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A SPECIAL PUBLICATION OF THE BOZEMAN DAILY CHRONICLE


Why Choose Stay Montana? Our experienced hospitality trained staff is unmatched in Southwest Montana! Our team recognizes delivering the highest level of service to our guests will enhance your Montana experience. Vacation rentals in Big Sky (formerly Lone Mountain Escapes), Bozeman, Paradise Valley and Bridger Bowl.

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CARVE | 2017

www.staymontana.com


2017 | CARVE

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hile compiling the interviews, articles, and artwork for the latest edition of ski publication CARVE, the word “prepared” kept popping up.

Winters in Montana are beautiful, vast and a little dangerous. One can certainly survive here, but thriving requires undaunted enthusiasm, adaptability and preparedness. You will find all of these qualities in Nina Hance, who’s story of nearly achieving a five-year long goal of earning an AMGA ski guide certification is chronicled page 10. Alex Legrand, a US Ski Team Physician and Orthopedic Surgeon, will tell you that Bozeman is undoubtedly a ski town. He’s seen his share of ski and snowboard related injuries, and on page 8, he preps

CARVE CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: Hannah Overton, Karin Kirk, Alex Legrand, Doug Chabot CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS: Tanner Latham, Karin Kirk, Cameron Smith, Nathan Peterson, Maximus Sanders, Ethan Schumacher, Tom Kwarciak, Nik Hardiman, Joel Riendeau, Noah Poritz, Doug Miller, Nick Lyon, Aaron Mugaas, Ethan Dissinger, Alexandra Dubin, Casey Fullem, Chris Kerr DESIGN AND LAYOUT: Matthew Gasbarre ADVERTISING DIRECTOR: Cindy Sease

potential patients for determining the right surgery in the event of an ACL injury. Doug Chabot, Director of the Gallatin National Forest Avalanche Center, discusses preparation of mind, gear and partner when entering avalanche territory on page 17. Leah Vogel, ACSM certified fitness instructor at The Ridge, prepares our bodies for full days on the mountain. Then there’s the Carnage Crew, a counterculture of grungy ski bros preparing to shoot a full-length film this winter. We have pages of great new gear to keep you warm and dry on the hill, and a calendar of events in West Yellowstone that will help Nordic Skiers map out their weekends. Ski season is upon us. Are you prepared?

TABLE OF CONTENTS: THE BEST GET BETTER..........................................

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THE FIRST TURN: GET YOUR RUN OFF TO A STRONG START BY KARIN KIRK .......................................................

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THE DREADED ACL INJURY BY ALEX LEGRAND.................................................

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GIRL GUIDE: NINA HANCE SEEKS HER AMGA SKI GUIDE CERTIFICATION..........................

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THE CARNAGE CREW: MORE BEER THAN GEAR........................................

12 WINTER WARM UPS................................................ 14

COVER PHOTO:

THE NORDIC SKI MECCA THAT IS WEST YELLOWSTONE...............................

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Skier: Karin Kirk Photographer: Chris Kerr

SAY WHAT? TRANSLATING SKI SLANG...............................................................

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BEING PREPARED BY DOUG CHABOT.................................................. 4

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17 GEAR OF THE YEAR................................................ 20

DOUBLE SUNRISE AT THE TOP OF POWDER SEEKER AT BIG SKY PHOTO BY TOM KWARCIAK


The

BEST get BETTER SEVEN YEAR-OLD TUCKER SMITH SKIING HANGING VALLEY IN BIG SKY PHOTO BY CAMERON SMITH

Big Sky

Bridger Bowl

Four new carpet lifts have been installed at Big Sky this year; three at the Mountain Village Base Area and one at the Madison Base Area. One carpet will be covered with a blue canopy, protecting riders from the elements. A new double chairlift, called Stagecoach, will operate out of Ulery’s Lake area bringing the total number of lifts at Big Sky to 36.

Newbies are going to love the recently expanded beginner area located south of Saddle Peak Lodge. Two covered conveyor lifts and the relocation of the Snowflake chairlift make accessing this 7-acre area a breeze. The Snowflake Warming hut provides an ideal location for families to watch their little ones learn to ski and snowboard. $10 Beginner Area lift tickets will be available to those wanting to ride Snowflake and surface lifts only.

Big Sky Resort has added three new gladed runs: Oxbow, PB&J Way and Wild Bill. One is parallel to Swift Current Chairlift, one is accessible from the North Summit Snowfield and the third is off Horseshoe. The width of Fast Lane, the main arterial from the Madison Base Area back to the Mountain Village, has been doubled.

The Virginia City Lift got an upgrade this past summer. The Lift has replaced all of the old double riblet chairs with triple chairs. Bridger Bowl is excited to announce a 27% increase in lift capacity and a height adjusting loading conveyor for kids.

Big Sky Sports Demo Center has been completely renovated. This year, guests will have access to equipment delivery services. Equipment will be fitted and dropped off at select hotels and condos throughout Big Sky Resort.

A renovation of Saddle Peak Lodge has provided several new additions, including new Snowsports Offices, a remodeled Playcare Facility, Program Lunch Room, additional cafeteria space, and seasonal locker rentals. All Snowsports and lesson meeting areas will now be in close proximity to the beginner area. A new retail shop is located across from the rental shop in Jim Bridger Lodge at the old Snowsports Desk. Rental sales and services have expanded, and the retail shop will sell outdoor clothing, goggles, avalanche equipment and souvenirs.

Care When and Where You Need It Bozeman Health Urgent Care Bozeman 1006 West Main Street | 406-414-4800 Belgrade 206 Alaska Frontage Road | 406-414-3334

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bozemanhealth.org/Urgent-Care

| #outdoorhealthylife 2017 | CARVE

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Bummed your foot or ankle can’t finish ski season? Call or Visit Big Sky Foot and Ankle today to see how we can get you back on the slopes!

1648 Ellis St. Suite 201 Bozeman, MT 59752

406-782-2278

104 Bridger Center Drive | Open at 7AM

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Before and after surgery of bunion and hammertoe


THE

FIRST TURN: GET YOUR RUN OFF TO A STRONG START STORY AND PHOTO BY KARIN KIRK

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o matter what part of the mountain you ski on, there are always some places that give you pause before you set off down the hill. Maybe it’s steep, or narrow, or rock-studded. Maybe it’s a line you’ve never skied, or a cute boy is watching. God forbid, maybe it’s all of the above. In any case, the top of a run offers a particular challenge. Until you get into the run, it’s hard to know what particular tactic to use. What are some ways to get your descent off on the right note?

But first, some etiquette Many places at Bridger Bowl and Big Sky have sinuous traverses leading out to the bowls. Please don’t stop on the traverses! Instead, move along until you reach the place you want to ski from, then pull off, either above or below the traverse. Find an out-of-the-way spot to sort yourself out, fiddle with your boot buckles, size up your line, and start your GoPro.

Point yourself in a favorable direction Take a moment to read the slope. Is the fall line consistent or does the slope angle left or right? Is the pitch the same everywhere, or is there a friendly-looking starting point? What about that suspicious-looking tree branch sticking out of the snow? Suss out the details, but don’t stare for too long and get over-analytical about it. Steer clear of terrain features that are going to make your life complicated, and envision your first turn. No need to plot your course beyond that – just scope out your entry and look for an opportune spot to start that first turn.

Slide in diagonally, not straight down In many situations, it’s a smart tactic to enter the

SHELBY ROGALA STARES DOWN "THE GREAT ONE."

slope with a short, skidded traverse. Don’t just traverse straight across, but flatten your edges so you slide downhill somewhat. Get a feel for the snow by digging in your edges just a bit, and then releasing them. Similarly, you can gently bounce up and down on your skis to feel how the snow reacts. You can get a lot of information in just a few feet of skiing. Is the surface slick? Or grabby? Is the pow deeper than you thought? Do what you can to get a sense of what’s under your feet before you take the plunge. That said, do not traverse the whole darn slope, because you’re likely to dead-end yourself at the trail’s edge, limiting your options. Plus, a prolonged traverse is never an inspiring way to set yourself up for your best skiing. So slide on in, feel what the snow’s like, and carry on right into your first turn.

Mind over matter for the first turn Will your initial turn be the most awesome turn you’ve ever made? Probably not, and that’s okay. Just get it done. If you end up stepping your ski around, or swinging your shoulder in that dorky way you always do, that’s alright. Don’t beat yourself up; just get the train moving in whatever way you can.

Ease on up to full speed One of the most frequent suggestions I give to clients and ski partners when embarking down a steep or techy run is to start off at about 60% of your normal speed. Once the first few turns are under your belt, you can dial up the intensity. This approach keeps you balanced as you adjust to the snow and the slope. Get yourself in the groove and moving along, and then you can let it run and ski more dynamically. If you go too fast at the onset, you’ll likely find yourself skiing defensively and jamming on the brakes at

the bottom of your turns. This is the opposite of letting yourself flow through each turn. Let the rhythm and momentum come to you; don’t force it.

Commit, stay strong, and keep going Good skiers make it look effortless, but it isn’t. Dynamic skiing in difficult terrain is demanding. Keep your core tight and do everything you can to stay over your feet. As long as you’re balanced (more or less), keep moving toward that next turn, without stalling out or losing momentum. This is perhaps the single biggest difference between awesome skiing and boring skiing. Keep looking for your next opportunity to start a new turn, and do your best to make it happen. I tend to yell at myself in those clutch moments, “Keepgoingkeepgoingkeepgoing!” Sometimes we all need a little nudge to propel ourselves down a steep slope.

If at first you don’t succeed… Luckily we have many chances to dial in our formula for kicking off a successful run. If you don’t nail it, don’t fret. Make a note of what worked and what didn’t, and give it another shot. Figure out what works best for you, and keep practicing so you’re ready when that cute boy is watching.

Karin Kirk is a ski instructor, Ridge guide, and staff trainer at Bridger Bowl. If you happen to hear her yelling at herself as she skis by, don’t worry, that’s normal for her. Karin can be reached at karinkirk@gmail.com.

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THE DREADED

ACL INJURY BY ALEX LEGRAND

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ithout question, Bozeman is a ski town. As much as I love my partners and my practice, it was the mountains that brought me to our town 11 years ago. They dominate our culture, provide our recreation, inspire us, test us, exhilarate us and occasionally break us. In ski towns, one of the most common orthopedic injuries is disruption of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) in the knee. The typical presentation of this injury is a fall while skiing (or catching air on a snowboard). Often the patient will feel a pop in the knee and be unable to ski or ride down on their own. Over the next 24 to 48 hours, it is common to develop significant swelling in the knee joint (an effusion) and walking becomes difficult a day or two after the initial injury. Diagnosis is usually made in an orthopedic office. The combination of the history and physical exam are sufficient to make the diagnosis, often confirmed with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Initial treatment can be physical therapy to reduce swelling and regain normal motion. This can take a couple of days to several weeks.

Once normal motion is regained, it is time to determine a treatment plan. In broad categories, this can be non-operative or surgical with ACL reconstruction (ACLR). Non-operative treatment consists of strengthening the surrounding muscles to compensate for the absent ACL, use of an ACL substituting knee brace and potentially avoidance of higher risk activities. Non-operative care is recommended for people with less active lifestyles and older patients, (although there are plenty of retirees who can ski laps around me and elect to reconstruct their ACL). For those electing a surgical treatment, this typically involves an arthroscopy (inserting a small camera and other instruments into the knee through small poke holes) to address any meniscal or cartilage injuries and then using some form of tissue to make a new ACL. Surgery typically lasts 60-90 minutes and is almost always done as an outpatient. Although the surgery is relatively short, it is typically 6-9 months before a patient is able to resume high level athletic activities. There are 4 types of ACL grafts that are commonly used in the United States. The grafts can be allograft (tissue from a deceased person), often referred to as donor or cadaver grafts, or autograft (tissue from the patient's own body). There are relative risks and benefits of each graft type. Although there are medical providers treating these injuries with stem cells or other biologicals, currently there is no data to support this. Allograft can be an appealing option because it does not involve harvesting the patient's own tissue and therefore avoids the potential for morbidity (harm) that can be associated with graft harvest. Still, several recent studies have shown a higher failure rate when allografts are used in younger, more active patients. In these studies, “young� is defined as less than either 30 or 40. In my practice, I typically recommend allograft to patients close to or over the age of 40. If the patient's own tissue is harvested, the gold standard has long been the patella tendon (BTB or bone-tendon-bone). This involves harvesting the central third of the patella tendon along with a plug of bone from the patella (knee cap) and

tibia (shin bone). This is a robust, predictable graft and has been the go to graft for physicians taking care of collegiate and professional athletes. Unfortunately, as with all autografts, there are downsides. The most common complaint after BTB ACLR is anterior knee pain with kneeling or knee walking. Although not present in all patients, it can be permanent and makes this graft less appealing for those who spend extensive time kneeling. Another popular autograft choice is using two of the patient's hamstring (HS) tendons. Through a smaller incision than the BTB incision, the surgeon harvests the semitendinosus and gracilis tendons. Some studies have shown similar success rates to BTB ACLR while others have shown a slightly higher failure rate in the HS groups. Other drawbacks of the HS ACLR is permanent hamstring weakness. Good post-operative therapy can reduce this, but there will always be a degree of hamstring weakness. In addition, the size of the hamstrings is not predictable and smaller diameter grafts have a higher failure rate. Allograft can be combined with a smaller graft to improve size, but these hybrid grafts have a higher failure rate than a large diameter HS ACLR. Although long used in Europe, quadriceps autograft (Q) has more recently gained popularity in the US. With this graft, the central 1cm of the quad tendon (the tendon above the patella) is harvested, with or without a plug of bone from the patella. These grafts have shown similar to improved failure rates when compared to BTB and HS ACLR. The main advantage to a Q ACLR compared to a BTB is that the incidence of anterior knee pain is almost completely eliminated. Although initial quadriceps strength can be diminished after Q ACL, this is temporary and resolves with appropriate therapy. It can be a daunting task to decide what is the appropriate treatment or graft choice for any given patient's ACL injury. Often, it is a combination of the patient's age, activities and occupation, along with surgeon comfort that dictates what is the best option. Typically, an experienced orthopedic surgeon and physical therapist can help provide patients with sufficient data to make the best choice for their knee.

Alex Legrand is a board certified, sports medicine subspecialty trained orthopedic surgeon practicing at Bridger Orthopedics. He is a US ski team physician and a MSU team physician.

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GIRL N

NINA HANCE SEEKS HER AMGA SKI GUIDE CERTIFICATION

GUIDE

The AMGA is an educational non-profit organization that supports the mountain guiding and climbing instructor community. Certification isn’t required in America, but it can certainly help ski guides enhance their skills and get jobs. Each winter, participants apply for a course. Applicants must provide a complete resume of ski experience and letters of recommendation from previous instructors. “After the course, you have a homework list of things you need to accomplish before taking the next one,” Hance said. “It’s things like 10 days of mock-guiding experience, and doing at least five ski descents in glaciated terrain; they want to make sure you’re getting out there and applying what you have learned. Then, you take your next exam.” Ski-guides-in-training document their courses on an application, including dates, elevation gain, total mileage, maximum slope angle and terrain. Once they have completed their homework assignments and exams, they can apply for the next course. “For the exams, there’s a 4:1 ratio of examiner and students. It’s usually an 8-12-day exam. You go out and guide your examiners and treat them like they’re your clients. They’re assessing you on several different things.” “During my first course, they made us sleep in a snow cave one night,” Hance said. “I’ve been at a yurt. For my next exam, we’ll be flying into a hut.” Hance’s first course took place in Jackson, Wyoming. Her final exam will last 8 days and must be administered in glaciated terrain, 10 CARVE | 2017

ina Hance is one exam away from earning her American Mountain Guides Association (AMGA) Ski Guide Certification. She took her first course with the AMGA at 21 years old, and has since completed one course and exam each winter season. Now, at 25, she is looking forward to that final exam. “It’s a whole series of guiding courses and avalanche certifications,” Hance said. “Some people can do it in three or four years, but that’s really ambitious.”

either in Canada or Alaska. “Every day, we will be going out on big tours. We will take turns leading the group and be assessed on several categories. Some categories will be professionalism, mountain-sense, client care, and risk management.” With an Alaskan heli-ski guide for a father and a ski instructor for a mother, Hance has skiing in her blood. She took her first turns at Bridger Bowl when she was no more than three years old. She went on her first heli-ski run in Alaska at age five. At 14, she received a scholarship from the Hans Saari Memorial Fund to attend a five-day ski mountaineering camp in the Tetons. “That was my first introduction to ski mountaineering,” she said. “Ski mountaineering is more technical (than resort or back-country skiing.) There are bigger objectives, like going further back into the mountains. You put on crampons, tie into ropes and rappel into a ski line that you can’t directly ski into.” Hance knew she wanted to be a professional ski guide since high school. For three years, she worked as a heli-ski guide for Black Ops Valdez in Alaska. When she discovered heli-guiding wasn’t her thing, she took a job with Beartooth Powder Guides in Cooke City, where tours are completely human-powered. Last year, she co-guided in South America with Chile Powder Adventures. The group spent eight days in the backcountry with a basecamp set up in the mountains. This will be Hance’s third year working with Beartooth Powder Guides. She takes groups

out on single-day to three-day trips. On the longer trips, Hance cooks, melts water and keeps the cabin or yurt warm for her clients. She also administers avalanche courses, instructing clients on how to assess avalanche danger. Her days start with checking the weather forecast and avalanche advisory. “Two years ago, we did an all women ski mountaineering camp. It was four days long and the group of ladies we had was awesome! It started with a skills day of teaching them how to tie knots and use their crampons and harness and rappel into a couloir. After that, we went out and applied those skills and skied some bigger objectives. Two of the days at the top of the runs, they’d pull out a little speaker and have a dance party before we skied our lines.” Leading a strong group of women in the back country can be a rare treat. Ski guiding is a profession dominated by men and Hance is often the only girl in her course and exams. “Because I’m a female and I’m smaller, I have to train that much harder to keep up with the men. Being female hasn’t been an obstacle to guiding, but it is a little intimidating to go into an exam and be the only girl.” Still, she remains steadfast in her decision to be a ski guide in Montana. “I’m still young, and I’m taking my life year by year, but I have an awesome job. The terrain is amazing, the company amazing. I don’t really have any need to leave."


BASE CAMP ON BACKCOUNTRY TRIP IN CHILE PHOTO BY NINA HANCE

GUIDING SKI-MOUNTAINEERING IN COOKE CITY PHOTO BY NINA HANCE

NINA HANCE GUIDING IN ALASKA PHOTO BY ALEX MARIENTHAL

SKING IN CHILE PHOTO 2017 BY | DONNY CARVEROTH 11


THE

CARNAGE

CREW:

MORE BEER THAN GEAR PHOTOS BY TANNER LATHAM

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hose frequenting ski hills across America and watching videos on newschoolers.com are familiar with ski crews. Ski crews consist of rambunctious, riotous individuals, typically young men, who can be found sending it in the back country or park, causing an uproar in a lift line, or “thumb gunning” beers on the mountain. (Thumb gunning is the act of piercing a beer can with one’s thumb, then drinking it as quickly as possible). They ski hard, fast and loud, and they are probably better than you.

Bozeman is home to a few ski crews, including the Carnage Crew, a group of guys who have been skiing their “whole heckin’ lives.” For the interview, Jack Jochum, Seth Harding (the lone snowboarder of the crew), Cayden Cecil, Nash Lisac, Jack Harris, Derek “Beef” Van Itallie and Nick Hall were present. A few other members were missing due to a “hostage situation” (they have girlfriends). There was a lot of yelling and laughter, and a touch of sentimentality that can only be found in kids who love what they do.

Rail Jam. They often refer to themselves as “Bozeman’s least favorite ski crew,” but it has nothing to do with pranks or recklessness. “It comes from the heat we get on Newschoolers from not filming park edits,” Cecil says. “We’re skiing around the resort. And then when we do ski park, we’re just having fun.” “We’re also really loud.” The Carnage Crew prefers backcountry skiing to park. Everyone can find their own line, and they don’t have to throw insane tricks to be considered good. The park presents the same routes over and over, and there’s an expectation to it that none of them are interested in. “If you’re not 14 years old and throwing quadruple corks in the park, you’re going nowhere,” Harding says. “But, there’s also a lot of nerds in the back country.” Everyone laughs. For the most part, the Carnage Crew avoids competition. Some of them participated under the name Bozeman Sewer Mutants and won the Red Bull Bracket Reel Snow video contest in 2016. Both Van Itallie and Harding have competed in ski racing and snowboarding in the past, but competition, corporations and name-brand ski gear are not what drive the Carnage Crew to hit the slopes. “You have to go against all these other kids and it takes the fun out of it,” Harding says. “It does push you and make you a better skier,” Van Itallie says. When they started out, the guys would take turns using Jochum’s Cannon t3i with a fish eye lens to make movies. They would follow each other down the mountain, sticking together and watching out for one another. The just-for-fun short films have developed into a new project for the crew - they’re hoping to make a full-length film. Tanner Latham, local photographer, has taken over the filming. The movie isn’t without its challenges; finding funding, shooting enough

The members of Carnage hail from all over the country, including Michigan, Colorado, Oregon and Maine. They came to Bozeman for school and skiing, and met freshman year in the dorms. In January 2015, in room 802 of Roskie Hall, the Carnage Crew was born. “It was Seth and my dorm room,” Jochum says. “I wanna say it was like, January 12th.” “That was the first day we ever filmed,” Harding says. “That was the best video we ever made.” Ski crews film their days on the mountain then edit and post their videos online. The Carnage Crew’s videos can be found at newschoolers.com under the handle BloodyCarnage. Three-minute videos showcase the boys shredding at Bridger Bowl, Big Mountain in Whitefish, Alta in Utah and dominating the Bozeman

CHECK OUT THE CARNAGE CREW E Search Carnage Crew at www.newschoolers.com

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Follow them on Instagram at ski_carnage

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Find the Bozeman Sewer Mutants winning video at www.newschoolers.com/news/read/Red-BullBracket-Reel-Applications-Open CARVE | 2017

NASH LISAC SHREDS NEAR FAIRY LAKE


SETH HARDING MAKES CLIFF-DROPPING LOOK EASY AT BIG SKY

material, working and going to school all at once is ambitious, but the Carnage Crew draws stoke from one another. This winter, they’re all headed to Canada on a two-week road trip that will provide the crew with some amazing footage. They’re planning on filming all winter and hope to release the film next fall. Talk of the movie gets them riled up, and the group erupts in excited chatter:

“Dude. If we get funding, we’re not using the money to pay your rent.” “We’re selling gear on Craigslist.” “We’re starting to realize that we can do something really cool,” Hall says. “We just have a different style and we love skiing together.” “We’re all really good friends” Jochum says. “We have each other’s backs.”

“I gotta pay rent. We’re thinking of starting a GoFundMe.”

JACK JOCHUM BACKFLIPS INTO HIS 21ST BIRTHDAY WHILE THE CARNAGE CREW CHEERS.

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WINTER WARM-UPS L

eah Vogel, ACSM certified fitness instructor at The Ridge Athletic Club in Bozeman, has been helping people sculpt healthy physiques and lifestyles for nine-and-a-half years. The certified Wellness and Tribe Team Training Coach teaches a winter conditioning class where she helps attendees prepare themselves for full days of skiing and snowboarding. “You see all shapes and sizes in the class,” Vogel says. “As far as demographics go, it’s people ages 16 – 70. The thought process is to increase strength, mobility, ability, and capacity in a progressive nature so that the likelihood of injury on the mountain is decreased.” Here, Vogel shows us some moves to strengthen our bodies for winter sports. Each exercise is part of a circuit. Complete a set, then move to the next exercise. Go through the whole circuit three times.

STEP UPS: A) Begin with your right foot on the box and your left leg stretched out behind you. B) Step up so that your are standing on the box with your left leg held at a 90 degree angle in front of you.

WALL SITS: A) Hold the position for 60-90 seconds.

Do 3 sets of 10 reps for each leg, switching legs after completing 10 reps on one side.

SINGLE LEG SIT DOWNS: A) Standing on one leg, hold your other leg in front of you, keeping your hip, knee and ankle aligned while gently lowering yourself onto the box.

STABILITY BALL HAMSTRING CURLS: A) Begin with your legs straight out, resting your heels on the center of the ball with your torso in the air. Your arms should be at your sides.

B) Do not sit down with all your weight. Allow your butt to touch the box, then raise and repeat.

B) Roll the ball toward you, lifting your torso and knees into the air. Use your arms to keep stability as your body raises up. Do 3 sets of 10 reps.

HURDLES: A) Place a hurdle (or pillow, or anything) in the center of the room and stand next to it. B) Using both legs, jump over the hurdle, landing on both feet on the opposite side of the hurdle. Complete 20 jumps.

PLANK HIP-DIPS: A) Begin in plank position. Keep your elbows under your shoulders and your back straight.

BOX JUMPS:

B) Lower your hips from one side to the other, briefly pausing in the center.

A) Start (and land) in a squat position.

Complete 30 reps, or 15 on each side.

B) Leap onto the box and hold the squat.

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CARVE | 2017

Do 3 sets of 10 reps.

Do 3 sets of 10 reps for each leg, switching legs after completing 10 reps on one side.


THE NORDIC SKI MECCA THAT IS

West Yellowstone boasts over 50 km of groomed Nordic ski trails. With three Cross-Country Ski areas, (two of which run congruent to Yellowstone National Park and are pet-friendly), events take place all winter long. Most events are held at Rendezvous Ski Trails, where 35 km of trails are available for people of all skill sets and techniques. “Anyone can Cross-Country Ski,” says Kelli Sanders, co-owner of West Yellowstone’s Freeheel and Wheel. “There are many health benefits associated with Cross-Country Skiing. You are working the upper body and lower body simultaneously. It relies solely on your own strength and technique to stride.” 

WEST

YELLOWSTONE

2018 CROSS COUNTRY SKI EVENTS IN WEST YELLOWSTONE:

Race! Choose from six different races depending on your age and ability. Ride on the beautifully groomed, rolling terrain of the Rendezvous Ski Trails.

B FREE SKI & TRY BIATHLON DAY: SUNDAY, JANUARY 7, 2018

B ANNUAL TASTE OF THE TRAILS: SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2017

Visit Rendezvous Trail System for a free day of skiing in honor of National Winter Trails Day. WYSEF will host free, hour long ski tutorials at 1 pm. Freeheel & Wheel will have free 2-hour equipment rentals. Altius Custom Firearms and WYSEF will host a Biathlon Demo at 12 pm. No registration required.

All skiers and snowshoers are invited to attend this 5k at Rendezvous Ski Trails. Cost is $20 per person or $5 for 5 and under. Four stops along the course will provide participants with food and drinks. Tickets must be purchased in advance by March 7.

B BIATHLON CUP #2 - PURSUIT FORMAT: SUNDAY, JANUARY 7, 2018

*To register for events or find out more, visit www.destinationyellowstone.com/calendar or www.skirunbikemt.com. For gear rentals, visit www.freeheelandwheel.com.

7.5k, 10k, or 12.5k. The biathlon consists of contestants skiing around a cross-country trial system. The total distance is broken up by either two or four shooting rounds, half in prone position, the other half standing. All cross-country skiing techniques are permitted in biathlon, the biathlete carries a bore rifle. Novices must attend the Novice Clinic.

DIVISION JUNIOR NATIONAL QUALIFIER: B INTERMOUNTAIN JANUARY 13 &14, 2018 Registration is due January 8 by 5 p.m. Final course maps will be available January 10. The 5k interval will be held January 13 at 10 a.m., with a banquet and awards held at 6:30 p.m. The 5k/10k Freestyle Mass Start will commence January 14 at 9 a.m. Awards will be presented directly after the race.

B BIATHLON CUP #3 - MASS START: SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2018 *Details about this race can be found at www.destinationyellowstone.com later in the year.

B YELLOWSTONE RENDEZVOUS RACE: SATURDAY, MARCH 3, 2018

1692025 692025

Racers new and old will attend the 38th annual Yellowstone Rendezvous

MinEral MusEuM & GiFt Shop Fossils • Gemstone Jewelry • Wall of Bugs • Crystals

EarthsTreasuresMT.com • 586-3451 • 25 N. Willson • Bozeman, MT

2017 | CARVE

15


Say What? Translating Ski Slang

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hen I met with Casey Fullem, Zach Peterson and Isaac Castren, they were dropping in on a homemade backyard set-up. The boys have been skiing for about two decades, and the lack of snow wasn’t stopping them from practicing rail tricks. They took a break to drink PBRs and make sense of the slang you’ll hear on the hill.

drop in: noun: A ramp constructed of wood and turf, used to practice rail tricks. Yo dude, let’s hit the drop in. verb: The act of rolling over the cornice; the point of no return. Hey bud, are you gonna drop in or stand there like a kook? stoke: noun: Excitement for ski season/General Bozeman mentality. As soon as it started snowing, I reached full stoke.

steeze: noun: Style and ease. Bro, when she hit that booter she stole my heart. That girl has steeze. See also: Angel Collinson. chunder: 1. noun: Snow that is full of chunks of ice. I was blowing through that chunder and thought I was going to snap a stick. 2. verb. Chundered. To injure one’s self. I tried to do a cork 3 and chundered my face.

scorpion: verb: The act of slamming one’s face into the snow with such force, the legs fly over the head, much like a scorpion tail. Did you see that Jerry scorpion? I’m surprised he got up after that.

send: verb: To go super hard. I saw your boy send it off the ridge. That dude is crazy. participle: Sending If you’re not crushing it, you’re not sending it. scorpion church: adjective: Describing the perfect day of skiing. Bro, I was elbow-deep in powder. It was a religious experience; I found God AND the meaning of life. It was church. chundered "Look at Casey's chundered face." send Cawford Noyes sends it at Bridger Bowl. pitted: verb: The act of being surrounded by deep snow. Last year at Bridger, Casey and I got super pitted on that 32” day. booter: noun: A larger jump, hand-built or natural, found throughout the ski terrain (back-country or park.) If you can jump off of it, it’s a booter. Let’s finish these Tallboys and go hit that sick booter. The Gucci Plateau: noun: The flat-area directly after the landing on a jump in the terrain park. Your boy sent the jump so big and hit the Gucci Plateau.

death cookie: noun: Large chunks of chunder. When I was getting pitted in the chunder, I skied up on a death cookie and had a yard sale. yard sale: noun: To have a bad fall or wipeout, and scatter all of your gear. I sent it way too hard and had a yard-sale under the lift. The Steeps: noun. Slopes that sit at a 40-degree angle or higher. I’m going to hike the ridge and hit up the steeps. gaper: noun: Skiers with little-to-no experience, incapable of exhibiting basic technique. Gapers often give themselves away by wearing jeans tucked into their ski boots, brightly colored windbreakers from 1983, and sporting a “gaper gap” between their helmet and goggles. That gaper lost control and almost took out your boy. Jerry: noun: A gaper who sends it. What the hell was that Jerry doing in the park? He could’ve chundered his face.

The Gucci Plateau A. Sweet Spot, B. Thug Zone, C. The Gucci Plateau, D. Big Air Dave 16

CARVE | 2017

church Ben Goertzen is church right now. He's getting pitted, and he's super stoked on it.

Fat to Flat: Phrase describing overshooting a jump. Dude, I just went fat to flat and now I have wicked shin-bang. Photos by Maximus Sanders and Nathan Peterson


BEING PREPARED

NOLAN SCHUMACHER CRASHES AT BIG SKY PHOTO BY ETHAN SCHUMACHER

BY DOUG CHABOT

I

have looked at avalanche accidents for over 25 years and one principle stands true: preparation changes outcome. With preparation we can derail small failures. Being prepared to play in the backcountry includes prepping your gear, your mind, and your partner. In complicated systems, small failures easily become bigger ones leading to a catastrophic event, death in this case. Traveling in avalanche terrain is a complicated system requiring many decisions, communication and knowledge. Checklists are powerful tools to help us remember, as are the individual rituals we adhere to every day, like buckling a seatbelt. Being prepared takes effort and there are no shortcuts. A person is either prepared or not.

Doug Chabot is Director of the Gallatin National Forest Avalanche Center.

Avalanche gear is easy to prepare. Fiddling with gear is fun and tangible and we see the results of our efforts immediately. An avalanche transceiver needs strong batteries to work effectively. As soon as beacon power drops below 70%, I replace mine; Batteries drain quickly from cold temperatures, multiple burial scenarios, and being on “search.” Being prepared means having a beacon that works perfectly every time. With a shovel, it’s crucial to make sure the handle slides easily into the blade. Probe pole sections need to snap together fluidly and not have frayed wires. If either shovel or probe are sticky, give them a shot of silicone. If you carry an airbag make sure the air canister is full and connected properly along with the pull-handle attachment. The device must be armed. A 2012 study found that airbags had a 21% failure rate with half of that number from human error that could have been avoided with proper preparation. Having gear in working shape is half the preparation. The other half is knowing how to use it. We have to practice in order to perform well under pressure. Ski

patrols practice regularly at locating and digging up beacons. They time themselves to get faster. Fumbling with a probe pole or not being able to quickly get a shovel out of their pack are rookie moves that are embarrassing. In real life someone may die. Our avalanche transceiver is the most complicated and advanced piece of safety gear we own. It requires practice to intimately know how it works. It will flash lights, make sounds and have buttons that need to be pressed. In skilled hands this tool will find someone or multiple people quickly. It will save lives. In unskilled hands it can be a disaster. Before I head into the backcountry I run through a checklist: beacon, shovel and probe. I say it out loud at the trailhead and make sure my partner has done the same. Beacons need to be turned on and attached to our bodies, and the other gear needs to be on our backs. We check each other to make sure beacons are transmitting properly. Gear is important because of one simple fact: a person completely buried in an avalanche has an 80% chance of survival if they are dug up in 10 minutes, and the only way to do a quick rescue is to have the gear and know how to use it. Two minutes later, at 12 minutes, the survival rate drops to 40% and in 30 minutes they fall to a dismal 20%. Finding and digging someone out in 10 minutes takes a commitment to train and be prepared. Besides gear, we have to mentally prepare ourselves for backcountry travel. The first step is to read the avalanche advisory, a foundation of making good decisions. It covers current weather, snowpack and avalanche activity and outlines travel advice and avalanche danger for an entire mountain range, not a specific slope. In order to decide if a slope is safe to ski or ride a person has a bit of field work to do, most no-

tably paying attention to obvious signs of instability (cracking, collapsing, and recent avalanches) which are red flags that warn us slopes are dangerous. In the absence of these signs, there’s one last step before skiing in avalanche terrain: putting your shovel in the snow and doing a stability test. Tests may warn us of instability. Once warned, we must heed it. Taking an avalanche class is the easiest way to learn the basics about stability tests. It’s also the best way to learn about how avalanches occur. Venturing into the backcountry is serious business and taking an avalanche class with a field component is necessary preparation. Being mentally prepared also means showing up with a clear mind. In order to be safe we need to make good decisions. Problems at work, at home, with a spouse, with the kids, with yourself, all cloud our thinking and set us up for failure. An easy tour in low-angled terrain may be the right choice for someone whose mental state is not focused on the avalanche danger. This is where a good partner comes in. At a minimum, two heads are better than one at avoiding problems. We all make mistakes and a solid partner will yank us back on track. A good partner is fully prepared and practiced. They have food, water, all their gear, are mentally and physically ready for the day, and are dutifully there to watch your back and you theirs. You both have a job to do and take this responsibility seriously. No person is a liability, along for a free ride, or cutting corners. A good partner will save your life and not choke under pressure. A worthy partner is avalanche educated, has studied today’s avalanche potential and thought through worst case scenarios. They are prepared and they know their hard work will affect the outcome of the day. 2017 | CARVE 17


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LOCATION: BRIDGER BOWL SKIER: JACOB DRAKE PHOTOGRAPHER: NIK HARDIMAN

LOCATION: RAYNOLDS PASS

SKIER: HARRISON SCHREINER SNOWBOARDER: HOLDEN SAMUELS PHOTOGRAPHER: ETHAN SCHUMACHER LOCATION: BIG SKY

SKIER: JOEL RIENDEAU PHOTOGRAPHER: JOEL RIENDEAU LOCATION: BRIDGER BOWL – SOUTH BOWL

LOCATION: HORN MOUNTAINS SKIER: WYLIE MUGAAS [AGE 12] PHOTOGRAPHER: AARON MUGAAS LOCATION: STORY HILLS

SKIER: NOAH PORITZ PHOTOGRAPHER: NOAH PORITZ

SKIERS: ETHAN DISSINGER AND HIS MOM, RHONDA PITTARD LOCATION: YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK

SKIER: JOYCE MILLER PHOTOGRAPHER: DOUG MILLER LOCATION: BRIDGER BOWL

SNOWBOARDER: NICK WINN PHOTOGRAPHER: NATHAN PETERSON LOCATION: BRIDGER BOWL SKIER: ETHAN DOWNES PHOTOGRAPHER: NICK LYON LOCATION: BRIDGER BOWL, RICHMANDS CHUTE

SKIER: ALEXANDRA DUBIN LOCATION: MOONLIGHT

2017 | CARVE

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GEAR Q OF THE Q YEAR

GEAR ON THESE PAGES AVAILABLE AT BOB WARD'S

SMITH VANTAGE $239.99 Super adjustable helmet, well vented and has MIPS! BURTON WOMEN'S PARK GLOVES $54.95 Versatile, cute and warm!

ROXY JETTY $188.99 3in1 jacket, great for everything. Plus, a ton of pockets

KRISTIN BRINKMAN BOB WARDS CASHIER YEARS RIDING: 5 years SKI PASS AT: Bridger Bowl FAVORITE TERRAIN TO RIDE: Tree Runs BEST/DEEPEST RUN OF YOUR LIFE: First run on last year's deep powder day at Bridger

BURTON SOCIALITE

SKI RUN ON YOUR BUCKET LIST: Jackson Hole, wholly I NEVER RIDE WITHOUT MY: Music FAVORITE SONG TO LISTEN TO WHILE RIDING: Rockstar – Post Malone FAVORITE QUOTE TO LIVE BY: “Talent is given, greatness is earned.”

VOLCOM FROCHICKIE

$469.95 Hardest charging “soft” board on all the mountain

$130.00 Easy to move around in.

SNOWBOARDER

BURTON LIMELIGHT BOA $279.95

STOCKING STUFFERS

Super comfy with all day riding, and easy to get on.

Dakine® Heli Pro 24L Ski Pack (Women’s Specific Fit)

Dakine® Stomp Pad

Hydro Flask® Insulated bottle

OneBall® Wax scraper/bottle opener OneBall® 4wd Snowax

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CARVE | 2017

GoPro® Hero 6 Action Camera

Outdoor Tech® Chips 2.0 Wireless Helmet Audio Stance® Snowboard All-Mtn Socks

Dakine® Spine Protector


SAM TRIPP

SMITH QUANTUM

$300 It's lightweight and has good airflow. You can't put a price on the safety that MIPS provides.

GIRO CONTACT $250 Huge field of view, easy and secure lens swap out, plus those VIVID lenses means you can see those lovely lady lumps even in the flattest of light.

MARMOT MINIMALIST JACKET $190 I'm a big fan of light shells, especially while skinning. This is a bomber shell with GORE-TEX from Marmot that wont break the bank. Use it as a rain shell in the summer.

BOB WARDS HEAD SKI TECH YEARS RIDING: 20 SKI PASS AT: Public Land FAVORITE TERRAIN TO RIDE: Anything and everything, it’s all a good time. BEST/DEEPEST RUN OF YOUR LIFE: Four years ago, at Big Sky, we had a huge storm. Two weeks later, we got 5" overnight and my buddy and I got first chair up Ramcharger and skied down Wounded Knee. It was unreal! The sun had just come up and snow was falling from the trees. We had the biggest, softest bumps I've ever had the pleasure of skiing. It wasn't a gnarly or crazy run, but it was fun! SKI RUN ON YOUR BUCKET LIST: Corbets, gotta do it at least once in life I NEVER RIDE WITHOUT MY: Watch ... rarely ever check it, but I feel naked without it WHAT DO YOU LOVE MOST ABOUT RIDING? The freedom, how it's just a reset button for my brain. It's a great way to clear the mind and relieve stress. FAVORITE SONG TO LISTEN TO WHILE RIDING? I hate listening to music when riding, I like hearing the snow underneath me. FAVORITE QUOTE TO LIVE BY: "I may be crazy, but it keeps me from going insane." -Waylon Jennings

BURTON LIFTY GLOVE $39.95

NORTH FACE RARIG BIB $199

I NEED leather gloves, anything else always rips on me, plus these things look sweet and keep the ol' bear paws toasty!

I have been rocking North Face pants as long as I can remember and my last pair lasted me 8+ years. So these bibs were a no brainer, lots of pockets, warmth and movement.

BACKCOUNTRY STOCKING STUFFERS Ortovox® Free Rider 20L Ava Bag

DALBELLO LUPO AX120 $800

ELAN RIPSTICK 106 $850

This is the most important part of anybody's kit, especially when it comes to touring. I like the 100 last in the forefoot while still maintaining a narrow heel to keep my heel locked in. They're not the lightest boots on the market but boy do they still ski like the Krypton Pros!

Holy cow are these skis fun! Easy turn initiation, great float and crazy light for how hard they charge - the epitome of the quiver killer!

Ortovox® Pro ALU 2.7 Shovel

Marker® King Pin Bindings

Goal Zero® Flip 10

Bridgedale® Vertigo Light

Black Diamond® Icon Headlamp

Ortovox® ALU 240 Light Probe Ortovox® S1 + Beacon

Ski Retriever® Ski Beacons

Titan Strap® Super Strap

2017 | CARVE

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GEAR Q OF THE Q YEAR

GEAR ON THESE PAGES AVAILABLE AT ROUNDHOUSE

SYLVIE COSTON

SMITH VANTAGE HELMET: Best

all around fit with great ventilation for head and goggles.

SMITH IO GOGGLE: Two goggles for the price of one, with easy to change lenses.

PHUNKSHUN:

OSPREY KAMBER 32L PACK:

The perfect accessory to any outfit to add a little pizzazz!

Durable pack for the outdoor enthusiast.

ROUNDHOUSE SALES ASSOCIATE YEARS RIDING: 18 years

BLACK CROWS DAEMON BIRDIE:

SKI PASS AT: Bridger Bowl FAVORITE TERRAIN TO RIDE: Meadows and trees BEST/DEEPEST RUN OF YOUR LIFE: Squaw Valley 2014; 48” in 2 Days

PICTURE ORGANIC CLOTHING

Fast hard charging ski for the intermediate to expert lady.

Mineral Jacket: Comfortable and breathable, no matter where I’m riding; and it’s made of 45% recycled material!

SKI RUN ON YOUR BUCKET LIST: Heli-Skiing I NEVER RIDE WITHOUT MY: Smile FAVORITE APRÈS SKI SNACK/BEVERAGE: PB&J WHAT DO YOU LOVE MOST ABOUT RIDING? The ski community is awesome & I love the people you meet along the way. FAVORITE QUOTE TO LIVE BY: “Carve beautiful patterns and fly until you feel you are not you anymore!” ~Mamita

LOOK HIGH MOUNTAIN BINDING:

PICTURE ORGANIC CLOTHING TREVA PANT: The reverse

powder skirt is the best feature on these pants!

HESTRA HELI SKI FEMALE MITT:

They say it best, “A slimmer profile mitt than the legendary Heli Ski Glove. Suitable for those who ski a lot in powder and need an extra warm glove.”

SCARPA GEA BOOT:

Backcountry designed boot that can be taken all over the hill.

Dynafit Radical TLT that has a look logo on it.

PICTURE JUDE BEANIE: Cute,

comfy and a fun fur pom to keep it stylish! 22

CARVE | 2017

LEKI POLES:

Technical pole with the perfect strap to fit around your hand for ultimate control.


ELLIS PETRIK

ROUNDHOUSE SALES ASSOCIATE BLIZZARD SHEEVA SKI: All mountain

ski for the lady who knows how to rip!

YEARS RIDING: 21 years SKI PASS AT: Bridger Bowl FAVORITE TERRAIN TO RIDE: All, variety is key. BEST/DEEPEST RUN OF YOUR LIFE: The Cirque, Winter Park Resort, Colorado SKI RUN ON YOUR BUCKET LIST: Chamonix, France I NEVER RIDE WITHOUT MY: Boots buckled, ha ha

THE NORTH FACE STRUTTIN' JACKET: Perfect

FAVORITE APRÈS SKI SNACK/BEVERAGE: A cold, cold beer

all around great coat for all of your skiing adventure days!

WHAT DO YOU LOVE MOST ABOUT RIDING? The opportunity to be outside in the most beautiful terrain all day! FAVORITE QUOTE TO LIVE BY: “Remember, remember darling, that there is a morning inside you ready to burst open into light.” ~ Rachel Pohl

HESTRA ALPINE PRO LEATHER FALL LINE 3-FINGER: Perfect pole grip!

THE NORTH FACE SHREDROMPER BIB: The fully

waterproof bib made for the ultimate backcountry adventure when the snow is dumping!

ARMADA HAVEN CREW NECK AND CAPRI: Flat seams make these products comfortable and cozy for the perfect next to skin baselayer!

GRIFFON BINDING:

SCOTT POLES:

Perfect pole for any skier!

LANGE XT 90 BOOTS: Ski-walk

Best binding on the market!

boot with the Lange race heritage.

2017 | CARVE

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CARVE | 2017

Profile for Bozeman Daily Chronicle

CARVE 2017  

The latest issue of Carve introduces you to off-season upgrades at Big Sky and Bridger Bowl. Also: Meet The Carnage Crew, Winter Warm Ups an...

CARVE 2017  

The latest issue of Carve introduces you to off-season upgrades at Big Sky and Bridger Bowl. Also: Meet The Carnage Crew, Winter Warm Ups an...

Profile for bozchron