lawn clippings, vegetable waste and coffee grounds. Compost improves air circulation in clay soils and nutrient retention in sandy soils. Plus, healthy plants in a wellcomposted landscape bed don’t need to be watered as frequently.

In other areas of town, the soil can be extremely porous. Bottom line: you need healthy soil for a healthy garden, so it pays to know your dirt and water accordingly.

Most soils can be improved by adding compost, which helps retain water in the soil and at plant roots. Compost can be added to flower beds and gardens and before installing sod or planting trees and shrubs. Compost can also be used as a top dressing on existing lawns.

DIY HOME COMPOSTING Follow a recipe! Like baking cookies, composting requires that you know what ingredients, and how much of them, are needed. Ingredient list: • Materials: be sure to add the brown and the green! The ‘brown’ materials, or sources of carbon in the compost, are things like dead leaves, wood chips, and cardboard. The ‘green’ materials, or sources of nitrogen, are things like lawn clippings, vegetable waste and coffee grounds. The C:N (carbon to nitrogen ratio) should be about 30:1.

• Microorganisms: they are the cooks in the kitchen and do the dirty work! You can add worms, manure, or starters to get things going. • Oxygen: needed for the microorganisms and speeds up the process. • Water: the compost pile should be damp, like a wrung-out sponge.

All of these ingredients work together to get things cooking! Water Smart Planting Guide for the Bozeman Area | www.bozemanwater.com | 3

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Lawn & Landscape

Plant Smarter: Go Drought-Tolerant A regular old lawn sucks up water, but landscaping with droughttolerant plants can help you water less—whether you replace a few high-maintenance flowers, remove a section of turfgrass, or redo your entire landscape. Choosing to landscape with drought-tolerant plants can cut your watering by fifty to seventy-five percent.

Watering aside, drought tolerant plants simply make gardening and landscaping easier. They need less maintenance, require no fertilizers or pesticides, offer habitat for pollinators, and they protect your landscape investment against drought. Plus, well-designed water efficient landscapes raise property values, offsetting the cost of installation. DROUGHT TOLERANT VS. WATER SMART PLANTS Drought tolerant plants generally don’t need extra watering after the plant is established, unless there is a long dry spell. Plants are considered “established” usually two to three seasons after planting. Water smart plants can withstand periods without supplemental water but will need deep watering during hot and dry conditions. See pages 8–15 for drought tolerant and water smart plant lists.

PLANNING YOUR DROUGHT-FRIENDLY TAKEOVER Thinking through your drought-tolerant landscape before you start planting can pay off big-time later. 1) Start by familiarizing yourself with drought tolerant plants at local nurseries. Per the USDA, most of the Bozeman Area is in hardiness Zone 4. Selecting Zone 4 plants (or lower zones) ensures that your plants are suited for Bozeman’s climate. 2) Using graph paper, draw a map of your property noting trees, fences, walkways or buildings. Indicate areas of sun or shade which will help you determine plant selection and watering needs. Study the drainage patterns of the property. If you have a sloped yard, consider terraces to reduce erosion and soil loss from rain storms and outdoor watering. 3) Think about how each area will be used. Outdoor living areas, playing, seating, pathways and visual barriers should be added to the plan. Grass patches should be easily mowed. Curved barriers are preferred over straight lines with sharp corners. Bigger shrubs and trees can be located next to buildings to offer heating and cooling. MAINTAINING YOUR DROUGHT-TOLERANT LANDSCAPE Good maintenance is essential for a beautiful landscape, but even more so for saving water. · Prune shrubs and trees when they are dormant. Pruning during the growing season will actually spur growth and increase watering needs. · Weed early in the season. Regular weeding makes more water and nutrients available to your chosen landscape plants, instead of getting sucked up by invaders. · Add mulch to your landscape bed (about two inches in depth) to hold in soil moisture. · Check your drip system for leaks.

4 | Water Smart Planting Guide for the Bozeman Area | www.bozemanwater.com

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Lawn & Landscape

Water Smarter: Lusher Landscapes DRIP YOUR WAY TO MORE GREEN Drip systems deliver water directly to landscape plants, minimizing water lost to evaporation. They are also great for mulched beds because water soaks into the soil without disturbing the mulch. Typical Flow Rates · Give trees a chance: Trees have deeper root zones and require more water than turf grass, shrubs and perennials. But, tree root zones also store lots of water, so they can be watered less frequently than smaller plants.

Drip 0.5 – 4 gal/hour Bubbler 0.5 – 2 gal/minute Hose 2 – 5 gal/minute

This chart will help you understand how much water drip, bubbler and hose systems deliver to your landscape.

· Far out: Trunks and leaves do not carry water to the roots of trees or shrubs. Deliver water to the edge of the leaf canopy, known as the drip line, which is where the roots are.

KEEP YOUR LANDSCAPE LOVELY FOR LESS · Root for plants: Water deeply and infrequently to encourage deep root development.

· Keep plants happy: Shrubs and perennials like deep but infrequent watering.

· One, two, three: Water no more than three days per week.

· Create plant cliques: Cluster plants with similar watering needs together in the same zones to avoid over and under watering.

· Don’t water the driveway: Save by keeping water from spraying on concrete and asphalt.

HOLD H20 HOSTAGE Most water evaporates before it ever reaches plant roots. A two-inch mulch barrier around trees, plants, and shrubs will help them hold on to water.

· The pool rule: Avoid letting water pool in gutters, streets and alleys.

· Don’t hose up: If you use a hose to water, install a spray nozzle to control the rate of flow.

GET LUSH FOR LESS GUSH. Green up your scene without wasting water, save some money, and get a little cash back too. Install drought tolerant plants and drip irrigation and receive up to $500 in rebates from the City of Bozeman. Lower your water bills without sacrificing your lawn and landscape.

For more details, see page 7 or visit www.bozemanwater.com. Water Smart Planting Guide for the Bozeman Area | www.bozemanwater.com | 5

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Lawn & Landscape

Water Smarter: More Lawn for Less Green We can’t stop heat waves, but we can watch our water—especially when it comes to our lawns.

SPRUCE UP YOUR SPRINKLERS! A recent survey indicated that seventy-two percent of all Bozeman residents have automatic in-ground sprinkler systems. These systems can save water—but only if they are maintained and operated properly. TWO TYPES OF SPRINKLER HEADS IN THIS WORLD There are two basic types of sprinkler heads: pop-ups and rotors. · Pop-up spray heads deliver about 1.5 to 2 inches of water per hour in a fan-shaped or full-circle spray. · Rotor spray heads deliver about a half inch of water per hour in a rotating jet of water. THE DOWNSIDE OF POP-UPS Pop-up systems that spray a steady fan of water can water four times as fast as rotor systems. If the soil is getting too much too fast, water will run off and be wasted. TEST YOUR LAWN WITH TWO WEEKS’ WORTH OF TUNA Each lawn’s water requirements are different, depending on the soil, sunlight, and other landscaping factors. To find out how much water your sprinkler system delivers, all you need is a tuna tin—well, 12 tuna tins. 1) Place 12 flat bottomed cans (tuna or cat food cans work) evenly across your lawn.

Sprinkler Run Times to Apply One Inch of Water Per Week Average Sprinkler Flow (Inches) from Test 0.2

0.3

0.4

0.5

0.6

0.7

0.8

0.9

Watering Time (Total Minutes Per Week) 75

50

37

30

25

22

19

16

SNEAK IN MORE WATER SAVINGS · Wake, water and roll: Water between 4am and 8am, since water evaporates during the middle of the day. · Rain check: Turn off your sprinkler system when it rains, or install a rain sensor to do it for you. · Don’t blow it: Avoid watering during high winds. · On again, off again: Experiment with your lawn by watering in cycles—five minutes on, five minutes off—to allow water to penetrate the soil and create a healthier lawn with less water. · Back off: Try taking two minutes off the watering times for each zone. If that works and your lawn stays green, take off another two minutes. · One, two, three: Water only when your lawn needs it. Watering three days per week is more than sufficient. · Green thumb rules: Adjust watering times throughout the season. A good rule of thumb is 1–1.5 inches of water per week during peak season (July and August). Water less in May and June, and by Labor Day, reduce watering to once per week to prepare grass for dormancy. · Don't get busted: Check your sprinkler system for leaks, broken, and misaligned nozzles and repair within seven days. · Stand taller: Raise your mower blade! Keep your grass at least three inches long to keep the soil cool.

2) Run your sprinklers for 15 minutes. 3) Use a ruler to measure the depth of the water (in inches) in each can and write it down.

PUT A LITTLE SPRING IN YOUR STEP If you step on your lawn and it doesn’t spring back, it’s time to water.

4) Add up the amounts and divide by the number of cans. This number is the average amount of water your sprinkler delivers in 15 minutes.

GET NEW GREEN GROWING To efficiently establish new lawns, water as needed for up to 21 days. After 21 days, routine watering can be reduced to three days per week or less, between 4am and 8am.

5) Use the following chart to determine what your total watering time is each week based on the amount of flow in inches from the Tuna Can Test.

6 | Water Smart Planting Guide for the Bozeman Area | www.bozemanwater.com

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Lawn & Landscape

Lower Your Flow for More Dough can be retrofitted to work with existing systems. Some are internet based and include apps to make it fun and easy to adjust sprinkler settings whether you are at home or away.

ek

0.9

16

Keep your lawn green, save money, and get some cash back too. When you install qualified sprinkler products, the City of Bozeman will reward you with a rebate. But that’s not the only advantage—these steps can help lower your water bills without sacrificing your lawn. Landscape and Sprinkler System Rebate Program Amounts* Products WaterSense® Labeled Smart Controllers Multiple Stream Multiple Trajectory (MSMT) Nozzles

Retrofit to existing system $300 $5/nozzle

Rain Sensors

$50

Drip Irrigation

$350

Drought Tolerant Plants and Grasses

(qualifying products are listed on pages 8-15 of this guide)

$150

*Rebate amounts differ for new construction. Rebate amount not to exceed purchase price.

ABOUT OUR REBATE PRODUCTS · WaterSense® Labeled Smart Controllers use local weather and landscape conditions to make decisions about when and for how long to water to better match plants’ water needs. These controllers

· Multiple Stream Multiple Trajectory (MSMT) Nozzles deliver water more efficiently than spray heads. With spray heads, 50% of the water is lost to evaporation and drift. Plus, they can easily replace your existing spray heads. · Rain Sensors override the sprinkler system when a certain amount of rain has fallen to shut off the system. When the sensor dries, it opens the connection to allow the system to resume normal operations. · Drip irrigation delivers water directly to plants—targeting the roots and minimizing water lost to evaporation and wind drift. · Drought tolerant plants require less maintenance than turfgrass and use 50-75% less water. Plus, they are beautiful and can add a big splash of color to your landscape. All plants and grasses listed on pages 8-15 of this guide qualify for our Rebate Program. · Sprinkler systems must be operating properly for these products to be of benefit. To qualify for a rebate on a smart controller or more than 10 nozzles, you must first check your sprinkler system or have one of our Approved Providers take a look. · Water use and water bills can be reduced with any of these rebated items. Rebates are available for single family residences (single meter), that receive water for outdoor watering from the City of Bozeman. For more information about the City of Bozeman’s Landscape and Sprinkler System Rebate Program, visit www.bozemanwater.com.

Free Sprinkler System Assessment* Did you know your sprinkler system can use more water in a week than your family uses inside your home in a month? Find out how to trim that water use (and your bill). Contact the City of Bozeman to schedule a free sprinkler system assessment. (Space is limited for this service, so early birds get the worm.) Or rent a DIY Sprinkler System Assessment Kit from the City of Bozeman. Then, check out the City of Bozeman’s Landscape and Sprinkler System Rebate Program and work with one of our Approved Providers to upgrade your system. You’ll be conserving water in no time. For more information about scheduling a sprinkler system assessment, or working with one of our Approved Providers, visit www.bozemanwater.com.

WE’RE WATCHING OUR WATER. YOU CAN TOO!

CONTACT THE CITY OF BOZEMAN FOR INFORMATION ABOUT SPRINKLER SYSTEM ASSESSMENTS WWW.BOZEMANWATER.COM

*Available to residences connected to City of Bozeman water for outdoor watering Water Smart Planting Guide for the Bozeman Area | www.bozemanwater.com | 7

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Plant Lists

Drought Tolerant Shrubs for Full Sun The plants contained in this list should not require supplemental water once the plant is established two to three years after planting. This does not apply during periods of prolonged drought. No.

Common Name

Scientific Name

Notes

1.

Rabbit Brush Green*

Chrysothamnus viscidiflorus

Benefits from annual pruning to keep it from sprawling.

2.

Sumac Trilobe*

Rhus trilobata

Stays low in the wild but will grow tall in landscape situations, prune lower branches for specimen plant.

3.

Sumac 'Grow Low'

Rhus aromatica

Nice low growing shrub, shiny green leaves.

4.

Yucca, Great Plains*

Yucca glauca

Very drought tolerant, will form colonies.

5.

Sagebrush, Big*

Artemisia tridentata

Can be pruned over time to keep interesting habit.

6.

Rabbitbrush, Silver*

Chrysothamnus nauseosus

Benefits from annual pruning to keep it dense.

7.

Rabbitbrush, Dwarf Blue

Chrysothamnus nauseosus nana

Stays dense and low without pruning.

8.

Rose Harison's Yellow

Rosa harisonii

Often found naturalized in historical landscapes, does spread by suckers.

9.

Caragana, Siberian

Caragana arborescens

Used as a hedge or windbreak plant. Yellow flowers attract hummingbirds.

10.

Caragana Pygmy

Caragana pygmaea

Fine textured, lower growing caragana, yellow flowers.

11.

Sandcherry, Western

Prunus besseyi

Early white flowers in spring and edible berries. 'Pawnee Buttes' is low growing spreader.

12.

Potentilla*

Potentilla fruticosa

Actually not a prairie plant, native to higher foothills.

13.

Golden Currant*

Ribes aureum

Can be pruned into a medium height hedge, early blooms benefit pollinators, good for windbreak if planted densely.

No.

14.

Kinnickinnick*

Arctostaphylos uva- ursi

Spreading groundcover, one of our only broadleaf evergreens.

1.

*indicates plants native to Montana. 1

3

11

13

2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Drought Tolerant Shrubs for Full Sun (continued on p. 9)

All plants and grasses listed within this guide qualify for rebates as part of the City of Bozeman Landscape and Sprinkler System Rebate Program. Visit www.bozemanwater.com for more details. 8 | Water Smart Planting Guide for the Bozeman Area | www.bozemanwater.com

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s,

Plant Lists Drought Tolerant Shrubs for Full Sun (continued) 15.

Oregon Grape*

Berberis repens

Holly like foliage, somewhat evergreen. Foliage can brown over winter but pruning will renew.

16.

Buffaloberry, Silver*

Sheperdia argentea

Can be pruned at bottom to create a nice specimen, does sucker, edible berries and silver leaf color.

17.

Juniper Low Spreading*

Juniperous horizontalis

Very low growing groundcover.

18.

Juniper Common*

Juniperus communis

Juniper with softer foliage, nice low habit.

19.

Chokecherry

Prunus virginiana

Tall shrub with white flowers and edible berries, will sucker but can be pruned into specimen small tree. *indicates plants native to Montana.

15

16

17

d by

ttes'

Drought Tolerant Shrubs for Part Sun and Shade The plants contained in this list should not require supplemental water once the plant is established two to three years after planting. This does not apply during periods of prolonged drought. No.

Common Name

Scientific Name

Notes

ns.

1.

Lilacs

Syringa vulgaris

Older plants can tolerate long dry spells. Leaves will begin to wilt but plant often survives. It can be grown in full shade.

ontana.

2.

Golden Currant*

Ribes aureum

Can grow a bit lanky without sun, responds to pruning.

3.

Oregon Grape*

Berberis repens

Holly like foliage, somewhat evergreen. Foliage can brown over winter but pruning will renew.

4.

Kinnickinnick*

Arctostaphylos uva- ursi

Spreading groundcover, one of our only broadleaf evergreens.

5.

Sumac ‘Grow Low’

Rhus aromatica

Best if has some hours of sun.

6.

Chokecherry*

Prunus virginiana

Can tolerate full shade.

7.

Juniper Common*

Juniperus communis

Can also take shade. *indicates plants native to Montana.

1

4

6

on p. 9)

Water Smart Planting Guide for the Bozeman Area | www.bozemanwater.com | 9

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Plant Lists

Drought Tolerant Perennials for Full Sun The plants contained in this list should not require supplemental water once the plant is established two to three years after planting. This does not apply during periods of prolonged drought. No.

Common Name

Scientific Name

Notes

1.

Sedum: hardy cultivars

Sedum species

2.

Penstemon* native

Penstemon species

3.

Penstemon Rocky Mountain

Penstemon strictus

4.

Buckwheat Sulfur*

Eriogonum umbellatum

Forms tight mat over time, 'Kannah Creek' is a good cultivator.

5.

Russian Sage

Perovskia atriplicifolia

Tall plant with silver foliage and lavender like flowers.

6.

Purple Coneflower*

Echinacea pallida and angustifolia

Great plant for butterflies.

7.

Pearly Everlasting*

Anaphalis margaritacea

Long lived, will form a large mound over time, needs good drainage.

8.

Peony, Old Fashioned

Peonia hybrids

Even though they might not grow as large or bear as many flowers, this plant can survive without supplemental water.

9.

Yarrow, Moonshine

Achillea hybrid

Seems to be very drought tolerant, does not spread like the native yarrow.

10.

Gayfeather, Dotted*

Liatris punctata

Needs good drainage but once established can be long lived, late blooming.

11.

Iris, Bearded

Iris hybrids

Can take very dry conditions, needs to be divided when they form tight clumps.

12.

Hollyhocks

Alcea hybrids

Alcea rugosa is longest lived.

13.

Blanketflower

Gaillardia aristata

Long blooming, many cultivars.

Littleleaf (P. procerus) is longest lived.

*indicates plants native to Montana. 1

2

5

6

7

9

10

11

10 | Water Smart Planting Guide for the Bozeman Area | www.bozemanwater.com

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or.

d,

Plant Lists

Drought Tolerant Perennials for Part Sun and Shade The plants contained in this list should not require supplemental water once the plant is established two to three years after planting. This does not apply during periods of prolonged drought. No.

Common Name

Scientific Name

Notes

1.

Snow on the Mountain

Aegopodium podagraria

Borders on invasive, needs to be in contained area but will grow in difficult dry shade.

2.

Violet, Canadian*

Viola canadensis

Grows in shade, can go dormant without water but persists.

3.

Columbine, Yellow

Aquilegia chrysantha

Columbines are amazingly drought tolerant.

4.

Columbine, Colorado Blue*

Aquilegia coerulea

5.

Pussytoes*

Antennaria species

Low silver leaf groundcover.

6.

Penstemon Little Flowered*

Penstemon procerus

Mat forming, early bloom.

7.

Roundleaf Alumroot*

Heuchera cylindrica

Great garden plant, long blooming and good foliage.

8.

Barrenwort

Epimedium x versicolor ‘sulphureum’

Good dry shade plant. *indicates plants native to Montana.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

form

All plants and grasses listed within this guide qualify for rebates as part of the City of Bozeman Landscape and Sprinkler System Rebate Program. Visit www.bozemanwater.com for more details.

Water Smart Planting Guide for the Bozeman Area | www.bozemanwater.com | 11

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Plant Lists

Drought Tolerant Grasses The grasses contained in this list should not require supplemental water once the plant is established two to three years after planting. This does not apply during periods of prolonged drought. No.

Common Name

Scientific Name

Notes

1.

Bluebunch Wheatgrass*

Pseudoroegneria spicata

Montana state grass, upright.

2.

Little Bluestem*

Schizachyrim scoparium

Warm Season grass, so greens up a bit later in spring, red fall color.

3.

Prairie Dropseed*

Sporobolus heterolepsis

Warm Season, low growing.

4.

Idaho Fescue*

Festuca idahoensis

Low growing, grass that is common in native grass areas in valleys.

5.

Blue Grama

Boutelous

‘Blonde Ambition’ is a taller cultivar.

6.

Side Oats Grama

Bouteloua curtipendula

Interesting seed head.

7.

Prairie Junegrass

Koeleria macrantha

Small grass, early to green up.

8.

Indian Ricegrass

Oryzopsis hymenoides

Needs a very dry and well-drained soil. *indicates plants native to Montana.

2

3

4

5

Water Smart Grasses Water smart plants can withstand long periods without supplemental water but will need deep watering during prolonged hot and dry conditions. No.

Common Name

Scientific Name

Notes

1.

Feather Reedgrass

Calamagrostis x acutiflora

Karl Foerster, El Durado, Avalanche all good upright bunch grasses.

2.

Blue Fescue

Festuca glauca

Blue foliage, short stature, can be short lived.

3.

Tufted Hairgrass*

Deschampsia cespitosa

Lacey seed heads.

4.

Switchgrass*

Panicum virgatum

Tall upright Northwind is less prone to toppling.

5.

Moor Grass Moorflame

Molina caerulea

Upright growing grass but more open than ‘Karl Foerster’.

6.

Moor Grass Skyracer

Molina cerulean sp arundinacea

Very tall grass, strong feature.

7.

Korean Feather Reedgrass

Calamogrostis brachytricha

Lovely plumed seed heads in fall.

8.

Blue Oat Grass

Helictotrichon sempervirens

Blue foliage color, large bunchgrass, needs space. *indicates plants native to Montana.

12 | Water Smart Planting Guide for the Bozeman Area | www.bozemanwater.com

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Plant Lists

Water Smart Shrubs for Full Sun and Part Sun and Shade Water smart plants can withstand long periods without supplemental water but will need deep watering during prolonged hot and dry conditions.

r. Full Sun

.

No.

Common Name

Scientific Name

Notes

1.

Serviceberry, Western*

Amelanchier alnifolia

Early white flowers and edible berries, slightly suckering but can be contained.

2.

Mockorange, Lewis 'Blizzard'*

Philadelphus lewisii

Fragrant white flowers.

3.

Spirea Birchleaf ‘Tor’*

Spiraea betulifolia

Great small shrub with white flowers and good fall color.

4.

Fernbush

Chamaebatiaria millefolium

Soft fern-like foliage and white flowers. Uncommon but does well.

5.

Apache Plume

Fallugia paradoxa

Very irregular shape, white flowers form silky seed heads all season.

6.

Lilacs

Syringa species

Lots of variety in sizes and flower color.

No.

Common Name

Scientific Name

Notes

7.

Daphne 'Carol Daphne'

Daphne x burkwoodii

Likes morning sun. Variegated foliage and fragrant pink flowers.

8.

Currant Greenmound

Ribes alpinum

Can also take sun. Dense, even grower, short mounding shrub.

Part Sun and Shade

ontana.

*indicates plants native to Montana. 1

2

5

6

3

7

4

8

s.

All plants and grasses listed within this guide qualify for rebates as part of the City of Bozeman Landscape and Sprinkler System Rebate Program. Visit www.bozemanwater.com for more details.

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Plant Lists

Water Smart Perennials for Full Sun Water smart plants can withstand long periods without supplemental water but will need deep watering during prolonged hot and dry conditions. No.

Common Name

Scientific Name

Notes

1.

Alyssum 'Basket of Gold'

Aurina saxatillis

Likes good drainage, can spread by seedlings but not aggressive.

2.

Purple Coneflower

Echinacea purpurea

Lots of cultivators available, some less hardy and long lived.

3.

Penstemon Pineleaf

Penstemon pinifolius

Likes good drainage and low water, striking orange flowers later in season.

4.

Meadow Sage

Salvia nemorosa

Long lived and hardy, lots of cultivators.

5.

Butterflyweed*

Asclepias tuberosa

Bright orange flowers, needs well drained soil, spreads somewhat but not in any way invasive.

6.

Catmint

Nepeta faassenii

Long blooming, likes dry hot places.

7.

Evening Primrose

Oenothera missouriensis

Large yellow flowers in mid summer, low growing.

8.

Soapwort ‘Max Frei’

Saponaria lempergii

Dusty pink flowers in late summer, low growing.

9.

Lewis Flax

Linum lewisii

Semi-evergreen. Blue flowers. Good erosion control. *indicates plants native to Montana.

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14 | Water Smart Planting Guide for the Bozeman Area | www.bozemanwater.com

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ssive.

ater

Plant Lists

Water Smart Perennials for Part Sun and Shade

_

Water smart plants can withstand long periods without supplemental water but will need deep watering during prolonged hot and dry conditions. No.

Common Name

Scientific Name

Notes

1.

Geranium White

Geranium macrorrhizum album

Nice under trees.

2.

Coral Bells 'Snow Angel'

Heuchera sanguinea

Interesting variegated foliage.

3.

Harebells*

Campanula rotundifolia

Forms colonies, delicate blue flowers.

4.

Pasqueflower*

Anemone patens

One of the earliest bloomers, crocus like flowers, silky seedheads, good foliage the rest of season.

5.

Lamium 'Hermans Pride'

Lamium galeobdolon

Variegated foliage and yellow flowers.

6.

Geranium

Geranium cantabrigiense

Great ground cover for shady areas.

7.

Turkish Veronica

Veronica liwanensis

Very low growing ground cover. Sky blue flowers.

8.

Heartless Bergenia

Bergenia cordifolia

Good foliage plant. *indicates plants native to Montana.

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All plants and grasses listed within this guide qualify for rebates as part of the City of Bozeman Landscape and Sprinkler System Rebate Program. Visit www.bozemanwater.com for more details.

Water Smart Planting Guide for the Bozeman Area | www.bozemanwater.com | 15

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We at the City are prepared to do what it takes to ensure that we have enough water as we welcome new Bozemanites to our semi-arid region. Our water is crucial—now, and for Bozeman’s future. New infrastructure is more expensive than simply being smart about conserving what we have. We literally can’t afford to waste our water.

Thank you in advance for contributing to Bozeman’s drought resilience by planting water-sipping plants, watering your landscapes with care, taking advantage of rebates, and setting your landscapes up for success. With your help, we’re ready to face the future.

City of Bozeman, Water Conservation Division 20 East Olive Street, Bozeman, MT 59715 406.582.2280 · waterconservation@bozeman.net www.bozemanwater.com

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Planting & Outdoor Watering Guide for the Bozeman Area | 2017